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Descendants of Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet and/or William Bramlett I/Sr.

COPYRIGHT © 2016-2017 DEBORAH G. DENNIS, CHARLESTON, S.C.

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Charleston, You Are Beautiful!courtesy Chad Matthew “Chad Wick” Dennis

One View of Charleston at Christmastime

Charleston You are beautiful.jpg

Compiled with appreciation and affection by Deborah G. Dennis

(Descendant of Reuben and Elizabeth Bramlett – Fauquier Co., Va., Laurens Co., S.C., Christian Co., Ky., Gallatin Co., Ill.)
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Mary Robert Ray grave
 
 
 

PREFACE

BRAMBLETTE FAMILY

The Bramblette family in America appears to have originated with William Bramlett I/Sr., born in/before 1694, most likely in Colonial Virginia, England, and perhaps his father, Ambrose Bamblet” or Bramblet, probably born in western Europe, who reportedly immigrated to America from Great Britain in 1690. We are a nation of immigrants made strong with our originally stated, founding ideals of diversity and freedom. Unfortunately, we are missing a good deal of early family history because the names of Ambroses wife and William I/Sr.’s first wife are unknown. William I/Sr. second married Elizabeth Callaway, who is the mother of some of his younger children. With few Bibles, wills and probate records to fully document the early Bramblette generations, we find only thin trails and hints of trials of historical existence in military records and life struggles, tragedies and triumphs in a few Virginia deeds, plat maps, tax records and other court documents. We piece together what we can and conclude, while the nuggets of information are interesting and valuable to us alone, the ancestors’ true legacies live on in the DNA of thousands of descendants with the name Bramblette, Bramblett, Bramblet, Bramlet, Bramlett, Bramlette and other variations and different allied surnames. Hopefully, DNA comparisons, while helpful in genealogy, will someday be replaced or enhanced by a better mechanism of linking our paper trails with matches and measuring the connections of relatives. Our familial multitude of thousands in the past and today populate the records of many areas of the country from the original Thirteen Atlantic Colonies to later California and states between. Research of possible ancestors in England has not been very successful. The LDS International Genealogical Index does have two marriages of interest: one Jone (Joanna) Bromlett and John Tynke reportedly married in 1571 at Yelverton, Norfolk, England, and one Henricus (Henry) Bremlight (Bramlett?) and Agnes Fulford married April 29, 1566, at Hartland, Devon, England. In AMERICA, many of us honor the early ancestors with respect and gratitude even if we cannot discern their names and histories, after realizing how fortunate we are to have been born into a courageous, adventurous, prosperous family with such distinctive allied connections as Lincolns, Boones, Callaways, let alone to have been born at all and survived in a dangerous world to adulthood. From fighting for freedom during the American Revolution to fighting in many other conflicts, including World War I and World War II, to fighting evil Communists in the old Cold War and Vietnam, to stopping Terrorists from attacking Western Civilization in general and America in particular today, our collective history is often defined by war of some kind. Our current world is often defined by competition resulting in brutal injustice, racial strife and profound political disagreements. We now may be entering into another or the same old extended Cold War and M.A.D. Nuclear Arms Race that began in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

“…Our tragedy today is a general and universal physical fear so long sustained by now that we can even bear it. There are no longer problems of the spirit. There is only one question: When will I be blown up? Because of this, the young man or woman writing today has forgotten the problems of the human heart in conflict with itself which alone can make good writing because only that is worth writing about, worth the agony and the sweat…”
— American treasure William Faulkner at the 1950 occasion of accepting the late, contested 1949 Nobel Prize for Literature from the Swedish Academy “For his powerful and artistically unique contribution to the modern novel.”

1946 Nuclear-Bomb

An Atomic Bomb Test in 1946

Life today seems even more dangerous than ever before with internal strife and divisive struggles between opposite extremist political, social and religious ideologies and innocents trapped in or fleeing war-torn regions overseas and terror attacks spreading in and beyond European borders. We have covert internal threats and collusion between internal political operatives and foreign governments as well as overt threats from rogue nations.

Civil Strife Again Takes Center Stage

Since the 2016 National Election campaign, we have been witnessing an unfortunate rise in domestic terrorist attacks by numerous white supremacy groups on American soil. Race relations, suffering from the attempted normalization of these hate groups, are now front and center with a phenomenal response on the ground from protestors at organized rallies and at spontaneous gatherings in big cities and in social media. More and more Americans are participating in the political process to fight racial hate. They choose courage to call out racism. #RIP HEATHER HEYER murdered by an evil white supremacist at CHARLOTTESVILLE 2017. We must encourage and embrace others and avoid unnecessary wars at all costs while engaging evil enemies and protecting the innocent. We must fight for justice and freedom while eschewing divisiveness and base our lives and histories on social inclusivity and our diverse human connectivity, on the quest for an open, just, free democracy. We need to work together to gain and celebrate social and cultural achievements–including and helping others, informing and educating ourselves and others, finding happiness and making ourselves and others happy. It all is the American Way. Our survival depends upon these actions. War! WE ABSOLUTELY KNOW WHAT IT IS GOOD FOR! We all need to commit to practicing and allowing equal rights for everyone in everything everywhere. Our diversity and our differences equate to strength. Our shared beautiful race is ONLY HUMAN. We all bleed red. LOVE, NOT HATE, Always Wins.

 — 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1: AMBROSE BAMBLET/BRAMBLET I/SR.

CHAPTER 2: WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR. & UNKNOWN & ELIZABETH CALLAWAY

(William I established The Bedford Branch)

CHAPTER 3: HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR. & UNKNOWN

(Henry I established The Fauquier Branch)

CHAPTER 4: REV. WILLIAM BRAMBLETT II/JR. & ANNA BALLARD

CHAPTER 5: SARAH “SALLY” BRAMLETT & COL. JAMES CALLAWAY

CHAPTER 6: JAMES BRAMLETT & WINEFRED UNKNOWN PAGE

CHAPTER 7: NANCY “ANN”? BRAMLETT & THOMAS LUMPKIN?

CHAPTER 8: AMBROSE BRAMLETT & JANE “JEAN” “JANNY” WOODSON

CHAPTER 9: AGATHA “AGGIE” BRAMLETT & STEPHEN WHITE 

CHAPTER 10: ELIZABETH “BETTY” BRAMLETT & CAPT. JAMES BUFORD

 AFTERWORD

WORKS CITED

 

Chapter 1: 

Generation 1

AMBROSE BAMBLET/BRAMBLET

Immigrant emblem

(Possible Immigrant 1690; Possible Patriarch of Bramblettes in America)

(Children: William I/Sr.? Others?)

Bronze Virginia Seal

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Possible Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis

AMBROSE BAMBLET (BRAMBLET), parents unknown, was born before 1690 when he apparently immigrated to America. Assuming he was an adult at the time, he was born circa 1669-1672 or earlier. One immigration document recorded in Virginia Land Patents suggests Ambrose was transported from England in 1689 or 1690, apparently alone without wife or other close relatives, to help populate New Kent Co., Va. It is not known if he actually boarded the ship, survived the journey and arrived in America. His name, “Ambrose Bamblet,” which appears on a Virginia Land Office Patent, is the only evidence yet found of his existence. In the land patent record, the scribe may have just misspelled the name by omitting the letter R from Bramblet, a common variant spelling. Ambrose reportedly was one of forty-five persons transported to America by John Lyddal, who received 648 acres of land in St. John’s Parish, New Kent Co., Va., for bringing in the new settlers. St. John’s Parish was created in 1680. The original hand-written patent, difficult to decipher, contains a description of the land and indicates it may have been part of more than 2,258 acres previously granted to Capt. Geo. Lydall and John Langston at a court held March 11, 1672, at Charles City, Va.

Land Patent Transcript

“To all ye whereas &tc. Now Know ye that … paid Nathaniel Bacon … … &tc. — give and grant unto said John Lydall two thousand two hundred fifty eight acres of Land lying and being in St. John’s Parish in New Kent County and … … … … … … Creek Bounded viz beginning upon south side of Black Creek at mouth of the south branch about thirty five … chains below the new mill adjacent to … water course &tc. now or late, of Mr. Napier &tc. … [full description of land] … acres and of which Land was formerly granted to Capt. Geo. Lydall … & by him deserted & granted to Mr. John Langston by order of a … Court held at Charles City March ye 11th 1672/3 but never present & by him deserted & granted to sd. John Lyddal by order &tc. … court 648 acres bering date of 17th of October 1689 remainder being waste Land now … taken up of said both … of Land being … by and for the importation of forty-five persons into the Collony, whose names … and under this pattent … to have and to hold … to be held at … and paying … … of the 21st of April anno dom 1690… [Names of all 45 persons imported] … Ambrose Bamblet …. ” (Virginia Land Patent Book 8:45)

AMBROSE

0dea1-ambrose

John Lyddal’s 1690 Virginia Land Office Patent, courtesy Library of Virginia

“Ambrose Bamblet” appears bottom left, last line, above double end marks.

The patent identifies 44 other immigrants with different surnames; no wife nor children or relatives with the same surname as Ambrose were listed on the land patent. Without later New Kent County records with the same names, we have no way of connecting the other persons to Ambrose. The other immigrants and Ambrose were most likely indentured servants who planned to work as farmers for a specific amount of years without pay in exchange for transportation to and possession of the new land. Ambrose apparently came to America to become a farmer in Virginia. No record of the exact plot of land within the granted property that he planned to farm or actually farmed in St. John’s Parish of New Kent County has been found. No marriage record or other public or official or private record of him has been yet located in existing documents: New Kent is a burned county with few surviving early records.

   At that time New Kent County included what is now King William County, created in 1702, and what is now King and Queen County, created in 1691. New Kent also adjoined what is now Essex County, which then was still part of Old Rappahannock County. Essex County, where William Bramlett I lived in 1715-16, was created in 1692 from Rappahannock. That part of Essex became Caroline County in 1729. Ambrose “Bamblet” may have died soon after he arrived in America or a few years later. No other existing record of him has been found in Virginia.

   No other details of his life are known. The cause of his death, his death date and place and burial place are unknown. The name of his wife, if he married, is unknown. The names of his children, if he had any, are undocumented. However, he may be father of William Bramlett I/Sr., most likely born as an English citizen before 1694 in Colonial Virginia, then ruled by Great Britain. Ambrose and William I/Sr. do have geographical proximity in common: New Kent County, created 1634, where Ambrose reportedly lived, is very close–only two narrow counties away–from Essex County, created 1692, where William I/Sr., lived in 1715-1716. No definitive record of immigration has been found for William. (One of William’s sons is named Ambrose Bramlette, perhaps a namesake of this paternal grandfather.) If Ambrose Bamblet had other children, in addition to William I/Sr., they are not yet known, unless Henry Bramlett I/Sr. is a son of Ambrose and brother of William I/Sr. William I/Sr. was born in/before 1694; Henry Sr. was born in/after 1710.

Chapter 2:

Generation 2

WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR. & UNKNOWN FIRST WIFE & ELIZABETH CALLAWAY
(Patriarch of Essex/Caroline, Lunenburg/Bedford Bramblettes)
(possible Patriarch or Uncle of King George, Prince William/Fauquier Bramblettes)
(Henry I/Sr.?, William II/Jr., Sarah, James, Nancy, Ambrose, Agatha, Elizabeth)
Bronze Virginia Seal
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

DNA Proven: Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis

William Bramlett I/Sr. and Children Established the “Bedford County Branch” 1752-1754

WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR., perhaps child of Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet I/Sr., was born in 1694-1695, most likely in Colonial Virginia. He witnessed a deed in 1715-1716, which indicates he was at least age 21 and born in/by 1694-1695, and much later successfully petitioned the Bedford County Court for an exemption from levies at about age 60 on Nov. 25, 1755, which suggests he indeed was born in 1694-1695. With a tax exemption, he was no longer required to pay poll or property taxes or work on roads or participate as an active member of the county and/or state militia. Although William I/Sr. has long been identified as our “immigrant ancestor,” no clear evidence of immigration has been found for him: He most likely was born here, in Colonial Virginia, to Ambrose “Bamblet” or Bramblet who reportedly arrived here in 1690 to help populate land in New Kent Co., Va., and an unknown mother whose name and history is not yet known. No other Bramblette of any spelling has yet been found in existing records who was old enough to have been the father of William I/Sr. The names of William I/Sr.’s mother and first wife are unknown. His second wife, with good reason, based on official records, is believed to be Elizabeth Callaway, daughter of Joseph Callaway. (Callaway Family Association made this connection years ago based on close Callaway-Bramlett relationships in deeds and Joseph Callaway’s probate records.) One source, The Parish Register of Christ Church, Middlesex County, Va., cited below, which has not been otherwise documented by review of the original record, names in baptismal records a family with familiar given names–a son William (Jr.) born Sept. 6, 1719, and christened on Oct. 4, 1719, whose parents are William and Catherine.

Parish Register

However, the surname of the family, mysteriously and inexplicably, is not provided, is not actually and literally written on the NSCDA transcribed/published record. But the given names and the family, located in Virginia, do fit the family of William Bramlett I/Sr. in a general sense.

Parish Register William -- Page 102

Parish Register William - Page 102 enlarged

The section in Virginia comprised within the present county of Middlesex was at first included in Lancaster county and parish. Some time before 1666 that parish was divided into two portions, separated by the Rappahanhock river, and the new parishes were named Lancaster and Pyanketank. In 1666 they were reunited under the name of Lancaster, but a few years later again was separated and acquired the organization which they retained through the Colonial period, as Christ Church, Lancaster, and Christ Church, Middlesex. The register of the latter is printed in this book. The vestry-book of Christ Church, Middlesex, beginning in 1663 and ending in 1767…is now preserved at the Episcopal Theological Seminary, Alexander county, Virginia.


About Christ Church Parish, Virginia Births, 1653-1812

“Located in one of Virginia’s oldest counties, Christ Church Parish was created in 1663 in Middlesex County. This database is a collection of birth records kept by the parish between 1653 and 1812. Each record reveals the child’s name, parent’s names, birth date, and baptism date. In addition, many records contain information regarding location of baptism or if the child was born to a slave family. With the names of about 5900 individuals, this can be a helpful collection for researchers of early Virginian ancestors.”

    William I/Sr. died between 1759 and 1762 in Bedford Co., Va. He probably died shortly before Nov. 26, 1759, the recording date for a deed he wrote six months earlier on May 3 that year. His burial place is unknown. He may be buried at the lost family graveyard on Bramblett land that later became Cedar Hill in Bedford, Va., the plantation established by his son Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. in 1760-1762. Or he may be buried at one of the church cemeteries nearby or in Callaway Cemetery. The burial place of his son James, whose probate records indicate he died 1758 in Bedford County, also is unknown.

   William Bramlett I/Sr. and his daughters and sons are all early settlers of Bedford since they already were living there in 1754 when the county was founded and created from Lunenburg. In a biographical reference to Capt. James Buford and wife, Elizabeth Bramlett, Frederick Adams Virkus in The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy refers to her father as “Sgt. William” Bramlett,“early settler Bedford Co.” (Vol. 5 p. 475).

First Families Bramlett:Buford

The transcript of the above Buford entry: “…5 — Capt. James [Buford] (1740-post 1798), removed to Bedford Co., ca. 1754; one of group which laid out Liberty, the county seat; presiding justice many yrs.; burgess, 1778; town trustee 1786; Am. Rev.; m. 1761, Elizabeth Bramlett ([dau. of] Sgt. William [Bramlett], early settler Bedford Co.)….”

    No source is given in the entry for William’s military rank. It is possible that he served in the colonial militia as a sergeant before he retired and received a military and tax exemption in 1755.

   Hening’s Statutes indicates three of William I/Sr.’s sons–William Jr., Ambrose, James–served in the Virginia Militia in 1756 during the French and Indian War. Another source, Alexander Brown, includes four Bramlets on an “Early Settlers’ List“: Ambrose Bramlet, Francis Bramlet, James Bramlet and Wm. Bramlet. Brown, a noted merchant, farmer and historian in the late 19th century indicates the four Bramlets from Virginia are named among 300 soldiers who served during the French and Indian War. The identity of Francis Bramlet is unknown and evidence of his existence and military service have not yet been found in Brown’s documents, which are housed in Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va. (A request for a copy of Brown’s reference, which was once posted online, has been made.) Brown received an honorary doctor of laws degree there at William and Mary in 1900.

   At some point, between 1747 and 1768, Bramblett Road was surveyed and cleared by William I/Sr. and/or some of his sons, perhaps including Rev. William Jr., to facilitate travel along or through an area now known as the former Cedar Hill Plantation in present day Bedford, Va. William Bramlett I/Sr., a surveyor and planter living in Caroline County at least until late 1747 and living by 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg that became Bedford County in 1754, no doubt was involved in building his own road on his land or wherever he lived there. He did not retire until 1755, and Bramblett Road ran right past or through his son Rev. William Jr.’s Cedar Hill property: today it is known as West Main Street. The road existed on or before April 26, 1768, when son Rev. William Jr. was appointed surveyor for a road “from Bramblett’s [Road or house/land] to Augusta Road” (CB-3:424). Celebrated historian Lula Eastman Jeter Parker describes the thoroughfare but offers no date for its origin in Parker’s History of Bedford County, Virginia:

“Bramblett’s Road” is the first road of importance mentioned in Bedford County records. This was an east-to-west thoroughfare passing through New London, and what was later the town of Liberty, and on to the Botetourt County line. It was probably the same route as that followed by the Lynchburg and Salem Turnpike, built in the early 1830s, and practically the same, from Bedford to Roanoke, as State Highway 460 of today. (85)

Lula is a direct descendant of William Bramlett I/Sr. through his daughter Elizabeth Bramlett, an early settler of Bedford in 1754, who married Col. James Buford. Able-bodied landowners and non-exempt residents were asked/required by county courts to clear and construct and maintain roads for their and public use in colonial and early America. County orders to “view a road” (meaning to suggest a location and/or survey the site) are common in early records.

William’s Marriages

   William I/Sr. married at least twice and had at least eight children. He probably married his first wife, unknown, circa 1710. She most likely is mother of Henry I/Sr., Rev. William Jr., Sarah, James and Nancy. William I/Sr. married his second wife, Elizabeth Callaway, circa 1732 in Essex or Caroline Co., Va. She most likely is mother of Ambrose, Agatha “Aggie” and Elizabeth “Bettie” Bramlett. Elizabeth Callaway, daughter of unknown mother, perhaps Catherine Browning, and Joseph Callaway, was born circa 1710 in Virginia, according to the late Bobbie Callaway, former Callaway Association Historian. (Elizabeth cannot be mother of William I/Sr.’s probable eldest son Henry I/Sr. since Henry I/Sr. and his stepmother Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett share the same birth year–1710.) Elizabeth died before 1759, probably in Caroline, Lunenburg or Bedford County, since she is not mentioned in the deed of gift dated that year which William I/Sr. wrote to transfer property to his son-in-law Stephen White, husband of Agatha “Aggie” Bramblett. He would have made living arrangements for Elizabeth as well if she were still alive. William I/Sr. wrote a will in 1758 that names heirs and legacies; however, unfortunately, its location is unknown and it apparently was not recorded. Many researchers over a period of decades have unsuccessfuly scoured Bedford County documents for the will.

William’s Life in Colonial Virginia

   William I/Sr. is the oldest definite Bramblette, referenced with various surname spellings, who has been found so far in existing records, not counting Ambrose I/Sr. William I/Sr. first appears as an adult, at least age 21, as a witness on a Feb. 16-17, 1715-1716, deed recorded in Essex County (DB-11:62). The record is most likely the first legal document he signed since becoming age 21. “William Bramlit” signed the deed, which records the lease or sale of 53 acres of land in St. Mary’s Parish, Essex Co., Va., by Matthew Collins to John Morgan, both of Essex County. George Robinson and John Smith also witnessed the document, which was recorded March 20, 1715-1716. The land, adjacent to a corner of John Ellitt’s land and the south fork of Peumansend Creek swamp called the Beaverdam branch, was formerly granted/patented April 17, 1667, to Henry Peters who was deceased. The land was located in an area of St. Mary’s Parish that later became Caroline County. Essex County, created 1692, is near New Kent where Ambrose I/Sr. reportedly settled in 1690. Since William I/Sr. was required to be at least age 21 to legally witness the 1715-1716 record, the signature allows us to calculate his birth year as in/before 1694-1695. Essex also is adjacent to King George County, created 1721, where planter Henry Bramlett I/Sr., believed to be son of William I/Sr., was living in 1735. The early found and documented Bramblettes in 1690-1715-1735–Ambrose I, William I/Sr., Henry I/Sr.–lived in relatively close geographical proximity to each other, within the same small region in three counties of eastern Colonial Virginia. William I/Sr. is mentioned in Essex and Caroline County records a few times as a witness to land transactions and a few times as the plaintiff and defendant in court cases. William I/Sr. and John Sanders witnessed a deed on Feb. 18-19, 1716-1717, when Thomas Griffin leased or sold 100 acres of land in Essex County to George Robinson (DB-11:64). He also witnessed a deed on July 13-14, 1722, when Allin Frazier of Essex County sold land to William Blanton of the same county (DB-11:84). Thomas Smith, George Robinson and Joan Frazier also witnessed (made their marks on) the document. William I/Sr. also served on several Caroline County and is named in a few court records between 1733-1736. He most likely lived in a portion of Essex that became Caroline in 1728, based on a legislative act of 1727. It is not known if he owned land in Essex and/or Caroline County. Exactly which land he owned in Lunenburg/Bedford County is not known, but the items in his personal possession in 1759, including livestock and household goods, suggest he owned a home and land and his occupation was planter and farmer. He may have first owned the land his son Rev. William II/Jr. acquired or inherited from the mysterious 1759 will, with a majestic view of the Peaks of Otter, perhaps part of more than 700 acres of land Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. used to establish Cedar Hill Plantation circa 1760-1762. An historical reference in an architectural report on Cedar Hill indicates a family graveyard, now lost, was located near the exterior kitchen building on the plantation. William I/Sr. and his son James and other family members may be buried there.

An important court record: William I/Sr. and the Callaway family: 

   Ann Callaway, sister of Thomas Callaway, petitioned the Caroline County Court to choose “Wm. Bramblitt” as her guardian on Oct. 12, 1732. (Ann would have been at least age 12 and under age 18, thus born between 1715-1720, in order to legally choose a guardian in Virginia in 1732. Her sister Elizabeth was born 1710, according to the later Callaway Association historian Bobbie Callaway.) Thomas Callaway was summoned to answer the petition (OB-1732-1740:43). Ann married James Sturgill in 1752 in Orange Co., Va. Thomas and Ann and Elizabeth are children of Joseph Callaway II of Essex County, who reportedly died of a fever in 1732, according to family tradition. (Joseph Callaway II’s children, all born between 1710 and 1725, include Elizabeth Callaway, born in 1710, second wife of William Bramlett I/Sr.; John Callaway; William Callaway; Francis Callaway; James Callaway who married Sarah Bramlett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr.; and Col. Richard Callaway, a resident of Essex/Caroline County who moved to Lunenburg County by 1752 and then moved to Boonesborough, Kentucky Territory, and settled on his own land where he was killed by Indians at his ferry in 1779. “Rich. Callaway” is included in the Lunenburg, Va., Tithe List that year in 1752 living near William Bramlett I/Sr. and with the latter’s son “Amb. Bramlet” as a tithable, a white male over 16, in his Callaway house. Richard paid three tithes. Thomas Mosely created the list for John Phelps. (Richard Callaway and brother William Callaway were among the first justices appointed in Bedford County in 1754. Col. Richard Callaway served as an officer in Virginia and Kentucky during the American Revolution.) “Wm. Bramlet Jr.” is listed as a tithable with his father, William I/Sr., on John Phelps’ list of residents whose names were collected by Matthew Talbot for Lunenburg County in 1752. William and Richard also may be on other tithe lists for earlier and later years. (This Ambrose later married Janny Woodson and moved to North Carolina and Georgia; he is not the elder Ambrose Bamblet, possible immigrant, who would have been at least 80-85 in 1755 if still alive, and exempt, thus not of tithable or military age.) Ann Callaway is believed to be the youngest sister of Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett, the reason Ann selected her brother-in-law and Elizabeth’s husband, William Bramlett I/Sr., as her guardian. There is no other documentation for the implied marriage of Elizabeth and William I/Sr., but he and sons are named with Callaways in several other Virginia records as well.

   William I/Sr. and Elizabeth, if still living, resided in Caroline County until at least 1747 before moving south to Lunenburg County. On Nov. 13, 1747, “The [Caroline County] Court proceed[ed] to lay the County levy” and paid William Bramlett 300 pounds of tobacco, perhaps for surveying. The court previously had appointed William Bramlett surveyor on April 10, 1741, “in the room of” (instead of/to replace) John Ralls (OB-1741:35).

William I and Family To Lunenburg, later Bedford, County by 1752

   William I/Sr. moved his family by 1752 to a portion of Lunenburg Co., Va., that became Bedford County in 1754. He was considered an early settler of Bedford County since he was living in the area when land boundaries changed to create Bedford. As mentioned above, John Phelps and Matthew Talbot’s Lunenburg Tithable Lists in 1752 include William Bramlet (I/Sr.) with son William Bramlet Jr., a white male tithable over age 16, in his house, and William (I/Sr.)’s son “Amb. Bramlet” (Ambrose Bramlet), a white male tithable over age 16, nearby in the house of Richard Callaway, who paid three tithes.

  Lunenburg County Court Road Orders on June 2, 1752, also include William Bramlet and his “Male Labouring Tithable Persons” in a list of those ordered to clear and keep a local road in repair:

William Stone is appointed Surveyor of the Road leading from the Fish dam of Otter River to James Johnsons at the Poplar Spring and ‘tis ordered that he together with the Male Labouring Tithable Persons, to wit, Mathew Talbot, John Anthonys hands, John Paynes at his Quarter, Rice Price, Thomas Price, Edward Mobberly, Benjamin Mobberly, John Mobberly, Thomas Pitman, William Moss, William Bramlet, Thomas Branch & John Turner and their Male Labouring tithables, forthwith Clear and keep the same in repair according to Law. –Historic Roads of Virginia, Lunenburg County Road Orders 1746 – 1764, by Nathaniel Mason Paulett & Tyler Jefferson Boyd, p. 48

William I/Sr. was still living in that area of Lunenburg that became Bedford a few years later when the county court on Nov. 25, 1755, gave him the above mentioned tax exemption due to his age: 60 years or older.

   A record mentioning “Wm. Bromlet Senr.”–either William I/Sr. in 1762 or his son Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. in 1766, is referenced as a creditor who was due 5 shillings in the Bedford Co., Va., estate of William Boyd, dated between 1762 and Sept. 23, 1766 (WB-1:21-24). The document was returned to the court on Sept. 23, 1766. By the latter date, 1766, Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. may have been the senior William “Bromlet” in Bedford. (William II/Jr. had a child named William whom we designate “William Bramblett III.) The scribe/clerk would not have referenced William Bromlet Senr.’s estate because there was no estate: William Bramlett I/Sr. had deeded his property to son-in-law Stephen White in 1759 and bequeathed other legacies to heirs named in his mysterious, lost 1758 will, which was not recorded. His estate was not recorded otherwise in Bedford County. The deed of gift to William Bramlett I/Sr.’s son-in-law Stephen White was not a probate record and does not name the heirs of those legacies or the items bequeathed in the 1758 will.

1762-william-i-record

   A family member found the reference and shared it to Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center.

   “William Bramblet Sr.” signed a bill of sale for livestock and other property given to son-in-law Stephen White on May 3, 1759, and it was recorded as a deed of gift in Bedford County in 1759:

Bramlet to White Bill of Sale: Know All Men by these Presents that I William Bramlet Senr. of the County of Bedford & Parish of Russel, do Bargain, Contract & Deliver unto Stephen White for a Valuable Consideration, that is to say for my maintainanse in a Decent and Wholesom manner with Clothing agreeable to my age, diet, washing & Lodging in a good & Wholesom & becoming Manner During Life, all & singular my Stock of Cattle & Hoggs & Horses, Household goods & all other appertenance to me Belonging of what Nature or Kind soever after the Legacies mentioned in my Will bearing date 6th of February 1758 are paid as I give this Bill of Sail only to Stringthen the Right & … Impower the said Stephen White in his Part and do warrant the same from myself and from any Person or Persons Whatsoever given under my Hand this third day of May 1759 William Bramlett (DB-A-1:238)

John Robinson and William and Anester Young or Going witnessed the document, which was recorded Nov. 26, 1759, in Bedford Co., Va. Mortimeyer and Revesz read the Young surname as “Gowing” and note the Gowing family name has evolved to Gowan, that some of William and Anester’s descendants may have moved to Bedford Co., Tenn. (201). Willliam I/Sr. does not mention slaves in the deed.

   William I/Sr.’s children are listed in an unpublished manuscript titled “Bramblett” written by Bedford County historian and Bramblette-Buford descendant Lula Eastman Jeter Parker in Bedford County on Sept. 28, 1933. Parker and the late Mrs. Sarah A. Bell Buford (second wife of Rowland Dabney “R. D.” Buford), who was then in 1933 deceased, “both searched the records of Bedford County, Va., for data of the Bramblett family, and often talked over our findings.” Parker deposited her brief history with the Bedford County clerk. She writes, 

We concluded that William Bramblett, Sr., settled in Brunswick County in the early 1700’s, perhaps in territory that was cut off into Lunenburg in 1748, and into Bedford in 1754; and that, since we found no other Bramblett who could have been his contemporary, he must have been the progenitor of the family in Virginia, and that he was the father of all of the older Brambletts in this section. He died after November 26, 1759, when he made a Bill of Sale to Stephen White, and perhaps before 1761, when his daughter, Elizabeth, (my ancestress) married James Buford, for she signed her own marriage bond.

William I/Sr.’s 1759 deed was written in May and recorded Nov. 26, so he may have died before or on the latter date. These family sleuths focused mainly on their beloved Bedford records for Bramblettes and did not check other Virginia counties, which would have introduced them to a whole new world of family activities in Essex, Caroline, King George, Prince William and Fauquier. They would have discovered in Caroline County Court records William Bramlett I/Sr.’s residence was not Lunenburg County when it still was Brunswick County–before May 1, 1746; recorded documents at that time prove he was living in Essex and then Caroline County until at least November 1747. However, he did live in 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg, formerly Brunswick, that became Bedford in 1754. Historians in the 1930s did not have the easy access to the large amount of information that genealogical researchers enjoy today, but Parker and Mrs. (Mary A. Bell) Buford did have easy access to Bedford records because Mrs. Buford was the wife of the county clerk. Rowland Dabney “R. D.” Buford, 1827-1921, served 32 years in that capacity. (Mary A. Bell Buford was born in 1838 and died in 1930. She and Rowland are buried at Longwood Cemetery.)

   Parker lists the following children for William Bramlett I/Sr. in her brief history:

1) William Bramblett II/Jr., who married Anna Ballard and died in 1779; 2) Ambrose, who lived in North Carolina in 1779; 3) James who married a woman named Winefred and died in 1758; 4) Elizabeth who married James Buford in 1761; and 5) Nancy, mentioned in her brother James Bramlett’s will. [Parker also lists as possible children of William I/Sr.:] 6) Lucy who married Thomas Lumpkin on March 4, 1778; 7) Molly who married Stephen Dooley on July 24, 1781; and 8) Aggy, wife of Stephen White. 

However, Lucy and Molly were born and married much later, between 17 and 20 years later, respectively, than Elizabeth Bramlett Buford. Molly (Bramlett) Dooley is a grandchild of William Bramlett I/Sr.–the daughter of Rev. William II/Jr. and Anna, according to their estate records. Lucy (Bramlett) Lumpkin also is probably a grandchild of William Bramlett I/Sr.: She may be the only child of James Bramlett who died in Bedford County in 1758 and his wife, Winefred. Lucy is not the daughter of Ambrose Bramlett: He names all of his children in his 1806 will. Nor is she the daughter of Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. and Anna: Their daughter Lucy married Patrick Nenney in 1796 in Bedford County and moved to Tennessee. No daughters have yet surfaced for Henry I/Sr. of Prince William/Fauquier.

   Other children of William Bramlett I/Sr. not mentioned by Parker are Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett who first married James Callaway Sr., son of Joseph Callaway, and then second married Leonard “Linus” “Lynah” “Liner” “Leo” Brown, and Henry Bramlett Sr., a planter living in King George County, Va., in 1735 when he bought land in a portion of Prince William County that later became Fauquier County, whose wife is unknown. (King George County in 1735 was adjacent to a portion of Essex County that later became Caroline County where William Bramlett I lived from 1715-1716 to 1747.)

   (Note: Lula Eastman Jeter Parker’s 1930s history books, although out of print, are still in high demand and treasured today. She and her White cousin Mary Denham Ackerly co-authored a wonderful book, Our Kin, which includes Boones, Callaways, Bufords, Whites and other allied relatives. See more about Lula in Chapter 10.) 

Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages of America: A Collection of Genealogical Studies, Completely Documented and Appropriately Illustrated, Bearing Upon Notable Early American Lines and Their Collateral Connections (New York: American Historical Company, 1939) contains the following information about the sons of William Bramlett I/Sr. in a section entry titled “Bramlette”:

William, Ambross and Amhus Bramlette or Bramlett were early bearers of the name in Bedford County, Virginia. It is possible that they were brothers.…In the militia rosters contained in Hening’s “Statutes at Large” is found a Bedford County list of September, 1758, in which appear the names of Ambrose Bramlett, sergeant; Amhus Bramlett, and William Bramlett. [Note: Their brother James, died 1758, also is listed in the Hening record as a paid soldier.]
A William Bram
lett was “one of the oldest settlers in Bedford County, and a sergeant in the Colonial Army.” He was father of Elizabeth, who married, July 14, 1761, in Bedford County, James Buford, son of John and Judith Beauford, of Culpeper County, Virginia. After carefully considering the land transactions … between Ann Bramlette (widow), her sons, James and Reuben Bramlette, and James Buford, it seems highly probable that William Bramlette, the sergeant, was also the father of William Bramlette [husband of Anna]….” (209-210)

Actually, the cited Hening’s Statutes does not designate William I/Sr. or William Bramlett II/Jr. as sergeant; and since William I/Sr. was aged 60 in 1755, it seems unlikely he would have served as a sergeant in the military at age 63 in 1758; but perhaps a record may surface indicating he served as a sergeant during an earlier time or that his son William II/Jr. served with that rank. In either case, William I/Sr. was an early settler of Bedford, as were his children, when it was created from Lunenburg County in 1754, and he was the father of William II/Jr., James who died 1758, Ambrose, Elizabeth and others. “Amhus” cited by Hening most likely is a misspelling of Ambrose (Ambus/Ambos/Ambros); no other reference to “Amhus” has yet been found in existing records. Hening also refers to a “Francis” Bramlett, according to one source, Francis being a complete mystery so far.

   Since Bible and probate records have not surfaced for some of the early generations, especially for William Bramlett I/Sr., extensive research in official Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Kentucky and South Carolina records has been used to reconstruct William Bramlett I/Sr.’s family: son/brother? Henry Bramlett I/Sr., and children Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr., Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett Callaway Brown, James Bramlett, Nancy (Ann?), Ambrose Bramlett, Elizabeth Bramlett Buford and Agatha “Aggie” Bramlett White.

End Note

  In addition, in the interest of reducing confusion, note the Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages biography quoted above in a footnote incorrectly identifies Reuben, brother of James and son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr., as Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky.: but the two Reubens had different fathers and lived in different areas in Virginia, i.e., Bedford and Fauquier, and definitely are not one and the same. The biography quotes an abstract from Reuben Sr.’s will: “Reuben; his will, dated December 10, 1806, and proved in January, 1807, in Bourbon County, Kentucky (WB-C-198), mentions wife Peggy; son-in-law, John Grinstead; son Hugh; three children in South Carolina, Reuben, Jr., Milly Robertson and Polly Robertson; son William; son Lewis; land I claim from heirs of Martin Pickett, deceased; son Henry. Executors, John Grinstead, Henry and Hugh Bramblett. Witnesses, Will Mitchell, Edward Riley, Reubin Bramblett, Jr.” (209-10). The following portion of the footnote, citing marriages from two different Reubens as the marriages of one Reuben, is incorrect: “Reuben Bramlette married (first) December 10, 1789, Sally Ashton [Abston]; probably (second) Margaret (‘Peggy’).” Reuben, son of Anna Ballard and William Bramlett Jr., returned to Bedford Co., Va., from Fayette Co., Ky., and married Sally Abston; they remained in Virginia, appearing in Bedford census records in 1810-1820 and court records there in 1830. The other Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky., is the son of Henry Bramlett I/Sr. of Prince William (later Fauquier) Co.,Va., and grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr.; Reuben Sr. never lived in Bedford County and never married Sally Abston. Reuben Bramblett Sr. married a woman named Margaret “Peggy,” surname unknown, perhaps Darnall but not proven, and went to Bourbon Co., Ky., from Fauquier County in 1794-95 after trading his Virginia land to Martin Pickett, as documented in Fauquier County deeds and the 1796 tax list for Bourbon Co., Ky. (DB-12:145; DB-12:324). A completely different man, not Reuben Sr. of Bourbon, the Reuben who married Sally Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, may have first applied for a marriage license to wed Lucy Abston, also a daughter of Jesse Abston and sister of Sally Abston, whom Reuben married in 1790. (Jesse Abston signed as surety.) Or Bedford County may have made a mistake, wrote Lucy instead of Sally, when they entered the following record: “Dec. __, 1790, Reuben Bramblett and Lucy Abston Married by Joseph Drury.” Lucy Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, later married Joel Callaway in Bedford County on Dec. 27, 1793. Alderson Weeks performed their marriage ceremony. Lucy and Joel applied for their marriage license on Dec. 24, 1793. Thomas Pullen signed as surety, and Lucy is named as the daughter of Jesse Abston. So, Reuben Sr. of Bourbon County is not the son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr.; however, as a son of Henry Bramlett I/Sr., Reuben Sr. is considered a grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr., as is Reuben, son of Rev. William II/Jr., who married Sally Abston in Bedford County. (No son named Reuben has yet been found for William Bramlett I/Sr.)

Chapter 3:

Generation 2/3

HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR. and UNKNOWN

(Children: Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr., William Bramblett, Reuben Bramblett Sr.)

6d9ed-virginia2bseal
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Definite Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis

Henry I and Children Established the “Fauquier County Branch” 1735-1759

HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR., believed to be child of Unknown First Wife and William Bramlett I/Sr., or perhaps brother of William Bramlett I/Sr. and son of Ambrose “Bamblet” who came to America in 1690, was born in or before 1710, most likely in Colonial Virginia. No documentary evidence has been found to connect Henry I/Sr. and William I/Sr. as father and son or as brothers; however, they lived near each other and William I/Sr. is the only known documented Bramblette who was old enough to have been Henry I/Sr.’s father unless we include Ambrose Bamblet. Henry I/Sr. probably died intestate between 1752 and 1758, in Prince William (later Fauquier) Co., Va., after he was replaced as constable there in 1752 and before his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture and began paying taxes on it for 1758 in 1759. (Land and tax records show Henry I/Sr. is the father of Henry II/Jr. Two other adult males living nearby in Prince William/Fauquier are considered sons of Henry I/Sr. as well, based on geographical proximity and a process of elimination for other possibilities. No will, probate or Bible records have surfaced for Henry I/Sr. His exact death date and place, cause of death and burial place is unknown. The name of his wife, unfortunately, is unknown.

Henry Bramlett Sr.’s Life in Virginia

   Henry I/Sr. was a planter living in Brunswick Parish in King George Co., Va., in 1735 when he purchased half of a contiguous tract of 500 acres of land–250 acres more or less, in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., from a man named John Ambrose. The recorded “lease” or first deed of their transaction indicates “John Ambrose of Brunswick Parish King George, planter” sold 250 acres on Elk Marsh Run adjacent to Jonas William’s line to “Henry Bramblet of same, planter” for twenty-five pounds sterling. John Ambrose owned about 500 acres of land in Prince William County, which he may have inherited or purchased or received though a gift or grant. John Ambrose then acknowledged the sale to “Henry Bramblet” in a “release” or second deed for the land, which was recorded in Prince William Co., Va., Court on Sept. 17, 1735 (DB-B:480-482). The transaction was witnessed by George Harrison, John James and Hugh West. (In Virginia in the early 1700s, one deed, known as a bargain and sale–and/or two deeds–a lease and release–could be prepared and recorded to transfer a full title when land or other property was sold or traded.) Available land at that point was scarce in Virginia and generally sold or transferred in the family when possible, so it is conceivable to logically consider a familial relationship by blood or marriage between Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and/or William Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose and/or a first wife. (His spouse in 1747, Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington, was about twenty-five years younger than John and may have been a second wife.) John Ambrose was born in Rappahannock Co., Va., circa 1684, according to a 1747 deposition stating his age as 63, (making him a contemporary of William Bramlett I/Sr.) and died at about age 72 in 1756. Elizabeth Ambrose states her age as 36 in her 1747 deposition, which means she was born circa 1711-1712 (DB-L:12-13). They were deposed witnesses in a case regarding a land title dispute between neighbors. Planter Henry I/Sr. and planter and church warden John Ambrose both moved their families from King George County and farmed adjoining tracts of land on Elk Marsh Run, Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, beginning in 1735, according to a recorded deed.

   John Ambrose and John Champe, relationship unknown, both Church Wardens of the Parish of Brunswick, King George Co., Va., bought 200 acres of land there for 100 pounds sterling money of Great Britain from Hugh French, Gentleman, of Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., Va., on May 31, and June 1, 1733 (DB-1729-1735:260-262/DB-1A:260-262). Deeds of lease and release with receipt of money were recorded June 1, 1733. Hugh French’s wife on May 4, 1733, appointed a representative for her dower release: “Know all men I Mary French, wife of Hugh French appoint Thomas Turner my lawfull Attorney” in the “sale of 200 acres conveyed by my husband to John Champe & John Ambris [sic] Church Wardens for a Glebe for the said Parish of Brunswick” in order to “relinquish my right of dower.” The power of attorney was recorded June 1, 1733. Mary Browne Triplett French, daughter of Original and Jane (Brooks) Browne, and wife of first husband, Francis Triplett, died after the above record and before Oct. 5, 1736, when Hugh French wrote his will in Stafford County and named children but no wife (WB-M:247).

   “Henry Brimlett” is included on a 1738-1739 Rent Roll for Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., which indicates he was at least age 21 and thus born in or before 1717. (This Henry is not Henry Jr.; Henry Jr. was only about 8 years old in 1838.) Henry Sr. paid five shillings on 250 acres of land for one year from Michaelmass 1738 to Michaelmass 1739. (Source: Transcriber RELIC Volunteer Greg Mason, Bull Run Regional Library, Manassas, Va., “Rent Roll from Michaelmass 1738 to Michaelmass 1739,” Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., manuscripts in the Huntington Library, 1 microfilm reel [366 frames]; RELIC Microfilm 975.527 Pri., page 2.) Mason included the Rent Roll in Prince William County People 1701–1800 A Name Index to Landowners, Soldiers, Voters, Tithables, Petitioners, Laborers, and Slaves of Colonial Prince William County, Virginia. This land is the property Henry Bramlett I/Sr. bought from John Ambrose in 1735 when they were both planters living in King George Co., Va.

Henry Brimlett tax 1738

   John Ambrose in 1738 is not included in the 1738-1739 Rent Roll, according to the Prince William County People transcriber. The index is current to date Dec. 30, 2012. John Ambrose may have been exempt due to his age, civic duty, or service in the local militia. John Ambrose was born circa 1684 or earlier in Rappahannock Co., Va.; He would have been age 58 or older in 1738. One John Ambrose is included on the Rent Roll in a later year, i.e., 1758, and on a 1741 voter poll. John Ambrose’s spouse in 1747, Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose (later married John Etherington), was about twenty-five years younger than John and may have been a second wife.) John Ambrose was born in Rappahannock Co., Va., circa 1684, according to a 1747 deposition stating his age as 63, (making him a contemporary of William Bramlett I/Sr.) and died at about age 72 in 1756. Elizabeth Ambrose states her age as 36 in her 1747 deposition, which means she was born circa 1711-1712 (DB-L:12-13). They were deposed witnesses in a case regarding a land title dispute between neighbors. Planter Henry I/Sr. and planter and church warden John Ambrose both moved their families from King George County and farmed adjoining tracts of land on Elk Marsh Run, Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, beginning in 1735, according to a recorded deed.

   One John Ambrose is included on a Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., Rent Roll dated 1758, which was transcribed by RELIC Volunteer Greg Mason at Bull Run Regional Library Manassas, Va., in 2012. Mason included the Rent Roll in Prince William County People 1701–1800. John Ambrose would have been at least age 74 at that time, in 1758, and therefore tax exempt. But he died in 1756. The Rent Roll notes his previous presence in the area. His name appears on page 1 of the roll, under the name “Ambros, [No First Name] Widow,” with no payment. This widow most likely is Elizabeth O’Bannon Ambrose who later married John Etherington. 

John Ambrose - People List

Greg Mason includes “John Ambross” in Prince William County People 1701-1800 as a voter on a Voter Poll in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., for the election of burgesses there in 1741. The “H., P” notation at the right of the date stands for the candidates John selected: Val Peyton and Thos. Harrison. The poll is included in Gleanings of Virginia History by William F. Boogher, pp. 116-120. Mason also notes John is included on Hamilton Parish Rent Rolls for 1751-1752, 1753 and 1754.

AMBROSES 2

Greg Mason includes “Henry Bromlet” (Henry Bramlett Sr.) in Prince William County People 1701-1800 as a voter on a Voter Poll in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., for the election of burgesses there in 1741. The “F, H” notation at the right of the date in the entry below stands for the candidates Henry selected: Wm. Fairfax and Thos. Harrison. The poll also is included in Gleanings of Virginia History, pp. 116-120.

Henry Bromlet Voter 1741

   Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose’s residences are mentioned as landmarks in several recorded deeds, and Henry I/Sr. witnessed a few documents in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., during various years up to 1750-51. They lived near Tinpot Run and Elk Marsh Run and Licking Run and Welches Rolling Road. Henry Bramlett I/Sr.’s property is mentioned as a landmark on a deed written March 16, 1744, when James Genn bought some land for his neighbor Catesby Cock/e of Fairfax County. The land, situated on Elk Marsh Run and Tinpot Run and Welches Rolling Road, was adjacent to property already owned by Catesby Cock/e and adjacent to property then owned by Henry Bramblet, Jonas Williams, Morgan Darnall, Nathaniel Dodd, John Bush and someone named Garner, Gardner or Gardiner. James Genn surveyed the property. Daniel Marr, Nathaniel Dodd and William Cairn witnessed the deed, which was recorded in Prince William County on Aug. 30, 1745 (DB-1745/46; GB-F:244). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on Aug. 21-22, 1746, when James Genn of Prince William County sold to John Higgins some property in Hamilton Parish on the branches of Elk Marsh and Tinpot runs. The property “bounded…along the land of Morgan Darnall to a Hickory and one red and 1 box Oak corner of said Darnall & Jonas Williams then with Williams line N. E. to a black Oak & Hickory in the said line Corner of Henry Bramblets land thence with Bramblets line N.W. to a large marked Hickory another of Bramblets corners thence No. W. to a box Oak by Welches Roling Road Corner of said Bramblet thence with another of his lines No. E. to a Spanish Oak on the side of a stony Ridge thence N. Wt. to a large live Oak in a Pond…” (DB-1745/46:173-77). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on March 11, 1745, when Augustine Jennings, planter of Prince William, bought property next to him from Honer and planter Jonas T. Williams: a “parcel of land containing One hundred and eight acres being in the Parish of Hamilton and County of Prince William adjoyning to a tract of land one part whereof in possession of John Ambros the other part whereof in possession of Henry Bramlet….” The acreage was granted to Jonas Williams on March 6, 1718, and was currently in possession of Augustine Jennings as a result of a one-year indenture. The cost was 3,000 pounds of “lawfull Tobacco Current money of Virginia.” Jno. Crump and John Bohanan witnessed the deed on March 24, 1745 (DB-1745/56:36-40). Henry Bramlett later witnessed Augustine Jennings’s will on Dec. 13, 1776, in Hamilton Parish, Fauquier County, and it was probated there Aug. 24, 1778 (WB-1:348). (Peter Barker and Lucretia Russell also witnessed the document. Heirs include wife Hannah, daughter Betty, daughter Hannah, daughter Sally, daughter Jemima Hudnall, daughter Nancy Weathers, son William, son Benjamin, son Baylor, son George, son Berryman, son Lewis, son Augustin Jennings. One Jennings daughter, Fanny, married circa 1767 Thomas Obannon, son of Samuel Obannon, nephew of Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington. One of Thomas Obannon’s sons is named John Ambrose Obannon.) Henry I/Sr.’s property is again mentioned as a landmark in a deed written March 30, 1748, when William Kernes bought some Prince William County land nearby. The land, situated on Licking Run, adjoined property then owned by someone named Page, Major Catesby Cocke, Thomas Stone, Henry Bramblet and John Ambrose who farmed adjoining tracts of land, and Colonel Carter. The deed was recorded April 2, 1748, in Prince William County (DB-1745/56:42). Henry I/Sr. also included on the 1751 Prince William Co., Va., tithable list, which records taxes for certain tithables (white males over age 16) and particular items of personal property (slaves and livestock). Henry I/Sr. witnessed a deed on Feb. 5, 1750/51, which records a transaction between John Darnall and Morgan Darnall regarding the dividing line of property left to them by the Darnall’s deceased father, Morgan Darnall Sr., in Hamilton Parish of Prince William County. The bond later was recorded Feb. 28, 1760 (DB-1759/78:59-60).

   One recorded reference to Henry I/Sr. in Prince William County Court documents indicates that, in addition to being a planter, he also was the constable there in 1752 when he was replaced. No reason was given. An entry in Prince William County Court Minute Book on Nov. 27, 1752, indicates “Thomas Gardner is appointed constable in the Room of Henry Bramlet.” Gardner was ordered that day to “go before some Justice of the peace and be sworn accordingly” there (OB-1:77). At that time, constables were exempt from paying tithes and taxes and working on roads. Although no reason is given in the court record, the act of replacement suggests Henry I/Sr. may have been seriously ill or already dead. At about age 42-50, he probably was not ready to retire due to old age. No other existing court, land or tax records have been found that refer to him as being alive or dead in Prince William or Fauquier County or any other place in Virginia after 1752. It appears his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture by 1758. Tax records indicate Henry I/Sr.’s other two sons–William and Reuben Sr.–had their own separate land, wre listed individually on tax records in 1759. Henry I/Sr.’s three sons also owned their own land in Fauquier Co., Va., in 1770, according to the Rent Roll, which lists Henry Bramlett (II/Jr.) with 250 acres, his father’s former land, Reuben Bramblett (Sr.) with 150 acres and William Bramblett with 123 acres. Henry II/Jr. apparently did not farm the plantation while living next to John Ambrose since the latter died circa 1756, most likely before Henry I/Sr. died and Henry II/Jr. inherited the family plantation. After John Ambrose died, his wife, Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose, probably a second wife, married again to John Etherington (a.k.a. Edrington) circa 1762; and he also died before October 1769. He had definitely before Nov. 29, 1776, when she wrote her will as Elizabeth Etherington, but did not name her husband, in the Fauquier County document (WB-1:323). John Etherington had living children when he died, but Elizabeth apparently did not. Elizabeth sued the Etherington children to get her pre-nuptial property returned from the Etheringon estate. She entered into an agreement with the other heirs to forfeit her one-third share of John Etherington’s estate in order to retrieve the property she owned before her marriage to John. Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr. witnessed her will, which was probated March 23, 1778. (Elizabeth’s heirs include Catherine Nelson, Betty Allen, Catherine Duncan, Benjamin Russell, nephew Thomas Obannon son of her brother Samuel and wife, Stelle Obannon, and Capt. John Wright. Elias Edmonds Sr. and Jeremiah Darnall were named executors; other witnesses: Berryman Jennings, James Wright.) Elizabeth Obannon was born circa 1711-1712, the daughter of Bryant “Boru” Obannon, as he named himself in his 6 will, reportedly an immigrant from Ireland, and, according to family tradition, first wife, Zena Sarah Isham. (Daughter “Elizabeth Ambrose” is named as an heir of 60 pounds current money and horses in Bryant “Boru” Obannon’s 1760 will [WB-1:41].) Since John Ambrose and Henry Bramlett I/Sr. were both planters in King George Co., Va., in 1735 who shared a tract of land in a sale and moved to adjoining plantations in that tract, it is logical to speculate about their relationship: close friends or relatives by marriage? John Ambrose, born circa 1684 or earlier, was a contemporary of William Bramlett I/Sr., so he and a first wife (not Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose) could have had a daughter Henry I/Sr.’s age, who married him in King George Co., Va.: John Ambrose may be Henry I/Sr’s father-in-law. If so, Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose could be Henry I/Sr.’s step-mother-in-law.

  Henry I/Sr. and unknown wife/wives had three known sons: Henry II/Jr., William and Reuben I/Sr. If he had daughters, unfortunately their names are not yet known; however, there is one Mary Bramlett, born before 1746-1749, in one Fauquier Co., Va., court record in 1767 who may be a daughter or perhaps wife of Henry Bramlett I/Sr. The same record also names Reuben Bramblett I/Sr.

Chapter 3:

Generation 3? 4?

MARY (UNKNOWN) BRAMLETT and UNKNOWN

(Children: ?)

  Mary Bramlett, perhaps child of Unknown and Henry Bramlett I/Sr. or possible wife of Henry I/Sr., was born before 1746-1749, most likely in Colonial Virginia. She died sometime after appearing in court in Fauquier Co., Va., on Oct. 25, 1767. Mary Bramlett is named in one Fauquier Co., Va., court record as a witness in a court case that also involved Reuben Bramlett/Bramblett Sr. as a witness. The Oct. 25, 1767, Fauquier Court Minute Book contains the only yet found reference to Mary: “On the motion of Mary Bramlett, it is ordered that William Duling pay her one hundred and twenty pounds of tobacco for five days attendance as a witness for him against Edward Williams and James Ball.” The nature of the court dispute is not provided in the record. Could Mary be the later wife of David Darnall, the Mary for whom Reuben made rent arrangements in Fauquier County before he moved to Bourbon Co., Ky., circa 1794?

Chapter 3:

Generation 3

HENRY HARRY” BRAMLETT II/JR. and MARGARET “PEGGY” UNKNOWN

(Children: Marianne, Benjamin, Jalilah, Henry III, Reuben, William, John, Nathan, Sarah? and Nancy?)

6d9ed-virginia2bseal

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Definite Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis

Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr., child of Unknown and Henry Bramlett I/Sr., was born circa 1730 in Colonial Virginia. Since Henry II/Jr. had possession of his father’s former plantation in Fauquier County and Henry Sr. died intestate under the laws of primogeniture, Henry II/Jr. can be considered the eldest son and heir to his father’s property. Henry II/Jr. died in 1779 or 1780, definitely before Aug. 5, 1780, most likely in Virginia. His burial place is unknown. Recorded deeds indicate Henry Jr. died a suicide but do not indicate where or why. No documentation has been offered or independently discovered, but family tradition, information held by family of Henry Bramlett III, holds that Henry II/Jr. became distraught and inconsolable and took his own life after the death of his eldest son, Benjamin, who reportedly perished as a soldier or patriot while being held on a British prison ship during the American Revolution.

   Henry II/Jr. married Margaret “Peggy” Unknown circa 1750, probably in Virginia. Her birth date and place and parents are unknown. She probably was born in the early to mid-1730s since one of her elder children, Marianne, was born in 1752. Margaret died sometime after she sold her Laurens Co., S.C., farm to her son Nathan in 1809. Her burial place is unknown, but she may rest near Gray Court, S.C., in the old cemetery section of Bramlett United Methodist Church, which she co-founded, next to the graves of her son Nathan and his wife, Elizabeth Gray, whose graves are still marked with inscribed tombstones and footstones: N. B. and E. B. There are three field or native stones without inscriptions next to Elizabeth and Nathan’s graves that could be the final resting places of Margaret and Marianne and husband, Frederick Burdette.

   Evidence of the possible final resting place of Margaret Bramlett is discussed in a June 4, 1989, email to descendants James T. Hammond and Michael T. Bramblett. The late Robert Sidney Bramlett, a descendant of John and Mary Peak Bramlett, visited Bramlett Church Cemetery on a trip to South Carolina that year and shared some of his research. He had located a book in a library, in South Carolina or Elbert Co., Ga., which he did not name, with burial transcriptions by Laura Pulley or Pullen that attributed to Margaret Bramlett a small stone inscribed “M.B.” which she located in the cemetery next to Nathan Bramlett’s plot. The initials could quite possibly also stand for Marianne Bramlett, wife of Frederick Burdette, believed to be buried there. It is not known if the small stone with “M.B.” still exists. Robert had planned to add a memorial marker for Margaret and repair Nathan Bramlett’s broken stone, but ran out of time and had too many unanswered questions about Henry II/Jr. and Margaret’s family. At that time, the research group had not yet seen the Burdete Diary and connected the myriad other records to reconstruct Henry Jr. and Margaret’s family. September 2017 Update: James T. Hammond visited the cemetery to expressly look for the “M.B.” stone, but it was not present. He did find the “fieldstones beside Nathan’s and Elizabeth’s graves” shown below.

Nathan's Grave.jpg

   Henry II/Jr. died intestate in 1780, so the Virginia plantation he had inherited from his father, Henry I/Sr., through primogeniture circa 1752-1758 was inherited by Henry III through primogeniture and documented as transferred in 1780 to Henry II/Jr.’s eldest son at that time. His name (Henry III) and the name of his father (Henry II/Jr.) is documented in Virginia Land Office Proprietory Records. Margaret’s name as occupant of the plantation is documented in 1784 when her son Henry III sold the land. Two of Henry II/Jr. and Margaret’s other sons–Reuben and John–are the designated chain carriers in the 1780 resurvey, transcribed below.

   Henry II/Jr. was a planter who inherited his father’s 250-acre Bramlett Plantation through primogeniture between 1752 and 1758. Court Minute Books indicate Henry II/Jr. and his brother Reuben I/Sr. witnessed a deed for Morgan Darnall, perhaps one of their in-laws, in 1760 in Fauquier County (MB-1:92). (Both Bramletts are easily identified because they were of legal age, at least age 21, and born before 1739, in 1760. Their sons Henry III and Reuben Jr. were cousins, young children, born circa 1755 and circa 1758 respectively, at that time, 1760, and not old enough to legally witness a deed.) Reuben I/Sr. also made a motion, filed suit, on Oct. 28, 1767, in Fauquier County Court asking to be paid for five days of appearances as a witness during a court case for William Duling who sued Edward Williams and James Ball. One Mary Bramlett, most likely a relative of Reuben Sr. since they shared the same surname–probably a sister or mother–also asked the court for the same consideration for the same court case during that court session. (Mary probably is not Reuben Sr.’s wife, Margaret (Darmall?), and probably is not his sister-in-law because only two brothers and their wives have been identified as his relatives: Henry Jr. and Margaret (Unknown) and William and Elizabeth (Gist?). Mary could be a sister of Reuben Sr., Henry Jr. and William–possibly a daughter of Henry Sr.–who married after the 1767 court case. One Mary Darnall and her husband are associated with Reuben Sr. in later Fauquier County land records.

   Henry “Harry Bramblett” II/Jr. witnessed neighbor Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington’s will, which was proved in court in 1778 (MB-5:307). Henry II/Jr.’s relationship to her is not given in the document, but family or close friends traditionally witnessed important documents such as wills and deeds. The will identifies her as the widow of John Etherington deceased and names a nephew with the surname Obannon as one of her heirs. She is named in Bryant Obannon’s will as his daughter Elizabeth Ambrose in 1760. Elizabeth may not have had children who survived since none were named as heirs in the will. Documents recorded in Fauquier County indicate she was the widow of John Ambrose, the man who sold Henry I/Sr. his plantation, before she married John Etherington.

Documentation of Margaret “Peggy” as wife and widow of Henry Bramlett II/Jr.

 

Margaret Unknown Bramlett, Wife of Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr.

Virginian, Patriot of the Revolution, Methodist Family Leader, South Carolinian 

6d9ed-virginia2bseal

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Patriot: Margaret gave provisions to Washington’s Army during the American Revolution; Sons served as soldiers

Documentation of Margaret “Peggy” as wife and widow of Henry Bramlett II/Jr.

 

   The wife and widow of Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr. is identified as Margaret in recorded land documents relating to Henry II/J’r.’s former plantation in Fauquier Co., Va. The property in 1780-1784 after his death was occupied by his widow, Margaret, who continued to live on the plantation during 1780-1784 and paid the taxes on the property during 1782-1784. Henry II/Jr.’s legal heir, Henry III, returned to South Carolina after the resurvey of his father’s land was complete in 1780. He then sold the property in 1784 to Ann and James Dobie/Dobey (DB-9:144). The deed notes Henry III’s residence as “96 District SC” and notes the buyer and acreage, “to James Dobie 231 acres,” and the resident of the plantation: “occupied by Margaret Bramblett” (obviously mother of Henry III and widow of Henry II/Jr.). The deed indicates the land was “formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett [II/Jr.], father of sd Henry [III] which the father died.” Tax records show Margaret moved to a smaller farm, fifty acres, in Fauquier County where she paid taxes until 1791 for the year 1790 and in 1790 moved to South Carolina where she is listed in the census in Laurens County (NARA Film M637:11:446).

Margaret 1790

Margaret is listed as head of a family of four females including herself in the second column near the bottom of the page. Her sons John and Nathan lived nearby and son Henry III is listed on the previous page.

   Henry II/Jr. died intestate, a suicide, so the Virginia plantation was inherited by Henry III through primogeniture and documented as transferred in 1780 to Henry II/Jr.’s eldest son at that time, Henry III, in Virginia Land Office Proprietory Records; and two of Henry II/Jr. and Margaret’s other sons–Reuben and John–are the designated chain carriers in the 1780 resurvey:

Henry Bramblett Advrtisement, Land Office, Northern Neck of Virginia, Lord Proprietor’s Office. To Mr. John Moffett–Whereas Henry Bramblett of South Carolina hath set forth to this Office that there is a certain tract of land on the Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County containing by estimation Two hundred and fifty Acres and formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett Father of Henry aforesaid & which said Henry (the Father) died seized thereof in Fee simple but dying a Suicide the said Tract Escheated to the Lord of the Fee. And the Rules of the Office having been complied with as to issuing and affixing at the Court House at Fauquier County an Advertisement at three several Courts & no person offering to shew Cause why the said Land should not be granted as Escheat to the said Henry Bramblett And the said Henry Bramblett desiring a Warrant to resurvey the same in order to obtain an Escheat Deed being ready to pay the Composition & Office Fees, These are therefore to impower you to resurvey the said Land for the Said Henry Bramblett A Plat of which Resurvey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 5th Day of February next. Given under my Hand & the Office Seal the 5th Day of August 1780. B. Martin. By virtue of a warrant from the Proprietor’s office to me directed, I have surveyed for Henry Bramblettof South Carolina, a tract of Land on Elk Marsh Run, in Fauquier County, formerly the property of A Henry Bramblett father to the aforesaid Henry, who dying a suicide the said Land became Escheatable: the said Land being Bounded as followeth Viz Beginning at A a white oak corner to Jonas Williams thence along the said Williams’s Line S 31 (degrees) E 60 Poles to B two Hicories thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two small hicories, thence 35 1/2 W 216 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & sundry saplings, thence S 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G two small hicorys in the said Williams’s Line, thence along the same to the Beginning Containing 231 Acres. … J. Moffett 20th Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett} Chain Carriers. (VLO entry 117 Box 1)

   Not much is known about Margaret–her physical description or what she liked to cook and preserve, her domestic and farming skills and interests–but she is highly regarded by descendants today as a Patriot of the Revolution who supplied provisions, beef and brandy, to Gen. George Washington’s troops and an individual with deep religious convictions. 

george-washington-portrait

 George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) – the first elected President of the United States (1789–1797), the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. He presided over the convention that drafted the United States Constitution and during his lifetime was called the “father of our country.” Widely admired for his strong leadership qualities, Washington was unanimously elected president in the first two national elections after John Hall served briefly as temporary appointed president during the Revolution. Washington’s incumbency established many valued precedents still in use today, such as the cabinet system, the inaugural address, and the title “Mr. President.”
   Margaret, named as “Peggy Bramlett” and “Margaret Bramlett,” is documented at Library of Virginia as a Revolutionary War Patriot in Fauquier County “Publick Claims” with certificates she filed during and after the war in 1782 and 1785 for providing supplies–beef and brandy–earlier to the forces led by Gen. George Washington in the Virginia militia and Continental Army. “Peggy Bramlett” first presented a certificate to Fauquier County Commissioners and applied for compensation for the listed provisions…

At a court held for Fauquier County 24 March 1782 and continued by several adjournments till 3 May following. The court pursuant to the act of Assembly entitled “an act for adjusting claims for property impressed or taken for public services” [by the military] examined the…claims and valued each article in specie viz Beef at the rate of 3p [pence] per pound…. Peggy Bramlett 225 (Fauquier County Commissioners Court Booklet p. 1).

In addition, the Publick Claim lists in Fauquier County Commissioners’ Books, Vol. II, p. 235, Lists p. 15, indicate “Margt. Bramlett” also presented on Nov. 25, 1785, a certificate granted by Col. William Edmonds for compensation by the county for earlier providing 3 1/2 gallons of brandy to the American troops. Cheers to the officers and soldiers who benefitted from her provision. This Margaret is wife of Henry Bramlett II/Jr. deceased, not wife of Reuben Bramblett Sr. Henry Jr.’s brother Reuben Bramblett Sr. was still living in Fauquier County in 1782 and would have himself obtained certificates for supplies donated to the war effort. His wife, Margaret “Peggy” Darnell? Bramblett, due to cultural and social conventions of the day, was neither the legal owner of nor legally responsible for items donated to the military from his plantation. In 1782 Reuben Sr. paid personal property taxes for two Personalities above 21, 0 Number of Negroes, 7 Horses, 19 Cattle in Fauquier Co., Va., not his wife; and his sister-in-law Margaret, widow of Henry Jr., was living there at the same time and paid her taxes there: 2 Personalities above 21, O Number of Negroes, 3 Horses, 14 Cattle.

1782 Fauquier County Personal Tax ListTax List Fauquier 1782 Bramlett Names.jpg

Fauquier 1782 Personal Tax PDF5

Margaret heads her family, including three other females, and lives near son Nathan and wife Elizabeth Gray, in Laurens Co., S.C., in 1790 (NARA Film M:637:11:446). Their names are written in the left columns at the bottom, below.

1790Laurens Census.jpg

Margaret heads her family, including one other younger female, and lives next to son Nathan and wife Elizabeth Gray, in Laurens Co., S.C., in 1800 (NARA Film M:32:50:15).

1800 Laurens

  Three of Margaret and Henry II/Jr.’s sons served as soldiers during the Revolution.

   Margaret and Henry Jr.’s great-grandson Reuben Henderson Bramlet provided historical information about his ancestors to a biographer who wrote sketches for the 1919 History of Fresno County, Calif.: Reuben Henderson Bramlet’s grandfather Reuben, 1757-1844, and two of Reuben’s brothers served as Revolutionary War soldiers.

The three Revolutionary sons are possibly Benjamin, who, according to family tradition, died on a British prison ship during the war; and definitely Henry III, documented as a soldier in 1827 Georgia Land Lottery records, who left Laurens Co., S.C., to settle in Elbert Co., Ga., about 1800; and definitely Reuben, documented as a soldier in Virginia and South Carolina in his pension application, who lived in 1787-1800 in Laurens County and left the state to farm in Kentucky in 1801-1818 before settling in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill., about thirty-five years after the war. Military service of the latter two sons and Margaret’s patriotic service qualify their descendants to apply for membership consideration in National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution and National Society of Sons of the American Revolution. Several descendants of Reuben and Marianne Bramlett Burdette and Jalilah Bramlett Riley and other ancestors have joined patriotic organizations, including Franklin Donald Burdette of Florida, a member of NSSAR. It is not known if Benjamin Bramlett married or had children and other descendants.

Margaret’s Religious Devotion

   Shortly before or just after husband Henry Jr. died, Margaret and her children joined the Methodist Church and formed a core religious group, worshipping at home in Virginia, and in 1780 or 1781 founded their own meeting house which became Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court, Laurens Co., S.C. The first congregation comprised local families named in a precious diary. Margaret’s great-grandson Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette, an exhorter in 1857 and local preacher at Bramlett, documented the history of the church. He wrote in the diary reproduced here in this history that Margaret and her sons “John, Nathan, or Henry Bramletts” were the co-founders of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1780 or 1781. Bishop Francis Asbury indicated in his Journal that Margaret–“Widow Bramblet“–had a meeting house in Laurens County in 1801. She had a farm there in 1791-1809 adjacent to her son Nathan’s land near the present-day location of Bramlett Church in Laurens County. She relocated from Virginia in 1790, but at least two of her adult children–Marianne and Henry III–were living in Laurens County in or before 1775 and later. Henry III is known as a Methodist lay preacher by one of his descendants who declined a request to quote her genealogical work and documents.  This descendant of Henry III and his son Nathan also said she had possession of Henry III’s original Revolutionary War military discharge papers, which in the 1980s were too fragile and valuable to copy. Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church in 1799 generated a satellite church in an adjacent county. John Bramlett’s meeting house, Bethel Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church, was founded circa 1799 near Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C. Bishop Francis Asbury is believed to have influenced and formally organized Bethel when he was visiting nearby Bramlett Church in 1799. A 1912 copy of the 1807 recorded land deed for Bramlett M.E. Church documents the presence of Bishop Asbury, an early American circuit-rider and the first, pioneer bishop of the American Methodist Church, at a Quarterly Conference at Bramlett Church in South Carolina in 1799. John Bramlett’s church, Bethel, is about ten miles away from Bramlett. Much later one of John Bramlett’s sons–named after Bramlett’s co-founder Nathan Bramlett–Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlett (1789–1876)—co-founded and developed a Methodist satellite, Hopewell Methodist Episcopal Church, in Hall Co., Ga., in the 1830s after he and his family had settled near Murrayville, Ga.

1912 1 USE

1912 USE

The original deed was recorded in Deed Book 26, p. 235 in Laurens County. The document copy above, created and donated by Bramlett trustees in 1912 to the Methodist Archives at Wofford College, states the venerated Methodist leader Bishop Francis Asbury held a Quarterly Conference at Bramlett Church on Nov. 9-10, 1799. Bramlett and Bethel churches are not far from each other in Laurens and Greenville counties. John Bramlett had co-founded Bramlett Church. Bishop Asbury most likely would visit John Bramlett’s core religious group or church in Greenville County in 1799 as well.

Margaret and Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church

Diary of Frederick H. Burdette

Diary of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, Cover Date 1875. Permission, courtesy, copyright Martha Anne Curry Duke

One of the most important records yet found for Henry II/Jr. and Margaret’s family is the Diary kept by their great-grandson Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette. The Burditt Diary was located in family papers in South Carolina and preserved and shared by descendant Martha Anne Curry Duke of Texas. The Diary not only documents the early founding year of Bramlett Church and the names of the founders and surnames of members, but also provides documentation for the connection between Henry III, John and Nathan as biological brothers and sons of Margaret. (Other records definitely connect the brothers with their father, mother and siblings, including Marianne and Reuben of Illinois.) Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette is the son of Frederick Reuben Burdett and second wife, Sarah Elizabeth Rhodes. Born in 1833, he died in 1892 and rests in the old section of Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery with a tombstone that identifies him as “Rev. F. H. Burdette.” He was a native resident of Laurens County, a member of the church and a Local Preacher who was licensed to preach at Laurens and Reedy River Quarterly Conference after he returned to the community from serving as a soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He also was later ordained as a deacon and performed marriages. He or one of his relatives apparently wrote or dispatched a verbal question via a messenger to his Great-Uncle John Bramlett in Greenville County before John died there in 1855 and got a reply that John “sent” to answer a question posed about the origins of the church. Copies of the Diary pages and a transcript follow:

First Qurt. [Quarterly] Conference in 1783 John Bramlett sent. from the best information the church had been organized three years before Preachers who they were is unknown only as we remember hearing old people speak such as Bingham, Travice, Tarply, Hillyard Judge, Stafford, Asbury and others. The members consisted of three or four families viz WilM. Bramlett, Dacus, Robertson and perhaps Stone. John, Nathan, or Henry Bramletts were the founders with their Mother in the year 1780 or 81 but the best information say[s] in 80 by what minister is unknown. Some suppose Asbury others Travice while others Hillyard Judge, but the last name lived some where from 1800 to 1820.

The name of one early preacher at the church, Rev. James King, is found in the 1853 obituary of Margaret Bramblett Gober, born in 1776 in Laurens Co., S.C., who joined Bramlett Church at about age 16, circa 1792. The information supports the premise concerning an early founding of the church before the latter date, 1792. Other published sources place the founding between 1774 and 1780-1781. Margaret is believed to be daughter of John’s elder brother Henry III. Her life story is recounted more fully elsewhere in this history.

“Died, near Harmony Grove, Jackson co., Ga., May 30, [1853] Mrs. Margaret Gober, wife of Wm. Gober, in her 77th year [born 1776]. It was in S. C., on the Saluda circuit, at Bramlet Church, under the ministry of the Rev. James King, and more than sixty years ago, [at about age 16, before 1792] that she joined the M. E. Church as an anxious seeker of religion, and two weeks thereafter found peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

Exerpt #3 from the diary of Frederick H. Burdette's diary.

Digital copies of two original pages from the Diary of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, preserved Thank God, and contributed by Great-Great-Granddaughter Martha Anne Curry Duke, who owns the diary and holds the copyright.

Exerpt #4 from the diary of Frederick H. Burdette's diary

Burditt/Burdette Diary preserved, courtesy, copyright Martha Anne Curry Duke

   The given name of the Bramlett Mother-Co-Founder is not literally written on the page, but other South Carolina and Virginia official tax lists with recorded land deeds name her in connection with her husband and children as Margaret, widow of Henry Bramblett II/Jr. and occupant of Henry Jr.’s Virginia plantation in 1780 after he died. She paid taxes on the land in the 1780s before her son Henry III sold the plantation. The diary entries are not dated, but the cover of Pierce’s Memorandum and Account Book indicates it was “Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1875, by R. V. Pierce, M. D., in the office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.” Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette inscribed the information about the church history in or after 1875, the date of the diary’s publication, and before Rev. Frederick Henry’s death in 1892, but the information came from, was “sent” by John Bramlett before he died in 1855. The Memorandum and Account Book is “A Present from the People’s Medical Servant, R. V. Pierce, M. D.” of Buffalo, N. Y., “designed for Farmers, Mechanics and All People who appreciate the value of keeping a memorandum of business transactions, daily events, and other items of importance, or future references.”

Portrait of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, owner of the Diary that documents the founding history–the date and names of the founders–of Bramlett Episcopal Methodist Church as well as the close biological connection of Marianne’s brothers Henry III, John and Nathan Bramlett, courtesy Great-Great-Granddaughter Martha Anne Curry Duke of Denton, TexasFrederick Henry Burdette

Bramlett United Methodist Church was co-founded in 1780 or 1781, according to Father John Bramlett, by John, his mother, Margaret Bramlett, and one or two of her other sons, Nathan and/or Henry (III). The church still holds services today on the same property deeded by Nathan Bramlett and George Sims and sold to the trustees for $5 in 1807 to secure the already existing church building. –Deborah G. Dennis

Margaret was recognized as family leader of Bramlett Church in Laurens County in November 1801 by Methodist Episcopal Bishop Francis Asbury (1745-1816) in his published Journal: “Wednesday [November] 21. We rode sixteen miles to the widow Bramblet’s meeting-house.” This was a church building or Margaret’s home on her property and next to or on Nathan’s land near or at the location of the current church. There were two Bramlett widows–Margaret and Elizabeth–in Laurens County in 1790-1800, and until 1809-1810: Elizabeth, documented in recorded deeds as wife of William Bramblett, formerly of Prince William/Fauquier Co., Va., and son of Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and owner of the 1773 royal land grant in Laurens County. A day or two earlier in 1801, the Bishop visited Margaret’s son John Bramlett at Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church in Greenville County: “Monday [November] 20. At John Bramblet’s, Greensville. After meeting, we rode to…Reedy River” (Asbury, 40).

John Margaret Bishop Asbury Journal

Bishop Asbury USE

Print Engraving, Half-Length Portrait of The Revd. Francis Asbury, Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States, painted by John Paradise and engraved by Benjamin Tanner at 74 South 8th Street, Philadelphia, PA, and published March 27, 1814, by Tanner. Courtesy Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Marian S. Carson Collection, Washington, D.C.

   A notation at the bottom of a document provided in 1912 by Bramlett Church trustees to the Methodist Archives at Wofford College, a copy of the 1807 deed transferring the existing church building and land to then current trustees, indicates Bishop Asbury held a Quarterly Conference at Bramlett Church in 1799, so he may have formally organized Bethel Church, co-founded by Nathan Bramlett’s brother John in adjacent Greenville County, during that same visit to South Carolina. The bishop knew John Bramlett from John’s association with co-founders, his mother, Margaret, and brothers Henry III and Nathan, at Bramlett Church. He most likely would not visit Laurens County in South Carolina and not go to Greenville County, about ten miles away, to visit John Bramlett’s religious group. The 1807 deed indicates Nathan Bramlett and George Sims on June 2, 1807, sold to the trustees for $5 two acres of land to secure Bramlett Church meeting house already in existence on the property. The building was situated on property owned by Nathan or once owned by his mother, Margaret, after she relocated from Virginia in 1790 and bought the next year a small farm adjacent to Nathan’s property, which he had settled on in or before 1789. A copy of the original June 2, 1807, deed, which copy was donated to the South Carolina Methodist Archives in 1912, includes a note at the bottom indicating the bishop visited Bramlett Church in 1799:

“A Quarterly Conference was held at Bramletts by Bishop Asbury Nov. 9th and 10th, 1799 — 113 years ago. Rev. Benj. Blanton was also present. This document by the consent of the trustees of Bramletts Church is tendered the Historical Society of the S.C. Conference. Nov. 26th 1912: J. M. Fridy”

Bishop Asbury in his November 1802 Journal recognized Margaret’s son Nathan Bramlett as leader of Bramlett Church, which he also called “Bramblet’s Chapel”: “Wednesday 22….Next day I went to Nathan Bramblet’s.…Sunday 27. At Bramblet’s chapel I spoke on Acts ii. 37-39” (Asbury, 86). The chapel may be the arbor.

NathanBramblet:Bishop Asbury Journal   Nathan, born in 1766, and John, born in 1764, were not old enough to actually found a church in 1780 or 1781, the date provided by John; however, it is known from Nathan’s tombstone inscription and John’s obituary that they both joined the Methodist Church as young men. John specifically joined about that time–1780–when he was age 16, so they were very early/charter members of Bramlett Church. Henry III was born earlier, was the eldest son in 1780 since he inherited through primogeniture his father’s former Virginia plantation. Henry III was born circa 1755, before his brother Reuben, who was born March 15, 1757. Henr would have been an adult and old enough to organize and found a church with his mother, Margaret, in 1780; and recorded Virginia deeds indicate Henry III was living in Laurens County at exactly that time. Henry III was in South Carolina earlier, in 1775-1776 when his son Reuben and daughter Margaret were born there and while he served as a soldier during the Revolution. Henry III and possibly other members of his close family may have traveled to Laurens County with his Uncle William Bramblett and family, also early members of Bramlett Church, in 1773. William and family settled in 1773-1774 on his royal land grant there, southeast of where Nathan later settled and the church was established.

   That year, 1774, and the year 1779 appear as a possible organizational or founding dates for the core membership group and Bramlett Church in “A History of Bramlett,” co-written by member Ruth Wallace Cheshire and pastor Rev. George B. Wilson for The 1962 Church Journal. They quote a respected, long-time member as the source of some interesting details about the church’s early organization. “C. R. Wallace (1856-1916), a venerable and diligent servant of God, has bequeathed the following information:”

   About 1774, or two years before the Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson, just thirty years after the first Methodist Conference was held in the old Foundry Church in London, England, a few people living in this community who were strong adherents of the Methodist faith, met in the home of a family who lived a few hundred yards west of where the house (the present church building), and held religious services. The services were conducted at regular intervals for two or three years. As interest in these meetings increased the need for more room was felt, and they decided to change the place of meeting. A log house was built. This log house was located one-fourth of one mile and a little south of east from this point. There the services were continued for several years. For four years after these meetings began, there was no organized society here. It was not until 1779 that this church was organized. In the little graveyard just across the road from this house is the sleeping dust of him whose name it bears.

The man referenced as the church namesake, of course, is Nathan Bramlett, whose inscribed tombstone still memorializes him in the old section of the cemetery, and who sold land at a small price of $5 to the trustees in 1807 “for the purpose of Secureing a Meeting house, thereon Standing and to Remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church.” This quoted part of the recorded deed indicates a church building was already in existence on the site, which means the church definitely was founded before the 1807 date of the document. The namesake family referenced, of course, is the family of Henry Bramlett Jr. and Margaret, especially Henry III, which suggests he and perhaps his parents, still residents of Virginia, were in South Carolina as early as 1774-1775. The parents, who may have been visiting, had grown children, Marianne and Henry III, already living there. Marianne and husband, Frederick Burdette, named in a recorded deed, were in Laurens County in 1775; and their first child was born there in 1776. There is evidence that indicates Henry III was in South Carolina by 1775-1776 and in 1780. He most likely lived and worked with relatives or leased or purchased land through a private transaction. He and sister Marianne as well apparently lived very close to the current location of Bramlett United Methodist Church before later obtaining property through post-war land grants. Henry II/Jr.’s brother William and family lived quite a distance and southeast from the church on land surveyed for them in 1773.

   Historic Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery, on the north side of Bramlett Church Road, approximately 2/3 of a mile west of the intersection of Higgins Cemetery Road, in the Woodruff Quadrangle of Laurens County, was surveyed Oct. 17, 2001, during consideration for National Historic Register designation. It was deemed not eligible, most likely because the oldest graves, six with field stones or eroded sand stones, are no longer marked with inscribed headstones; and the church lacks early burial records. The survey report details indicate the cemetery was constructed/established circa 1830, while other records/sources indicate the oldest part of the graveyard was established much earlier, perhaps before 1807-1809. Significant architectural features in the report include the church’s land deed date of 1807, and the oldest third of the cemetery dates “before 1900” with Nathan Bramlett’s grave and “many decorative stones showing wreaths, Masonic symbols.”

   The old section of Bramlett Cemetery also contains a slave section at the northwest edge, past the existing headstones and the trees, shown below. The slave section was memorialized in 1961 with a bronze plaque.

Bramlett Church Slave:Cem

Bramlett Slave Cem - USE

Bramlett Church Memorial Marker: “Slave Cemetery In Memory of Man’s Servants, Many of Whom Were God’s Servants. Methodist Men, 1961” Image courtesy historian Judy Riddle, church member and adult Sunday School teacher, financial chair and secretary of the Administrative Council. Judy also contributes the following 1871 plat map of Bramlett Church, most likely created to show the addition of another acre of donated land:

1871 Church building plat

1871 Bramlett Church plat

“South Carolina Laurens County I certify that the above plat is a true representation of a Tract or parcel of Land dedicated to the Methodist Church at Bramblett’s Chappel on which land for said Chappel now stands the said Tract or parcel of Land Hath such shape and form above laid down containing Three Acres (3) more or less. Surveyed Septr. 29th 1871. R. Martin Svr.”

Artifacts more recent than deeds and the cemetery headstones: outdoor signage

  Margaret Bramlett permanently settled in Laurens County before the census was taken in 1790. She bought her 50-acre South Carolina farm next to her son Nathan’s farm in Laurens County on May 10, 1791, from Ezekiel Griffith for 20 pounds:

This indenture made the Tenth day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand seven hundred & ninety one, and in the Sixteenth year of American Independency, Between Ezekiel Griffeth of Laurens county in the state of South Carolina on the one part, and Margaret Bramlett of the county & State aforesaid of the other part. Witnesseth that the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for & in consideration of the sum of Twenty pounds to him in hand well & Truly paid by the sd. Margaret Bramlett the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged Have Bargained, granted, sold, aliened Embossed & confirmed, and by these presents doth Grant, Bargain & Sell, alien emboss Riban [Ribbon] & confirm unto the said Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns forever part of a Tract of land Situate & Lying on Beaverdam Creek water of Enoree River, to begin on the north side of sd. creek on a Red Oak on a stoney nole, Thence to the corner in Nathan Bramlett’s field, Thence along the sd. Nathan Bramlett’s to the corner, Thence to the creek & up the creek to the mouth of the spring branch & up the branch to the head, Thence to the Begining to contain Fifty acres more or less, & hath such shape, form & marks as are represented by a plat thereof to the Original grant annexed, which was granted to the said Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs & assigns forever on the Twenty fourth day of January, one Thousand seven hundred & seventy by the…William Bull Then Governor and Recorded in…office in Book EEE page 68 and also the Reversion and Reversions, Remainder & Remainders, Rents…& Profits thereof & all the Estate, Right, Title, Interest Claim & demand whatsoever of him the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs or assigns to have and to hold the sd. Tract of fifty acres of land more or less with every appurtenance thereunto belonging to the only proper use & behoof of her the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs or assigns forever &tc. the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for him his heirs & assigns doth covenant with the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns that he the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth now is & untill the execution of these presents shall stand seized in his right of a good sure perfect, absolute indefeasible Estate of Inheritance in fee simple of & in all & singular the tract of land & every part & parcel hereof without any manner of Condition, Mortgage, limitation or use or uses or other thing or things matter, cause to alter, change, charge or Determin[e] the same and also that she the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns shall & may from time to time & at all times hereafter Peaceably & Quietly have, hold, occupy, possess & Enjoy all & singular the premises above mentioned without the least trouble, Hindrance, molestation, Inter[r]uption or Denial of him the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs or assigns & every other person whatsoever. And Lastly that the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth & his heirs all & singular the premises hereby granted with the appurtenances unto the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns against him the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth & his heirs & assigns & all every other person or persons will warrant & forever defend by these, hereunto. In witness thereof the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth hath hereunto set his hand & fixed his seal the day & year first above written.

Signed, Sealed, & Delivered in the presence of us Nathan Bramlett John Bramlett Ezekiel Griffeth LS

____

May the Tenth 1791, Then Recie’d of Margaret Bramlett the sum of Twenty pounds, it being the full consideration within mentioned. I say Received Pr. me Ezekiel (his X mark) Griffeth

____

State of S. Carolina} Laurens County} Before Daniel Wright one of the Justices for sd. county, personally appeared Nathan Bramlett & being duly sworn as the Law Directs & saith that he was personally present & did see Ezekiel Griffeth Sign, Seal & Deliver the within Deed of Conveyance to the within Margaret Bramlett for the use therein mentioned & that John Bramlett signed his name as a witness to the same with himself this deponent. Sworn to & subscribed before me this 10th day of May 1791. Daniel Wright J.P. [Signed] Nathan Bramlett (DB-D:5-6-7)

Margaret was present to receive the document from Griffith but did not sign the deed. (Griffith is related by marriage to John Bramlett’s family.) Margaret sold her farm on Zak’s (Zek’s/Zeak’s or Ezekiel’s) Creek, part of Beaverdam Creek, waters of Enoree River, to her son Nathan Bramlett for $100 on April 16, 1809. (That part of the creek may have been known locally as Zek’s after the former landowner, Ezekiel Griffith.) The deed indicates the land was originally granted to Ezekiel Griffith on Jan. 20, 1770, and conveyed to Margaret Bramlett on May 10, 1791. Margaret’s grandson John Burditt and Jesse Gray witnessed the 1809 deed (DB-J:73). No other record of Margaret has yet been found (unless she moved to Elbert Co., Ga., to live with her son Henry III and wife, Elizabeth Moss Bramlett, and family circa 1800-04; and she, not Henry III’s daughter, is the Margaret Bramlett who drew in the 1805-1806 Georgia Land Lottery. Participants registered for the lottery circa 1803-1804, when the mother was a widow and daughter of Henry III, Margaret, was still single. She married in 1805 in Franklin Co., Ga., where her brother Reuben lived at that time).

   Margaret and Henry II/Jr.’s children include Marianne Bramlett Burdette, possibly Benjamin Bramlett, probably Jalilah “Jaly” Bramlett Riley, Henry Bramlett III, Reuben, perhaps William Bramlett, John Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett and perhaps Sarah Bramlett Garrett and Nancy Bramlett Garrett or Nancy Bramlett Goodwin. (However, the latter may be daughter of Unknown Hendrix and William Bramlett who left South Carolina for Kentucky circa 1806-1810 then to Tennessee circa 1812-1815, and granddaughter of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr.)

Chapter 3:

Generation 5

Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette

(Children: John, Henry, Margaret, Mary Ann, Reuben, Elizabeth, William, Ailsey, Jesse)

6d9ed-virginia2bseal

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Frederick Burdette served as a Soldier during the American Revolution

Marianne Bramlett, most likely first or second child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born Sept. 15, 1752, in a portion of Prince William Co., Va., that later became Fauquier County. She died at age 81 years, 5 months, 21 days, on March 8, 1834, in Laurens Co., S.C. Family tradition shared in the past by family historian William Ralph Burdette and others holds that Marianne rests at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church Cemetery near Gray Court in Laurens County. Her grave has not yet been located; however, there are graves marked with field stones in the old section of the cemetery near the graves of Marianne’s brother Nathan Bramlett and his wife, Elizabeth Gray, which still have inscribed tombstones. Marianne and husband, Frederick Burdette, and Marianne and Nathan’s mother, Margaret, may occupy those unmarked graves. A will and probate records have not been found for Marianne. She and Frederick were living in Laurens County with or near some of her Bramlett relatives by 1775, and they settled and remained there all of their lives on property from a state land grant near the Enoree River after the Revolution. Their plantation was not too far away from Bramlett Church. 

Fieldstone Markers in Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery,

courtesy Deborah G. Dennis

Stones above are close, may mark graves of Marianne and Frederick

Field Marker 30

FIELD MARKER

Marker 3

Field Stone 40

Marianne’s Extended Family

    Since Bible records, other family records and other official public documents have not been found to connect Marianne directly and specifically to her parents and siblings, a number of other documents can be used to reconstruct her extended family. One key document, an 1842 probate record, connects Marianne legally and biologically to one of her brothers–Nathan Bramlett. Other records have been found that connect Nathan and thus Marianne to their mother, Margaret “Peggy” Unknown Bramlett, and some other siblings–Henry III and John. Nathan’s mother, Margaret, purchased land adjacent to his property in Laurens County close to Bramlett Methodist Church. A family minister’s diary entry most likely written in the 1870s to document the founding of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church connects Nathan, and by association Marianne, to two of their brothers (Henry III and John) to an unnamed widowed mother (Margaret). Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette (or one of his relatives) had apparently asked for and received information from Marianne’s uncle John Bramlett of Greenville County before John died about the early history of the church and later recorded what John “sent” in the Diary. Frederick Henry wrote in his Diary sometime in the 1870s that Bramlett Church was founded by “John, Nathan or Henry Bramletts…with their mother [Margaret, not specifically named] in the year 1780 or 81 but the best information say in 80….” Virginia deeds and other land records dating back as early as 1780 connect Marianne’s parents, Margaret and Henry II/Jr., to three of her brothers (Henry III, who later settled in Elbert Co., Ga., and may have died there by 1830; Reuben, who settled in 1818 and died in 1844 in Gallatin [now Saline] Co., Ill.; and John, who settled in Greenville Co., S.C., around 1798-1800 and died there in 1855). In addition, an unpublished family history written by Bramlett descendant Julien Potter Wooten in 1886 mentions his direct ancestor John Bramlett of Greenville County and correctly identifies John’s brother Reuben Bramlett but incorrectly cites Reuben’s residence: “of Indiana” (actually adjacent Illinois–Gallatin and Saline County). A self-published history written by Meeks Haley Bramlet, one of Reuben’s direct descendants, in 1924 in Illinois identifies John of Greenville Co., S.C., and Reuben of Gallatin Co., Ill., as brothers.

Dedicated Burdette-Bramblette Researchers

Martha Anne Curry Duke and Franklin Donald and Eloise Burdette

Direct descendants Martha Ann Curry Duke and Franklin Donald Burdette provide most of the following about Marianne’s marriage to Frederick, his war service, their Bible records and children.

The Marriage of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette

   Marianne married Frederick Burdette circa 1775, probably in Fauquier County where she and her parents were living. However, it is possible they married in South Carolina. Their first child, Henry, was born there in 1776. A deed recorded in Laurens County in 1790 indicates Frederick was in South Carolina when it was written in 1775. “Fredrick” was born Oct. 15, 1753, according to the Burdette Bibles. The names of Frederick’s parents are not yet known. Descendant William Ralph Burdette believed Frederick was born in Amsterdam, Holland, of French parents who came from Normandy, France. (William Ralph is son of Ella Towns Black and David Wilcut Jr. and grandson of David Wilcut and Zelena McPherson Burdett.) Ralph indicates in an unpublished written history that Frederick’s parents may have been Huguenots, French Protestants, who fled France to Holland to escape religious and ethnic persecution and later settled in Colonial America. There are early records of some Burdettes who lived in Amsterdam during the 1730s and 1750s; however, no definite evidence has yet been found to document the Huguenot connection. DNA evidence has not yet yielded enough connections to discern definite names of Frederick’s parents.

Will, Death, Estate of Frederick Burdette

   Frederick Burdette died at age 87 years, 3 months, 25 days, on Feb. 10, 1841, in Laurens County and most likely was buried there beside Marianne, by tradition in the old section of the cemetery at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court. Burial records or tombstones with legible inscriptions have not been located for them, but there are some fieldstone markers in the graveyard very near Nathan Bramlett’s inscribed tombstone which may be the final resting places of Frederick, Marianne and her mother, Margaret. Frederick wrote his Last Will and Testament on Nov. 30, 1826, in Laurens County, leaving his land to three grown children–William, Molly, Ailsey–and eventually to son William if the two daughters married or died, and if William predeceased them, after their deaths the estate would be divided among his other children or their heirs. Sons John and William, named as administrators, presented the will in court on March 1, 1841, and it was proved there by William on March 16, 1841 (Box 83, pkg. 2).

State of South Carolina} Laurens District}

In the name of God, amen, I Frederick Burditt of the State and District aforesaid being of sound and disposing mind and memory, but weak in body, and calling to mind the uncertainty of life, and being desirous to dispose of such worldly Estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with, do make and ordain this my last Will in manner following, that is to say: I give to my son William Burdit, and my two daughters now living with me, Molly and Ailsey Burditt, the plantation and tract of land whereon I now live, together with the Horses, Cows, Hogs and stock of every kind, Household and Kitchen furniture, plantation Tools, Waggon & Reins [geirs?] and Blacksmiths Tools, to them for their material benefit and support so long as they all live together but should either or both of my daughters above named marry or be disposed to seperate and leave the place, then and in that case it is my will that she or they take such part of my personal property as shall be her or their equal distributive share, and that the tract of land remain my son William[’s] in fee simple forever after his two sisters, Molly and Ailsey have married, died or other wise left him, provided, however, that my son William Burditt should die before his two sisters Molly and Ailsey, having no law full issue, then the said tract of land to remain the property of the daughters during their natural life time and at their death to be sold and the monies arising therefrom to be equally divided among the whole of my children or their lawful representatives share and share alike. I give to my grand daughter Ailsey Gray a certain Red cow and calf which she now claims, Eight head of sheep, and the bed and furniture which she has always claimed. And lastly, I do constitute and appoint my son William Burditt and Robert Hand Senr. Executors of this my last Will and testament by me heretofore made. In testamony whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal this thirtieth day of November 1826. Frederick (his x mark) Burditt Seal Signed, sealed, published and declared as and for the last will and testament of the above named Frederick Burditt in presence of us Thos. Wright Arch. Young John Harriss.

State of South Carolina} Laurens District} Personally appeared before me Archibald Young, John Harriss & Thomas Wright who being sworn as the law directs made oath they saw Frederick Burditt Execute the within instrument as his last Will and that they in the presence of Each other and in the presence of the testator subscribed as witnesses to the same sworn to before me the 16th day of March, One Thousand Eight Hundred and forty one. W. D. Watts O.L.D. [Ordinary of Laurens District] Archd. Young John Harriss Ths. Wright 

South Carolina} Laurens District} To W. D. Watts Ordinary of said District. The Petition of William Burditt showeth that Frederick Burditt late of said District recently died having first Executed his last will in which he names your Petitioner as one of his Executors, he therefore prays that you would grant him a citation to have the said will proven in solemn form and your Petitioner will pray &tc. This 1 March 1841. William (his x mark) Burditt 

South Carolina} Laurens District} Whereas William Burdett has made suit to me to have the will of Frederick Burdett proven in solemn form. Then and there fore to Cite and admonish all and singular the Kindred and Creditors of the late Frederick Burdett said to be and appear before me Archibald Young on the sixteenth day of March Inst. to show cause if any they can why the said will should not be proven and letters Testamentary granted to William Burdett who is named as one of the Executors to said will. Given under my hand & seal this the 1st March 1841 W. D. Watts O.L.D. State of South Carolina,} Laurens District.} Warrant of Appraisement By W. D. Watts Ordinary of said district [O.L.D.]. These are to authorize and empower you, or any three or four of you, whose names are here under written, to repair to all such parts and places within this State, as you shall be directed unto by William Burditt Excr. of the goods and chattels, rights and credits of Frederick Burditt deceased, wheresoever any of the said goods and chattels are or do remain within the said parts and places, and which shall be shown unto you by the said William Burditt and there view and appraise all and every the said goods and chattels, being first duly sworn on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, to make a true and perfect inventory and appraisement thereof, and to cause the same to be returned under your hands, or any three or four of you, unto the said William Burditt on or before the 16th day of May next.Witness W. D. Watts Esquire, Ordinary of the said district, the 16th day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty one and in the Sixty fifth year of American Independence. To Messrs. Benjamin Martin Jesse Gray James B. Higgins & David Higgins

Memorandum — That on the fifth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty one personally appeared before me Thomas Wright, one of the Magistrates assigned to keep the peace in Sd. District, Jesse Gray, James B. Higgins and David Higgins being three of the appraisers appointed to appraise the goods and chattels of Frederick Burditt late of Laurens District deceased, who being duly sworn, made oath that they would make a just and true appraisement of all and singular, the goods and chattels of the said Frederick Burditt deceased, and that they would return the same, certified under their hands, unto the said William Burditt on or before the of 16th of May next. Sworn the day and year above written, before me, Thos. Wright, M. for L. D.

Wright was a magistrate for Laurens District. The appraisement, which lists the following items and their value, was provided to William Burditt by Jesse Gray, James B. Higgins and David Higgins. 

Stock of hogs — cattle and sheep $55.50 Waggon & gear and 1 lot of waggon … 11.00 1 lot of Carpenters tools — grindstone &tc. 5.00 1 lot of plantation tools — drawing chains & log chains 14.25 1 cutting knife & box — oats — Riddle &tc. 3.00 1 stack of fodder & 1 lot of corn 24.00 1 gray Mare 60.00 1 lot of baskets & old irons 2.00 Bacon – Lard and barrels 32.00 Cupboard & furniture 1 lot of books & 2 tables 18.00 9 sitting chairs – 1 box and lot of bed clothing 23.00 2 beds – bedsteads & furniture 20.00 Shoe makers tools – shot gun & pouch 1 saddle & bridle 9.00 1 trunk & 1 can & bottles 3.00 1 lot of sundries (up stairs) 9.25 Castings – tin ware – pewter – knives forks &tc. 28.12 1 Loom & apparatus 5.00 Kitchen dresser & cupboard 2.00 Jugs – jars – sieve – gun powder – shots &tc. 6.00 1 half bushel measure – boxes – barrels – wheat & salt 7.00 4 sitting chairs & candlestick 2.60 1 lot of blacksmith tools – jointers – chisels & gouges 14.00 one note due the 25 of December next for one tract of land 236 acres 40.00 Total $708

After William, Ailsey and Mary Ann “Molly” died, Frederick’s estate, administered by son John Burdett, was sold in 1873 and the proceeds were distributed among the surviving heirs of Frederick’s other deceased children who could be identified and located: Henry, John, Margaret and Reuben Burdett. Some heirs at law, including Nathan B. Burditt, Eliza Ann Curry, Frederick Burditt and others not named–contested the administration of John Burdett of his father’s estate on Jan. 28, 1873, in Laurens County, but lost the lawsuit. A notice naming the three contesting heirs and “others,” advising them John would settle the estate by court order, was published on Feb. 1873. The distribution of the estate, amounting to $1,744.24, was settled March 21, 1873. Part of the settlement was recorded March 22 in Laurens. There were two sales for Frederick’s personal estate. The first sale on July 11, 1876, generated $320.64. The second sale on Oct. 10, 1876, generated $1,555.81. Purchasers listed include Wesley Burdett, who bought 1 lot of clothing & Bible and other items; John Burdett, a spinning wheel and other items; Elizabeth Burton, “2 smoothing irons” and a bed and furniture and other items; Peter Waddle, chairs and axes; Ivory Curry, smith tools, dried fruit, two trunks, chairs, two looking glasses, clothing, other items; and Jesse Burditt, “1 Bibell” and clothing. Frederick’s son William entered the will for probate in Laurens Co., S.C., Court on March 1, 1841. The court issued a warrant of appraisement on estate of Frederick Burditt April 5, 1841, in Laurens. 

Decree Whereas the names of many of the parties interested in this Estate are unknown to the Court – It is Ordered Decreed that the said Estate be divided as follows. One Share to the Children and representative of Henry Burdett decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of John Burditt decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of Margaret Gray decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of Reuben Burdett decd. according to their respective rights. March 21st 1873. Given under my hand and Seal of Office C. Lark Judge of Probate Court L. C.

The settlement documents indicate four shares of Frederick’s estate, each amounting to $436.46, were to be paid out by John Burdett. The names of the recipient heirs, “unknown by the court,” are not documented in the specific estate record. The documents indicate Frederick’s coffin, made by J. M. Riddle, cost $6.00. Property taxes for Frederick’s land amounted to $9.75. The estate paid an attorney, B. W. Ball, a total of $50.00. Probate fees to Laurens County amounted to $12 in 1873. A number of other payments were made to individuals for debts and services rendered.

1775 SC Map.jpg

South Carolina Map 1775: Frederick and Marianne lived in Ninety-Six District

Marianne and Frederick in South Carolina

   Frederick was living in Ninety-Six (Laurens) District in 1775, according to the aforementioned deed written and recorded there. Since Frederick and Marianne’s first child was born there in 1776, she probably was living with him there in 1775 as well. Her brother Henry Bramlett III was in the same area in 1776-1780: later Georgia census records indicate he had a child, daughter Margaret, born in South Carolina in 1776, and his stated residence in the 1780 Bramlett land resurvey recorded in Virginia is “Laurens Dist., S.C.” Marianne’s Aunt Elizabeth and Uncle William Bramblett and family, who moved to South Carolina by 1773 when their royal land grant from Gov. William Bull and King George III was surveyed, also lived nearby. Revolutionary War pension records indicate Marianne’s brother Reuben Bramlett, one of the three first cousins with that given name born in the same generation in Fauquier County, was stationed for three months in South Carolina on the Indian Line as a soldier during the war in 1780 or 1781; however 1787, the birth year of Reuben’s second son Henry, is the first definite date of his residency in South Carolina. Later census records indicate at least two of Reuben’s children were born in South Carolina: Henry in 1787 and Nathan in 1799. (Reuben later moved into Christian Co., Ky., circa 1801 and then settled in 1818 in a portion of Gallatin Co., Ill., that later became Saline County in 1847.) Marianne’s brother John went to Laurens County from Fauquier County circa 1785. Marianne’s brother Nathan may have gone to South Carolina at the same time, but was definitely in Laurens County by 1789 when he bought land there. Laurens County census records indicate Marianne also may have had at least two or three other sisters who moved in South Carolina with their mother, Margaret, by 1790. Marianne’s mother, Margaret, bought land adjacent to Nathan’s farm in 1791.

   Frederick’s name first appears in existing Laurens County records in that December 1775 deed: “Fredk. Burdett” and “Wm. Bramlet” (Marianne’s uncle) witnessed the deed on Dec. 10-11, 1775, when their neighbor William Vaughn, a “planter of Craven Co, Prev, of S.C.,” and his wife, Barbara Vaughn, sold two hundred acres of land on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River in Laurens District to John Stone (DB-C:159). The land was part of a 400-acre grant to William Vaughn on Jan. 16, 1772. The Vaughns owned land adjacent to Marianne’s Uncle William Bramblett’s 1773 William Bull land grant property. (The “William Bramlet” who witnessed the 1775 deed most likely is the owner of the 1773 loyal and grant and Frederick’s uncle by marriage, the brother of Marianne’s father, Henry Bramlett Jr.) Frederick Burdett and William Bramlet may have been signing as witnesses for John Stone. Stone’s land also adjoined the property that Margaret Bramlett, Henry Jr.’s widow, bought in Laurens County in 1791. Stones, who moved to South Carolina from Fauquier Co., Va., also were early members of Bramlett Methodist Church. They may be related to the Bramlett family in some way. William Thompson also witnessed the 1775 deed, probably for the Vaughns. The deed was recorded April 27, 1790, in Laurens County. To legally witness a deed in 1775, Frederick had to have been at least age 21, thus born in/before 1754, which is consistent with his documented birth year: 1753. “Fredk. Burdett” also witnessed a deed in Laurens County on Nov. 28, 1789, when Richard Fowler and wife, Debby, sold Nathan Bramlett his 225 acres of land “where sd N. B. now lives” on “Zeack’s” Branch (Beaverdam Creek) of Enoree River for “45 pounds proclamation money” (DB-C:131). The land was originally granted to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789. Other witnesses: William Stone, relationship unknown, and Reuben Bramlett (most likely the brother-in-law of Frederick and brother of Nathan Bramlett and Marianne, who went on to Kentucky and settled in Illinois, since Reuben Jr., son of Reuben Sr., did not move to the area until 1794). The deed was recorded March 16, 1790.)

Frederick’s Revolutionary War Service

   Frederick served as a soldier in the South Carolina Militia during the Revolutionary War before Charlestown fell in 1780. His company and unit and rank are unknown. Col. Robert Anderson, the officer and district commissioner who took Frederick’s claim for his Audited Account and signed the return for Frederick’s pay bill in 1785, “mistakenly destroyed” the pay receipts, reporting only the totals on his report to the auditor, according to Wade Dorsey at South Carolina Dept. of Archives and History; so the name of Frederick’s commander, which may have been written on the pay receipts, and his unit and rank were not recorded. Frederick has not yet been found on muster rolls. Frederick did not apply for a pension, so his service details are limited to sparse information in a few sources. His unit and rank are not yet documented. “Frederick Burdit” is included as a Revolutionary War soldier who performed duty in the South Carolina Militia, before the fall of Charles Town. This information was reported in loose papers found in the South Carolina State House in Columbia, S.C., according to “The Revolutionary Rolls,” published in installments by the South Carolina Secretary of State in The State newspaper beginning on Sunday, Oct. 9, 1904. Frederick Burdit and William Burdet are listed in the 22nd installment of the Rolls: “Burditt, Frederick, militia duty before the fall of Charleston” on May 12, 1780, [no unit or rank given] and “Burdet, Wm., 101 day’s militia duty on horseback in Capt. John Willson’s Company in 1779” (20).

Frederick Burdett Rev ServiceRev War 7 page 20 Burdetts (1)Installment 22 of “The Revolutionary Rolls” in The State Newspaper, courtesy James T. Hammond from the South Carolina State Library, Columbia, S.C.

   The introductory paragraph of “The Revolutionary Rolls” explains that the names of the soldiers on the rolls are of men who fought in South Carolina under three legendary militia generals, pictured below: Francis Marion “The Swamp Fox,” Thomas Sumter “The Carolina Gamecock,” and Andrew Pickens “The Wizard Owl.”

(It is the purpose of The State to publish from time to time the names of the soldiers of the Revolutionary war, as they have been culled from the quantity of loose documents discovered by Secretary of State Gantt in the State house. It was thought for many years that the names of the men who fought under Marion, Sumter and Pickens had been lost; it is hoped that these papers will in a large measure restore them. While these rolls will be far from complete, they will be of no little interest to the people of South Carolina of this generation, and will at least preserve the names, and the records of some of the deeds of our ancestors. These records have been edited by and are published under the supervision of the secretary of state.) (The State, 20)

   Frederick’s military service in the South Carolina Militia is documented in Stub Entries to Indents issued in Payment of Claims Against South Carolina Growing Out of the Revolution, edited by A. S. Salley Jr., Secretary of the South Carolina Historical Commission, and printed for the commission by the State Company, Columbia, S.C., in 1917 (p. 168).

No. 390 Book S} Issued the 16 of June 1785 to Mr. Fredereck Burdit for Three Pounds one Shilling and five Pence Sterling for Duty done in the Militia as Pr. [Per] Account Audited. –Principal £3,, 1 — 5 — Annual Interest £0,, 4,, 3 — (168)

Records courtesy South Carolina Dept. of Archives and History. Frederick’s service also is documented in Accounts Audited of Claims Growing Out of the Revolution in actual pay records in South Carolina Archives: Pay Stub entry Book S, No. 390, N: 46 issued June 16, 1785, indicates South Carolina paid

“Mr. Frederick Burdit” his acco[un]t of Militia duty before the reduction of Charlestown amo[un]t[in]g to Curr[ent Money] £21.10.0 [Sterling] £3.1.5 Three Pounds One Shilling and Five Pence Sterl[in]g, Exd, T. W. McAgee (Accounts Audited 912, SCDAH Film RW2700, frames 328-330)

Charleston fell on May 5, 1780. Payment was based on Col. (Robert) Anderson’s return.

 

 Historian Bobby Gilmer Moss in Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution, writes about Frederick Burdit and William Burdet (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1985. Vol. I: 123). This same information is documented in Accounts Audited of Claims Growing Out of the Revolution, cited above, and in the 1904 Columbia State newspaper “Patriot List” of names created from Loose Papers in the Columbia Statehouse, and in copies of actual militia pay bills duplicated in SCDAH:

 “Frederick Burdit: He served in the militia before the fall of Charleston. A.A. 912 [Accounts Audited]; [Book] S [No.] 390; (South Carolina Microfilm RW2700, Frames 328-330); [Source] C.S. [Columbia State newspaper]” and “William Burdet: He served in the Militia on horseback under Capts. John Willson and Hugh Wardlaw during 1779 and 1780. A.A. 911 [Accounts Audited]; [Book] I [No.] 607; (South Carolina Microfilm RW2700, Frames 325-327); [Source] C.S. [Columbia State newspaper].

   Loose papers in the South Carolina State House at Columbia indicate one “William Burdet” (possibly Frederick’s brother) served “101 days militia duty…on horseback….” as a private in Capt. John Willson’s Company and Capt. Hugh Wardlaw’s Company during Sept. 11, 1779, to June 16, 1780 (The State 1904). Transcript of the actual pay stub records, microfilmed by South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, follows:

“State So Carolina Dr. [Deliver/delivered] to William Burdet for 101 days Toward duty from four differ[en]t Pay Bills of Capt. [John] Willson performd alternately from Sept. 11th 1779 untill June 16th 1780 vizt on horseback *38 days — £38* [plus] 42 do — 42 [plus] 4 do — 4 [plus] 17 do — 17 [Total] 101 days Stlg 14.8.6 3/4 *This 38 Days to Capt. [Hugh] Wardlaw’s Pay Bill.” 

The transcript of the second page:

“[No.] 607 – 31 Decr 1784 Mr. William Burdet his acco[un]t. of 101 Days Militia Duty as Private on Horseback for four Bills Pay Rolls of Capt. H. Wardlaw’s perform[e]d alternately from Sept. Eleventh to June 16, 1780…pay 101 Days £288 … 14.8.6 3/4 Fourteen Pounds, Eight Shillings & Six Pence three Shillings Sterling – Exd. T. W. J. McAgee” (SCAR Microcopy 8 Roll 16 Record 911). [Figures written and e page:] 288.6 3/4 (minus) 20.09.11 1/4 (minus) 12 (equals) 239.

  Researchers calculate the birth year of William Burdett as circa 1755, which would make him a contemporary of Frederick, who was born in 1753. Although they lived in the same general area of South Carolina, present-day Edgefield and Laurens in Ninety-Six District, it is not known if the two men knew of or were related to each other. This William Burdett, known by descendants as William Reese Burditt/Burdett, is believed to be son of Averilla DeLoach and Giles Burditt/Burdett. (Averilla Deloach was born circa 1746 in Craven Dist., S.C., the daughter of Judith and William Deloach Jr. Averilla died there circa 1785.

William Reese Burdett’s children include Jesse S., Mary Burdett Crain, Giles Burdett, William Reese Burdett Jr. William Reese Burdett received three land grants in present-day Edgefield County, Ninety-Six District, S.C. He apparently then moved east to Bedford Co., Tenn., where he died Sept. 5, 1834. One scrap of history in the Orangeburg-Berkeley-Craven, S.C., Tri-County area includes a 1773 map that shows a place called “Bourdet” near the Santee River in Amelia Township of Berkeley County and a place called “Burdell’s Tavern,” which has historical significance. Berkeley County is northeast of Downtown Charleston, S.C.; and part of Berkeley County actually is geographically located within the city limits of Charleston, S.C. The connection between Bourdet and Burdell’s Tavern is not yet known. The website Global Gazetteer of the American Revolution, which refers to “Burdell’s Tavern,” indicates it is where American General Nathaniel Greene camped with his troops on Sept. 9 and Oct. 7, 1781, during the Southern Campaign of the American Revolution.

Burdell’s Tavern location: Not yet known

Bourdet’s location

Bourdet TavernOne John Burdell (or Burdett, if the scribe forgot to “cross the Ts”), perhaps a contemporary/brother? of William Reese Burdett, lived in that general area in Orangeburg County in the 1770-1780s. The Bourdet place is noted again in a different South Carolina map below showing Berkeley County, adjacent to and east of Orangeburg County, in 1773. See Bourdet next to, below, the words Santee River, above the K and L in Berkley.

Bourdet Map3

   Frederick acquired a state land grant in Laurens County in 1786. Land at that time was like gold, an investment and livelihood, the means to farm for crops to market, to feed livestock and grow food for the family table. The grant, according to Wade Dorsey at SCDAH, is not a bounty grant for Frederick’s Revolutionary War service. The grant merely allowed Frederick to purchase the land. The land is located near property owned by Marianne’s relatives who settled there in 1773-1774 and later in 1789-90. 

Frederick and Marianne’s land, located on this map slightly south and east of where Marianne’s mother, Margaret “Peggy” Bramlett, and brother Nathan Bramlett lived in 1789-90 and where Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church was and still is located. Marianne’s sister or cousin Sarah Bramlett and husband, Nicholas Ware Garrett, and her aunt and uncle Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett had also settled in the area, the latter in 1773-74. Nicholas Garrett’s land also is designated on the above map. He is son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett and brother of William Garrett who married Nancy Bramlett, possibly another sister or cousin of Marianne. Henry Bramlett III, brother of Marianne, may have obtained a post-war land grant in 1792 southwest of the other Bramlett properties in Laurens County and lived there before he relocated his family to Elbert Co., Ga.

Frederick and Marianne Burdette lived near Bramlett Church, shown in top left grid, and close to land owned by her brother Nathan Bramlett and mother, Margaret Bramlett. Frederick’s land, granted Dec. 4, 1786, is farther right, above Beaverdam Creek, south of Enoree River, north of William and Elizabeth Bramblett’s 1773 property. 

Frederick’s Land Grant

State of South-Carolina, To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting: Know Ye, That for and in Consideration of Four Pounds ten Shillings & 2 Pe[nce] Sterling Money, paid by Frederick Burdit into the Treasury for the use of this State, We have granted, and by these Presents do grant unto the said Frederick Burdit Heirs and Assigns, a Plantation or Tract of Land, containing One hundred and ninety three Acres Situate in the District of ninety six, on a Branch of Enoree River having such Shape, Form and Marks, as are represented by a Plat hereunto annexed, together with all Woods, Trees, Waters, Watercourses, Profits, Commodities, Appurtenances, and Heriditaments whatsoever thereunto belonging, To have and to hold the said Tract of One hundred and ninety three Acres of Land, and all and singular other the Premises hereby granted unto the said Frederick Burdit his Heirs and Assigns, for ever, in free and common Soccage. Given under the Great Seal of the State. Witness, his Excellency William Moultrie Esquire, Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the said State, at Charleston, this fourth Day of December Anno Domini, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty six and in the Eleventh Year of the Independence of the United States of America. William L. M. S. Moultrie And hath thereunto a Plat thereof annexed, representing the same, certified by F. Bremar Surveyor-General. 27th March 1786. (Vol. 13, p. 95)

Property owned by “Frederick Burdit” is mentioned as a landmark on a plat recorded for James Higgins in Laurens Co., S.C., in 1788. Higgins purchased 79 acres on Beaverdam Creek, Enoree River, Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., near land grant property previously surveyed for and owned by William Bramblett in 1773. The Higgins land was surveyed from a warrant dated May 24, 1788, by James Wofford on Sept. 24, 1788. The plat was recorded Sept. 3, 1798 (SCDAH S213190:23:240:2). The plat also references three acres of cultivated land and two cabin houses in the possession of Jesse Higgins.

James Higgins Land

Frederick’s 1786 land grant property is mentioned as a landmark in two deeds recorded in 1800 in Laurens County. One deed dated Dec. 17, 1800, when Isaac Lindsay sold 50 acres of land on the Pan Trough Branch of Enoree River to Moses Biter, indicates “Fetherick Burdett” and others owned adjacent land (DB-G:129). The land was also bounded by property owned by Edward Lindsay, James Higgins and Thompson Farley; and the deed indicates it was part of an original grant to Steen, J. (John) Lindsay, Brown and Cannon. William Higgins and Edward Lindsay witnessed the deed, which was recorded Dec. 18, 1800. Frederick and Marianne’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed dated Dec. 18, 1800, when Edward Lindsay and wife, Catey, sold 46 acres of land on the south side of Enoree River to Ezekiel Lindsay (DB-G:515). The land, part of a tract conveyed by John Lindsay to Edward, Isaac and Ezekiel Lindsay, was bounded by property owned by “Fredk. Burdet” and Ephraim Moore and Thompson Farley. Ephraim Moore, Elizabeth Moore and Isaac Lindsay witnessed the deed, which was recorded Nov. 29, 1802 (DB-G:515). “Fredk. Burdett” witnessed a deed in Laurens County on April 23, 1801, when Nathan and Elizabeth Gray Bramlett sold their nephew John Burdett 100 acres of land for 25 pounds (DB-O:199). The deed was not recorded until April 6, 1844, after Nathan and Elizabeth had died. The land, located on the south side of the Enoree River, was part of an original grant by Gov. Charles Pinckney to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789, and then sold to Nathan Bramlett that year. In 1801 it was bounded by property owned by Elias Stone, (Amos?) Critchfield and Margaret Bramlett (Nathan and Marianne’s mother), “along stony ridge.” Samuel Ansley and Zachariah Gray also witnessed the 1801 Bramlett-Burdett deed.

   Frederick was a trustee and member at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church near Young’s Store northeast of Gray Court, S.C., in 1807. “Fredk. Burdett” was one of three trustee recipients mentioned in a deed written June 2, 1807, when Nathan Bramlett and George Sims granted the trustees and the church “for the sum of five dollars” two acres of land “near Enoree River on Zaks Creek for the purpose of securing a Meeting House thereon, standing and to remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church…” (DB-H:235). (“Zak’s” or Zeak’s, Ezekiel’s, Creek is part of, known as Beaverdam Creek.) The other trustees listed are Joel Fowler and Raughley Stone. Frederick Burdett signed (made his mark on) the deed as recipient; and his son John Burditt and Benjamin Tradewell, a neighbor or possibly relative, witnessed the deed. Frederick’s son John Burditt also signed the deed and agreed to deliver it to his father when it was recorded July 6, 1807, by John Garlington, Register’s Office, of Laurens District.

Frederick and Marianne in Census Data

   Frederick may or may not be the “Frederick Burt,” Free white male of 16 years and upward, who is listed in the First U.S. Census for Ninety-Six (Laurens) Dist., S.C., in 1790. He headed a family that includes four free white females (wife, Marianne, and three daughters Margaret, born 1781; Mary Ann “Molly,” born 1784; and Elizabeth, born 1786) and three free whie males under age 16 years (three sons John, born 1776; Henry, born 1778; and Reuben, born 1787). Other children were born after 1790. “Frederick Burdict,” 45 and over, born before 1755, is listed in the 1800 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over, born before 1755 (wife, Marianne); two females 16-26, born 1774-84 (daughters Margaret and Mary Ann “Molly”); a male 16-26, born 1774-84 (nephew? son-in-law?); a female 10-16, born 1784-90 (daughter Elizabeth); a male 10-16, born 1784-90 (son William); a female under 10, born 1790-1800 (daughter Alcey/Ailsey); and one male under 10, born 1790-1800 (son Jesse). Sons John, Henry and Reuben Burdett, married and were living away from home, are listed as heads of their own families in 1800. “Fredrick Burdit,” 45 and over, born in/before 1765, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over (wife, Marianne), and four children: a male 16-26, born 1784-94 (son Jesse or William), and three females 16-26, born 1784-94 (daughters Mary Ann “Molly,” Elizabeth, Alcey/Ailsey) (NARA Film M252:61:88). Frederick is not listed as head of his family in 1820. (Frederick Burtz in 1820 is a different person.) “Fred Burdett,” 70-80, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 70-80 (wife, Marianne) and three grown children: a male 40-50 (son William), a female 30-40 (daughter Mary Ann “Molly”) and a female 15-20 (daughter Alcey/Ailsey) (NARA Film M19:169:275). “Frederick Burdett,” 80-90, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Laurens County as head of a family that includes two females 40-50 (daughters Mary Ann “Molly” and Alcey/Ailsey) and a male 40-50 (son William) (NARA Film M704:513:15).

   An excerpt in South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research indicates “Frederick Burditt” and sons John and Henry as well as several others, including Frederick’s brother-in-law Nathan Bramlett, foreman, and (Frederick’s son-in-law?) Hezekiah Gray, were called to a Laurens District Coroner’s Inquisition on Feb. 6, 1815, to “view the body of Daniel Bragg found dead and drowned in Enoree River” and find out “when where how and after what manner the s’d D. Brag[g] came to his death.” The report, filed two days later in Laurens District Court by Coroner William Irby, indicates Bragg, “in striving to save a negroe man he got drowned” (SCMAR 197). The same panel members were asked to “View the body of a negro man drowned on the plantation of Daniel Bragg” on the same day and report the manner of death. The report, filed two days later in Laurens District, indicated “Negroe George the property of Daniel Brag[g] came to his death…in crossing Enoree River” Feb. 5, 1815, when he “got wash’d off his horse and got drowned” (SCMAR 24-4:198).

Illustration from Jesse Bramlett Burdett’s Family Bible

Burdette Bible Title Page

Family Bibles

Inscriptions for Frederick and Marianne and their children were transcribed Feb. 19, 1950, by the late Helen A. (Gossett) Burdette, wife of the late Melvin Louis Burdette Sr., from a small Burdette Bible owned by the late Thomas Oscar Burdette. The inscriptions came from an older Bible. The small Burdette Bible was then, in 1950, in possession of Toy Donald Burdette. Helen shared her 1950 transcript with Franklin Donald Burdette, who, with Melvin Louis Burdette Jr., contributes the information to this history.

 

Burdett Bible Cover USE

Bible cover and pages courtesy Melvin Louis Burdette Jr. 

Following inscriptions are from the larger existing Burdette Bible, originally owned by Jesse and Agness Burdett, given to Thomas O. and Victoria Burdette, passed down to Toy D. and Maggie Burdette, then to Melvin Louis Sr. and Helen Burdette, then to Melvin Louis Burdette Jr., and to his son. The Bible is preserved in a sealed air-tight container and fire-proof safe.

MEMORANDA

Frederick Burdett was born Oct. 15th 1753 and died Feb. 10th 1841.

Marian Burdett was born Sep. 15th 1752 and died March 8th 1834.

John Burdett was born Feb. 4th 1776 and died March 11th 1859.

Henery Burdett was born Sep. 5th 1778 and died May 29th 1853.

Margaret Burdett was born Dec. 3d 1781.

May (Mary Ann) Burdett was born May 22d 1784 and died Nov. 13th 1867.

Reubin Burdett was born Nov. 26th 1787 and died Jan. 18th 1862.

Elizabeth Burdett was born Sep. 1st 1786 and died May 17th 1871.

William Burdett was born Jan. 18th 1790 and died Feb. 3d 1860.

Alcy Burdett was born March 18th 1793 and died May 28th 1871.

Jessee Burdett was born Oct. 18th 1795. (No death date)

Burdette Bible USE Memoranda
Jesse Bramlett Burdette Bible pages courtesy Melvin Louis Burdett Jr. See transcripts below in Jesse’s history.

Burdett Bible Births

Burdette Bible USE Deaths

Burdette BIBLE USE Marriages

Children of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette

   Some of Frederick and Marianne’s nine children may have been named after her parents and siblings and other relatives: John after Marianne’s brother, Henry after Marianne’s father, Henry Bramlett Jr., and her brother Henry Bramlett III and grandfather Henry Sr.; Margaret after Marianne’s mother, Margaret “Peggy” (unknown); and Frederick Reuben in part perhaps after Marianne’s brother Reuben Bramlett who settled in Gallatin Co., Ill. Jesse and Ailsey are given names in the allied Gray family and Jesse is a name used by the family of Marianne’s brother Henry Bramlett III. Mary Ann “Molly” was named after Marianne herself. Two other children–Elizabeth and William–may be named after Marianne’s paternal aunt and uncle or her great-grandfather William Bramlett I/Sr., or after Frederick’s family members.

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A Complete Map Sketch of Laurens County S. C. By Kyzer & Hellams, dated 1883, shows the area where Marianne and Frederick’s 193-acre tract is located and shows Bramlett Church with neighbors, including Mrs. A. Burdette, Mrs. E. A. Burdette and Rev. Burdette.

Mystery Burdette House: A photo owned by Carrie Purchase Burdette Curry but not labeled may be of a family house in South Carolina. Carrie’s granddaughter Martha Anne Curry Duke believes, since the picture was saved with other family photos, the modest home depicted in the image must have been owned by one of Carrie’s ancestors, perhaps her father, Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, a farmer and Methodist preacher in Laurens County during hard economic times for many years after the Civil War/War Between the States.

Burdette house USE
Mystery Burdette house, owner and date unknown, most likely in Laurens Co., S.C., courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke

Possible Burdette Connection

Frederick Burdette who married Marianne Bramlett may be related to John Burditt, exact origins unknown, named in the transport record below, who came to America from Middlesex, England, in 1728. More research is needed. This John settled in Prince William (later Fauquier) Co., Va.

   John Burdett is included on Taxpayer Lists in 1751-1755 and on the 1765 Tithable List in Index to People Records in Prince William County, Virginia, in Hamilton Parish, by Greg Mason. (That portion of Prince William became Fauquier County in 1759. Henry Bramlett Sr., believed to be grandfather of Marianne Bramlett Burdette, is documented as being a resident of Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, in 1735 and most likely until he died circa 1752-1759.) One other Burdett, Frederick, likely born in the 1730s, is included by the same source, Mason’s People Records, as being on the 1758 rent roll in Hamilton Parish, Prince William County. The same surname and close geographical proximity suggest he may be related to John Burdett. The younger Frederick Burdette, born 1753, who married Marianne Bramlett either in Virginia or South Carolina, may be a nephew or other relative to the elder Frederick born in the 1730s. DNA matches suggest the younger Frederick may be biologically related to John Burdett who was transported in 1728 and also related to William Burdette who lived in Edgefield Dist., S.C., during the American Revolution.

 

Burdett Convict

The record indicates John Burditt, who was in debtor’s prison for the “horrible crime” of failure to pay a coal bill, was transported to Virginia or Maryland in America from Middlesex, England, in 1728.

  One source, Steven Braun, submitted pedigree resource files to Family Search.org for several Burdettes, including John referenced above, and his son James Burdette, whom Braun designates as father of Frederick Burdette (1753-1841), husband of Marianne Bramlett.

Braun, Steven. “Frederick Reuben Burdette.” The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, “Pedigree Resource File,” database, Family Search (http://familysearch. org/ark:/61903/2:2:373[Bk7 : accessed 2017-09-01), entry for Frederick Reuben /Burdette/.
 
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Henry Bramblett III, Son of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr.

Generation 5

Henry Bramlett III and Elizabeth Moss

(Children: Reuben, Margaret, John, Lott, Elizabeth, Emeline Emelia, Nathan, Mary Ann)

Henry Bramlett III served as a Soldier during the American Revolution

6d9ed-virginia2bseal
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

HENRY BRAMLETT III, eldest surviving son in 1780 of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born circa 1755-56 in a portion of Prince William Co., Va., that later became Fauquier County in 1759. Henry died between 1828 and 1830, most likely in Elbert Co., Ga., where he and his family were living. He may have been buried there in a local Methodist Church cemetery or on land he owned in Elbert County or in a nearby private cemetery. The location of his grave is unknown. He married Elizabeth Moss before 1775 in Virginia or South Carolina. Her maiden name is provided by descendant of her son Nathan. Elizabeth’s given name appears in census data and land records. She was born circa 1755-1760, perhaps in South Carolina. She died after the 1840 census was taken and before the 1850 census, perhaps in Elbert, Franklin or Forsyth Co., Ga. Her burial place is unknown. They were living in Laurens Co., S.C., by 1776. Their son Reuben was born circa 1775, and their daughter Margaret was born in 1776 in South Carolina. Henry III served as a soldier during the American Revolution. Recorded documents indicate that as the eldest surviving son, Henry III inherited the plantation when his father died intestate. He returned to Virginia to claim the property in 1780 after Henry Jr. had died and then Henry III returned to South Carolina. He later sold the property in 1784.

Henry III’s Life in Virginia

   Henry III inherited his father’s Virginia plantation on Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County when Henry Jr. died in 1780. (Fauquier County deeds indicate Henry Bramlett Jr.’s 250-acre plantation originally was purchased by his father, Henry Bramlett Sr., a planter of King George Co., Va., in 1735, from a man named John Ambrose, also a planter in King George County. John Ambrose may have been a relative, perhaps a brother or father, of Henry Bramlett Sr.’s wife, whose name is unknown.) A resurvey of the plantation, implemented and recorded in Fauquier County in 1780, indicates Henry Jr. was already deceased at that time, and Henry III had already moved from the state. The deed indicates he was a resident of Laurens Co., S.C. Henry Jr. had died in or before 1780 intestate and a suicide, and his legal heir according to primogeniture, Henry III, was not in residence on the plantation in Virginia and not managing it when or after his father died, so the Lord of the Fee attempted to reclaim the land for the British Crown. Suicide, against the laws of man and God, was an illegal act that could have resulted in the loss of land for the surviving relatives. In this case, Henry III returned to Fauquier County and made a claim to the land as Henry Jr.’s eldest son and real heir. Some of Henry Jr.’s other sons–Reuben and John and most likely Nathan–were still living on the plantation with their mother, Margaret. Reuben, born in 1757, was old enough to manage the land; however, he and his brothers were not the eldest son and legal heir; and therefore they could not claim the land. Two of Henry III’s brothers, Reuben and John, served as chain carriers for the 1780 resurvey. Relatives of the landowner were usually involved in a resurvey since they knew the boundaries of the land and wanted to protect their interests by ensuring that all or most of the land was included. Fauquier County records indicate Henry III’s mother, Margaret, who continued to live on the plantation during 1780-84, paid the taxes on the property during 1782-84. Then Henry III sold the land to Ann and James Dobie/Dobey in 1784; and his mother, Margaret, moved to another nearby tract of land where she lived and paid taxes until she moved to Laurens Co., S.C., in 1790. Henry III’s place of residence on the 1784 Dobie/Dobey-Bramlett deed is noted as Ninety-Six (Laurens) District of South Carolina.

 
 
 
 

   A resurvey of his father’s former plantation, requested by Henry III after his father’s death, which was recorded in Fauquier County in 1780 with an accompanying plat map, documents Henry III and his brothers Reuben and John’s connection to the land, each other and thus to their father, Henry Bramlett Jr. The 1780 resurvey record mentions Henry III as the current new owner of the land, and their deceased father, “Henry Bramblett,” (Jr.) who died a suicide, as the former owner:

Northern Neck of Virginia. Lord Proprietor’s Office.To Mr. John Moffett–Whereas Henry Bramblett [III] of South Carolina hath set forth to this Office that there is a certain Tract of Land on the Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County containing by Estimation Two hundred and fifty Acres and formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett [Jr.], Father of Henry [III] aforesaid, which said Henry (the Father) [Jr.] died seized thereof in Fee simple but dying a Suicide the said Tract Escheated to the Lord of the Fee. And the Rules of the Office having been complied with as to issuing & affixing at the Court House of Fauquier County an Advertisement at three several Courts & no Person offering to shew Cause why the said Land should not be granted as Escheat to the said Henry Bramblett [III]. And the said Henry Bramblett [III] desiring a Warrant to resurvey the same in order to obtain an Escheat Deed being ready to pay the Composition & Office Fees. These are therefore to empower you to resurvey the said Land for the said Henry Bramblett [III] A Plat of which Resurvey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 5th Day of February next. Given under my Hand & the Office Seal the 5th Day of August 1780. B. Martin
Plat Map of Henry Bramblett’s [III] Land Area 231 Acres By virtue of a warrant from the Proprietors office to me Directed, I have surveyed for Henry Bramblett [III], of South Carolina, a tract of Land on Elk Marsh Run, in Fauquier County, formerly the Property of A Henry Bramblett [Jr.] father to the aforesaid Henry [III]; who dying a suicide, the said Land became Escheatable: the said Land being Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at a white oak corner to Jonas Williams, thence along the said Williams’s Line, S 31 E 60 Poles to B two Hicories, thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two Small hicories, thence N 35 1/2 W 21 6 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & Sundry saplings, thence Call 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G 2 small hicorys in the said Williams’s Line, thence along the same to the Beginning. Containing 231 Acres. J. Moffitt 20th Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett Chain Carriers

The above record is the only official documentation found so far for the biological connection between brothers Henry III, John and Reuben with their father, Henry Jr. (The Burditt Diary, a personal record of Bramlett Church history by an ordained minister and family member, also refers to brothers Henry III, John, Nathan, and their mother, Margaret, who occupied the plantation in the early 1780s and co-founded Bramlett Church in South Carolina.)

The First U.S. Census for Ninety-Six (Laurens) Dist., S.C., in 1790 lists “Henry Bromlet” (Henry III) living near his mother, “Margaret Bromlett,” and two of his brothers—“John Bramlett” and “Nathan Bromlett” as heads of families in their respective separate households. “Henry Bromlet” over age 16, is listed in 1790 with seven family members: four females (wife, Elizabeth and three daughters–Margaret, Emelia “Milly” and Elizabeth) and three males under 16, born circa 1774-90 (sons Reuben, John and Lott) (NARA Film M637:11:445:17).

    Henry III may have been the Henry Bramlett who obtained in 1792 a land grant of two hundred acres in Laurens District that had been surveyed Nov. 10, 1789, from Gov. Charles Pinckney. Peter Bremar, surveyor general, certified the plat on May 12, 1792: “South Carolina I do hereby Certify for Henry Bramlett a tract of Land containing Two Hundred Acres (Surveyed for him the 10th of November 1789) Situate in the District of Ninety six on Branches of Beaverdam Creek Waters of Enoree River & hath such form marks…& boundings as the above plat represents. Given under my hand this 12th of May 1792 J. W. Wofford D.S.} Bremar Survr Genl.”

The legal description indicates the land is located on Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River in Ninety-Six (Laurens) Dist., S.C., bounded on the east or southeast by land owned by John Travis and by vacant land on all other sides. The land is located southwest of property owned by other Bramletts in the county in the 1780s and 1790s. All or part of the land grant property probably was transferred or sold when Henry Bramlett III and family moved into Elbert Co., Ga., by 1801. Henry III later died intestate and no probate records have been found for him. No deed was recorded for a sale of the property; however, Lucey and William Couch, who had acquired at least half of the property, sold it to William Garrett on Feb. 24, 1809, and recorded a deed. Lucey and William Couch may be Henry III’s sister and brother-in-law. The deed indicates William Couch sold one hundred acres, part of a grant to Henry Bramblett by Gov. Charles Pinckney dated May 12, 1792, on a branch of Beaverdam Creek, waters of Enoree River, in Laurens District, to William Garrett for $125 on Feb. 24, 1809. The deed was recorded Aug. 7, 1809. P. (Peter?) Hammond and Jas. Couch, most likely a relative of William Couch, witnessed the deed. Lucey Couch signed the dower release. (DB-J:94). (William Garrett who bought the property most likely the husband of Nancy Bramlett, who may be Henry III’s sister, the daughter of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr.) No deed was recorded to show how the Couches first came into possession of the property. The sale was probably private, between family members, and the deed of the first sale, from Henry III to the Couches, was never recorded. Lucey and William Couch may have kept and continued to farm the other half of Henry III’s land grant for some time, since they are listed as Laurens County residents in 1810: William Couch, white male over 16-26, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 16-26 (wife, Lucey?) and two children: two males under 10 (NARA Film M252:61:35). Also enumerated is a white male over 45. One William Couch lived in Greenville County in 1820.

Reuben henry.jpg

Henry is not listed with his family in 1800; his son Reuben, white male 26-45, headed the family, including a female 45 and over (mother, Elizabeth), a female 16-26 (wife, Ailsey), another female 16-26 (sister Margaret), three females 10-16 (sisters Emelia “Milly” and Elizabeth and Mary Ann) and two males under 10 (brother Lott, son Jesse) in Laurens Co., S.C., in 1800 (NARA Film M:32:50:15). Henry III’s sons John and Nathan most likely accompanied him to Georgia.

Henry III and Elizabeth’s Life in Georgia

Henry III and Elizabeth and several of their grown children moved on from South Carolina between 1795 and 1800 to Elbert Co., Ga. He was gone before the 1800 census was taken in Laurens County, and Georgia land records indicate he bought land in Elbert County in or before 1801. “Henry Bramblet,” purchased 122 acres on Beaverdam Creek in Elbert Co., Ga., from Elisabeth and Eudosius Dozer Thornton for $400 on Jan. 2, 1801 (DB-G:104). The land adjoined property owned by John Ford (Henry’s brother-in-law), Colonel Appling, Benjamin Fanning and Benjamin Fortson and was bounded by Ridge Path, also known as Carter’s Old Path. Reuben Lindsay and Richmond T. Cosby on Sept. 5, 1801, witnessed the deed, which was acknowledged before Thomas Fortson, J.P., in Elbert County on Sept. 24, 1801, and registered by James Alston, J.P., on that same day. “Henry Bramblett” later sold this same property–122 acres adjoining land owned by John Ford (one of his in-laws), Long, Benjamin Fanning, and Benjamin Fortson and bounded by Ridge Path, also known as Carter’s Old Path–to William O. Robbins for $400 on Aug. 29, 1807 (DB-L:14). Henry Bramblet made his mark to sign the deed, which was recorded by Adam Gaar, J.P., on March 5, 1808. “Elizabeth Bramblet” made her mark to sign the deed in order to relinquish her dower rights to the property on Nov. 12, 1807, in court before Adam Gaar, J.P. Samuel Paxton and Plinney Robbins witnessed the deed in Elbert County on that same day.

   Henry then presumably moved and farmed 146 1/2 acres received as a land grant in the fall of 1807: James Angler of Elbert County appointed attorney Charles Henry of Elbert County “to execute a deed to Henry Bramblett for 146 1/2 acres at the head of Beaverdam Creek as soon as Bramblett procures a grant for same” on Sept. 24, 1807 (DB-K:199). Robert Kennedy, J.P., witnessed and registered the order on Sept. 29, 1807, in Elbert County. Henry III is listed in 1814-17 Elbert County tax records and in the 1820 Elbert County census. “Henry Bramlett,” white male over 45, is listed in the 1820 U.S. Census for Elbert Co., Ga., as head of a family that includes a female over 45 (wife, Elizabeth), and five others: three females 16-26, born 1794-1804, (daughters Emelia “Milly” and Mary Ann and daughter-in-law Jane “Jenny” Gober Bramlett), a male 26-45, born 1775-94, (son Lott), and a male 16-26, born 1794-1804, (son Nathan) (NARA Film M33:8:141). The 1820 Elbert County record shows marks for two others–males 10-16, born 1804-10–enumerated in Henry’s household, but they are smudged and may have been marked out. If they are indeed included, they may be grandsons, perhaps the two oldest sons of Reuben who was living in Franklin Co., Ga., in 1820. (Henry III and Elizabeth’s sons John and Reuben and their daughters Margaret and Elizabeth were married and living away from home by 1820. Nathan Bramlett and Jane Gober married in Franklin County early in 1820, but an 1820 Franklin County deed lists Nathan’s residence as Elbert County, indicating Nathan’s family probably lived with his parents briefly in 1820 until they moved on to Bradley Co., Tenn. However, their first child may not have been born until 1821. The children of John and his wife, Elizabeth Ford, are enumerated in the 1820 census with them in Elbert County.)

     Henry III had two draws each in the 1807, 1821 and 1827 Georgia Land Lotteries. Requirements for the 1806-07 lottery indicate he was at least age 21, had been living in Georgia for at least three years, and was married with at least one child under age 21: “Henry Bramblett,” of Captain Dunston Blackwell’s District in Major Richardson Hunt’s Battalion had two draws but did not win land in the lottery certified Aug. 26, 1806. In addition, three of Henry’s sons–John, Reuben and Lott–and either his mother or his daughter–Margaret–also had draws in the 1807 Georgia Land Lottery. The 1821 land lottery records indicate “Henry Brantlet,” who was living in Capt. Merritt’s District in Elbert County, had two draws but did not win land. Lottery records in 1827 show “Henry Bramblet” (III) was living in Captain Horton’s District and won land Muscogee and Lee counties (Houston, 1928). “Henry Bramblet” of Horton’s Dist., Elbert Co., Ga., drew Lot 63 in Section 1 of District 1 of Lee County. “Henry Bramblet R.S.” (Revolutionary War Soldier) of Horton’s Dist., Elbert Co., Ga., won Lot 161 in Section 2 of District 20 in Muscogee County. The deed for this property was written on Dec. 17, 1836.

    After Henry III moved from South Carolina into Elbert County in or shortly before 1800, he was included there as head of a family of eight (Henry III and wife, Elizabeth, and six children) on a list of Headrights and Bounty Warrants created Sept. 7, 1807. The list is included by historian Lucian Lamar Knight in his 1930 book, Georgia’s Roster of the Revolution” (337). “Henry Bramblet” received a Headright and Bounty Land Grant of four hundred acres in Elbert County in 1817 (Grant Book-L5:386). In addition, Henry III is identified as a Revolutionary War veteran in Georgia Land Lottery records. Knight also indicates that “Henry Bramblet” is included on a Certified List of Revolutionary War Soldiers compiled by Capt. B. F. Johnson from the Georgia Land Lottery list of 1827 (345). “Henry Bramblet,” Revolutionary Soldier, living in Capt. Hoarton’s Military District, Elbert Co., Ga., drew Lot 161 in District 20 of Muscogee County in the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery. The land was granted Dec. 17, 1836, and the deed was issued several years after Henry had died. “Henry Bramblett,” Revolutionary Soldier, living in Capt. Hoarton’s Military District, Elbert Co., Ga., also drew lot 63 in District 1 of Lee County in 1827. Henry III died between 1828-30, most likely in Elbert County between 1828, after the 1827 land lottery, and 1830 when his widow was named as head of the family in the Georgia census, “Elizabeth Bramblet,” 70-80, born 1750-60, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Elbert Co., Ga., with two other females age 20-30, born 1800-10, (daughters Emelia “Milly” and Mary Ann) and a male 30-40, born 1790-1800, (son Lott) in her household (NARA Film M19:17:135). “Elizabeth Bramblet,” Widow of a Revolutionary War Soldier living in Capt. Joel Bowers’ Dist., Elbert Co., Ga., had one draw in the 1832 Georgia Gold Lottery, according to William Longstreet in Historical Collections of Georgia (261). (“Levi Bramblet” of the same district, a grandson, also had one draw in that lottery.) “Elizabeth Bramblet” later sold the property she drew, Land Lot 531 in Section 2 of District 2 (located in Cherokee Co., Ga.), comprising forty acres more or less, to her son-in-law John Y. Gober of Forsyth Co., Ga., for $40 on Sept. 21, 1836 (DB-C:97). Elizabeth made her mark to sign the deed, which was recorded March 6, 1837, in Franklin County. Her daughter “Milly Bramblet” and Nelson Osbern/Osborn witnessed the deed before Job Bowers, J.P., in Franklin Co., Ga. Elizabeth and Henry III’s daughter Mary Ann headed the family in 1840: “Mary A. Bramlett,” 50-60, born 1780-90, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Dist. 194, Elbert Co., Ga., with a female 50-60, born 1780-90, (sister Emelia “Milly”), a male 50-60, born 1780-90, (brother Lott), and a female 80-90, born 1750-60, (mother, Elizabeth) (NARA Film M704:40:184).

Children of Henry Bramlett III and Elizabeth Moss

   Henry III and Elizabeth’s children include Reuben, Margaret, Daughter (Lucey?), John, Lott, Emeline (“Milly”), Elizabeth, Nathan, Mary Ann.

 Reuben Bramlett & Alsey his wife vs. Jesse Gray, administrator of John Gray decd. Washington District, South Carolina. complainants, of Franklin County, Georgia, petition for division of estate of John Gray, who died in Union District intestate in 1806. Possessed a considerable estate, tract of land in Union, two slaves, Rose and Pat, etc. He left a widow and her three minor children, together with nine children by a former wife to wit Alsey (your oratrix), John, William, Seth, Zachariah, Hezekiah, Jesse, Elizabeth the wife of Nathan Bramlett, and Jemima Bishop now a widow.” (Jemima’s husband, Nathan Bishop, is the brother of Martha Bishop who married Jesse Gray and brother of Rebecca Bishop, most likely the second wife of John Gray Sr., who married again after his first wife, Ailsey Hyatt/Green, died circa 1794-96.) Jesse Gray answered the lawsuit through his attorney on June 5, 1820: Jesse “obtained letters of administration and disposed of the estate of John Gray, decd, which was entirely personal, according to law. After he paid all debts, there was a balance against the estate of $3.76 1/4, which he paid out of his private funds. Exhibit A: Copy of [John Gray Sr.’s estate] Sale and other papers filed in Union Courthouse, certified by William Rice, Ordinary (Box 4, Package 49). Exhibit B: Copy of deed dated Feb. 20, 1805, Francis Fincher of Union District to Jesse Gray of same place for $300 all that plantation containing 148 acres on Enoree River…. Wit: I. Pearson, Jacob X Prince. J. P. Sarter, J.Q. Dower release of Elizabeth X Fincher, wife of Francis Fincher. Certified copy by John Rogers, C.C., Union District. Proof of Defendant’s statement that John Gray never owned the land cited by the complainants. Nor did he own the two slaves. Exhibit C: Copy of Bill of Sale, dated March 8, 1806, John Gray Senr. to Jesse Gray for $400 owed to said Jesse Gray two negroes, woman Rose and girl Pat, of black complecion. Wit: Thomas X Bishop, William X Call. Certified copy by John Rogers, C.C. Union District. Further, the Statute of Limitations is pleaded, as the complainants have tacitly accepted for a term of 10 or 12 years the settlement of the estate.

The court dismissed the lawsuit, which is valuable in that it names Ailsey’s parents and eight siblings and refers to the widow, second wife, of John Gray Sr. and their three minor children.

    Reuben is enumerated in the 1790 U.S. Census in Laurens District with his father, Henry III, his mother, Elizabeth, and siblings. He moved his family to Elbert Co., Ga., after the 1800 U.S. Census was taken in Laurens District. His parents and siblings also moved to Elbert County. Reuben headed Henry III’s family in 1800 since Henry III is not included in the census: “Reuben Bramlet,” age 16-26, born 1774-84, is listed In the 1800 U.S. Census for Laurens District as head of a family that includes his wife (Ailsa) 16-26, and one son (Jesse, born 1799-1800) under age 10 (NARA Film M32:50:18A). Also enumerated with Reuben are several people whose ages fit certain members of Reuben’s extended family: a female 45 and over (Reuben’s mother Elizabeth?), a female 16-26 (Reuben’s sister Margaret?), and three females 10-16 (Reuben’s sisters Mary Ann, Elizabeth, Millie?) and a male under 10 (Reuben’s brother Lott Bramlett?). It is possible that Reuben’s father, Henry III, and his brothers John and Nathan had gone on earlier to Elbert Co., Ga., to find and clear land make a home for the family. Reuben and Ailsa lived in Elbert County in 1802. They lived there 1807 when Reuben was listed as a resident of Captain Dunston Blackwell’s District in the Georgia Land Lottery. He had two draws, which indicates he was married at that time. In March 1808 he acquired 300 acres of land in Elbert County; the deed was recorded there on April 1, 1808, according to Lucian L. Knight in Historical Collections of Georgia (228). Reuben and Ailsa then moved on to several other counties in Georgia: Franklin, Habersham, Rabun and a portion of Union that later became Fannin County. Fannin County was formed from Union and Gilmer counties in 1853. After Reuben died in Union County in 1843, Ailsa lived in Gilmer County in 1850 with the Hayes family. She lived in Union/Fannin County with or near her sons John and Reuben E. Bramlett in 1852-56.

   Reuben and family were living in Franklin County by 1810. There he served as a private in Capt. John Walter’s Company of Col. Booth’s Regiment of Riflemen during the War of 1812. Ailsa’s later bounty land application, which was based on Reuben’s war service, indicates he entered the service at Carnesville, Franklin Co., Ga., and was discharged at Fort Hawkins in May 1814. He entered the service again in Franklin County on Nov. 11, 1814, and was discharged at Fort Jackson On April 30, 1815. Her son Reuben E. Bramlett swore Ailsa received a previous bounty land warrant of eighty acres under the Septemer 1850 act and then sold the land. She identified herself as Ailsa Gray before her marriage.

   Reuben paid taxes on 100 acres on Lightwoodlog Creek in Capt. Thompson’s District in Franklin Co., Ga., in 1810. He also paid taxes on the property in 1811 and 1813. Robert Walters paid Reuben’s taxes in 1813. Reuben paid his own taxes in 1818. Reuben signed a deed as a witness on March 29. 1816, when J. H. Fanin gave his power of attorney to Peter Brown. The deed says “Sworn to by Bramblet before Charles Henry, J.P. Elbert County, Georgia.” Reuben had been in Elbert County visiting his parents when he signed the deed because Franklin County Tax Digests show that he owned land in Franklin County from 1810 to 1820. Reuben’s neighbor in Franklin County in 1813 was John H. Fannon, who owned 25 acres on waters of Beaverdam Creek in Elbert County at that time. Thomas W. Mabry also signed the Fanin-Brown deed, recorded April 1, 1816.

    “Reuben Bramblet” signed a deed as a witness in Franklin County on Oct. 3, 1816, when Peter Brown sold some land on Lightwoodlog Creek to Edward Swann. Other witnesses listed are Charles Walters and John Burton, J.P. Franklin County Tax Digests indicate that Charles Walters, who lived on Lightwoodlog Creek, was one of Reuben’s neighbors in 1813. Robert Walters and Joseph Walters lived on Shoal Creek in 1813. Polly Walters and Joseph Walters lived on Shoal Creek in 1818. Edward Swain also lived on Lightwoodlog Creek in 1818. 

    Reuben is mentioned in an 1818 lawsuit in Franklin County, Georgia. He is included in the 1820 tax digest for Franklin Co., Ga., in Captain Barton’s District. He and Alisa moved back to Laurens District and may be included in the 1820 census there or were visiting relatives. Evidence in South Carolina court records indicate that Reuben was in Laurens District in 1820 when he and Alisa filed suit against her brother, Jesse Gray, who served as administrator of their father John Gray’s estate, in Laurens District Equity Court on Feb. 3, 1820. The contest is referenced above. Reuben and Ailsa also were involved in their own lawsuit later, in 1822 in Franklin County. Ailsa filed suit against Reuben. They may have divorced or separated since Ailsa is not listed with him in 1830.

   Reuben lived in the Burton area of Tallulah District, Rabun County, Georgia in 1830 (Rabun was created from Cherokee Land in 1819, and Habersham, which bordered Rabun, was created from Cherokee Land in 1818.) “Reuben Bramlett,” 50-60, born circa 1770-80, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Burton, Tallulah Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., as head of a family that includes two males 20-30 (Ambrose L., John) and three males 15-20 (Charles C.: Reuben E., Elisha/Elijah W.). Ailsa is not enumerated in the record. She may have been missed by the census taker or living with some of her younger children–Levi and Nathan–in Habersham Co., Ga.

   “Reuben Bramlett,” 50-60, born between 1780 and 1790, probably actually about 65 years old, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Capt. Harris’s Dist., Habersham Co., Ga., as head of a family that includes a female (wife, Ailsey Gray) 60-70, born between 1770 and 1780, probably about 65 years old. Their son Jesse lived nearby. Reuben may be duplicated in the 1840 census. He probably lived near or on the border of Habersham and Rabun counties and was counted twice by different census takers, or he moved from one county after the census was taken to the other county before the census was taken there. “Reuben Bramlett,” 60-70, born between 1770 and 1780, probably about 65 years old, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Dist 509, Rabun Co., Ga., as head of a family that includes a female (wife, Ailsa “Ailsey”) 60-70, born between 1770 and 1780, probably about 65 years old. Ailsa may have been living in Gilmer County in 1843 after Reuben died. Her son John married Nancy Allen there that year. She also may have lived in Gilmer Co., Ga., in 1850: “Lilcy or Alcey Bramlett,” 85/95 (actually 75?), is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Subdist. 33, Gilmer Co., Ga., living with Mary Hayes, 60, born in South Carolina, and Gilbert Hayes, 91, born in North Carolina, head of the family. Reuben and Ailsa’s children are Jesse, Levi, Ambrose L., Carlisle Charles, Reuben E., William Albert, John, Elisha/Elijah W., N. H. (Nathan?) Bramlett.

    Jesse Bramlett, child of Reuben and Ailsa “Ailsey” (Gray) Bramlett, was born circa 1799-1800 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died after 1870, perhaps in Rabun Co., Ga. Jesse lived with his parents before he married Mary M. “Polly” Palmore on Nov. 18, 1827, in Clarksville, Habersham Co., Ga. She was born circa 1809 in South Carolina. She died before 1870, probably in Rabun Co., Ga. “Jesse Bramlett,” 20-30, born between 1800 and 1810, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Rabun Co., Ga., as head of a family that includes a female 30-40 (wife, Mary M. “Polly” Palmore) and two children: two males under 5 (Jesse? and Reuben W.?) (NARA Film M19:20:225). Jesse and family lived near his father, Reuben, in Habersham Co., Ga., in 1840: “Jesse Bramlett,” 50-60 (actually 40-50?) is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Capt. Harris’ Dist., Habersham Co., Ga., as head of a family that includes a female 40-50 (wife, Mary M. “Polly” Palmore) and six children: a male 15-20 (Jesse?), three males 5-10 (Reuben Wiley/Wriley, Joel), a male under 5 (Willis) (NARA Film M704:49:213). Seven family members were engaged in mining and three engaged in commerce. “Jesse Bramblet,” 51, farming, and wife, Polly, 41, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., with nine children born in South Carolina: Joel, 18, farmer; Willis, 15, farmer; Manerva, 13; Sarah A., 10; Lucinda, 8; John (W.), 7; Thomas (M.), 5; Henry, 3; and Jeffrey, 1 (NARA Film M432:81:318B). Rabun County Court records indicate some of Jesse’s children received financial assistance in 1858: Listed in the “Record of Poor Children 1857-1862 Rabun County” in the Probate Judge’s Office at Clayton, Ga., are John Bramlet, Thomas Bramlet and Jeffry Bramlet of Talula District. “Jesse Bramlet,” 61, born in South Carolina, farmer, $155 personal estate, and wife, Polly, 45, born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Clayton P.O., Tallulah Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., with six children born Georgia to parents born in South Carolina: Minerva, 23; Lucinda, 18; John (W.), 17, farmer; Thomas (M.), 15; Jeffrey, 12; and Elizabeth, 9 (NARA Film M653:134:541). “Jesse Bramblet,” 70, born in South Carolina, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Clayton P.O., Rabun Co., Ga., with one grown child: Jeffrey, 18, born in Georgia to parents born in South Carolina, at home, farm laborer (NARA Film M593:171:197A). Mary “Polly” and Jesse’s children are Jesse, Reuben Wiley/Wriley, Joel, Willis, Minerva, Sarah A., Lucinda, John W., Thomas M., Henry, Jeffrey and Elizabeth Bramlett.

     Jesse Bramlett Jr., perhaps first child of Jesse and Mary M. “Polly” Palmore, was born circa 1820. He died sometime after 1862, perhaps in Georgia. Some sources indicate he died in 1865. Jesse may be a male under 10 enumerated with his father, Jesse, in the 1830 U.S. Census for Rabun Co., Ga. One “Jesse Bramlet,” 20-30, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., near his grandfather Reuben, with a female 15-20 (wife?) and a child, a male under 5. One Jesse Bramlett served as a Union soldier, a private in Company A, First Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted Aug. 18, 1862, in Union Co., Ga.

Grave markers of Reuben W. and Martha M. Worley Bramblett at Rock Creek/Grove Cemetery near Tiger, Rabun Co., Ga. Descendants believe the inscription for Reuben is incorrect.

     Reuben Wiley/Wriley Bramlett, second child of Jesse and Mary M. Polly” (Palmore) Bramlett, was born circa 1829-30 in Georgia. He died in 1915 and was buried in Rock Creek/Grove Baptist Church Cemetery on Bridge Creek Road west of Tiger in Rabun Co., Ga. Reuben is enumerated with his parents in 1830 in Rabun County and in 1840 in Habersham County. Reuben married Martha Matilda “Patsy” Worley on June 17, 1849, in Tiger, Rabun Co., Ga. She was born circa 1828 in Georgia. She died in 1900 at Church, Wetzel, W. Va., and was buried in Rock Creek/Grove Baptist Church Cemetery. “Reuben Bramlet,” 23, farmer, and wife, Martha (M. “Patsy”), 22, both born in Georgia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., with one child: Mary M. (Matilda), 1/12, born in Georgia (NARA Film M432:81:321). “Reuben Bramlet,” 28, farmer, $80 personal estate, and wife, Martha M., 27, both born in Georgia, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Tiger P.O., Rabun Co., Ga., with five children, all born in Georgia: Mary M. (Matilda), 9; Sarah L., 7; James E. (Edward), 5; Martha A. (Adaline), 3; and Rachel C. (Catherine), 2 (NARA Film M653:134:571).

soldiers

Reuben served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He was enlisted as a private in Company F, Beauregard Braves, Fifty-Second Regiment, First Georgia Volunteer Infantry, by Sgt. Holden on Aug. 18, 1862, in Clayton, Ga. He was a resident of Rabun County. He was captured July 4, 1863, during the Battle of Vicksburg and held as a prisoner of war before being paroled. He apparently did not return to his unit after he took the Oath of Allegiance to the United States because the November-December 1863 company muster roll in his NARA Compiled Service Records lists him as AWOL since Sept. 24, 1863, and not paid (NARA Film M266 Roll 516). War records are not complete; No other information was available in his file. He survived and returned home to Rabun County from the war.

  “Reuben Bramblet,” 40, farmer, $150 personal estate, and wife, Patsy, 40, keeping house, both born in Georgia, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Clayton P.O., Rabun Co., Ga., with ten children born in Georgia: Mary Matilda, 19; Sarah (L.), 18; James Edward, 15, farm laborer; Martha Adaline, 12; Rachel Catharine, 10; Isaac Cicero, 9; Joel Jackson, 7; Virgil Monroe, 6; Reuben Thomas, 4; and Franklin L. (Lafayette), 2 (NARA Film M593:171:209B). “Reuben W. Bramlet,” 50, born in Georgia to a mother born there and father born in South Carolina, farmer, and wife, Martha, 50, born in Georgia to a mother born there and father born in South Carolina, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Talullah, Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., with eleven children born in Georgia to parents born there: Mary M., 27; Sarah L., 25; Martha A., 23; Rachel C., 21; Isaac I., 19; Joel J., 17; Virgil, 15; Reuben T., 12; Franklin L., 10; Ana L., 9; and Hannah S., 9 (NARA Film T9:162:73A). “Reuben W. Bramblet,” 70, born in October 1829 in Georgia to parents born in South Carolina, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, married forty-eight years, and wife, Martha M., 70, born in April 1830 in Georgia to parents born there, mother of fourteen children, twelve living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Dist. 509, Tallulah, Rabun Co., Ga., with six grown children born in Georgia: Mary M., 46, September 1853, farm laborer; Sarah L., 45, January 1855, farm laborer; Martha A., 41, March 1858; Rachel C., 40, May 1860; Tex Anner (Anna L.), 22, June 1878; and Hanner S. (Savannah), 22, June 1878 (NARA Film T623:218:100A). Also listed are six grandchildren: Vassie A., 16, October 1883; Lavona M., 16, May 1884; Cintha Ann, 13, June 1887; Carly Rosco, 7, March 1893; Candler E., 2, November 1898; and Cicero S., 10/12, July 1899. All were born in Georgia to parents born there. “Ruben W. Bramblet,” 75, born in Georgia to parents born in South Carolina, farmer, general farm, owner of a mortgage-free farm, widowed, and six grown children born in Georgia to parents born there (Mary M., 56; Sarah L., 55; Martha A., 54; Rachel, 53; Texanna, 31; and Savannah, 31), 1910 Tallulah, Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., census (NARA Film T624:209:15B). All of the children were farm laborers. Reuben W. and Martha’s fourteen children include Mary Matilda, Sarah L., James Edward, Martha Adaline, Rachel Catherine, Isaac Cicero, Joel Jackson, Virgil Monroe, Reuben Thomas, Franklin Lafayette, Texannah L., Hannah Savannah Bramblett. 

Martha and James Edward, sonMartha Worley Bramblett and son James Edward with grandson, possibly Frank, circa 1893

   Reuben W. and son James Edward Bramblett are included on the 1882-1887 Rabun Co., Ga., Tax List, duplicated below:

1882-1887 GA tax

Mary Matilda Bramblett, child of Reuben Wiley/Wriley and Martha M. “Patsy” (Worley) Bramblett, was born in 1850 in Rabun Co., Ga. She died at age 104 on Oct. 28, 1954. She lived with her parents and did not marry. She headed her extended family after the parents died: “Mary Matilda Bramblet,” 66, farmer, general farm, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Tallulah, Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., with four sisters and two nephews: Sarah, 64, sister, farm laborer; Martha, 56, sister, farm laborer; Texan, 47, sister, public washer woman; Savannah, 47, sister, public washer woman; Carly, 26, nephew, invalid; and Watts, 7, nephew (NARA Film T625:270:232A). All were born in Georgia to parents born there.

Sarah L. Bramblett, child of Reuben Wiley/Wriley and Martha M. “Patsy” (Worley) Bramblett, was born circa 1853-55 in Rabun Co., Ga. She lived with her sister Mary Matilda Bramblet in Tallulah, Rabun Co., Ga., in 1920.

James Edward Bramblett, child of Martha and Reuben W. (Wriley?) Bramblett, was born in 1856 in Georgia. He died at age 79 in 1936 in Texas. James first married Isabella Rebecca Worley in 1876 in Georgia. Isabella was born in 1860 in Georgia. She may have died in Tennessee circa 1893. They lived in Stone Pile, Ga., in 1880: “James E. Bramblet,” 24, farm laborer, and wife, Izabella H., 20, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Stone Pile, Rabun Co., Ga., with two children: Marvin R. (Roscoe), 1, and Martin P., 1/12 (NARA Film T9:162:81A). All were born in Georgia to parents born there. James and family moved to Tennessee before May 1893. James second married Felicatilia “Tull” “Tully” “Teleta” Green Patterson circa 1894-1900 in Texas. Felicatilia was born on Sept. 9, 1870, in Lincoln Co. Tenn. They lived in Texas in 1900. “J. E. Bramlette,” 44, born in September 1855 in Georgia to parents born there, farmer, and wife, I. T. (Tully), 30, born in 1870 in Tennessee to parents born there, married six months, no children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Lamar Co., Tex., with four Bramlette children: Marvin (Roscoe), 21, born in May 1879, farm laborer; John (Ketter), 14, January 1886, farm laborer; Joel (Joseph Lafate/Lafayette), July 1887, farm laborer; Frank (Franklin Frazier), 7, May 1893 (NARA Film T623:1652:228A). All of the children were born in Georgia to parents born there except Frank, who was born in Tennessee to parents born in Georgia. Also listed are two Patterson children from Tully’s previous marriage: Otie, 8, May 1892, stepson, and Ula, 6, March 1894, step-daughter. Both were born in Tennessee to parents born there. James and Isabella’s known children are Marvin Roscoe, Martin P., John Ketter, Joseph Lafate/Lafayette and Franklin Frazier Bramblett.

Martha Adaline Bramblett, child of Reuben W. and Martha M. “Patsy” (Worley) Bramblett, was born circa 1857-58 in Rabun Co., Ga.

Rachel Catherine Bramblett, child of Reuben W. and Martha M. “Patsy” (Worley) Bramblett, was born circa 1859-60 in Rabun Co., Ga.

Isaac Cicero Bramblett, child of Reuben W. and Martha M. “Patsy” (Worley) Bramblett, was born circa 1861 in Rabun Co., Ga. He died sometime after 1935. He married Martha Jane Smith Arrendale. She was born circa 1859 in Georgia, the daughter of Emily Moore and Charles Smith. She died sometime after 1900. “Isaac C. (Cicero) Bramblett,” 39, born in July 1860 in Georgia to parents born there, and wife, Martha, 41, born in January 1859 in Georgia, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Clayton, Rabun Co., Ga., with Martha’s child, May M. Arrendale, 23, born in March 1887, and four Bramblett children: Malanie J. (Malissa Jane “Lissie”), 17, October 1882; (Thomas) Sylvester, 13, July 1887; Levi M. (Monroe), 10, April 1890; and Henry L. (Lawrence), 6, July 1894. All were born in Georgia. Isaac lived near Glassy Mountain, according to an editor’s note on page 1 of the Sept. 26, 1935, edition of the Clayton Tribune: “Mr. Isaac Bramblett, who has lived all his life at the foot of Glassy Mountain says that he has heard his father, Reubin Bramblett, and a neighbor, Joel Arrendale, grandfather of John V. Arrendale, tell of an Indian by the name of Glassy being buried on the mountain and that the grave is still there. My recollection is that Mr. Bramblett said that he knew where the grave is located. This Indian seems to have been of some prominence and the mountain received its name in honor of the Indian.–L.P. Cross, Editor.” Isaac and Martha’s children are Malissa Jane (“Lissie”), Thomas Sylvester, Levi Monroe and Henry Lawrence Bramblett.

Joel Jackson (“Jack”) Bramlett, child of Reuben and Martha “Patsy” (Worley) Bramlett, was born circa 1863 in Georgia.

Virgil Monroe Bramlett, child of Reuben and Martha “Patsy” (Worley) Bramlett, was born Feb. 29, 1864, in Tiger, Rabun Co., Ga. He died at age 84 on Oct. 6, 1948, in Las Cruces, New Mex. He first married Ella Victoria Smith, daughter of Emily Moore and Charles Smith, in 1883 in Tiger, Ga. Ella was born circa 1866 in Rabun County. She died between 1888 and 1898. Virgil second married Mattie Childers. She was born circa 1881 in Texas. They lived in Texas in 1900: “V. M. Bramlette,” 45, born in February 1855 in Georgia to a mother born in Germany, father born Georgia, coal shoveler, and wife, Mattie, 19, born in February 1881 in Texas to a mother born in Ireland and father born in Tennessee, married two years, mother of two living children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 9, Fort Worth, Tarrant Co., Tex., with two children: Lacretia, 16, born August 1883, at school, and Stellanis, 12, born in February 1888, at school (NARA Film T623:1671:55A). Both were born in Georgia to a mother born in Texas and father born in Georgia. Virgil and Ella’s children are Lucretia (“Cretie”), born April 9, 1884; and Stellania (“Stella”) Bramlett. Virgil and Mattie had five children. The family later lived in Las Cruces, N. Mex.

Chad Marshall

Chadwick Layne Marshall, a descendant of Reuben W. and Martha M. Worley Bramblett, with a framed photograph of his great-grandparents Reuben Thomas Bramblett and Mary Elizabeth Powell. Chadwick provided some of the following about Reuben Thomas Bramblett and family on 29 February 2008.

Reuben Thomas Bramblett, child of Reuben W. and Martha M. “Patsy” (Worley) Bramblett, was born Aug. 5, 1868, in Rabun Co., Ga. He died Feb. 1, 1953, in Habersham Co., Ga., and was buried there in Ebeneezer United Methodist Church Cemetery, Hollywood, Ga. He married Mary Elizabeth Powell. She was born circa 1871. She died after 1930 and was buried in Ebeneezer Cemetery. “Thomas Bramlet,” 31, born in August 1868, farmer, general farm, rents farm, married twenty years, and wife, Mary E., 29, born in May 1871, mother of five living children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Deep Creek Dist., Habersham Co., Ga., with five children: Georgia S., 10, June 1889; Reuben L. (Lafayette), 8, August 1891; William E. (Earnest), 5, November 1894; Thomas T., 3, April 1897; and Isaac L. (Leonard), 1, April 1899 (NARA Film T623:202:36A). All were born in Georgia. “Tom Bramlet,” 33, farmer, rents farm, married twelve years, and wife, Mary E., 29, born in May 1871, mother of nine children, seven living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Beaverdam Dist., Oglethorpe Co., Ga., with six children: Reuben (Lafayette), 15; (William) Earnest, 12; (Isaac) Leonard, 12; Sally, 7; Virgil (Newton), 5; and Ostelle/Estelle, 1 (NARA Film T624:206:11A). All were born in Georgia to parents born there. “Reuben Bramblett,” 53, farmer, general farm, and wife, Mary E., 48, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Newtown, Mil. Dist. 253, Jackson Co., Ga., with four children: Fate (Reuben Lafayette), 25, farmer; Virgil (Newton), 14, farmer; Stella (Mae), 11, farmer; and Dollie, 7 (NARA Film T625:264:110A). All were born in Georgia to parents born there. Reuben and Mary’s son Earnest W. lived nearby. “Ernest W. Bramblett,” 22, farmer, general farm, and wife, Lorina, 18, both born in Georgia to parents born there, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Newtown, Mil. Dist. 253, Jackson Co., Ga. (NARA Film T625:264:110A). “Ruben T. Bramblett,” 57, farmer, own farm, married twenty-one years, and wife, Mary E., 54, married eighteen years, are listed in the 1930 U.S. Census for Mil. Dist. 1486, Demorest, Habersham Co., Ga., with one grown child: Estell E., 20, single (NARA Film T626:367:124A). All were born in Georgia to parents born there. Reuben and Mary’s children are Georgia S., Reuben Lafayette (“Fate”), William Earnest, Thomas T., Isaac Leonard, Sally, Virgil Newton, Estelle Mae (“Stella”) and Dollie Bramblett.

Franklin Lafayette Bramblett, child of Reuben W. and Martha M. “Patsy” (Worley) Bramblett, was born May 4, 1868, in Rabun Co., Ga. He died at age 81 on Jan. 23,  1950, in Greensboro, Ga., and was buried in Greene, Ga. He married Alza Victoria Hollifield, daughter of Malissa Smith Hollifield and granddaughter of Emily Moore and Charles Smith, on June 1, 1890. Their children include Tolbert Nelson, James Corbett, Metter V., Myrtle, Reuben Lafayette, Franklin Roscoe Sr., Maude, Mabel, Maedelle, Merle, Charles Brand Bramblett. 

Texanna L. “Anna” Bramblett, child of Reuben W. and Martha M. “Patsy” (Worley) Bramblett, was born circa 1871 in Rabun Co., Ga. She died there at age 76 on Aug. 12, 1953.

Hannah Savannah Bramblett, child of Reuben W. and Martha M. “Patsy” (Worley) Bramblett, was born circa 1871 in Rabun Co., Ga. She died there at age 76 on Oct. 28, 1954.

Joel Bramlett, child of Jesse and Mary M. “Polly” (Palmore) Bramlett, was born circa 1832 in Georgia. He lived with his parents in 1850.

Willis Bramlett, child of Jesse and Mary M. “Polly” (Palmore) Bramlett, was born circa 1834 in Georgia, perhaps in Habersham or Rabun County. He died by 1900. Willis lived with his parents in Rabun County in 1840 and 1850. “Willis Bramlet,” 15, born in Georgia, is listed with his parents, Jesse, 51, and Polly, 41, and siblings in Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., in 1850. Willis married Rebecca Jane Ransom circa 1856. She was born circa 1835 in North Carolina. She died after 1900, perhaps in Fannin Co., Ga. ”Willis Bramlett,” 25, born in Georgia, farmer, with $456 personal estate, and wife, Rebecca J., 25, born in North Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Clayton P.O., Tallulah Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., with three children born in Georgia: Wm. M., 3; Nancy A., 2; and Infant Not Named (Thomas M.), 2/12 (NARA Film M653:134:545). “Willis Bramblet,” 36, born in Georgia to parents born in South Carolina, farmer, $400 real estate, $100 personal estate, and wife, Rebecca, 38, born in Georgia (North Carolina?), are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Clayton, Rabun Co., Ga., with six children born in Georgia: William (M.), 13, farm laborer; Nancy A., 12, at home; Thomas (M.), 10, farm laborer; Sarah Jane, 9; Roleangeline, 5; and Paddy S. (Patrick), 3 (NARA Film M593:171:197A). They lived next door to Willis’ father, Jesse Bramblet. ”Willis Bramlet,” 46, born in Georgia to parents born there (actually South Carolina), farmer, and wife, Rebecca J., 50, born in North Carolina to parents born there, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Fair Play, Fannin Co., Ga., with three children born in Georgia: Nancy A., 21; Sarah J. (Jane), 17; and Patrick S., 12 (NARA Film T9:145:659B). All three children worked on the farm. “Jane Bramblet,” 69, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Fair Play, Fannin Co., Ga., with one grown child: Nanca (Nancy A.), 42. Both were born in Georgia. Willis and Rebecca’s children are William M., Nancy A., Thomas M., Sarah Jane, Roleangeline and Patrick S. Bramlett 

Minerva Bramlett, child of Jesse and Mary M. “Polly” (Palmore) Bramlett, was born circa 1837-38 in Habersham Co., Ga. She died at age 89 on Jan. 31, 1926, in Clarke, Ga. She lived with her parents in Habersham County in 1840 and in Rabun County in 1850 and 1860. “Minerva Bramlet,” 13, born in Georgia, is listed with her parents, Jesse, 51, and Polly, 41, and siblings in Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., in 1850. “Minerva Bramlet,” 23, born in Georgia, is listed with her parents, Jesse, 61, and Polly, 45, and siblings in Tallulah Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., in 1860.

   Sarah Ann Bramlett, child of Jesse and Mary M. “Polly” (Palmore) Bramlett, was born Aug. 15, 1842, in Habersham or Rabun Co., Ga. She died age 74 on July 26, 1917, in Rabun, Ga. She lived with her parents in Rabun County in 1850. “Sarah A. Bramlet,” 10, born in Georgia, is listed with her parents, Jesse, 51, and Polly, 41, and siblings in Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., in 1850. She married Absolem McDonald Teem on Feb. 25, 1864. They had six children: John M., Leander T., Susan E., Daniel, William H., Mary Teem.

   Lucinda Bramlett, child of Jesse and Mary M. “Polly” (Palmore) Bramlett, was born circa 1842 in Habersham or Rabun Co., Ga. She died there on July 26, 1917. She lived with her parents in Rabun County in 1850 and 1860. “Lucinda Bramlet,” 8, born in Georgia, is listed with her parents, Jesse, 51, and Polly, 41, and siblings in Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., in 1850. “Lucinda Bramlet,” 18, born in Georgia, is listed with her parents, Jesse, 61, and Polly, 45, and siblings in Tallulah Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., in 1860.

   John Wesley Bramblett, child of Mary “Polly” Palmore and Jesse Bramblett, was born circa 1844-1845 in Rabun Co., Ga. He died in May 1914 and was buried at Buckhorn Cemetery, Arbaugh, Newton Co., Ark. His will, naming wife, Nancy Caroline, and three sons (Thomas J. [Jefferson], Silas, Joseph [Wesley]), was recorded in 1914 in Huntsville, Madison Co., Ark. (WB-I:137-138). “John Bramblet,” 7, born Georgia to parents born South Carolina, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist 509, Rabun Co., Ga., with parents, Polly, 41, and Jesse, 51/57, farmer, both born South Carolina, and eight siblings born Georgia (Joel, 18; Willis, 15; Minerva, 13; Sarah A., 10; Lucinda, 8; Thomas, 5; Henry, 3; Jeffrey, 1) (NARA Film M432:81:318). “John Bramlet,” 17, born Georgia, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Tiger P.O., Rabun Co., Ga., with parents, Jesse, 61, and Polly, 45, both born South Carolina, and five siblings born Georgia (Minerva, 23; Lucinda, 18; Thomas, 15; Jeffrey, 12; Elizabeth, 9) (NARA Film T653:134:541).

   John served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company F, “Beauregard Braves,” Rabun County, Fifty-Second Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A. His Compiled Military Service Records indicate he enlisted March 4, 1862, at Clayton, Ga., as a resident of Rabun Co., Ga. He was a prisoner of war captured July 4, 1863, at the Battle of Vicksburg. He was paroled July 7, 1863. He apparently did not return to his unit by Sept. 12, 1863, since he was designated AWOL Sept. 20, 1863 (NARA Film M266 Roll 516).

John W. Bramlett roll

John W. Bramlett roll 2.jpg

   John married his first wife, “Miss Martha E. Teem,” on Feb. 25, 1864, in Rabun Co., Ga., and had at least three children there before moving to Arkansas between 1878 and 1880. Martha may have died circa 1878. Not yet located in 1870: John and family may have been missed by the census taker or may be listed under a different name or with a variant surname spelling. He married his second wife, Nancy Caroline Patterson, circa 1881. She was born Feb. 16, 1850, and died in Arkansas on March 24, 1917. She rests at Buckhorn Cemetery. “Thomas [John W.] Bramblet,” 50 [actually 35?], works on farm, no wife, and three children born Georgia to parents born there (Thomas, 12, works on farm; Silas, 8, at home; Joseph [Wesley], 3, at home), 1880 Lees Creek, Crawford Co., Ark., census (NARA Film T9:41:474C). John’s two children are duplicated in 1880 Lees Creek, Crawford Co., Ark., census: Thomas Bramlet, 13, other, at home, and Joseph Bramlet, 2, other, at home, both born Georgia to parents born there, with John Hanson, 30, born Missouri to parents born Kentucky, farmer, and his wife, Mary Hanson, 19, born Arkansas to parents born there, keeps house, and one child (John Hanson, 1, born Arkansas) (NARA Film T9:41:467A). “John W. Bramlet,” 55, born May 1845 Georgia to parents born South Carolina, farmer, married nineteen years, and (second) wife, Caroline (Nancy Patterson), 50, born February 1850 Tennessee to parents born there, mother of five children, none living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Hill Township, Johnson Co., Ark., census (NARA Film T623:64:50). “John W. Bramlett,” 64, born Georgia to parents born South Carolina, farmer, second marriage, married thirty-two years, with wife, Caroline, 58, born Tennessee to parents born there, first marriage, married thirty-two years, mother of five deceased children, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Boston Twp., Madison Co., Ark. (NARA Film T624:57:31B). John and Martha’s children include Thomas Jefferson, born circa 1858; Silas, 1872; Joseph Wesley, 1877, all born in Georgia.  John homesteaded in Johnson and Madison Co., Ark. John was a minister of the gospel who performed marriages in Johnson and Franklin counties in Arkansas in the early 1900s. He and Nancy Caroline’s children are Jefferson Davis (“Jeff D.”), 1887-1887, and Marion Bramlett, 1891-1894, and three Infants. None of the children survived.

  Thomas M. Bramblett, child of Mary “Polly” Palmore and Jesse Bramblett, was born circa 1845 in Rabun Co., Ga.

 Henry Bramblett, child of Mary “Polly” Palmore and Jesse Bramblett, was born circa 1847 in Rabun Co., Ga.

  Jeffrey Bramblett, child of Mary “Polly” Palmore and Jesse Bramblett, was born circa 1848 in Rabun Co., Ga.

    Elizabeth Bramlett, child of Jesse and Mary M. “Polly” (Palmore) Bramlett, was born April 18, 1852, in Rabun Co., Ga. She died at age 74 on Nov. 2, 1926, in Clarke, Ga., and was buried in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery, Clarkesville, Habersham, Ga. “Elizabeth Bramlet,” 9, born in Georgia, lived with her parents, Jesse, 61, and Polly, 45, and siblings in Tallulah Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., in 1860. “Elizabeth Bramblet,” 21, housekeeper, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Clayton P.O., Rabun Co., Ga., living with Tillatha Stonecypher, 30, head of her family, which includes her three children: James, 5; William, 3; and Newton Stonecypher, 1. Elizabeth married Rev. Louis Lee Waldroup (Waldrup) on Feb. 11, 1873, in Habersham Co., Ga. He was born July, 26, 1833, the son of Tabitha McIntyre and Joseph L. Waldrop. Elizabeth is his second wife. He and his first wife, Minerva, had five children in 1870: Sarah, Judah, Julia, Geo. L., Joseph. Louis served as a soldier-chaplain during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted in Company C, Young’s Battalion, on May 10, 1864, at Cleveland White Co., Ga., and was discharged in April 1865 at Augusta, Ga. Elizabeth applied for a Widow’s Pension on Oct. 26, 1926, based on his military service. He was a pastor of churches in the northeast Georgia area, including Hazel Creek Baptist Church. Louis also served at Bethlehem Baptist Church from 1874 to 1881. He died Oct. 1, 1890, and was buried there. Louis and Elizabeth’s children are Frances Miranda (“Fannie”), Martin Houston Sr., William Walker, Joseph Lumpkin, Mary Omie, Calvin Lee Waldrep. Martin had a daughter and three sons. One descendant, Shirley Waldrep Seay of Hartwell, Ga., and her brother are grandchildren of Martin.

   Malinda Bramblett, child of Reuben and Ailsey Gray Bramlett, was born circa 1804 in Georgia.

   Ambrose L. Bramblett, child of Reuben and Ailsey Gray Bramlett, was born circa 1806 in Georgia. He died in March 1880 in Rabun Co., Ga., according to the Federal Mortality Census Schedule: “Ambros L. Bramblet,” 74, born Georgia, mother born South Carolina, father Georgia, “sudden death cause unknown,” married, farmer, county resident 42 years (since 1838) (NARA Film T655:12:1). He rests at Zion Cemetery.AMBROSE DEATH CENSUS

   Ambrose married Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller on Dec. 5, 1835, in Habersham Co., Ga. She was born in 1820. She died in 1884.

   Ambrose is listed in the 1864 Rabun County Census for Re-Organizing the Georgia Militia:

Ambrose.Andrew Bramlett Rabun

The names Ambrose and Andrew, noted above, were interchangeable in some census data. Ambrose had a son Andrew J. who is named as Ambrose in one census. Thomas Bramlett, age 18, born Georgia, farmer, also listed in 1864, is most likely son of Jesse, whose history is found above.

   “A. L. Bramblet,” 52, born Georgia, farmer, $150 real estate, and wife, Mary M., 31, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., with six children born North Carolina: Elizabeth, 13; Sarah, 9; Mary J., 7; Elijah, 6; William L., 4; Ary L., 3/12 (NARA Film M432:81:320-321). “A. L. Bramlet,” 53, born Georgia, farmer, $300 real estate, $595 personal estate, and wife, Mary M., 39, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Clayton P.O., Tallulah Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., with seven children born Georgia: Sarah, 19; Mary Jane, 17; William T., 13; Ary L., 9; Andrew J., 8; Melinda, 6; James B., 3 (NARA Film M653:134:537-538). “Ambros Bramblet,” 64, born Georgia, and wife, Mary M., 50, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Clayton, Rabun Co., Ga., with grown and minor children born Georgia: Elizabeth, 33; Ara L., 19; Ambros J., 17; Malinda V., 15; James B., 13; William, 22 (NARA Film M593:171:187A).

   Ambrose and Mary’s children include Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary Jane, Elijah, William T., Ary L., Ambrose Andrew Jackson, Malinda V., James Buchanan Bramlett.

   Elizabeth Bramblett, child of Ambrose L. and Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller Bramblett, was born circa 1837 in Georgia.

   Sarah Bramblett, child of Ambrose L. and Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller Bramblett, was born July 31, 1840, in North Carolina or Rabun Co., Ga. She died at age 85 years, 7 months, 23 days, on March 14, 1926, in Rabun Co., Ga. She is buried there at Rocky Grove Cemetery. Sarah lived with her parents in Rabun County in 1850-1860. Sarah’s parents are named as Ambers Bramblett” and “Pauliler in “Georgia Deaths, 1914-1926,” at Department of Archives and History, Atlanta, Ga. (FHL Film 2364180.+q). The file names Sarah’s husband as “Avil Baker” and contains Sarah’s Death Certificate (GS Film number 2364180), copied here: 

Sarah Baker

 Sarah’s son Frank signed the document as informant and as undertaker for her burial.

    Sarah married Robert Avil or Avril Baker circa 1862. He was born circa 1840 in North Carolina. He died between 1900 and 1910 in Rabun County. “Sarah Baker,” 30, born Georgia, keeping house, and husband, Robert Baker, 29, born North Carolina, farm laborer, with $200 personal estate, and four children born Georgia (Columbus, 8; Lucy, 4; [William] Shairman, 2; Adaline, 7), 1870 Clayton P.O., Rabun Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M593:171:187A).

Confederate StatesRobert served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. His NARA Compiled Service Records are incomplete (Film M266 Roll 516). He enlisted April 3, 1862, Decatur, Ga., as a private in Company F, “Beauregard Braves,” 52nd Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. He was a resident of Rabun Co., Ga.; POW? may have been captured with regiment at Vicksburg July 4, 1863; may have returned after a 30-day furlough; may have been exchanged with his unit Sept. 12, 1863. The records say he deserted Jan. 16, 1864, when the regiment was stationed at winter quarters near Dalton, Ga. Only Record: Robert A. Baker, “Pri., Co. F, 52 Regt. Ga. Inf. Appears on Company Muster Roll…for Nov-Dec 1863 dated Feb. 20, 1863”: Enlisted April 3, 1862, Decatur, Ga., by Sgt. Weems for three years; no pay; deserted Jan. 16, 1864.

   Robert and Sarah continued to live in Rabun County after the war. “Sarah Baker,” 40, born Georgia, and husband, Robert T. (A.) Baker, 39, born North Carolina, farmer, with four children (Columbus, 18; Lucy, 13; William S., 10; Franklin R., 9), 1880 Tallulah, Rabun Co., Ga., census (NARA Film T9:162:72D). “Sarah Baker,” 59, born July 1840 Georgia, mother born North Carolina, father born Georgia, married thirty-nine years, mother of four children, three living, and husband, Robert A. Baker, 59, born April 1840 North Carolina, parents North Carolina, farmer, owner mortgage-free farm, 1900 Stonepile, Rabun Co., Ga., census (NARA Film T623:218:57A). “Sarah Baker,” 71, born Georgia to parents born there, widowed, married forty-nine years, mother of four children, three living, with son Frank R. Baker, 39, farmer, and wife, Jane, 32, and three children, 1910 Stonepile Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., census (NARA Film T624:209:56A-B). Their children include Columbus, Lucy, William Sherman, Franklin R. “Frank” Baker.

    Mary Jane Bramblett, child of Ambrose L. and Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller Bramblett, was born May 21, 1842, in Georgia or North Carolina. She died March 24, 1923, in Rabun Co., Ga., and was buried there at Craig Cemetery. She married Alpheus Benfield. He was born Oct. 7, 1844, in Burke Co., N.C., the son of Nancy Schueffer (1810-1876) and Absolem Benfield (1815-1903). His paternal grandparents are Elizabeth Hartle and John Benfield. Alpheus died Dec. 10, 1928, and was buried at Craig Cemetery.

The Benfields rest in Craig Cemetery with inscribed tombstones adorned with the Gates of Heaven: “Mary J. Wife of A. Benfield May 21, 1842 Mar. 24, 1923 ‘Asleep in Jesus'” and “Alpheus Benfield Born Oct. 7, 1844 Died Dec. 10, 1928 ‘Rest, Soldier, Rest, thy warfare is o’er.'” Images courtesy Wanda Darnell.

   Mary lived with her parents and siblings at Rabun Co., Ga., in 1850 and 1860. “Mary J. Bramlet,” 7, born in North Carolina, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 509, Rabun Co., Ga., with parents, Mary M., 31, born North Carolina, and A. L., 52, born Georgia, farmer, $150 real estate, head of the family, and six siblings born North Carolina (Elizabeth, 13; Sarah, 9; Elijah, 6; William T., 4; Ary L., 3/12) (NARA Film M432:81:320B-321A). “Mary Jane Bramlet,” 17, born Georgia, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Clayton P.O., Tallulah Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., with parents, Mary M., 39, born North Carolina, and A. L., 53, born Georgia, farmer, $300 real estate, $595 personal estate, head of the family, and six siblings born Georgia (Elizabeth, 20; Sarah, 19; William T., 13; Ary L., 9; Andrew J., 8; Melinda, 6; James B., 3) (NARA Film M653:134:537-538).

   Alpheus lived with his parents in North Carolina in 1850 and moved with them and his siblings to Rabun Co., Ga., by 1860. Alpheus Benfield, 5, with parents, Absolem, 35, farmer, and Nancy, 39, and two siblings (Christley, 2; Sarah, 1/12), all born North Carolina, 1850 Burke Co., N.C., census (NARA Film M432:622:382A). Alpheus Benfield, 15, born North Carolina, farmer, with parents, Absolem, 45, farmer, $410 personal estate, and Nancy, 49, both born North Carolina, and three siblings (Christofer, 12, North Carolina; Sarah E., 10, North Carolina; Mary L., 7, Georgia), 1860 Clayton P.O., Rabun Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M653:134:501).

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Confederate StatesAlpheus served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company K, First South Carolina Artillery, on March 22, 1863. He served until paroled at the close of war. The last entry in his compiled military service records indicates Alpheus “Appears on a Muster Roll of Officers and Men paroled in accordance with the terms of a Military Convention entered into on the 26th of April, 1865, between General Joseph E. Johnston, Commanding Confederate Army, and Major General W. T. Sherman, Commanding United States Army in North Carolina. Roll dated near Greensboro, N.C., on April 28, 1865.” He was paroled at Greensboro, N.C. The roll also indicates Alpheus was from “Elbert, Ga.,” but all other entries state his residence as Rabun Co., Ga. (NARA Film M267 Roll 57).

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   Mary and Alpheus married in or before 1870. “Jane Benfield,” 24 (27), born Georgia, and (husband) Alphas, 26, born North Carolina, farm laborer, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Clayton P.O., Rabun Co., Ga., living with his parents, Absolom, 56, farmer, $200 personal estate, and Nancy, 60, keeping house, both born North Carolina, and three of his siblings (Christopher, 22, farm laborer, home farm; Sarah E., 20, both born North Carolina; Mary L., 17, Georgia) (NARA Film M593:171:197B). “Mary J. Benfield,” 38, born Georgia to father born Georgia, keeping house, and husband, Alpheus, 35, born North Carolina to parents born there, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Stonepile, Rabun Co., Ga., with five children born Georgia (William C., 9; Virgil A., 7; Sarah L. T., 5; James C., 3; Charles H., 1) and one other (Stephen D. Smith, 60, North Carolina, boarder) (NARA Film T9:162:82B). “Mary J. Benfiel,” 58, born May 1842 Georgia to a mother born (illegible) and father born Georgia, mother of five living children, and husband, Alphus Benfiel, 55, born October? 1844 North Carolina, parents’ birth states illegible, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Stonepile Dist., 1275, Rabun Co., Ga., with three children born Georgia to a mother born Georgia and father born North Carolina (names illegible, but they are: Sarah L. T., James C., Charles H.) (NARA Film T623:218:57A). “Mary J. Benfiel,” 68, born Georgia to parents born there, mother of five living children, first marriage, married 39 years, and husband, Alpheus, 65, born North Carolina to parents born there, rents farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Stone Pile Militia Dist., Rabun Co., Ga., with one grown child (James C., 34, Georgia, single, farmer, home farm) (NARA Film T624:209:57A). “Mary J. Benfield,” 77, born Georgia to parents born there, mother, and husband, Alpheus Benfield, 75, born North Carolina to parents born there, father, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Stonepile Dist. 1275, Rabun Co., Ga., living with son James C. Benfield, 42, farmer, general farm, owner of a mortgage-free farm, and wife, Elma, 41, born Georgia to parents born there, and child (Ruth, 5) and Mary’s sister (Malinda Bramblett, 64, aunt of James, nurse), all born Georgia (NARA Film T625:270:272A). Alpheus and Mary’s children, born between 1871 and 1879, include William Clinton, Virgil A., Sarah L. T., James C., Charles H. Benfield.

One of the Benfields’ descendants is an Ancestry.com DNA Match to Deborah G. Dennis. (The match’s maternal great-great-grandmother Mary Jane Bramblett Benfield is great-grandaughter of Henry Bramlett III; Henry Bramlett III is an elder brother of Reuben Bramlett, fifth-great grandfather of Deborah. Both brothers and brother Benjamin, sons of Henry Bramlett Jr., served as soldiers during the American Revolution in Virginia and South Carolina.)

    Elijah Bramlett, child of Ambrose L. and Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller Bramlett, was born 1844 in Georgia.

   William T. Bramlett, child of Ambrose L. and Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller Bramlett, was born 1846.

  Ary T. “Ara” Bramlett, child of Ambrose L. and Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller Bramlett, was born circa 1850 in Georgia. She married Daniel Littleton.

   Ambrose Andrew Jackson Bramlett, child of Ambrose L. and Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller Bramlett, was born 1852 in Georgia.

   Malinda V. Bramlett, child of Ambrose L. and Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller Bramlett, was born 1852 in Georgia. “Malinda Bramblett,” 64, aunt, nurse, is listed with her sister Mary J. Benfield, 77, both born Georgia, and her husband, Alpheus, in the 1920 U.S. Census for Stonepile Dist., 1275, Rabun Co., Ga. (NARA Film T625:270:272A). They were living with son James C. Benfield, 42, farmer, general farm, owner of a mortgage-free farm, and wife, Elma, 41, born Georgia to parents born there, and child (Ruth, 5).

   James Buchanan Bramblett, child of Ambrose L. and Mary M. “Polly” “Paulien” Fuller Bramblett, was born circa 1857 in Georgia.

   Levi Bramblett, child of Reuben and Ailsey Gray Bramlett, was born circa 1809 in Elbert or Franklin Co., Ga. He died after 1880, between 1881 and Dec. 1, 1883, in Habersham or White Co., Ga. “Levi Bramblett” of Capt. Joel Bowers’ Dist., Elbert Co., Ga., had one draw in the 1832 Cherokee Land Lottery, also known as the “Gold Lottery of 1832” (Vol. III, p. 239). The record in Historical Collections of Georgia also documents “Elizabeth Bramblet” (Levi’s grandmother) with one draw (Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol. III, p. 239). Levi married Louisa Williams on March 18, 1834 in Habersham County. She was born 1811 in Georgia, the daughter of Elizabeth and Aler Williams. She died after the 1880 census. They lived in Elbert Co., Ga., in 1832 and moved to Habersham Co., Ga., by 1840. “Levi Bramlett,” 20-30, born between 1810 and 1820, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Capt. Harris’ Dist., Habersham Co., Ga., as head of a family that includes a female 30-40 (wife, Louisa), and three children: a male under 5, born between 1835 and 1840 (Alexander Williams “Aler”), and two females under 5, born between 1835 and 1840 (E. A. and Nancy S. C.). His neighbors were his father Reuben Bramlett, 50-60, and his brother Jesse Bramlett, 30-40, and relatives of his wife, Louisa Williams: Absalom Williams, 30-40; Aler Williams, 70-80; William Williams, 30-40; and Littleton M. Williams, 20-30. “Levi Bramblett” sold some land to Joshua Sutton on April 22, 1845, in Habersham County (DB R-204). “Levi Bramblet,” 41, and wife, Louisa, 39, both born in Georgia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 4, Habersham Co., Ga., with seven children born in Georgia: A. W. (Alexander Williams “Aler”), 14; E. A. (Elizabeth Ann?), 12; N. S. C. (Nancy), 11; W. H. (William), 9; C. B. (Charles), 6; L. D. (Levi Denton), 5; and S. L. (Sarah), 2. M. Brannon, female, 11, also is listed in the house. Their neighbors are relatives of Louisa: Elizabeth Williams, 62; L. (Littleton) M. Williams, 33; and John Williams, 26. “Levi Bramblett,” 48, farmer, and wife, Louisa, 48, housekeeper, both born in Georgia, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Clarksville P.O., Habersham Co., Ga., with eight children, all born in Georgia: Nancy S. C., 19, day laborer; William H., 18, day laborer; Charles B., 16, day laborer; Levi D., 14; Sarah L., 12; Narcissa A., 10; Lucy A., 6; and Teresa, 5. “Levi Bramblett,” 65, farmer, $150 real estate, $800 personal estate, and wife, Louisa, 56, keeping house, both born in Georgia, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Clarkesville P.O., Batesville Dist. 501, Habersham Co., Ga., with five grown children born in Georgia: Nancy S. C., 30; Sarah L., 22; Mary A., 19; Lucy A., 15; and Lenesa (Teresa), 14 (NARA Film M593:154:223A). Also listed: Louisa’s mother, Eliz. Williams, 81, born in North Carolina. Levi and Louisa sold some land to Thomas P. Wilson on Nov. 29, 1876, in Habersham County. “Levi Bramblett,” 80, born in Georgia to parents born in South Carolina, farmer, and wife, Louisa, 66, born in Georgia to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Batesville Dist., Habersham Co., Ga., with four children born in Georgia to parents there: Nancey C. S., 39, keeping house; Narcissa (A.), 28, works on farm; Lucy A., 26, works on farm; and Terecey, 24, works on farm (NARA Film T9:150:600A). Also listed: James W. (Willie) Bramblett, 18, born in Georgia to parents born there, grandson, works on farm. Also in Habersham County in 1880 in the house of his step-father, Alfred Spencer, and wife Nancy, is Andrew Bramlet, 1, born in Georgia. Levi and Louisa’s children include Alexander Williams (“Aler” “Alex” “Alvis”), E. A., Nancy S. C., William H., Charles B., Levi Denton, Sarah L., Martha (Marcena), Mary A., Narcissa, Lucy A., Teresa Bramblett.

   The three eldest sons died during the 1861-1865 war. Levi or his son Levi Denton served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted Aug. 1, 1863, in Habersham Co., Ga., as a private in Capt. James H. Field’s Company H, 4th Battalion, Georgia Infantry, “Brentsville Volunteers” and “Batesville Volunteers,” State Guards, C.S.A. (Note: NARA Compiled Service Records do not provide the soldier’s age nor vital statistics.)

Work Cited: Longstreet, William. “Volume III: Land Lotteries 1806-1821-1827 and 1832.” Historical Collections of Georgia Chapters, Daughters of American Revolution. Atlanta, Georgia: C. P. Byrd, 1926.

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Alexander Williams “Aler” “Alex” “Alvis” Bramblett, child of Louisa Williams and Levi Bramlett, was born circa 1836 in Habersham Co., Ga. He died of disease May 6, 1864, at Nashville, Tenn., while serving as a soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He originally was buried in Nashville, then reinterred in grave J 13771, at Nashville National Cemetery in Madison, Davidson Co., Tenn. He served as a Confederate and Union soldier in the war. His Compiled Military Service Records indicate he enlisted in 1862 as a private in Company B, “Cleveland Volunteers,” Twelfth Regiment, Georgia Infantry, C.S.A. (NARA Film M266 Roll 268). He also served as a private in Company B, Fifty-Second Regiment, Georgia Infantry, enlisting March 4, 1862, in Cleveland, White Co., Ga. (NARA Film M266 Roll 516). He was ill several times and hospitalized. He was wounded June 10, 1863, and captured July 4, 1863, at Vicksburg. He was paroled in the field July 6 and exchanged in September. He took the Oath of Allegiance to the U.S. He enlisted as a private in Company I/B, Twelfth Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, U.S.A., at age 28 on March 10, 1864, with brothers Charles B. and William H. Bramblett (NARA Film M392 Roll 2). He was mustered in March 23, 1864, and died of complications of measles in May at Nashville, Tenn. His Union service also is documented in the 1866 Tennessee Adjutant General’s Report (596).

   Aler lived with parents in 1850: “A. W. Bramblet, 14, born Georgia, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 4, Div. 37, Habersham Co., Ga., with parents, Lousa, 39, and Levi, 41, farmer, $150 real estate, both born Georgia, and six siblings born Georgia (E. A., 12, female; N. [Nancy] S. C., 11, female; W. [William] H., 9, male; C. [Charles] B., 7, male; L. [Levi] D. [Denton], 5, male; S. [Sarah] L., 2, female) (NARA Film M432:72:252). He married Malinda Allison circa 1860. She was born circa 1840 in Georgia. She may have died between 1870 and 1876. “Aler Bramblet,” 24, with wife, Malinda, 22, both born Georgia, no children yet, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Mt. Yonah, White Co., Ga. (NARA Film M653:140:478A). Malinda filed for a Widow’s Pension, Application 140628 Certificate 98394, on Jan. 18, 1867, based on Aler’s war service. Jonathan Bramblett applied for a Bramblett Minor’s Pension, Application 224398 Certificate 173325, filed Jan. 21, 1876, in White Co., Ga. He filed to get support for the three orphans of Aler and Malinda–James, Julia and Louisa. This record suggests their mother had died. Melinda Bramblet, 30, born Georgia, widowed, farmer, $300 real estate, $190 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Cleveland P.O., Subdiv. 135, White Co., Ga., with three children born Georgia (Jula/Julia, 12 [10], domestic servant; James, 10 [8/9], farm hand; Louiza, 8 [6]) (NARA Film M593:183:44A). Aler and Malinda’s three children, Julia Bramblet, 17 (20), works on farm; Louisa Bramblet, 16, works on farm; and James Bramblet, 18, works on farm, all born Georgia to parents born there, grandchildren, living with grandparents Jonnathan Allison, 74, born North Carolina to parents born Virginia, farmer, and wife, Eunice Allison, 76, born South Carolina to parents born Virginia, keeping house, and a cousin (Mary E. Reed, 22, born Georgia to parents born there, granddaughter, works on farm), 1880 Nacoochee, Dist. 189, White Co., Ga., census (NARA Film T9:171:512B). Aler and Malinda’s children are Julia, James and Louisa Bramlett.

Julia Bramlett, child of Alexander Williams “Aler” and Malinda (Allison) Bramlett, was born circa 1858-60 in White Co., Ga. She died sometime after 1920. She is identified as a Bramblett in her son Caster’s Georgia death certificate, 32749, which indicates his mother, Julia Bramblett, was born in White Co., Ga. and his father, Norris Stanford Cantrell, who is listed as informant, was born in Habersham Co., Ga.   “Julia Bramblet,” 12, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Cleveland P.O., Dist. 135, White Co., Ga., living with her mother, Melinda, 30, farmer, $300 real estate, $190 personal estate, and two siblings: James, 10, and Louiza, 8 (NARA Film M593:183:44A). All were born in Georgia. Julia married Norris Stanford Cantrell circa 1882. He was born circa 1859 in Habersham Co., Ga. He died sometime after 1920. “Julia Cantrell,” 39, born in October 1860, mother of eight living children, married eighteen years, and husband, Norris S., 41, born in April 1859, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Mil. Dist. 427, Nacoochee, White Co., Ga., with eight children born in Georgia: Alice M., 17, March 1882; Zadie W., 14, August 1885, daughter; Hattie J., 12, June 1887; Alex/Alen E., 10, June/January 1889, son; Celie V., 9, May 1891; Cicero C., 7, May 1893; John H., 4, September 1895; and Julia E., 1, July 1898 (NARA Film T623:228:4). All were born in Georgia to parents born there. They moved to Franklin County by 1910. “Julia Cantrell,” 50, born in Georgia to parents born there, mother of eleven children, nine living, married twenty-eight years, and husband, Norris S., 50, born in Georgia to a mother born there, father born South Carolina, farmer, general farm, owner of a mortgaged farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Stranges Dist., Franklin Co., Ga., with five children born in Georgia: Caz (Caster Cicero) S., 15; John H., 13; (Julia) Etta, 11; Bill M., 8; Bessie, 3 (NARA Film T624:189:147B). Also listed: J. D. Patterson, 18, born in Georgia to parents born there, servant, farm laborer, private family. They lived in Franklin Co., Ga., in 1920: “Julia Cantrell,” 61, born in Georgia to parents born there, and husband, Norris S., 61, born in Georgia to a mother born there, father born South Carolina, farmer, general farm, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Red Hill Dist. 212, Franklin Co., Ga., with three children born in Georgia: William McK., 17; Etta, 20; and Bessie, 13 (NARA Film T625:255:131A). All of the children were farm laborers. Their son John H. Cantrell, 23, born in Georgia to parents born there, farmer, general farm, lived next door. Norris and Julia’s children are Alice M., Zadie W., Hattie J., Alex/Alen E., Celie V., Caster Cicero, John H., Julia Etta, William McKinney (“Bill”), Infant and Bessie Cantrell.

James Bramlett, child of Alexander Williams “Aler” and Malinda (Allison) Bramlett, was born circa 1860 in White Co., Ga. He died sometime after 1892. He may have married a woman named Martha R. and had three children before he died. She was born circa 1871 and died in 1910. She second married Jefferson Allison circa 1887. He was born circa 1862. Jefferson Allison, 38, born in May 1862, farmer, rents farm, married thirteen years, and wife, Martha R., 29, born in May 1871, mother of six living children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Mil. Dist. 558, Tesnatee, White Co., Ga., with four Bramlet children and two Allison children: Mary E. Bramlet, 11, July 1888; Cora M. Bramlet, 9, November 1890; James R. Bramlet, 7, December 1892; Lemuel A., 7, December 1892; Margaret L. Allison, 4, October 1895; and Martha A., 2, May 1898 (NARA Film T623:228:23B). All were born in Georgia to parents born there. Three Bramlett children–Cora, 18; James, 16; and Lemuel, 16–are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Nacoochee Dist., White Co., Ga., living with their step-father, Jefferson Allison, 48, farmer, general farm, rents farm, widowed (NARA Film T624:217:261B). Also listed are six Allison children: Maggie, 13; Martha, 11; Richardson, 8; Georgia, 6; Samuel, 3; and Walter, 6/12. All were born in Georgia to parents born there.

   Louisa Bramlett, child of Alexander Williams “Aler” and Malinda (Allison) Bramlett, was born circa 1862 in White Co., Ga. She was named after her grandmother Louisa (Williams) Bramlett. She died sometime after 1880.

   E. A. (Elizabeth Eunice Ann?) Bramlett, child of Louisa Williams and Levi Bramlett, was born circa 1838 in Georgia. She lived with her parents in 1850.

   Nancy S. C. Bramlett, child of Levi and Louisa (Williams) Bramlett, was born circa 1841 in Georgia. She lived with her parents in 1850-80. “Nancy Bramlett,” 60, born in March 1840, owner of a mortgage-free farm, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Shooting Creek Township, Clay Co., N.C., as head of a family that includes her sisters Marcena, 50, born in April 1850, and Treasie, 44, born in January 1836, and her niece Almer, 14, born in March 1886 (NARA Film T623:1188:282B). All were born in Georgia to parents born there.

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Confederate StatesWilliam H. Bramlett, child of Louisa Williams and Levi Bramlett, was born circa 1841 in Georgia. He died of disease April 16, 1864, at Nashville, Tenn., while serving as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He originally was buried in Nashville, Tenn., and later was reinterred in grave H-9755 at Nashville National Cemetery, 1420 Gallatin Road, South Madison, Davidson Co., TN 37115.

U.S. Army [Emblem] William’s father is named in military records as “Levi Bramblet,” who filed a Surviving Relative’s Pension, Application 216.666, based on William’s war service, on Aug. 13, 1874. William lived with parents and siblings in 1850-1860: W. H. Bramblet,” 9, born Georgia, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 4, Div. 37, Habersham Co., Ga., with parents, Lousa, 39, and Levi, 41, farmer, $150 real estate, both born Georgia, and six siblings born Georgia (A. W. [Alexander Williams], 14, male; E. A., 12, female; N. [Nancy] S. C., 11, female; W. [William] H., 9, male; C. [Charles] B., 7; L. [Levi] D. [Denton], 5, male; S. [Sarah] L., 2, female) (NARA Film M432:72:252). “W. H. Bramblet,” 18, day laborer, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Clarksville P.O., Habersham Co., Ga., with parents, Levi, 48, farmer, and Louisa, 48, housekeeper, and seven siblings (Nancy S. C., 19, day laborer; William H., 18, day laborer; Charles B., 16, day laborer Levi D., 14; Sarah L., 12; Marcena A., 10; Lucy A., 6; Teresa, 5), all born Georgia (NARA Film M653:125:855A).

   William also served as a Confederate soldier during the 1861-1865 war. He first served as a private in Company A, Sumter Co., Ga., “Muckalee Guards,” Twelfth Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Army of the Northwest and Army of Northern Virginia, C.S.A. He served in another unit, “Habersham Guards,” with brother Alexander W. (NARA Film M266 Roll 268). A resident of Habersham County, he enlisted a private in Company A, Fifty-Second Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, on March 4, 1862, in Clarksville, Ga. William H. Bramlet, “Pvt., Co. A, 52 Reg’t Georgia Infantry,” Absent, “Appears on Company Muster Roll…for Nov. & Dec., 1863” as “Absent without leave Nov. 15, 1862, at Manchester, Tenn.” He then joined the Union Army with brothers Alexander W. and Charles B.: He enlisted as a private in Company I, Twelfth Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry, U.S.A., at age 19 on March 10, 1864, in Nashville, Tenn. He was mustered in there on March 23, 1864, and died April 16, 1864, of complications from pneumonia at General Hospital #1, Nashville, Tenn.

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U.S. Army [Emblem] Charles B. Bramlett, child of Louisa Williams and Levi Bramlett, was born circa 1843 in Georgia. He died while serving as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He died of disease at age 18 on April 15, 1864, at Regimental Hospital, Gillem, Tenn., and was buried at Nashville National Cemetery, Madison, Davidson Co., Tenn. Charles lived with parents and siblings in 1850: “C. B. Bramblet,” 7, born Georgia, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 4, Div. 37, Habersham Co., Ga., with parents, Lousa, 39, and Levi, 41, farmer, $150 real estate, both born Georgia, and six siblings born Georgia (A. W. [Alexander Williams], 14, male; E. A., 12, female; N. [Nancy] S. C., 11, female; W. [William] H., 9, male; L. [Levi] D. [Denton], 5, male; S. [Sarah] L., 2, female) (NARA Film M432:72:252). His parents are named in military records: Levi Bramblett, Father, filed for a Relative’s Pension, Application 216.666 Certificate 222.121, on Aug. 13, 1874. Louisa Bramblett, Mother, filed for a Relative’s Pension, Application 223.616 Certificate 180.971, on Nov. 30, 1875. His Union war service is documented in the 1866 Tennessee Adjutant General’s Report: Bramlet Charles B Pvt I 12 TN Cav Union (p. 596). Charles B. Bramblett at age 18 enlisted as a private in Company I, Twelfth Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, on March 10, 1864 (NARA Film M392 Roll 2). He deserted the Confederate Army, and joined the Union Army at Nashville, Tenn., with brothers Alexander W. and William H. He was mustered in March 23, 1864; died April 15, 1864, from measles at Regimental Hospital, Gillem, Tenn. 

Confederate StatesCharles first served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He first enlisted as a private in Company B, “Cleveland Volunteers,” 52nd Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. After he died, his father, Levi Bramblett, applied for a Survivor’s Pension, Application 216.666, certificate 222.121, filed Aug. 13, 1874. His mother, Louisa Bramblett, applied for a Survivor’s Pension, Application 223.616, certificate 180.971, filed Nov. 30, 1875. Charles probably didn’t marry: he lived with parents in 1860: Charles B. Bramblett, 16, with parents, Levi, 48, and Louisa, 48, and siblings, all born Georgia, 1860 Clarksville P.O., Habersham Co., Ga., census.

   Levi Denton “Louie” Bramlett, child of Levi and Louisa (Williams) Bramlett, was born circa 1843-45 in Georgia. He died March 5, 1906, in Georgia or Clay Co., N.C. He lived with his parents in 1850-60. Levi Denton married Mary Eliza McClure in October 1870 in Habersham Co., Ga. She was born circa 1852 in Georgia or North Carolina. Family tradition holds that her mother was a full-blooded Cherokee Indian, and that Mary was adopted and raised by a McClure family. She died sometime after the 1910 census, perhaps in Anderson Co., S.C. “Levi D. Bramblett,” 25, farmer, and wife, Mary E., 18, keeping house, married in October, both born in Georgia, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Clarkesville P.O., Batesville Dist. 501, Habersham Co., Ga. (NARA Film M593:154:223A). Levi and Mary lived in Shooting Creek Township, Clay Co., N.C., in 1900. “L. D. Bramlett,” 53, born in December 1846 in Georgia, farmer, rents farm, first marriage, married thirty-one years, and wife, Mary E., 45, born in September 1854 in North Carolina to parents born in Georgia, first marriage, mother of eleven children, nine living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Shooting Creek Township, Clay Co., N.C., with seven children born in Georgia: America, 23; Harvey, 21; Mary Lou, 16; James, 14; Oliver, 11; Amanda, 8; and Rufus, 6 (NARA Film T623:1188:281A). “Mary E. Bramlett,” 55, born in North Carolina to parents born in Georgia, widowed, mother of eleven children, seven living, rents home, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Pendleton Township, Anderson Co., S.C., with two grown children born in Georgia to parents born there: James M., 21, twister hand, cotton mill, and Rufus, 15, doffer, cotton mill (NARA Film T624:1449:52B). Also listed: Felix Rogers, 15, born in North Carolina to parents born there, boarder, drawer, cotton mill. Mary and Levi’s children are Alfred Ervin, Levisa America, Harvey Patmus, Ben G., Mary Lou, James Marion, Oliver Lawrence, Amanda “Mandy” and Rufus B. Bramlett. There may be others. Some of their descendants moved to Westminster, Oconee Co., S.C.

Confederate StatesOne “Levi Bramlet” enlisted as a private in Capt. James H. Field’s Company H, Fourth Battalion, Georgia Infantry, “Brentsville Volunteers” and “Batesville Volunteers,” State Guards, C.S.A., on Aug. 1, 1863, in Habersham Co., Ga. (Note: Levi could be the father, Levi, or the son, Levi Denton; NARA Compiled Service Records do not provide the soldier’s age nor vital statistics.) Levi may have been discharged in February 1864 after the six-month term of service ended. Only record: Levi Bramlet, Private, Capt. James H. Field’s Company H, 4th Battalion, Georgia Infantry, State Guards, Present or absent not stated, “Appears on a Muster Roll of Capt. James H. Field’s Company, Infantry, Georgia, for local defence to serve six months within the bounds of the 9th Congressional District and agreed to unanimously by the company for Aug. 1, 1863” dated Aug. 1, 1863.

   Sarah L. Bramlett, child of Louisa Williams and Levi Bramlett, was born circa 1848 in Georgia.

   Martha “Marcena” Bramlett, child of Louisa Williams and Levi Bramlett, was born in Georgia.

Narcissa A. Bramlett, child of Levi and Louisa (Williams) Bramlett, was born circa 1850 in Georgia. She lived with her parents in 1860 and 1880.

Mary A. Bramlett, child of Levi and Louisa (Williams) Bramlett, was born circa 1851 in Georgia. She lived with her parents in 1860-80.

Lucy A. Bramlett, child of Levi and Louisa (Williams) Bramlett, was born circa 1855 in Georgia.

Teresa “Tercey” Bramlett, child of Levi and Louisa (Williams) Bramlett, was born circa 1855 in Georgia. She lived with her parents in 1860-80.

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Confederate States Carlisle Charles “Colman” Bramblett, child of Reuben and Ailsey Gray Bramlett, was born circa 1810-12 in Franklin Co., Ga. He died in or by 1870 and may rest at Stock Hill, Fannin Co., Ga. His 1863 military records describe him as age 53, six feet 10 inches tall with a fair complexion, black hair, blue eyes. C. C. served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Brown’s Company H, “Fannin Rifles,” 52nd Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, on March 4, 1862, at Morganton, Ga. He was a resident of Fannin Co., Ga., later discharged with disability Feb. 20, 1863. Colmon C. Bramblet, Private, Company H, 52nd Regiment, Georgia Infantry, “Appears on a Payroll…showing payment of bounty,” April 13, 1862, payroll dated April 13, 1862: volunteered March 4, 186(2), Morganton (Ga.), enlisted by W. W. Brown for three years, Bounty due: $50, Paid $50, Colmon C. Bramblet received payment. C. C. Bramlet, Company H, 52nd Regiment, Georgia Infantry, “Appears in a Book containing a list of deaths and discharges in the 52nd Ga. Reg’t. Remarks: Discharged 20 February 1863.” Note: “This card was made from the original record borrowed from Dr. N. F. Howard, Dahlonega, Ga.–M.S. 11894431.” C. C. Bramlet, Company H, 52nd Regiment, Georgia Infantry: “ Remarks: Jan. 24, 1863, Debility; Feb. 4, 1863, Rheumatism, Diarrhea, Debility, Discharged Feb. 20, 1863. Certificate of Disability Discharge, Army of the Confederate States: C. C. Bramlet, Private in Company H, 52nd Regiment, Georgia Infantry, born Franklin Co., Ga., black hair, farmer (record faded, very difficult to decipher). Captions and Record of Events cards indicate regiment was stationed near Vicksburg, Miss., Jan. 21, 1863. Colmon C. Bramblet, “Soldier’s Discharge. To all whom it may concern. Know Ye, That Colmman C. Bramblet, Private in Captain W. W. Brown[’s] Company H, 52nd Regiment of Geo. Vol., who was enlisted the (4th) fourth day of March one thousand eight hundred and 62, to serve Three years is hereby honorably discharged from the Army of the Confederate States….C. C. Bramblet was born in Franklin County in the State of Georgia, is fifty three years of age, 6 feet 10 inches high, fair complexion, Blue eyes, Black hair, and by occupation…a farmer. Given at Vicksburg, Miss. this February day of Twentieth 1863. W. W. Brown, Capt. Comdng. Cav. Approved R. R. Asbury Capt. Comdg. 52nd Geo. Regt.”

     C. C. married Nancy Johnson or Levasque on Sept. 20, 1835, in Habersham Co., Ga. She was born circa 1812 in North Carolina. She died after the 1870 census. Carlisle and Nancy lived in Union and Fannin counties. “Charles Bramblet,” 20-30, employed in agriculture, with one female 20-30 (wife, Nancy) and one male under 5 (son Elisha Lafayette), 1840 Union Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M704:52:8). “C. C. Bramlet,” 35, born Georgia, farmer, $200 real estate, and wife, Nancy, 38, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 85, Union Co., Ga., with five children born Georgia ([Elisha] Lafayette, 11; Martha, 8; Julian [F.], 4; Sarah, 3; Mary, 2) (NARA Film M432:84:256B). “Caroline C. Bramblet,” 49, born North Carolina (actually Georgia), farmhand, $100 personal estate, and wife, Nancy, 50, born North Carolina, housekeeper, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Stock Hill P.O., Dist. 844, Fannin Co., Ga., with three children born Georgia (Julia, 15, housekeeper; Sarah, 10, twin; Mary, 10, twin) (NARA Film M653:120:1070). His widow, Nancy Bramlet, 60, keeping house, $200 real estate, $100 personal estate, and daughter Mary Woody, 20, and her husband, Robert, 22, both work on farm, married within the year in October, all born North Carolina, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Morganton P.O., Fannin Co., Ga. (NARA Film M593:148:394A).

Elisha Lafayette Bramlett, child of Nancy Levasque and Carlisle Charles Bramlett, was born circa 1839, in Georgia.

Mary Jane Byers1Martha Jane Bramlett, child of Nancy Levasque and Carlisle Charles Bramlett, was born May 23, 1840, in Habersham Co., Ga. She died at age 76 on March 9, 1917, in Pope Co. Ark., and was buried there. She married John Albert Byers.

Julia F. Bramlett, child of Nancy Levasque and Carlisle Charles Bramlett, was born circa 1846 in Georgia.

Sarah Bramlett, child of Nancy Levasque and Carlisle Charles Bramlett, was born circa 1847 in Georgia.

Mary Bramlett, child of Nancy Levasque and Carlisle Charles Bramlett, was born circa 1842 in Georgia.

 Descendants Kim Tankersley and Deanie Bramlett Beazley provided information about Reuben E. Bramlett and family.

“Stars and Bars” and “Southern Cross Battle Flag”

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Confederate StatesU.S. Army [Emblem]Reuben E. Bramlett, child of Reuben and Ailsey Gray Bramlett, was born circa 1810-1814 in Laurens Co., S.C., or Franklin or Elbert Co., Ga. He died Oct. 16, 1864, in Stock Hill, Fannin Co., Ga., according to his son Rufus Bramlett’s Bible, and was buried there. Family tradition holds that he was assassinated at home by an unknown Confederate sympathizer, agent, or home guard because he had served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. Reuben’s Compiled Military Service Records indicate he first served as a private in Capt. Kincaid’s Company C, Sixteenth Battalion, later Thirteenth Regiment, Georgia Cavalry, State Guards, C.S.A. (NARA Film M266 Roll 56). He was enlisted in the Confederate unit on Aug. 1, 1863, at Morganton, Ga., for six months. He also served in a Union unit as a private in Company A, Union County, First Battalion, First (Col. James G. Brown’s) Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, State Troops. Reuben and son Jesse are among “Forgotten Union Guerillas of the North Georgia Mountains” who opposed secession and the war, according to historian Robert S. Davis Jr. Reuben and Jesse are included as soldiers on original rosters and records of Col. James G. Brown’s First Georgia State Troops, Union Volunteers, which documents were destroyed in Gen. John Bell Hood’s attack on Dalton, Ga., in October 1864. A recreated roster, which includes Reuben E. Bramblet and Jesse Bramblet, was prepared Jan. 10, 1870, from memories of veterans who served in Company A, First Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, U.S.A., and sent to the U.S. War Dept. to document participants’ service (NARA Document R882, Vol. 5, 1865, Box 824, Record Group 94).

Reuben E. Roll
Reuben Roll 2

  For a characterization of the Union soldier of North Georgia during the Civil War/War Between the States and a better understanding of why some North Georgians fought for the Union Army, please see the transcript of an April 19, 1901, address to the Grand Army of the Republic by Sion A. Darnell, Union soldier in Georgia and Tennessee and founder of two GAR posts and president of Georgia Department of GAR.

   Reuben married Sarah E. McMinn circa 1838. She died March 26, 1860, according to her son Rufus Bramlett’s Bible. She is not listed with Reuben in the census that year.

A descendant’s recollections of the Reuben E. Bramlett’s family history in the war:

“My Daddy, Raleigh Edgar Bramlett (born 9/17/1879 in Round Mt., Ala.) said that his father, Elisha Marion Bramlett (born about 1849 in Dalton, Ga.) and his family were living in Georgia during the War Between the States. When Gen. Sherman made his wide swath through that state, they stole everything they found – chickens, pigs, vegetables – everything. Elisha was in his early teens then and was not in the War, but his brothers were Confederate soldiers. The Bramletts, hiding with others from the wreckage of the Sherman drive, went into a nearby wood, carrying with them the only food they had – cornbread and molasses. What ‘Mad Dog’ Sherman and his group didn’t steal, they burned. Elisha’s parents were Reuben E. and Sarah Bramlett. Another story Daddy told was that one night the Bramlett family, Elisha and his parents, Reuben E. and Sarah Bramlett, were at the evening meal when a knock at the door was answered by Reuben E. When he opened the door, a man or men shot and killed him. The identity of the murderer was never known. It was thought to be a dispute concerning the War but never really understood.”

Note: Sarah, wife of Reuben E., died March 26, 1860, according to her son Rufus Bramlett’s Bible; and Reuben died Oct. 16, 1864. The Bible record and 1860 census indicate Sarah could not have been physically present when Reuben E. was murdered in 1864 because she was already deceased. Raleigh Edgar Bramlett moved from Georgia to Alabama and then to Arkansas with his father, Elisha Marion Bramlett, and family. 

Reuben E. may be the Reuben Bramlett who served as a private in Cleveland’s Company, Lindsay’s Regiment, Georgia Mounted Militia, in the Cherokee War in 1838. His brother Elijah or Elisha Bramlett also served in the same unit (NARA Film M907:1). Their father, Reuben Bramlett, served as a soldier during the War of 1812.

Census data indicate Reuben and Sarah lived in Union and then Fannin County in Georgia. “Reuben E. Bramblet,” white male 20-30, born 1810-20, with female 20-30 (wife, Sarah) and one female under 5 (daughter Caroline), are listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Union Co., Ga. (NARA Film M704:52:5). “Reuben E. Bramlet,” 35, farmer, $180 real estate, and wife, Sarah, 35, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 85, Union Co., Ga., with six children born Georgia: Caroline, 12; Adaline, 10; Rufus, 8; (Albert) William, 6; Elisha (Marion), 4; Infant (Wesley), 1 (NARA Film M432:84:276A-B). “Reuben E. Bramblet,” 50, born North Carolina (actually South Carolina or Georgia), farm hand, $150 personal estate, widowed, (wife, Sarah, died in March before the census) is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Stock Hill P.O., Dist. 844, Fannin Co., Ga., with eleven children born Georgia: Caroline, 20, housekeeper; Rufus, 18, farm hand; Adaline, 17, housekeeper; (William) Albert, 16, farm hand; Martin, 14; Elisiah (Elisha Marion), 12; Wesley, 10; Reuben Jr., 9; Sarah (Jane), 6; Cicero (Robert), 4; and (John) Benjamin, 4/12 (NARA Film M653:120:1067). Reuben and Sarah’s children include Caroline, Adaline, Rufus, William Albert, Martin, Elisha Marion, Wesley, Reuben Jr., Sarah Jane, Cicero Robert, John Benjamin Bramlett.

   Caroline Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1838 in Georgia.

   Adaline Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1840 in Georgia.

   Rufus Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born May 2, 1841, in Georgia. Rufus died Jan. 29, 1928, in Nampa Canyon, Idaho, and was buried beside his wife at Kohlerlawn Cemetery. He married Elizabeth Ann “Eliza” Summers. (She is sister of George Summers who married Adaline Bramblett.) Elizabeth was born Feb. 4, 1844, in Georgia, the daughter of Mary Endsly and Thomas E. Summers. She died Aug. 22, 1921, and was buried at Kohlerlawn.

RUFUS Bramlett grave

Rufus Bramlett’s grave marker, Section 11, Kohlerlawn Cemetery, Canyon Co., Ida., courtesy Dennis McIndoo, Greenleaf, Idaho, 2006.

“Stars and Bars” and “Southern Cross Battle Flag”

Civil War flags

Confederate StatesRufus served as a Confederate and Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He first enlisted as a private in Company E, “Joe Browns,” Second Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A., on April 22, 1861; resident of Fannin Co., Ga. He was ill, hospitalized Jan. 27, 1862, Moore Hospital, General Hospital No. 1, Danville, Va.; wounded, hospitalized July 14, 1863, Staunton, Va.; transferred to a Richmond, Va., hospital Aug. 5, 1863; prisoner of war who deserted April 1864; took Oath of Allegiance to U.S., at Chattanooga, Tenn., April 7, 1864.

Rufus Bramlette, “Pvt. 2 Regt Ga Inf Name appears as signature to an Oath of Allegiance to the United States, subscribed and sworn to on the day and year set opposite the several names.” Place of residence: Fannin Co., Ga. Complexion: Dark, Hair: Brown, Eyes: Grey; Height: 5 ft. 7 1/2 in. Date: April 7, 1864 Remarks: Signs by mark. Note: “name appears on Roll of Deserters who have taken the Oath of Amnesty at Chattanooga, Tenn.” (Roll 101, Sheet 4)

Two days later, on April 9, 1864, he enlisted at age 23 as a private in Company K, Twelfth Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry, U.S.A. He was mustered in April 11, 1864; appointed corporal May 1, 1865; mustered out Oct. 7, 1865. Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Tennessee of the Military Forces of the State from 1861 to 1866, Nashville, Tenn.: Adjutant General’s Office, March 1, 1866, documents Rufus Bramlett’s military service in Company K, Twelfth Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, U.S.A. (p. 596). 

 Family tradition holds that Rufus was part Cherokee and served as a U.S. Cavalry Volunteer and Indian Fighter after the Civil War/War Between the States.

   “Rufus Bramlet,” 8, born Georgia, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Union Co., Ga., with parents, Sarah, 35, and Reuben E., 35, farmer, both born Georgia, and five siblings born Georgia (Caroline, 12; Adaline, 10; William, 6; Elisha [Marion], 4; Infant [Wesley], 1) (NARA Film M432:84:276A-B). “Rufus Bramblet,” 18, born Georgia, farm hand, with father, Reuben E., 50, born North Carolina, farm hand, and ten siblings born Georgia (Caroline, 20, housekeeper; Adaline, 17, housekeeper; [William] Albert, 16; Martin, 14; Elisiah [Elisha Marion], 12; Wesley, 10; Reuben Jr., 9; Sarah [Jane], 6; Cicero [Robert], 4; [John] Benjamin, 4/12), 1860 Stock Hill P.O., Dist. 844, Fannin Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M653:120:1067).

   “Rufus Bramblet,” 29, lumber hauling, $300 personal estate, with wife, Eliza A., 26, keeping house, and two children (Mary P. [Pearl/Parile?], 3, and Albert E. [Elbert], 3/12, born February, and died before 1880) and four other family members (Taylor Ledford, 22, lumber hauling, $300 personal estate; Elizabeth Ledford, 20, keeping house; Rutha? J., 9/12, born August; George Somers, 22, lumber hauling, $75 personal estate; Adaline Somers, 27, weaver; Kansas Somers, 7/12, born October; Jane Bramblet, 15; Robert C., 13, works on farm; John B. Bramblet, 10), all born Georgia, 1870 Dalton P.O., 12th Land Dist., Georgia Mil. Dist. 872, Whitfield Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M593:183:122A). Rufus and family moved to Missouri; lived in Dent County and then near West Plains, Howell County. Ruff Brambtell/Bramblett, 39, born Georgia, mother’s birth state not given and father born North Carolina, laborer, with wife, (Elizabeth) Annie, 36, born Georgia to a mother born there and father born North Carolina, house keeper, and three children: [Mary Pearl?] Parile, 13, born Georgia [died in 1886]; Frank [Ray], 8, born Missouri; and [Rufus] Elbert [Albert? “Bert”], 4, born Missouri [died 1915]; [one other child, George F., born and died 1880, in the family Bible], and three others (Daniel Green, 24, Missouri, teamster; John Man, 25, Missouri, father Indiana, laborer; James Gibson, 40, Missouri, father Indiana), 1880 E. D. 64, Norman Twp., Dent Co., Mo., census (NARA Film T9:685:396B). Rufus and Eliza’s children include Mary Pearl (“Parile”), Frank Ray, Rufus Elbert (“Bert”), George F. Bramlett.

   William Albert Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1843 in Georgia.

   Martin Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1844 in Georgia.

   Elisha Marion Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1845 in Dalton, Whitfield Co., Ga. He died March 26, 1928, in El Dorado, Union Co., Ark., and was buried at Old Union Cemetery, Union Co., Ark. His grave is unmarked. His obituary appears in The El Dorado News:

E. M. BRAMLETT IS DEAD, AGE 83

Native of Georgia – Had Lived in El Dorado For Last Thirty Years

Elisha Marion Bramlett, aged 83, pioneer citizen of El Dorado, died at his home, 523 March Avenue, at 7:30 last night following a short illness. Mr. Bramlett was taken ill of influenza several days ago and complications set up. The deceased was born in Dalton, Ga., and went to West Plains, Mo. in the early 90’s. He moved to El Dorado a few years later and has lived here ever since. Mr. Bramlett was engaged in the lumber business here for many years. He followed railroad work prior to coming to Arkansas. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Bertie Bramlett; three sons, R. E. of Camden; R. R., Fort Worth; and S. E., Homer, La.; one daughter, E. Lester; 11 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren; two brothers, John, Nampa, Idaho; and West, of Fort Worth. He had been a member of the Baptist church for 60 years. Funeral services will be held at Union church at 3 this afternoon, with Dr. F. R. Dudley officiating. Funeral arrangements are in charge of the Baton Undertaking company.

He first married Mary Head. Their child is Robert Rufus Bramlett. Elisha second married Roberta “Bertie” O’Barr. She was born 1858 and died 1934. Both E. M. and Bertie are buried at Old Union Baptist Church out from El Dorado; however, neither grave is marked and family members have been unable to locate them. They are believed to be just past the entrance, next to grave with cemented oyster shell cover and bench. They moved from Georgia to Alabama and Missouri and then to Arkansas. Their children include Raleigh Edgar Bramlett, born in Alabama; Ellie Mae Bramlett Lester; Sellie Elisha Bramlett.

   A memory from Roberta “Bertie” O’Barr, wife of Elisha Marion Bramlett, relates the fear she and other Southern residents felt during the infamous March to the Sea: “[Roberta] said that when Sherman and the Union troops came through Georgia,” when she was five years old, “she could hear the guns thundering, and frightened, she took refuge beneath her bed.” –Descendant Deanie Virginia Bramlett Beazley, 1916–2003, daughter of Willie Clifford Hall and Raleigh Edgar Bramlett, wife of Jefferson Durwood Beazley, Summer 1997.

   Wesley Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1849 in Georgia. He lived in Fort Worth, Tex., in 1928.

   Reuben Bramlett, Jr., child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1851 in Georgia.

    Sarah Jane Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1854 in Georgia.

   Cicero Robert Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1856 in Georgia.

   John Benjamin Bramlett, child of Sarah E. McMinn and Reuben E. Bramlett, was born circa 1859 in Georgia. He lived in Nampa, Ida., in 1928.

   Elijah W. Bramblett, child of Reuben and Ailsey Gray Bramlett, was born May 28, 1815, in Georgia. He died Jan. 4, 1896, in Whitfield Co., Ga.

   William Albert Bramblett, child of Reuben and Ailsey Gray Bramlett, was born 1817 in Georgia. He died Nov. 28, 1869.

   John Bramblett, child of Reuben and Ailsey Gray Bramlett, was born April 3, 1820, in Georgia. He died after 1870, burial place unknown. He married Nancy L. Allen on Oct. 15, 1843, in Gilmer Co., Ga. She was born circa 1822 in North Carolina, the daughter of Rebecca Berry and John Allen. Nancy died after the 1870 census.

 John Bramblet Nancy Allen.jpgConfederate StatesJohn served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. His Compiled Military Service Records indicate he enlisted as a private in Company F, Eleventh Regiment, “Mrs. Joe Brown’s Boys,” Gilmer County, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia, on July 3, 1861, at Atlanta, Ga. (Film M266 Roll 260). He was a resident of Fannin Co., Ga. He traveled “From residence in Fannin Co., Ga., to Cartersville, Cass Co., Ga., 80 miles” to join his company. John Bramblet, same rank, unit, enlistment, Absent, Jan-Feb 1862 Company Muster Roll: was “Absent on recruiting service from Feb. 6, 1862” and “Sent to G. H. [General Hospital] Feb. 27, 1862.” “Name appears in Columns of names as John Bramblet.” Last paid by Capt. J. Guthrie to Dec. 31, 1861. “Received payment as John Bramlet.” He was on “Absent enlisted men accounted for: Sent to Gen’l Hos.” J. Bramlet, same rank, unit, “Appears on a Regimental Return…for…Dec. 1862”: “Alterations since last return among the enlisted men:” Discharged July 20, 186(2) Richmond, Va. Last Record: Service/Pension Inquiry, John Bramlett, Private, Company F, 11th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Confederate Statement of Service Reference Slip, from Commissioner of Pensions, State of Georgia, dated July 21, 1916: “Mr. Harley, What have you relative to final record of this man. Reg’l. Return Dec. 1862 shows him disch’g’d July 20, 1862, at Richmond.” Reply on July 22, 1916, from 10th Street: “Nothing additional found in the Confederate Archives. Harley.” He was sent to General Hospital, Richmond, Va., in February 1862, and discharged with disability July 20, 1862, at Richmond, Va. He survived the war and returned home to Georgia.

    John and wife, Nancy, lived in Cass, Fannin and Bartow counties in Georgia. “John Bramblet,” 30, born Georgia, farmer, and wife, Nancy (Allen), 20, born North Carolina, housekeeper, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Div. 12, Cass Co., Ga., with three children born Georgia: Rebecca, 4; John, 3; Agnes, 1 (NARA Film M432:63:197B). “John Bramblet,” 40, born Georgia, farmhand, and wife, Nancy, 38, born North Carolina, housekeeper, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Dist. 1205, Pierceville P.O., Fannin Co., Ga.., with seven children born Georgia: Malinda 17; Allen, 18, farmhand; Agness, 11; James, 9; Nancy Matilda, 5; Francis, 3; Sarah, 1 (NARA Film M653:120:1047). “John Bramlett,” 49, born Georgia, farmhand, and wife, Nancy L., 43, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Subdiv. 5, Cartersville P.O., Bartow Co., Ga., with five children born Georgia: Nancy Matilda, 16; Frances, 14; Sarah E., 12; Mary A., 9; George (Robert), 6 (NARA Film M593:135:467). John and Nancy’s children include Rebecca Malinda, John Allen, Agnes, James, Nancy Matilda, Frances, Sarah E., Tom (died young), Mary A., George Robert Bramlett.

    Rebecca Malinda Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born circa 1846 Georgia.

    John Allen Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born April 15, 1847, in Georgia. He died April 3, 1920, in Eastaboga, Calhoun Co., Ala., and was buried at Plum Springs Cemetery. He married Parthenia Davis on Feb. 3, 1869, in Cass Co., Ga. She was born circa 1872. She died Dec. 28, 1908, and was buried at Plum Springs. “J. A. Bramlett,” 33, and wife, Parthena, 28, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Bartow Co., Ga., with two sons and a daughter: J. E., 11; William, 9; F. E., 4, daughter. All were born in Georgia.

    Agnes Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born circa 1849 in Georgia. She died on Oct. 3, 1893, in Alabama. She married Dillavan Peck, who used the alias Dan Purmort, in 1866.

  James Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born circa 1851 in Georgia.

   Nancy Matilda Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born March 21, 1854, in Rome, Georgia. She died at age 77 on July 24, 1931, in Lincoln, Ala.

  Frances Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born in 1857 in Georgia. She married Ebenezer Ciprian Stewart and had eight children. She second married Lonzo V. Bramlett and had two children.

  Sarah E. Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born circa 1858 in Georgia.

  Tom Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born circa 1860 in Georgia and died there in or by 1870.

  Mary A. Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born circa 1861 in Georgia.

  George Robert Bramlett, child of John and Nancy L. Allen Bramlett, was born circa 1864 in Georgia.

Margaret, Daughter of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III

   Margaret Bramblett, believed to be child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born July 25, 1776, in Laurens Co., S.C. She moved from Laurens County to Elbert Co., Ga., circa 1800-1801 with parents and siblings. Margaret married William Gober II/Jr. on Oct. 29, 1805, in Franklin Co., Ga., where she was apparently visiting or staying with her brother Reuben and family. She and her husband settled in Jackson Co., Ga., after their marriage. She died May 30, 1853, and was buried at Gober Cemetery, Commerce, Jackson Co., Ga. Margaret’s obituary appears in the July 8, 1853, issue of Southern Christian Advocate:

Died, near Harmony Grove, Jackson co., Ga., May 30, [1853] Mrs. Margaret Gober, wife of Wm. Gober, in her 77th year.

It was in S.C., on the Saluda circuit, at Bramlet Church, under the ministry of the Rev. James King, and more than sixty years ago, [at about age 16, before 1793] that she joined the M. E. Church as an anxious seeker of religion, and two weeks thereafter found peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Without any reserve, she then made a full surrender of heart and life to the cause of Christ; and that solemn covenant was ever after, to the time of her departure from earth, most strictly observed.

The ordinary means of grace, religious conversation, private and social prayer, she highly valued, and her very soul feasted upon the Scriptures. And only last year ‘in age and feebleness extreme,’ she was at the altar receiving the emblems of the broken body and shed blood of her dying Lord, and truly did she feed upon him by faith in her heart.

Sister G. was very warmly attached to the peculiarities of Methodism, such as the class-meeting and love-feast; and she always hailed the return of those gracious seasons as times of refreshing from the presence of the Lord. Possessing an unusually sweet voice for singing, she was not only blessed herself, but also added much interest to those joyful occasions. Nor did she neglect her duties at home to husband, children and servants.

Her last illness originated from a severe cold that settled on the right gland of the throat; it was protracted and peculiarly distressing, as it disabled her from talking, made it difficult for her to eat, and even to breathe. With Christian fortitude and resignation of the will of her heavenly Father she bore all with a patience of which none but a child of God is capable.

A short time before her death she said to one of her daughters, that she had seen many trials in the world, but that they were about over, and she was almost gone, and when it was the will of God, she did not care how soon. When the time of her change came, she fell asleep in Jesus. W. J. Cotter

One “Margaret Bramblett” of Capt. Dunston Blackwell’s District, Elbert Co., Ga., most likely daughter of Henry III, had one draw in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery. Her one draw indicated she was then single. (This Margaret could be daughter or mother of Henry III, who were both single at the time of the lottery registration in 1804 or 1805. Henry III’s mother Margaret became a widow circa 1779-1780 when her husband died. She had a farm in South Carolina, but may have been visiting or living with her son Henry III in 1804-1805 during registration. Elbert Co., Ga., was not very far from Laurens Co., S.C.) Henry III’s daughter Margaret married William Gober II/Jr. in Franklin Co., Ga., on Oct. 29, 1805, most likely some time after reNSSAR EMBLEMgistering for the Georgia Land Lottery. They moved to Jackson Co., Ga. He was born April 6, 1765, in Amelia Co., Va., the son of Lucy Craddock and William Gober I/Sr. The latter was born 1744 in Virginia and died 1826 in Newton Co., Ga. He served as a Revolutionary War Veteran who served in or supported the North Carolina Militia. One of their Gober descendants, William Gober Lyons, of Stuart, Fla., in 1959 provided information about them and their family members when he joined the Florida State National Society of Sons of American Revolution (NSSAR). He cited the Oath of Allegiance in Granville Co., N.C., where William Gober I/Sr. lived, as his ancestor’s service “in assisting in establishment of American Independence during the War of the Revolution.” Lyons cites the elder Gober’s wife as “Lucy Appling.”

   William Gober II/Jr. died June 24, 1860, in Jackson Co., Ga., and was buried there at Gober Cemetery. William II/Jr. wrote his will on July 8, 1853, in Jackson County. It was probated Nov. 13, 1860, in Jackson County Court of Ordinary. He added a codicil on Jan. 14, 1854 (WB-B:29-32):

Last Will and Testament and Codicil of William Gober II

In the name of God, Amen. I, William Gober of said State and County being of advanced age, of sound mind and disposing memory, deem it right and proper both as it respects my family and myself that I should make a disposition of the property with which the kind Providence has blessed me do therefore make this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking all others heretofore made by me.
First Item. I desire and direct that my body be buried in a Christian like manner. My soul I trust shall return to him who gave it as I hope for Eternal Salvation through Jesus Christ whose religion I have professed and trust enjoyed for forty-nine years.
Second Item. I desire and direct that all my just debts be paid by my Executors hereinafter appointed as soon as possible after my decease.
Third Item. I give and bequeath to my two afflicted daughters, viz. Alsey L. and Susannah for their support and my aged slave Chaney during their natural lifetime forty acres of land more or less to be run off the upper part of the lot whereon I now live commencing at the southeast corner of the fresh field running north with the fence to line at the creek thence with said line around to the beginning including said field and two negroes, George and Bob, two cows and calves, and two beds and my furniture, which property to be subject to the control of my executors or some person chosen by Alsey L. for that purpose to see to it that it is properly managed for their support and benefit during their natural lives. At the death of both of them, the said property is to be sold at public outcry by my executors and equally divided among my children as hereinafter directed.
Fourth Item. I give and bequeath to my daughter Alsey L. one negro girl Harriet about thirteen years old and one horse and carriage subject to her control during her natural lifetime only then to revert back to my estate with the increase of the girl, if any.
Fifth Item. To Wiley Gober’s living children I give nothing more than I have expended on their father and them years past.
Sixth Item. The balance of my property not otherwise disposed of, I direct my Executors to sell at public outcry and be equally divided among my children viz: Sarah Armstrong, John Y. Gober, Mary Gober, Nancy Phillips, Martha Bramlett, William C. Gober, Elizabeth B. Gober, Permelia Sewell, Alsey L. Gober, Henry B. Gober, Jessie L. Gober, Clarissa Smith, Christian Butler, Susannah Gober.
Seventh Item. I hereby constitute and appoint my beloved sons, John Y. Gober and Henry B. Gober Executors of this my last Will and Testament this 8th day of July 1853.

William Gober, Sr[II/Jr.]
Signed, sealed, declared and published by William Gober as his last Will and Testament in the presence of us the subscribers who subscribed our names hereunto in the presence of said Testator at his special instance and request and each other, this July 8, 1853
William D. Smith
S. M. Shankle
C. Sewell, T.T.
Recorded November 13, 1860.

Codicil of William Gober [II/Jr.]
State of Georgia}
Jackson County}

Where I, William Gober, did on the eighth day of July Eighteen Hundred and Fifty-three sign, seal, declare and publish my last Will and Testament in the presence of Wm. D. Smith, S. M. Shankle and C. Sewell, J.P. who signed the said Will and Testament as witnesses and whereas I an desirous of altering and adding to a bequest and desire in said Will I therefore make and publish this Codicil to said Will
First Item. I revoke and add to the third item of said Will so far relates to the forty acres of land named in said Item and add all the north part including the building commencing at the north of the Spring branch at the ditch thence west straight across said lot to H. B. Gober’s line, thence north from the lines as they now run to the beginning for the purposes and uses names in said third Item of said Will and to revert back to my Estate to be disposed of as directed in said Will at the death of my daughters Alsey L. and Susannah and Chaney my aged servant this January 14th 1854.
William Gober, Sr. [II/Jr.]
Signed, sealed, declared and published by William Gober on the Codicil to be his Will and Testament of the eighth day of July 1853 in the presence of us the Subscribers who subscribed our names hereunto in the presence of said Testator at his special instances and request in the presence of each other this January 14th 1854.
S. M. Shankle
Wm. D. Smith
C. Sewell

Georgia}
Jackson County}
Personally came into open Court S. M. Shankle and Wm. D. Smith who being duly sworn saith that they saw William Gober, Sr., the within Testator sign, seal, publish and deliver the within writing to be his last Will and Testament and that they with C. Sewell subscribed the same as witnesses in the presence of each other and in the presence of the Testator and at his request they believe that he was at the time of sound mind and disposing memory. Sworn to and subscribed before me this second July 1860.
A. C. Thompson Ordinary
S. M. Shankle
Wm. D. Smith
Recorded 13th November 1860 – A. C. Thompson, Ordinary. (WB-B:29-32)

Last Will and Testament and Codicil of William Gober II

wm-gober-will

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William Gober II/Jr. first married Elizabeth Burns. Their children, named in his 1853 Last Will and Testament, illustrated above, include Sarah Gober Armstrong, John Young Gober, Mary Gober, Nancy Gober Phillips, Martha Gober Bramlett, William C. Gober, Elizabeth B. Gober.

   Margaret and William Gober II/Jr.’s children, named in his 1853 Last Will and Testament, include Permelia (“Millie”), Alsey L., Henry Bramlett, Jesse Lee, Clarissa P., Catherine Christiana, Susannah Gober. 

    Permelia “Millie” Gober, child of Margaret Bramblett and William Gober II, was born 1807 in Jackson Co., Ga. She died in 1884. She married John E. Sewell. Their children include Margaret, William, Angus, Elizabeth, Milly, Nancy, John, Janette Sewell.

    Alsey L. Gober, child of Margaret Bramblett and William Gober II, was born 1809 in Jackson Co., Ga. She died intestate in 1862. She did not marry. Jackson Co., Ga., court appointed her brother Henry Bramlett Gober as administrator of her estate.alsy-l-gober-estate-2

Georgia, Wills and Probate Records, 1742-1992 for Alsey L. Gober Letters of Administration, 1862

    Henry Bramlett Gober, child of Margaret Bramblett and William Gober II, was born April 8, 1811, in Jackson Co., Ga. He died Feb. 12, 1879, and was buried at Gober Cemetery. He married Martha Wafer “Patsy” Hudson on Jan. 26, 1835, in Franklin County. She was born April 27, 1815. She died at age 99 on June 11, 1914, and was buried at Gober Cemetery. Her obituary appears in the June 12, 1914, edition of The Atlanta Constitution with the headline “Mrs. Martha Gober Dies in Ninety-Ninth Year”:

Commerce, Ga., June 11 – – (Special) – – Mrs. Martha Gober died of paralysis at her home near this place this morning. Had she lived until next April, she would have been 100 years old. She was possibly the oldest Methodist in the state, having joined that church here in childhood. The interment will be tomorrow at the family burial ground, four miles south of this place, by her pastor, Rev. J. T. Eakes.

Martha and Henry had four children, including Francis Asbury, Margaret Melissa and William Joshua Gober.

   William Joshua Gober was born Sept. 24, 1844, in Jackson Co., Ga. He died Feb. 9, 1917, in Ocala, Fla. He married Clarissa Embry on Dec. 13, 1868. She was born April 10, 1845. She died in 1916 in Commerce, Ga.

   Jesse Lee Gober, child of Margaret Bramblett and William Gober II, was born March 5, 1814, in Jackson Co., Ga. He died Aug. 12, 1863, at Boggy Depot, Choctaw, Indian Territory, now Oklahoma, and was buried at Dulaney Cemetery near Celeste, Hunt Co., Tex. He first married Margaret Minerva Mayes on June 17, 1835, in Georgia. He second married Mary Ann Austin on Jan. 17, 1843, in Georgia. She was born Jan. 10, 1821. She died Dec. 27, 1879, and rests next to Jesse at Dulaney Cemetery. “Jesse L. Gober,” 37, born Georgia, farmer, $200 real estate, and (second) wife, Mary A., 29, born South Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Merritts, Cobb Co., Ga., with four children born Georgia (Marion C., 14; Salena A., 13; Sephas C., 5; Minerva, 3) (NARA Film M432:66:155B). Jesse and Margaret’s children include Marion C., Salena A., William L., Gober. Jesse and Mary Ann’s children include Cephas C., Manerva, James Bascom, Mary Jane Elizabeth, Orilia Parthena, Joseph Lee Gober.

Marion C. Gober grave

Marion C. Gober’s military headstone, courtesy Carl Jones

Confederate StatesMarion C. Gober, child of Margaret Minerva Mayes and Jesse Lee Gober, was born Nov. 17, 1836, in Georgia. He died Oct. 18, 1862, in Pine Bluff, Jefferson Co., Ark., while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He was buried at historic Camp White Sulphur Springs Cemetery. He married Charlotte J. Manning, daughter of Renerend Walter Manning, in 1856 in Cobb Co., Ga. They lived in Arkansas. “M. C. Gober,” 24, born in Georgia, and wife, C. J., 28, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Marie Saline, Hamburg P.O., Ashley Co., Ark., with one child (E. V., 1), (NARA Film M653:37:184). Marion enlisted as a private in Capt. Bragg’s Company G, Thirty-Seventh Regiment, Arkansas Infantry, on May 10, 1862, at Hamburg, Ark. (The regiment was designated at various times as First Regiment Trans-Mississippi Infantry, Pleasants’ Regiment Arkansas Infantry, and Bell’s Regiment Arkansas Infantry; and it was also known as First Regiment Arkansas Infantry, 29th Regiment Arkansas Infantry and 37th Regiment Arkansas Infantry.) Marion and Charlotte’s child is Elizabeth Viola Gober, born Nov. 11, 1858, in Ashley Co., Ark. She married a man named Medlock. She died in May 1880 in Gwinnett Co., Ga., and was buried with an inscribed grave marker at Norcross City Cemetery in the Moore Clark Medlock family plot.

 
    Salena A. Gober, child of Margaret Minerva Mayes and Jesse Lee Gober, was born circa 1837 in Georgia. She died June 21, 1902, in Cobb County and was buried there at Sardis Baptist Church Cemetery. She married John D. Gantt on Aug. 9, 1858 in Cobb Co., Ga. Their children include Margaret Louisa, William Mayes, Jasper LaFayette, Virginia Lee, James M., Jesse Newton, Rosa Emma, Hattie Litita, Elzia Cleo, John May, Omer C. Gantt.
 

   William L. Gober, child of Margaret Minerva Mayes and Jesse Lee Gober, was born Nov. 17, 1839, in Georgia.

 

   Cephas C. Gober, child of Mary Ann and Jesse Lee Gober, was born circa 1845 in Georgia.  Minerva Gober, child of Mary Ann and Jesse Lee Gober, was born Dec. 17, 1845, in Georgia. She died July 16, 1882. She married D. N. Lee on July 2, 1873, in Hunt Co., Tex.

 

     James Bascom Gober, child of Jesse Lee Gober, was born circa 1847 in Georgia.

   Mary Jane Elizabeth Gober, child of Jesse Lee Gober, was born circa 1845 in Georgia.

   Orilia Parthena Gober, child of Jesse Lee Gober, was born circa 1847 in Georgia.

   Joseph Lee Gober, child of Jesse Lee Gober, was born circa 1847 in Georgia.


   Christiana Catherine Gober, child of Margaret Bramblett and William Gober II, was born Jan. 6, 1817, in Jackson Co., Ga. She died Dec. 7, 1906. She married Alfred/Alford P. Butler on Jan. 25, 1833, in Jackson County.

   Clarissa P. Gober, child of Margaret Bramblett and William Gober II, was born 1814 in Jackson Co., Ga. She died in 1893. She married Jeptha F. Smith on June 28, 1840, in Jackson Co., Ga.

  Susannah Gober, child of Margaret Bramblett and William Gober II, was born 1819 in Jackson Co., Ga. She died after the 1870 census in Jackson County. She did not marry.

John, Son of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III

   John Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1784-85 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died in or after 1860 in Rock Creek, Murray Co., Ga. John married Elizabeth Ford, daughter of John Ford, before July 6, 1817, most likely circa 1805 in Elbert Co., Ga. John Bramblett contested in 1817 the 1803 will of John Ford, father of Elizabeth Ford Bramblett, as presented by the estate administrators in Elbert Co., Ga.

John Bramblett v. John Ford estate administrators

John Bramblett filed a court petition on July 6, 1817, in Elbert Co., Ga., on behalf of his wife, Elizabeth Ford Bramblett, to contest a will and filed later petitions to contest the distribution of slaves in her father John Ford’s estate. The document provides proof that John and Elizabeth Ford married before that date. Petition 20681704 asks the court to prevent Mary Ford, the widow of John Ford, and Thomas Cook, relationship unknown, from moving the family slaves from Georgia while a will was being contested. In the 1817 petition, John Bramblett contends that, by right of his wife Elizabeth, he is entitled to one-fourth of her father’s estate. John Ford, Elizabeth’s father, apparently died intestate. Mary Ford and Thomas Cook had produced a will that Bramblett charged is a forgery. The will was currently being contested and Bramblett believed it will be ruled void. Meanwhile, Bramblett asserted, Mary Ford and one Jesse Patterson had taken possession of John Ford’s eight slaves, valued at $3,000, and intended to leave the court’s jurisdiction. Bramblett asked that Ford and Patterson answer his allegations and that they be prevented from removing the slaves from the state until the estate dispute is settled. The records indicate John Ford’s widow, Mary Ford, had possession of the following slaves in 1817: Ally black female, Dennis black male, Peter black male, Johnson black male, Fanny black male, Sally black female. Jesse Patterson, relationship unknown, perhaps husband of Elizabeth’s sisters, had possession of two black female slaves: Hannah and Betcy. Estate case documents filed in Elbert County include an “Injunction Against Mary Ford and Jesse Patterson” dated Oct. 10, 1817; a “Subpoena and Writ of Ne Exeat, Mary Ford and Jesse Patterson,” dated Oct. 11, 1817; a “Sheriff’s Return,” dated Oct. 20, 1817; a “Bond signed by Mary Ford and Jesse Patterson, Thomas Cook, John Ford, Robert Kennedy, Reuben White” dated Oct. 20, 1817; and the May 16, 1822, final “Decree” when John Bramblett’s petition was “dismissed” by Judge John M. Dooly. Mary Ford may be Elizabeth’s mother or stepmother. Elizabeth’s siblings are John Ford Jr., who married Nancy Graham; Jesse Ford; and Dorcas Ford.

Source: “John Bramblett and Elizabeth Ford Bramblett 1817 Petition.” Records of the Superior Court, Writs 1830-1833, pp. 11 1/2-13, Elbert County, Georgia, Courthouse, Elberton, GA. Note: Georgia Archives has posted an abstract of this petition online at http://s-libweb2.uncg.edu/slavery/petitions/details.aspx?pid=493.

    “John Bramlett,” 75, born South Carolina, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Murray Co., Ga., with daughter-in-law Sarah Bramlett, 52, born Georgia, day laborer, and her two children born Georgia (Polly A., 18; Josephus, 12) (NARA Film M653:132:42). (Sarah “Sally” is widow of Nathan Bramlett.) Next door: Sarah’s son “Nathan Bramlett,” 22, and wife, Malinda, 14, born Georgia. John and Elizabeth’s children include John S. and Nathan Bramlett.

   John S. Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Ford and John Bramlett, was born circa 1805 in Elbert Co., Ga. He died circa 1886-1887 in White Co., Ga. He married Nancy Dickson on Nov. 26, 1826, in Habersham Co., Ga. She died before 1880 census, when John was listed as a widower, perhaps in Blue Creek, White Co., Ga., where they lived.

john-and-nancy-dickson-mba-100
Confederate StatesJohn served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company B, Col. J. S. Fain’s Regiment, Col. Sumner J. Smith’s Legion, “Georgia Partisan Rangers,” Georgia Volunteer Infantry Battalion, on Feb. 15, 1863, at Clarksville, Habersham Co., Ga. He was a resident of White Co., Ga. He transferred when the regiment merged into Sixty-Fifth Georgia Infantry. “J. S. Bramlet Appears on a Report of a Guard mounted at Knoxville, Tenn., on Aug. 2, 1863” posted at “Jail” (Miscellaneous File No. 182). His Compiled Military Service Records indicate he was ill and hospitalized in Dalton, Ga., Oct. 25, 1863. He was absent on sick furlough, and then AWOL in December 1863. His name was dropped from Company Muster Roll Aug. 1, 1864 (NARA Film M266 Roll 571). His records are incomplete; it is not known if he returned to his unit or joined another.

   John and family lived in Habersham County in 1850 and in White County during 1860–1880. “John S. Bromblett,” 44, farmer, and wife, Nancy, 44, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 3, Div. 37, Habersham Co., Ga., with nine children (N./H., 21, female; E. (Enoch), 18; M. [Martha] J., 16, female; E. [Elizabeth], 15, female; T. A. [Agnes], 3, female; R. [Rufus] M., 10, male; M. [Melissa], 5, female; J. [James] A., 4, male; A. [Alonzo Richard], 1, male), all born Georgia (NARA Film M432:72:242). “John S. Bramblet,” 55, farmer, $90 personal estate, and wife, Nancy, 55, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Mount Yonah P.O., White Co., Ga., with three children: Malissa, 14; James (A.), 12; Allonza (Richard), 11, all born Georgia (NARA Film M653:140:496). “John (S.) Bramlett, 63, farmer, $1,000 real estate, $35 personal estate, and wife, Nancy, 63, keeping house, both born Georgia, 1870 Cleveland P.O., Subdiv. 135, White Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M593:183:53B). “John Bramblet,” 63, and wife, Nancy, 63, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Subdiv. 13, Cleveland P.O., White Co., Ga. (NARA Film M593:183:53B). “John S. Bramblet,” 74, born Georgia to parents born South Carolina, widowed, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Blue Creek, White Co., Ga., with grown daughter Malissa, 33, born Georgia (NARA Film T9:171:540A). John paid taxes in 1882–1887 on land at Cleveland P.O., Blue Creek Dist. in White Co., Ga.

John S. Bramlett taxes   John and Nancy’s children include Rosa, N./H. (Nathan? Henry? or Daughter?), Enoch, Martha J. (“Mett” “Marthy”), Elizabeth, T. Agnes, Rufas M., Malissa B., James A., Alonzo Richard Bramlett.

   Rosa “Rosey” Bramlett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born in 1827 in Habersham Co., Ga. She married John Fletcher Ledford on Feb. 3, 1847, in Habersham County. She died in or after 1910 in Georgia. “Rosie Ledford,” 84, born Georgia to a mother born there, father Tennessee, widowed, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Falling Water, Habersham Co., Ga. (NARA Film T624:195:80B). She lived with her brother Enoch and family. Rosa and John’s children include Louvena, Enoch, Sarah, Jefferson, Daniel, John, Rutha M. “Ruthie” Ledford.

  N. H. or (Nancy?) Bramlett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born circa 1829 in Habersham Co., Ga. This child, who could be Nathan or Henry or a daughter–Nancy? unknown, is included with the parents in 1850.

enoch:ester graves

Graves of Enoch and Ester Bramlett, courtesy Sandy Newsome

   Enoch Bramlett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born Nov. 17, 1830/31, in Habersham Co., Ga. He died Jan. 3, 1922, and was buried at Chattahoochee Baptist Church Cemetery, White Co., Ga. His inscribed tombstone provides his birth and death dates and describes him as “A Kind Father.” “E. [Enoch] Bromblett,” 18, born Georgia, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 3, Div. 37, Habersham Co., Ga., with parents, Nancy, 44, and John S., 44, farmer, and eight siblings (N./H., 21, female; M. [Martha] J., 16, female; E. [Elizabeth], 15, female; T. A. [Agnes], 13, female; R. [Rufus] M., 10, male; M. [Melissa], 5, female; J. [James] A., 4, male; A. [Alonzo Richard], 1, male), all born Georgia (NARA Film M432:72:242). (Another child, Rosa, had married and left home.) 

   Enoch married Easter Elizabeth. She was born circa 1846. Her sister may be Orpha “Orphy” Dillard who lived with Easter and Enoch in 1880-1900, “Enoch Bramlet,” 35 (actually 29/30), miner, and wife, Easter, 23, both born Georgia, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Benton P.O., Dist. 8, Polk Co., Tenn., with one child (daughter Sarah, 10/12, born Tennessee, mismarked as a male) (NARA Film M653:1268:432A). (His brother Rufus Bramlett, 18, lived nearby with E. H. Denny and family and also worked as a miner.)

Enoch CSAConfederate StatesEnoch served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. Confederate Muster Rolls in Georgia State Archives indicate he first enlisted as a second sergeant in Company G, Capt. John H. Cravens’ Company, Eighth Regiment, Third Brigade, Georgia Infantry, on Nov. 7, 1861, in Loudsville, White Co., Ga., for six months. He resigned his commission Feb. 17, 1862, and was discharged as a private. He second enlisted as a private in Company A, Sixteenth Battalion, “Partisan Rangers,” Thirteenth Regiment, Georgia Cavalry, on Feb. 9, 1863, in Cleveland, White Co., Ga. (NARA Film M311 Roll 53). He was a prisoner of war captured at Blue Springs, Tenn., Oct. 12, 1863. He was first sent to Camp Nelson, Ky., then transferred to Camp Chase, Ohio, and then sent to Rock Island, Ill., before being transferred for exchange March 20, 1865, and discharge in April at Richmond, Va. He survived the prison camps and the war. He applied for a pension in 1900 at age 70 while living in White Co., Ga. It was transferred to Habersham County between 1910 and 1920. He suffered from old age, infirmity and poverty.

Enoch CSA 1He signed his name “Enoch Bramblet and recognized a wife and four children in 1900 in White County. Later, after Easter died, their daughter Sarah S. Bramlett signed his final pension payment documents, which include medical and burial expenses, on July 24, 1922, in Habersham County.
Enoch CSA dead

Census: “Enoch Bramblet, 39, gold digging, with wife, Ester, 30, and four children (Sarah [Samantha], 10; William [A.], 8; James [R.], 4; John [T./F.], 1), all born Georgia, 1870 Subdiv. 13, Cleveland P.O., White Co., Ga., (NARA Film M593:183:53B). (They lived near his parents, John [S.], 63, and Nancy, 63.) “Enoch Bramblet,” 49, born Georgia to parents born there, farmer, with wife, Easter, 43, born Georgia to parents born North Carolina, and seven children, all born Georgia except eldest (Sarah S., 20, born Tennessee, works on farm; William A., 18, laborer; James R., 14, works on farm; John F., 11, works on farm; Robert T. [Thadius], 8; Laura A., 2; Joseph L. [Love], 6/12), plus four Dillard family members (Orphy A., 46, born North Carolina, sister-in-law, works on farm; William A.

, 13, born Georgia to mother born North Carolina, father born Georgia, niece, female, works on farm; William A., 36, born Georgia to parents born North Carolina, brother-in-law, works on farm; John T., 26, born Georgia to parents born North Carolina, cousin), 1880 Tesentee, Dist. 189, White Co., Ga. (NARA Film T9:171:518A). (They lived near Enoch’s father, John S. Bramblet, 74, born Georgia to parents born South Carolina, widowed, and daughter Malissa, 33, born Georgia, 1880 Blue Creek, White Co., Ga. [NARA Film T9:171:540A].) “Enoch Bramblet,” 69, born November 1830 Georgia to a mother born Georgia, father born South Carolina, farmer, rents farm, married forty years, with wife, Easter, 53, born 1846 Georgia to parents born North Carolina, mother of seven children, six living, and three grown children all born Georgia except the eldest (Samantha [Sarah], 38, born July 1861 Tennessee; Joseph [Love], 18, 1882; Laura, 21, 1879) and two others (Orpha Dillard, 67, 1833 Tennessee, sister-in-law; America, 33, 1867 Georgia, niece) 1900 Chattahoochee, White Co., Ga. (NARA Film T623:228:19B). “Enock Branlett,” 78, with wife, Easter Elizabeth, 63, born 1846, both born Georgia, and one grown child (Sarah L., 48, born Tennessee) and two others (granddaughter Maud, 14, born Georgia to a mother born Tennessee, father born Georgia, and sister Rosie Ledford, 84, born Georgia to a mother born Georgia, father born South Carolina, widowed), 1910 Falling Water, Dist. 1391, Habersham Co., Ga. (NARA Film T624:195:80B). “Enoch Bramlett,” 88, and two grown children (Samantha [Sarah], 57, and Laura [A.], 40, both born Tennessee to a mother born North Carolina and father born Georgia, both spinners, cotton mill), 1920 Falling Water, Dist. 1391, Habersham Co., Ga. (NARA Film T625:261:90B). Enoch and Easter’s children, born between 1861 and 1882, include Sarah Samantha, William A., James R., John T./F., Robert Thadius, Laura A., Joseph Love Bramlett.

Tombstone of Martha Jane Bramblett Allison, courtesy Theron Rogers

Martha Bramblett Allison

   Martha Jane “Mett” “Marthy” Bramblett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born circa 1834 in Habersham Co., Ga. She died after 1880 and rests at Mount Pleasant Methodist Church Cemetery, Cleveland, White Co., Ga. She married Burch Allison by 1860. He was born June 23, 1831, in Habersham Co., Ga., the son of Margaret Unknown and Hampton Allison of Habersham Co., Ga.. He died Nov. 1, 1884, in White Co., Ga., and was buried at Mount Pleasant Methodist Church Cemetery.

Burch Allison grave

Grave of Burch Allison, husband of Martha Jane Bramblett

Confederate Flags

   Burch served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Smith’s Legion, Georgia Infantry Battalion, on May 15, 1862, and transferred to Company C when the unit merged into the Sixty-Fifth Regiment, Georgia Infantry, in March 1863. His Compiled Military Records indicate he deserted July 28, 1863, and rejoined his company from desertion. He was arrested Oct. 5, 1863. He was captured and held as a prisoner of war until paroled at Greensboro, N.C., April 28, 1865. He was ill with a fever and hospitalized June 27–July 3, 1865. He survived the war.

   Burch and Martha lived in Mt. Yonah, White Co., Ga., in 1860 and in Cleveland, White Co., Ga., in 1870 and in Nacoochee, White Co., Ga., in 1880. After Burch died Martha lived in Falling Water, Habersham Co., Ga., with a daughter and four grandchildren in her house. Burch and Martha’s children are Mary S., Susan Elizabeth, Georgia Ann, Margaret Elender, Rufus W., Francis C., Nancy M., James Alonzo, John N. Allison.

   Mary S. Allison, child of Martha Jane Bramblett and Burch Allison, was born in Georgia.

   Susan Elizabeth Allison, child of Martha Jane Bramblett and Burch Allison, was born in Georgia.

   Georgia Ann Allison, child of Martha Jane Bramblett and Burch Allison, was born Jan. 18, 1862, in Georgia. She died 1920, in Helen, White Co., Ga. Her Georgia Death Certificate 21927 identifies her as Georgia Wright, daughter of Martha Bramlet and Burch Allison. (1862 – 1920)

   Margaret Elender Allison, child of Martha Jane Bramblett and Burch Allison, was born in Georgia.

   Rufus W. Allison, child of Martha Jane Bramblett and Burch Allison, was born in Georgia. (1868 – 1935)

   Francis C. Allison, child of Martha Jane Bramblett and Burch Allison, was born in Georgia.

   Nancy M. Allison, child of Martha Jane Bramblett and Burch Allison, was born in Georgia.

   Jim Alonzo Allison, child of Martha Jane Bramblett and Burch Allison, was born in Georgia. (1871 – 1945)

Mystery Parents of Sarah Ann — Daughter or Niece of John S. Bramlett?

Tombstone of Sarah Ann Allen

Sarah Allen grave 1

“She hath faded away to shine brightly in heaven.”

   Sarah Ann Bramblett may be a daughter of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett who was missed by the census taker in 1850 and married in 1860 before the census or a niece. She was born Aug. 8, 1841, in Habersham Co., Ga. She died at age 74 on Sept. 4, 1915, in White Co., Ga., and rests at Mount Pleasant United Methodist Church Cemetery, Cleveland, Ga. She married John Coleman Allen Jr. on March 4, 1860, in Fannin Co., Ga. (MB-A:118). She provided their marriage date and her birth date and place in her pension application in 1903.

SARAH ANN BRAMLETT ALLEN MARRIAGE

John was born Aug. 21, 1841, at Duke’s Creek, Habersham (later White) Co., Ga., the son of Dorcas Allison and John Coleman Allen Sr. and brother of Henson Marion Allen who married Elizabeth Bramblett, in Habersham Co., Ga. John Jr. died at age 58 on Sept. 22, 1899, in White Co., Ga., and was buried there at Mount Pleasant United Methodist Church Cemetery, Cleveland, Ga. John served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. His Compiled Military Service Records, which are incomplete, indicate he enlisted as a private in Company K, “Dixie Rangers,” Infantry Battalion, Col. Sumner J. Smith’s Legion, Georgia Partisan Rangers, on May 15, 1862, at Loudsville, White Co., Ga. (NARA Film M266:601). That unit later became Company D, Infantry Battalion, Smith’s Legion, Georgia Volunteers. Then the infantry battalion became Sixty-Fifth Regiment, Georgia Infantry, in March 1863. John was assigned to Company C. He is listed as “Capt. J. C. Allen” in Enoch Bramblet’s Compiled Military Service Records. John was severely wounded June 27, 1864, at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Ga. Last record on Aug. 31, 1864, indicates he was absent due to wounds. He survived the war and returned to White County where he and family are listed in 1870: “Sarah A. Allen,” 26, keeping house, and husband, John, 26, both born Georgia, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Fork, Habersham Co., Ga., with four children born Georgia: Julia H., 8; Good H., 4; Lou A., 3; William A., 1 (NARA Film M593:154:239B). 

John C. Allen 1880

“Sarah Allen,” 30, keeping house, and husband, John C., 30, farmer, both born Georgia, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Town Creek, White Co., Ga., with eight children, all born Georgia: Julia, 19, domestic; Hughs G., 15, works on farm; Lou A., 13; William A., 11, works on farm; Nancy L., 9; John R., 6; Sarah M., 4; Benjamin W., 9/12, born August. John owned 100 acres of mountain land and farmed some of it in White County. 

After John died on Sept. 22, 1899, in White County, Sarah filed an application for a Widow’s Pension based on his military service. It was approved in 1903.

Sarah A Pension 6

Sarah A. Pension 2Sarah A. Pension

John Jr. and Sarah’s children include Julia H., Elijah Goodman Hughes, Louisa A. (“Lou”), Dorcas, William Alonzo, Elisha, Nancy Odessa, John Robert, Sarah Melissa, Benjamin Walter Allen. One daughter and two sons–Julia, William A. and Elijah Hughes–were living near Sarah in 1903. They purchased 40 acres of their parent’s 100-acre mountain farm in White Co., Ga. “E. H. Allen” who witnessed the power of attorney copied above, is Elijah Goodman Hughes Allen.

Julia H. Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born circa 1861 in White Co., Ga. She married a man named Harrison.

Elijah Goodman Hughes “Eli” Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born circa 1864 in White Co., Ga. He died at age 81 on April 20, 1945, in Tarrant, Tex., at the age of 81.

Louisa A. “Lou” Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born June 10, 1867, in White Co., Ga. She died at age 81 on May 16, 1949, in Fulton, Ga.

Dorcas Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born 1868 in Georgia.

William Alonzo Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born 1869 in Georgia.

Elisha Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born 1870 in Georgia.

Nancy Odessa L. Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born July 24, 1871, in White Co., Ga. She died at age 80 on Jan. 5, 1952, in Habersham Co., Ga.

Rev. John Robert Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born Dec. 1, 1873, in White Co., Ga. He died at age 68 on May 31, 1942, in Floyd, Ga.

Sarah Melissa Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born June 25, 1876, in White Co., Ga. She died at age 70 on Oct. 3, 1946, in Clarkesville, Ga.

Benjamin Walter Allen, child of Sarah Ann Bramblett and John Coleman Allen, was born Aug. 9, 1879, in White Co., Ga. He died at age 57 on Nov. 28, 1936, in Gainesville, Hall Co., Ga. 

John Coleman Allen grave 1

Tombstone of John Coleman Allen Jr.

“Count that day lost whose low descending sun views from thy hand no worthy action done.” “The world won’t study the Bible, it is studying you.” — Inscription Transcribed by Susan Strickland

John C Allen CW 1

John C. Allen CW (2)

Brothers John C. Allen Jr. and Henson Marion Allen served in the Confederacy Confederate Flags

Confederate States

Lawrence Cemetery grave of Elizabeth Bramblett Allen, courtesy Shelby Morris   Elizabeth Bramblett Allen grave

   Elizabeth Bramblett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born Dec 10, 1836, in Habersham Co., Ga. She died 1907 and rests at Lawrence Cemetery, Helen, White Co., Ga. She married Aug. 30, 1856, Henson Marion Allen, in Habersham Co., Ga. He is a brother of John Coleman Allen Jr. who married Sarah Bramblett and son of Dorcas Allison and John Coleman Allen Sr. Henson was born Aug. 30, 1832, Duke’s Creek, Habersham Co., Ga. He died Sept. 27, 1862, at home in White Co., Ga., while on duty in the service of the Confederate States, and rests at Lawrence Cemetery, Helen, White Co., Ga. He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. His Compiled Military Service Records indicate he was age 31, and he enlisted in Stiff’s Company, later Company D, Col. Sumner J. Smith’s Legion, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, on May 15, 1862, at Loudsville, Ga. (NARA Film M266:601). “Henson M. Allen, Private, Company D, Smith’s Legion, Name appears on a Register of Claims of Deceased Officers and Soldiers of Georgia which were filed for settlement in the Office of the Confederate States Auditor for the War Department.” Claim was presented by (Capt.) John H. Craven “Atty.” for Elizabeth Allen, widow, on March 25, 1863. The record indicates Henson died in White Co., Ga. (Confederate Archives, Chapter 10, File 25, page 4). Henson and Elizabeth’s children include John Cicero, Tilmon Lonzo, America Allen.

Henson Allen CW 2

Henson Allen CW 3

Georgia gravesite of Henson Marion Allen, courtesy Shelby Morris

Henson Allen grave

Lawrence Cemetery, Helen, White Co., Ga.; eligible for military tombstone

   John Cicero Allen, child of Elizabeth Bramblett and Henson Marion Allen, was born Oct. 16, 1856, in White Co., Ga. He died Feb. 14, 1941, in Atlanta, Fulton Co., Ga., and rests at Roselawn Cemetery. He married Mae Etta McMillian. She was born Oct. 20, 1856, in Georgia. She died Dec. 24, 1954, in Atlanta, Ga. Their children are Pauline Theresa Allen Cody, Osborne Dooley Allen, Corine Bellzora Allen Williams, Myra Gertrude Allen Gowder, Marion Edward Allen, Charles Robert Allen.

    Tilmon Lonzo Allen, child of Elizabeth Bramblett and Henson Marion Allen, was born in 1859 in White Co., Ga. His grave marker indicates he was born March 26, 1862; however, he is listed as age 1 in the 1860 White Co., Ga., census. He died Feb. 17, 1955, in Cumberland, Harlan Co., Ky., and was buried there at L. Green Morris Family Cemetery, Hiram, Ky. He married Alpha Elizabeth Clark. She was born Dec. 23, 1859, in Lee Co., Va., the daughter of Rebecca Witt and James Monroe Clark. She died April 28, 1940, in Harlan Co., Ky., and rests at Eden Cemetery, Lee Co., Va. Their children include James Elonzo “Lonnie” Allen, Luria May Allen Morris, Bessie Allen Halcomb.

Grave Marker of Tilmon Lonzo Allen, courtesy Shelby Morris

Tilmon

   America Allen, child of Elizabeth Bramblett and Henson Marion Allen, was born June 19, 1861, in White Co., Ga. She died July 15, 1934, in Hall Co., Ga. She married John Hiram Highsmith. He was born March 18, 1850. He died Sept. 30, 1925. They and an Infant rest at Alta Vista Cemetery, Gainesville, Hall Co., Ga. Their children include Infant and Mertie Highsmith Daniels.

America Allen Highsmith grave

America John Highsmith grave

Tombstones of America and John Hiram Highsmith, courtesy Lee G. Barrow

 
   T. Agnes Bramlett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born circa 1837 in Habersham Co., Ga.
 

Confederate StatesRufus M. Bramlett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born circa 1840 in Habersham Co., Ga. He died of disease Jan. 11, 1862, at Camp Washington, N.C., while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civii War/War Between the States. His burial place is unknown. Rufus enlisted as a private in Company C, “White County Marksmen,” Twenty-Fourth Regiment, Wofford’s Brigade, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, on Aug. 24, 1861, in White Co., Ga. His death claim was filed March 4, 1862, by his father, John S. Bramblett, who declared Rufus never married or had children and left no estate (NARA Film M266 Roll 355).

Rufus Bramblet/Bramblett Death Claim by father, John S. Bramblett

“Name appears on a Register of Claims of Deceased Officers and Soldiers from Georgia which were filed for settlement in the Office of the Confederate States Auditor for the War Department”: Presented by John S. Bramblett, father, March 4, 1862; reported to Comptroller Jan. 3, 1862; returned Jan. 5, 1862; Certificate Number 2459; Amount found due: $50.00 (Confederate Archives, Chap. 10, File No. 25, p. 8).

“Name appears on a Register of Claims of Deceased Officers and Soldiers from Georgia which were filed for settlement in the Office of the Confederate States Auditor for the War Department”: Presented by John S. Bramblet, father; filed March 4, 1862, Camp Washington; reported to the Comptroller Sept. 16, 1862; returned Sept. 16, 1862; settlement number 1210; amount found due: $26.03 (Confederate Archives, Chap. 10, File No. 25, p. 7).

“Appears on a Register containing a record of the Property of Deceased Confederate Soldiers”: January 1862; died at Camp Washington Jan. 11, 1862; Remarks: “Effects money $41.20, 2 pr. pants 1 coat, 3 shirts, 2 under shirts, 4 pr. socks, 1 cap, 3 pr. shoes, 1 small bowie knife, 1 pocket knife. Entitled to pay from 1st Nov. 1861” (Confederate Archives, Chap. 1, File No. 27, p. 19).

At the time, John S. Bramblett lived at Clarkesville, Habersham Co., Ga.

Declaration: “Georgia Habersham County} On this the twentieth day of February A.D. 1862 before me personally came John S. Bramblett, who being duly sworn Says that he is the father of Rufus Bramblett who was lately a private in the Company of Geo. Vols. in the Service of the Confederate States commanded by Captain William L. Sumter 24th Ga Regt commanded by Col. Robert McMillan stationed at Washington in the State of North Carolina. That the said Rufus Bramblett died in said service as this deponent is advised and believes on or about the 11th day of January 1862. And that he left neither wife nor child having never been married to claim his estate. & that said Rufus was a minor at his death. He makes this Declaration for the purpose of obtaining the amount due said Rufus from the Government of the Confederate States for his services as a soldier in the army and that there is no administration on his (said Rufus’) estate, and that there is not likely to be there being no necessity for it. [Signed] John S. Bramblet Sworn to and subscribed before me the day & year aforesaid and I certify that John S. Bramblett is known to me and that I know he is the person he represents himself to be and have no doubt of the truth of the foregoing statement and that I have no interest in this Case. C. H. Sutton Justice Inferior Court Hab. Co. Ga.”

   Rufus is found with his parents in census data. “R. [Rufus] M. Bromblett,” 10, with parents, Nancy, 44, and John S., 44, farmer, and eight siblings (N./H., 21, female; M. [Martha] J., 16, female; E. [Elizabeth], 18, male; E. [Enoch], 15, female; T. A. [Agnes], 13, female; M. [Malissa], 5, female; J. [James] A., 4, male; A. [Alonzo Richard], 1, male), all born Georgia, 1850 Dist. 2, Div. 37, Habersham Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M432:72:242). “Rufus Bramlet,” 18, born Georgia, miner, lived with E. H. Denny and family, 1860 Benton P.O., Dist. 2, Polk Co., Tenn., census (NARA Film 653:1268:429A). (His brother Enoch and family lived nearby in same county.)

   Malissa B. Bramlett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born circa 1845 in Habersham Co., Ga.

   James A. Bramlett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born circa 1846 in Habersham Co., Ga. He may have died after 1880.
Confederate StatesJames served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company A, Sixteenth Battalion (later Thirteenth Regiment), Georgia Cavalry, before Oct. 14, 1864. He was a resident of White Co., Ga. His Compiled Military Service Records indicate he was a prisoner of war captured Oct. 30, 1864, in White Co., Ga.; AWOL, deserted Confederate Army: took Oath to U.S. Oct. 31, 1864. He was released Nov. 20, 1864, at Louisville, Ky., with a pass to travel to Indiana Dec. 21, 1864. His physical characteristics are recorded in the muster roll documents transcribed here:

James A. (his X mark) Bramblet “Pvt. A. 16 Regt. Ga. Cav. Name appears as signature to an Oath of Allegiance to the United States, subscribed and sworn to at the Office of Pro. Mar. Gen’l of East Tenn., Knoxville, Tenn., during the month of Oct., 1864”: Oct. 31, 186(4), place of residence: White Co., Ga.; vitals: fair complexion, dark hair, grey eyes, 5 feet 5 inches tall; remarks: “Deserted at Morristown, Tenn., Oct. 28, 1864. Received pass to Ind[iana]” (Roll 83, Sheet 5). James A. Bramblet, Private, “Co. A 16th Bttn. Ga. Cav. Name appears as signature to an Oath of Allegiance to the United States, subscribed and sworn to at Louisville, Ky., November 20, 1864”: place of residence White Co., Ga.; vitals: light complexion, dark hair, hazel eyes, 5 feet 7 inches”; remarks: “Vol[unteer].” “Signature by mark. Name appears in Col[umn] of Names, Jas. A. Bramlett” (Roll 627, Sheet 4). Endorsement shows: “Oath of Allegiance of Rebel Deserters received at Louisville, Ky., Nov. 5 ‘64.” (NARA Film M266 Roll 53) 

James married Julia Ann (White?) Logan. She was  born circa 1839 in Georgia. She died after 1880. “James Bramblet,” 23, farming, $300 real estate, $247 personal estate, and wife, Julia, 31, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Cleveland P.O., Subdiv. 135, White Co., Ga., with  four children (step-daughter Nancy [Logan?], 12, at home; step-daughter Huldy [Logan?], 9; Milly Bramblet, 3; Mira Bramblet, 1) (NARA Film M593:183:15B). Julia Bramlet, 42, born Georgia to parents born North Carolina, keeping house, married, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Shoal Creek, White Co., Ga., with three children born Georgia to parents born there (Mildred [“Milly” Powell], 12, at school; Miriam [“Mira” Cromer], 11, at school; Frank, 9) (NARA Film T9:71:559B). James and Julia’s children include Mildred Powell (“Milly”), Miriam Cromer (“Mira”) and Frank Logan Bramlett.

   Alonzo Richard Bramlett, child of Nancy Dickson and John S. Bramlett, was born circa 1849 in Habersham Co., Ga.

  Nathan Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Ford and John Bramlett, was born circa 1810 in Elbert Co., Ga. He died after 1848 and before 1850. He married a woman named Sarah “Sally” by 1836. She was born circa 1805-08 in Georgia. She died after 1860. She lived in Gilmer County in 1850 and Murray County in 1860. Sally Bramlett, 45, born South Carolina, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Gilmer Co., Ga., with three children born Georgia: Nathan, 14; Mary Ann, 10; Josephus, 3. Sarah Bramlett, 52, born Georgia, day laborer, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Murray Co., Ga., with two children born Georgia: Polly A., 18; Josephus, 12 (NARA Film M653:132:42). Also listed: her father-in-law, John Bramlett, 75, born South Carolina. Next door: Sarah’s son “Nathan Bramlett,” 22, and wife, Malinda, 14, born Georgia. Sarah and Nathan’s children include Nathan Jr., Mary Ann “Polly” and Josephus Bramlett. Another child may be Zachariah Bramlett.

Zachariah Bramlett, child of Sarah Unknown and Nathan Bramlett, was born circa 1830. He died in 1862 while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. “Zachariah Bramlet,” 20, living in Lumpkin Co., Ga., in 1850 with Daniel Nigler, 36, and Susan Hulsey, 31, widow or separated, and six children; Zachariah in McMinnville, Warren Co., Tenn., 1860. Also living in Franklin County in 1870: Zachariah’s remarried Widow, Rebecca (Martin?) Pless, 30, born Georgia, with husband, Andrew J. Pless, 27, born North Carolina, laborer, and three Bramlet children: John, 12; Mary  E., 9; Sarah, 6.

One source lists a marriage for H. H. Bramlett in 1870 to M. Pless in Franklin County, Tenn. Another Pless connection: William Harvey Bramlet, born Feb. 16, 1850, in Cobb or Walker Co., Ga., who may be son of Nathaniel D. and Elizabeth Thomason Bramlett of Greenville Co., S.C., and Georgia and Indiana, married Melvina Pless on Feb. 10, 1870, in Franklin Co., Tenn. He died at age 84 on Oct. 5, 1934, in Swisher, Tex. Melvina was born 1838 in Burke, Ga., to Mary J. “Polly” Limbaugh and Jacob Pless. (Their other seven children include Martin V. and Newton J. Pless.) Melvina died at age 71 on Aug. 5, 1909, in Tennessee. Their children: Jacob Nathaniel (“Jake”), William Cornelius, Minnie Maud, Alice Almeda, Ella Bramlet.

   Nathan Bramlett Jr., child of Sarah Unknown and Nathan Bramlett, was born circa 1836 in Cherokee Co., Ga. He died Sept. 5, 1862, at Manassas, Va., while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He rests at a Cemetery in Warrenton, Va. Murray Co., Ga., court records indicate “A. N. Bramblett” joined as a private in July 1861 and was promoted to sergeant by September 1862 in Company C, Eleventh Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. His NARA Compiled Military Service Records name him as “Nathan Bramblet” and “Nathan Bramlet.” He enlisted at age 24 on July 3, 1861, in Atlanta, Ga. He was present on Company Muster Rolls dated July 3–Aug. 1, 1861; September–October 1861; November–December 1861; and January–February 1862. A Regimental Return indicates “N. Bramlet, Sgt.,” died of wounds on Sept. 5, 1862, at Manassas, Va. Service records in National Archives, including a Descriptive List and Bounty Roll, indicate he was a farmer born in Spartanburg, S.C. He was 24 years old and 5 feet eleven inches tall, with a fair complexion, dark hair, blue eyes. The record confirms he died of wounds Sept. 5, 1862, at Manassas. A Register of Claims includes one by Sarah A. M. Bramlet, widow of Nathan, dated Dec. 4, 1862, which indicates Nathan died on a different date, Sept. 7, 1862, at Manassas and Nathan (or Sarah?) born Cherokee Co., Ga. He married Sarah Malinda A. Adams by 1860. She was born circa 1846 in Georgia, the daughter of Isabell Adams. “Nathan Bramlett,” 22, born in Georgia, and wife, Malinda, 14, born South Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Rock Creek P.O., Murray Co., Ga. (NARA Film M653:132:42).

Mary Ann “Polly” Bramlett, child of Sarah Unknown and Nathan Bramlett, was born circa 1842 in Georgia.

Josephus Bramlett, child of Sarah Unknown and Nathan Bramlett, was born 1848 in Georgia. “Joseph Bramlette, 21, born Georgia, head of the family, no occupation, and wife, Elizabeth, 38, born S.C., keeping house, 1870 McMinnville, McMinnville P.O., Civil Dist. 8, Warren Co., Tenn., with three Carter children: Frances E., 13; Juda Ann, 10; Wm., 9, all born Georgia. (NARA Film M593:1568:95B). Also living in Tennessee in 1870: Zachariah Bramlett’s remarried Widow, Rebecca (Martin?) Pless.

Lott, Son of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III

   Rev. Lott Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born between 1780-1785 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died after 1840, probably in Elbert Co., Ga. He and his wife, name unknown, lived in Elbert and Franklin Co., Ga. “Lott Bramblett” of Capt. Dunston Blackwell’s District, Elbert Co., Ga., had one draw in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery, which indicates he was single and over age 21. He was a Baptist minister and the second pastor at Double Branch Baptist Church, which was organized and constituted near Lavonia in Franklin Co., Ga., in 1801. “History of Double Branch Church,” by Rev. H. P. Osborne, published in the June 26, 1914, edition of the Lavonia Times and Gauge refers to “Rev. Lott Bramlet” and wife, unnamed, as charter members of the church. He was still serving Georgia Baptists in 1829. Lott and his wife were also named as original or charter members in History of Franklin County, Georgia (290). No Bramlett markers are evident in the church cemetery. No children for Lott and wife have been found. The current church building, constructed in 1911, is located on Double Branches Church Road, northeast of Jackson Bridge Road, near Lavonia, Ga. Services are still held. (Telephone: 706.356.2154). The church was first a member of the Sarepta Association. In 1817 it joined the Tugalo River Association, formed from churches in Georgia and South Carolina, according to J. H. Campbell in his 1874 book Georgia Baptists: Historical and Biographical. The history mentions a conference meeting in 1829 at Conoross in South Carolina in which Rev. Lott Bramlet was recommended with three others to ride for three months each to “visit the churches and destitute places.”

     “History of Double Branch Church,” by Rev. H. P. Osborne, published in the June 26, 1914, edition of the Lavonia Times and Gauge also names “Rev. Lott Bramlet” and wife as charter members of the church:

“The organization of the Double Branch Church occurred in the year 1801 in Franklin County Georgia. The first building was made of round logs, and located between two small branches, near their junction and thus the name was suggested and appropriated Double Branch Church. The site of the first building was not on the same ground where the present location is, but was Southwest of this. The old original building had but one door for entering, no door shelter and the floor was the dirt. Split logs were used for seats. The men and women sat separately in the church. The boards were not nailed on the roof, but held down by poles and weights to keep them in place. The work done in building this church was a freewill offering by the people, no charges and no pay received by anyone. Thus it was, with the beginning of old Double Branch Church over one hundred years ago. The first pastor was Samuel Hymer, the second Lott Bramlet, and probably the third was Rev. Dozier Thorton and the fourth John A. Davis of Habersham County (now Stephens). Among the original or pioneer members listed by Osborne are Rev. Lott Bramlet and wife and Joseph Couch.”

Joseph Couch, mentioned above, may be related to the husband of Lucy Couch who once lived in Laurens Co., S.C. She may be a Bramblett, the daughter or sister of Henry Bramblett III: She and her husband had possession of a land grant probably first owned by Henry Bramlett III in Laurens County before he moved to Georgia in 1800. She may be Lott’s aunt or sister Lucy Bramlett Couch.

    Lott probably lived in 1840 with two of his sisters, Mary Ann and Emelia “Millie” and his mother, Elizabeth, in Elbert County. “Lott Bramblet,” not named, is most likely the white male 50-60, born between 1780 and 1790, who is enumerated in the 1840 U.S. Census for Dist. 194, Elbert Co., Ga., with some of his extended family members: his sister Mary Ann Bramblet, 50-60, born between 1780 and 1790, headed the family, which also included a female 50-60, Lott’s sister Emelia “Millie,” and a female 80-90, born between 1750 and 1760, Lott’s mother, Elizabeth (Moss?) Bramlett. Lott and his wife apparently did not have children.
Works Cited

Osborne, Rev. H. P. “History of Double Branch Church.” Lavonia Times and Gauge. 26 June 1914. Mentions Rev. Lott Bramlet and wife.

Campbell, J. H. Georgia Baptists: Historical and Biographical. Macon, Ga.: J. W. Burke, 1874. Rev. Lott Bramlet 1829 reference.

Elizabeth, Daughter of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III

   Elizabeth Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born 1790 in Laurens Co., S.C. She died 1880. She married John Young Gober on Dec. 15, 1813, in Elbert Co., Ga. He was born Jan. 31, 1791, in Chatham Co., N.C., the son of Elizabeth Burns and William Gober II. He died in 1876, probably in Forsyth Co., Ga. “Elizabeth Gober,” 63, born South Carolina, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Cumming, Forsyth Co., Ga., living with husband, J. (John) G. (Y.) Gober,  62, born North Carolina, head of the family, and her sister “Mary Bramlett,” 61, born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:121:479). Their children include Sarah Ann, John Wesley, Mary Elizabeth, Henry Elsbury, William Asbury, Ailsey Jane, Marion B. Gober.

   Sarah Ann Gober, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and John Young Gober, was born Oct. 28, 1814, in Elbert Co., Ga. 

    John Wesley Gober, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and John Young Gober, was born Jan. 19, 1819, in Franklin Co., Ga. He was a farmer and religious, teaching Sunday School at his church. He died Dec. 4, 1895, and rests at Alta Vista Cemetery, Gainesville, Hall Co., Ga. He married Temperance B. Chastain. She was born 1817 in Greenville Co., S.C., the daughter of Mary West and William Chastain. She died Sept. 17, 1878, and was buried at Alta Vista. Their children include Hockenhull and Lisbon Failes Gober.

Confederate States Lisbon GoberLisbon Failes Gober, child of John Wesley and Temperance B. Chastain Gober, was born May 12, 1845, in Forsyth Co., Ga. He died Nov. 28, 1921, in Millbrook, Elmore Co., Ala., and was buried at Rocky Mount Cemetery with an inscribed tombstone and an inscribed military marker. He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company K, Rush’s Legion, Georgia Regiment, State Troops, in August 1863 at Cumming, Ga. He served until discharge in April 1865. His wife, Carrie Gober, 70, R.F.D. #2, P.O. Elmore, Ala., applied for a Widow’s Pension on Jan. 19, 1922, in Alabama. Lisbon first married Lydia Clementine Maness. She was born 1847. She died 1901. Their child is Callie Lucinda Gober Bennett. Lisbon second married Caroline Elizabeth Rowlen. She was born 1876. She died 1936. Their children include Joseph Neal, John Wesley, Lisbon Falls, Henry Owen Gober.

Confederate States Henry Elsbury Gober served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company E, Fourteenth Regiment, Georgia Infantry. He was captured May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania Court House, Va., and was exchanged Sept. 18, 1864. He died five days later.

Emeline Bramblett, Daughter of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III

   Emeline Emelia “Milly” Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1792 in Laurens Co., S.C. She may have died circa 1840. She married John G. Gober. He was born circa 1768 and died circa 1866.

Nathaniel “Nathan,” Son of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III

Descendant Martha Edna (Bramlet) King (1920-2006) wrote The Ancestors and Descendants of Minnie May Stewart and Her Husband Nathan Hull Bramlet and published it in Phoenix, Ariz., in 1986. The sixty-seven page book, which she declined to share, reportedly contains information about Henry Bramlett Jr.’s sons Benjamin and Henry III, Henry III’s son Nathan and family, Nathan Hull Bramlet and family and Minnie May Stewart and family.

   Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlet, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born Sept. 15, 1794, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died of cholera on Aug. 14, 1852, on the Oregon Trail near Caldwell, Canyon Co., Ida. He and his wife rest in an unmarked graves along the trial. Nathan lived in Elbert Co., Ga., with his parents in 1800-05. As a young man, he moved on to Franklin Co., Ga., probably traveling with or following his brother Reuben and a married sister, Elizabeth (Bramlett) Gober, in or before 1818. That is the year “Nathan Bramblet” paid a poll tax in Franklin County, which means he was age 21 or over, born before 1797, and owned no taxable land at that time. Nathan married Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober on Feb. 17, 1820, in Franklin Co., Ga. Their marriage license, dated Feb. 15, 1820, lists him as “Nathaniel Brumblet” and her as “Jiney Gober.” Jane was born Oct. 13, 1797, in Granville Co., N.C., the daughter of Nancy Gober and George Gober and the granddaughter of George Gober and Martha Wisdom, according to some sources, or daughter of Frances Leary and William Y. Gober, according to Ruth Hardman of Tacoma, Wash. Jane was born Oct. 13, 1797, in Granville Co., N.C. Jane also died of cholera on Aug. 14/17, 1852, on the Oregon Trail near Payette, Payette Co., Ida. “Nathan Bramblett of Elbert County” bought ninety-six acres of land in Franklin County from Thomas Akins Jr. of Franklin County for $150 on Aug. 2, 1820. They probably sold the Franklin Co., Ga., land in before 1824. Nathan and Jane apparently moved to Habersham Co., Ga., or were visiting his brother Reuben there, in 1824. “Nathan Bramblett” witnessed a deed there in August 1824 when William Redwine sold John Grant some land there in District 10. Ruth Hardman describes Nathan as an “itinerant Methodist Minister” in her 1985 Bramlet history Family Notes.” Family tradition holds that Nathan’s father, Henry III, also was a Methodist minister and one of the co-founders of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court, S.C.

   Nathan and Jane moved their family in December 1827 or January 1828 to Tennessee where they farmed in McMinn County and Bradley County. “Nathan Bramlett,” male 30-40, born 1790-1800, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for McMinn Co., Tenn., with four others: a female 40-50 (wife, Jane), one female 5-10 (daughter Elizabeth Ann “Betsy”) and two males 0-5 (sons Francis “Clayton” and Henry M.) (NARA Film M19:178:145). “Nathan Bramlett,” 40-50, born 1790-1800, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Bradley Co., Tenn., with a female 40-50 (wife, Jane) and six children: a female 15-20, born (Elizabeth Ann); two males 10-15, born (Francis Clayton and Henry M.); a female 5-10, born (Nancy Jane); and two females 0-5, born (Daughter and Martha Lorana). In 1842 they moved to McDonald Co., Mo., where they owned a ranch with a sawmill, gristmill and pinery on Sugar Creek for about ten years. “Nathan Bramlet,” 57, born in South Carolina, farmer and preacher, $500 real estate, and wife, Jane, 53, born in North Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 53, McDonald Co., Mo., with seven children: Betsey A. (Elizabeth), 21, born in Georgia; Francis C. (Clayton) B., 21, farmer, born in Georgia; Henry M., 20, farmer, born in Tennessee; Nancy Jane, 17, born in Tennessee; George W. (Washington), 14, born in Tennessee; Martha L. (Lorana), 12, born in Tennessee; and William H. (Henry), 9, born in Tennessee (NARA Film M432:405:98B). The census was taken Sept. 7, 1850.

   In the spring of 1852 Nathan and Jane and five of their children began traveling west in wagons on the Oregon Trail in a fateful journey toward the Williamette Valley to settle on land in Oregon Territory. Their other children, Elizabeth Ann “Betsy” and Henry M., stayed in Missouri and later moved to Texas about 1854. After Nathan and Jane died on the Oregon Trail, the five children accompanying them continued on to Portland, Ore. Nathan and Jane’s children are Elizabeth Ann (“Betsy”), Francis Clayton B., Henry Merritt, Daughter, Nancy Jane, George Washington, Martha Lorana and William Henry “Bill” Bramlet. (Some descendants refer to the surname of Nathan and his children as Bramlet and others Bramlett.)

    Elizabeth Ann “Betsy” Bramlet, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlet, was born March 4, 1823, in Franklin Co., Ga., and died circa 1854 in Texas. She may have married a man named Tibbetts, according to Ruth Hardman.

 

   Francis Clayton B. Bramlett, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlet, was born June 26, 1827, in Franklin Co., Ga. He died March 15, 1911, in Wallowa, Ore. He married Martha Ellen Tower on June 27, 1867. She was born circa 1844. She died circa 1913. Their children include Nathan Hull, William Henry, Sarah Jane, George Edwin, Mary Nancy, Martha Ellen, Lewis/Louis Francis, Charles David, James Abraham Bramlett.

   Henry Middleton Bramlet, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlet, was born Nov. 12, 1829, in Bradley Co., Tenn. He died at age 78 about 7 p.m. on Jan. 30, 1908, of heart failure and “La Grippe” (influenza) one mile south of Muse in Wise Co., Tex. His Death Certificate 858892 from Texas Bureau of Vital Statistics, represented below, identifies him as “Henry W. Bramlett.” He rests at Trimble Cemetery, Paradise, Wise Co., Tex.

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Henry M. Bramlet“Henry M. Bramlet,” 20, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 53, McDonald Co., Mo., living with parents, Nathan, 57, and Jane, 53, and six siblings (Betsey A., 21; Frances C. B., 21; Nancy Jane, 17; George W., 14; Martha L., 12; William H., 9) (NARA Film M432:405:98B). Henry first married Martha Eliza Davenport circa 1854 in Missouri. She was born April 17, 1835, in Massac Co., Ill., the daughter of Mary Ann Finch and Edmond Jones Davenport. She died Oct. 25, 1883, in Wise Co., Tex., and was buried at Trimble Cemetery. “Henry Bramblet,” 30, born Tennessee, and wife, Martha, 25, born Missouri, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Wise Co., Tex., with children born Texas: Mary A., 4; Eliza A., 4; William W., 2; James L., 3/12 (NARA Film M653:1308:309). Also listed: Thos. W. Deavenport, 21, and W. H. Deavenport, 21, both day laborers, both born Illinois. “Henry Bramlett,” 40, born in Tennessee, farmer, and wife, Martha E., 35, born in Tennessee (Illinois? or Indiana?), are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Wise Co., Tex., with seven children born in Texas: Mary J., 16; Eliza Ann, 15; William W. (Wesley), 13; James L., 8; Henry? H.? (Harvey?), 7; Christopher (Columbus), 4; and Martha R., 1. “Henry Bramlet,” 50, born in Tennessee to a mother born in Georgia and father born in North Carolina, farmer, and wife, Martha, 45, born in Illinois to a mother born in Tennessee and father born in Illinois, keeps house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Precinct 1, Wise Co., Tex., with seven children born in Texas: James (L.), 20; Harry (Henry H.), 17, farmer; Nancy, 15, keeps house; (Christopher) Columbus, 13, farmer; Martha (R.), 11, keeps house; Charley, 9; and Richard (Renshaw), 4 (NARA Film T9:1333:97A). Henry second married a woman named Francis E. She was born circa 1845 in Indiana. She died sometime after the census was taken in 1900. “Henry Bramlett,” 70, born in November 1829 in Tennessee, and wife, Francis E., 55, born in October 1844 in Indiana, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Wise Co., Tex., with one grown child: James L., 40, born in February 1860 in Texas to a mother born in Indiana and father born in Arkansas. Henry and Martha’s children include Mary Jane A., Eliza Ann, William Wesley, James L., Henry H.? (Harry/Harvey), Nancy F., Christopher Columbus, Martha R., Charles and Richard Renshaw Bramlet.

Mary Jane Bramlet, first child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born circa 1854 in Missouri.

Eliza Ann Bramlet, second child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born circa 1855 in Missouri. She died in 1884, in Wise Co., Tex., and was buried in Trimble Cemetery. She married Charles Roach Terry. He was born 1857. He died 1918.

William Wesley Bramlet, third child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born circa 1857 in Missouri. He died after the 1910 census, in Wise Co., Tex. “Westley Bramlet,” 22, born in Missouri to a mother born in Illinois and father born in Georgia, farmer, and wife, Mary (E.), 22, born in Georgia to a mother born in Tennessee and father born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Precinct 1, Wise Co., Tex., with one child: Alice, 1, born in Texas (NARA Film T9:1333:94C). They lived near Wesley’s parents and siblings. “William Bramlett,” 42, born in July 1857 in Missouri, and wife, Mary E., 44, born in February 1856 in Georgia, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Wise Co., Tex., with six children, all born in Texas: Fred, 15, March 1885; Earney (Earnest E.), 14, December 1887; Harley H., 12, February 1888, son; (Mary) Myrtle, 9, August 1890; Boney (Oliver), 6, March 1894; and John, 3, October 1896. “Will Bramlett,” 54, born in Missouri, and wife, Mary E., 54, born in Georgia, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Wise Co., Tex., with six children, all born in Texas: Ernie E., 23; Harley H., 21; Mary M., 18; (Oliver) Bony, 16; John, 13; and Bill, 8. William and Mary’s children are Alice, Fred, Earnest E., Harley H., Mary Myrtle, Oliver (“Boney”), John and William “Bill” Bramlet.

James L. Bramlet, fourth child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born circa 1859 in Texas. He lived with his parents in 1900.

Henry H. (“Harry” “Harvey”) Bramlet, fifth child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born circa 1861 in Texas. He lived in Elizabeth, Colo., in 1950.

Nancy F. Bramlet, sixth child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born Jan. 25, 1865, in Texas. She died Dec. 30, 1930, in Fort Worth, Tarrant Co., Tex., and was buried at Highland Cemetery, Lawton, Comanche Co., Okla. She married John P. Rushing. He was born 1864. He died 1938. He signed Nancy’s Texas Death Certificate 60611 as informant. He identified her parents as Henry Bramlet and Martha Davenport, both born Missouri (sic Tennessee).

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Christopher Columbus Bramlet, seventh child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born circa 1867 in Texas. He died June 15, 1926, and was buried at Tahoma Cemetery, Yakima, Yakima Co., Wash.

Martha R. Bramlet, eighth child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born Oct. 30, 1869, in Texas. She died Dec. 31, 1903, in Wise Co., Tex. She married William C. Nelson and John William Cooper.

Charles Bramlet, ninth child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born circa 1871 in Texas. He lived with his parents in 1880.

Richard Renshaw Bramlet, tenth child of Henry Merritt and Martha E. Davenport Bramlet, was born April 22, 1876, in Wise Co., Tex. He died after a heart attack on April 27, 1950, in Olney, Young Co., Tex., and was buried there in Jean Cemetery. He married Carrie Ashlock, who signed his Texas Death Certificate 20477 as informant. She named his parents as H.M. Bramlet and Martha Davenport, both born Tennessee.

Richard Renshaw Bramlet Death Cert.jpg

Carrie was born circa 1876-77 in Texas. Richard lived in Fort Worth until 1944 when he moved to Jean, Tex. “Richard Bramlett,” 24, born in April 1876 in Texas, and wife, Carrie, born in November 1876 in Texas, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Wise Co., Tex., with three children born in Texas: Lottie, 4, January 1896; Chester, 2, January 1898; and Henry, 8/12, September 1899. “Richard R. Bramlet,” 34, and wife, Carrie, 33, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Wise Co., Tex., with three children: Lottie, 13; Chester, 12; and Henry M., 11. All were born in Texas. Richard and Carrie’s known children are Lottie Bramlet Stephens, Chester and Henry Middleton Bramlet. Henry married Ella Mae Blue and died in 1973. He and Chester lived in Fort Worth.

Nancy Jane Bramlet, fourth child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlet, was born Sept. 10, 1832, in Bradley Co., Tenn. She died in 1853 in Oakland, Douglas Co., Ore. She married Moses Preston Rice on Dec. 28, 1852, in Oakland.

The late Billy (Bramlet) Scott and husband, Bud Scott, of Salem, Ore., who provided information for this history in October 2000, had possession of a photograph of George Washington and Mary Malissa (Smith) Bramlet which was taken in the early 1900s and George’s military service discharge papers. Billy died at age 57 on Nov. 28, 2000.

Descendant Charles David Bramlet wrote a wonderful history in 1959 about his parents and grandparents and their pioneering adventures in Oregon, Washington and California, and the Scotts provided some of the following.

George Washington Bramlet, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlet, was born Aug. 12, 1835, in Bradley Co., Tenn. He died April 16, 1910, in Lakeport, Lake Co., Calif., and was buried there. His grave may not be marked. George lived with his parents in Missouri and traveled with them in a wagon train on the Oregon Trail in 1852. He worked on a ranch near Portland after he and some siblings arrived in Oregon in 1852. In 1855 George traveled down the Rogue River to mine and moved on to Jacksonville. In 1856 he moved to Soda Town on Beaver Creek and then to Cole’s Station to herd cattle. He worked around Hayfork and Weaverville then moved to Humboldt County where he herded cattle in 1857 from Eel River to South Fork Mountain. He then went to Hydesville. In 1858 he moved to North Cottonwood, now Ono. George lived in California in 1860-61.

U.S. Army [Emblem]George served as a private in Company C, Fourth California Infantry, United States Army Volunteers, during the Civil War/War Between the States. Military records indicate he enlisted Sept. 19, 1861, in Shasta, Calif. His company marched to Red Bluff and moved down river to Benicia. They went to Walla Walla where George worked in a blacksmith shop all winter. He returned to Benecia with his unit and escorted a wagon train of supplies to Fort Independence, Owens Valley, and returned to Benecia. The company then went to Los Angeles and Catalina Island. He was discharged Oct. 5, 1864, at Drumbarracks near Los Angeles. He received a pension based on his war service. After his discharge George went to live and work with his brother Clayton at Half Moon Bay. They then moved back to Oakland, Ore., where George met his future wife. He married Mary Malissa “Marie” Smith on Nov. 18, 1869, in Roseburg, Douglas Co., Ore. She was born Dec. 9, 1850, the daughter of David Smith. She died Oct. 8, 1910, in Lakeport and was buried there. Mary and her family went to Oregon in 1854 and settled near Oakland, Ore., near the Rices. George and Clayton and their families took a large herd of sheep to Hot Lake, between Union and LaGrande, in 1870. In 1876 Clayton and his family moved to Wallowa Valley, and George and his family moved to Walla Walla, Wash. Mary and George and family lived in Oregon in 1872. They lived in Garfield Co., Ore., in 1877. They moved into the Washington Territory by 1877. George and family lived in Columbia, Wash., in 1880. “G. W. Bramlet,” 44, born in Tennessee to parents born in Georgia, works on farm, and wife, Marie M., 29, born in Illinois to parents born in Ohio, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dist. 3, Columbia Co., Wash., with three children: C. D. (Charles David), 8, born in Oregon; J. W. (John William), 3, born in Washington Territory; and H. L. (Henry Lafayette), 1, born in Washington Territory (NARA Film T9:1396:159D). George farmed 280 acres near Pataha City, Garfield Co., Ore., in 1882. George and family and his brother Bill moved to Rogue River Valley, Jackson Co., Calif., in 1889. In 1893 the family moved to Scotts Valley, Siskiyou Co., Calif. “George W. Bramlet,” 64, born in Tennessee, and wife, Mary, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Scott Valley, Siskiyou Co., Calif., with five children: Henry L. (Lafayette), Mary E. (Elizabeth), Emmet E. (Edgar), Ella A. (Ann) and Osger G. (George) Bramlet. In 1900 the family moved to Chico, Butte Co., Calif. In 1902 they settled in Lake Port, Lake Co., Calif., where they lived the rest of their lives. George and Mary’s children, born between 1871-1888, include Abigal Jane, who lived three weeks; Charles David, who married Elizabeth Hill; Elisa Ellen, who lived two weeks and was buried in Wallowa Valley; John William, who married Angelina May Ratcliff; Henry Lafayette; Walter (died an infant); Mary Elizabeth, who married George Willis; Nancy (died at birth); Emmett Edgar, who married Della Fouch; Ella Ann, who married Otis Francis Tritcher; Oscar George, who married Helen Rachel Stevens and Annie Elizabeth Martin; and Bates Bramlet, who lived a few days.

Daughter Bramlet, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlet, was born circa 1835-40 in Bradley Co., Tenn. She died young, by 1850. She is listed with her parents in 1840 but not 1850.

Martha Lorana Bramlet, seventh child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlet, was born April 19/29, 1838, in Bradley Co., Tenn. She died Dec. 14, 1899, in Oakland, Douglas Co., Ore. She traveled west with her parents and siblings on the Oregon Trail in 1852. She married Ica Foster “Ike” Rice on April 6, 1854, in Oakland. They owned a large ranch called Rice Hill. They had three children: Daughter, Bill and Dexter Rice. Bill Rice left home circa 1861 and moved to Heppner, Ore., and Helena, Mont. Dexter Rice was a lawyer in Roseburg, Ore.

William Henry “Bill” Bramlet, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlet, was born Aug. 22, 1841, in Bradley Co., Tenn. He died Jan. 12, 1903, in Washington or Oregon. Bill went west with his parents on the Oregon Trail. Once settled there, Bill and a friend went to Prineville and operated a pack train of mules making 500-mile trips from Attalia on the Columbia River to Oregon to Helena, Mont., and back. They later sold the mules and bought cattle and horses to raise in Antelope Valley. A group of thieves robbed a stagecoach and passengers there and killed the messenger near Heppner, Ore. Bill and four other men were falsely identified as the culprits. Bill’s brother-in-law Ike Rice mortgaged his ranch for ten thousand dollars to pay for Bill’s defense; however Bill and the others were convicted by the false testimony from a witness. Bill received a life sentence in prison for allegedly robbing the U.S. Mail and attempted murder. He arrived at Oregon State Prison, Salem, Ore., on Nov. 9, 1872. He was later pardoned and released Nov. 20, 1875, after another man in Dayton, Wash., confessed the crime to a local marshal and the others who were involved were located in Arizona. After Bill was released he stayed with Ike Rice for a few years to help pay off the mortgage used to pay for Bill’s defense. Bill married Emma R. S. Smith on Nov. 17, 1878, in Oregon. She was from the Yoncalla, Ore., area. They later separated when Emma went back to her family with their two children. Bill then moved to Milton out in the foothills and then lived with his brother George and family in Wallowa, Washington Territory, in 1888. He moved with them to Rogue River Valley, Jackson Co., Calif., in 1889 and was living there in 1893. He may have moved back to Prineville. Family tradition holds that he went out with a sheriff’s posse after horse thieves and was shot and killed during the chase.

Mary Ann, Daughter of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III

   Mary Ann Bramblettchild of Henry Bramlett III and Elizabeth Moss, was born between 1780 and 1790 in Ninety-Six (Laurens) Dist., S.C. Census data in 1850-60 indicates she was born circa 1805 and circa 1797-99. She died Feb. 18, 1860, in Cherokee or Forsyth Co., Ga. Mary Ann lived with her mother and siblings in 1830-40 in Elbert Co., Ga. She headed her extended family in 1840 after her father had died and when her mother was elderly: “Mary A. Bramlett,” 50-60, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Elbert Co., Ga., as head of the family, which includes a female 50-60 (sister Emelia “Milly”) and a female 80-90 (mother Elizabeth). Mary Ann lived with her sister Milly and husband in 1850: “Mary Bramblett,” 45, born in South Carolina, sister-in-law, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Franklin Co., Ga., living with her sister Emilia (Milly Bramlett) Gober, 60, born South Carolina, and husband, John Gober, 79, born Virginia, head of the family. Mary Ann lived with her sister Elizabeth and husband in 1860: “Mary Bramlett,” 61, sister-in-law, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Cumming, Forsyth Co., Ga., living with her sister Elizabeth (Bramlett) Gober, 63, and husband, J. (John) G. (Y.) Gober, 62, head of the family (NARA Film M653:121:479).

Chapter 3:

Generation 5

Reuben Bramlett and Elizabeth Brown

(Children: Benjamin, Henry, John, Nathan, Coleman Brown, Margaret, Elizabeth)

Reuben Bramlett served as a Soldier during the American Revolution
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Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Direct Ancestors of Deborah G. Dennis

Reuben Bramlett, child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born March 15, 1757, on his parents’ plantation in Prince William (now Fauquier) Co., Va. He died at age 87 on Sept. 11, 1844, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill., at home on his farm and was buried beside his wife, Elizabeth, in her family’s Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery. Reuben served three tours of duty as a soldier from Virginia during the American Revolution. His detailed service record is included below. His mother, Margaret “Peggy” Bramlett, was an American Patriot who supplied provisions–beef and brandy–to the military; a brother named Benjamin may have perished as a soldier or patriot; his brother-in-law John Riley Jr., husband of Jalilah Bramlett, served as a soldier in Virginia; his brother Henry III served as a soldier, most likely from South Carolina; and his brother-in-law Frederick Burdette served as a soldier from South Carolina. Other extended family members were also soldiers or patriots of the Revolution. Reuben married Elizabeth Brown circa 1784, most likely in Fauquier County. No marriage record for them has been located: the parish records are lost, and they did not record their union at the county courthouse, which actually was not a common custom until after the Revolution. Elizabeth was born circa 1760-1765, the child of Mary Coleman and William Brown by family tradition. Elizabeth’s full name, Elizabeth Brown, is recorded by Meeks Haley Bramlet in his 1924 history A Pioneer Family – Bramlet. Her mother, Mary Coleman Brown, and some siblings, including Lucy, Coleman, William, John, Francis and Thomas, lived in Kentucky after the war and also settled in Gallatin County between 1813 and 1816 before the Illinois Territory became a state in 1818. Elizabeth died in Gallatin County circa 1830. She may have died from complications of measles since her son Benjamin died of the disease about the same time–circa 1830–while staying with Elizabeth and Reuben at their home after his wife had died. Elizabeth Brown Bramlett was buried at Brown Graveyard, established circa 1814-1816 on her brother Coleman Brown’s land on the sad occasion of the death of Elizabeth’s daughter-in-law Liddy Stephens Bramlett, first wife of Henry “Harry” Bramlett. The graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery, predated Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church, which was established in June 1830 at Brown Blockhouse with a later building constructed in the center of the oldest and highest section of the burial ground before 1847. Jonathan Brown deeded the church building and land in 1847. The church building later was rebuilt closer to the cemetery entrance. The cemetery and church are now within the city limits of Eldorado. Elizabeth was a charter member of Bethel Creek Baptist Church in Raleigh Township in 1820, and some of her children were members of Bethel Creek, Wolf Creek, Lick Creek, Lick Creek Boundary, Union Grove Missionary and other Baptist churches in the county.

    A sign at the entrance of Wolf Creek Cemetery and Church provides some early history, suggesting the church was organized by the Brown family who held the first meetings at Brown Blockhouse:

Meeting House

Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church

Organized Before 1830

Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church was organized sometime before 1830. The first meetings were held in the Brown Blockhouse which was located where the flagpole now stands which was on the Kaskaskia Trail. The vestiges of which can be seen running from the southeast to the west. Trails were narrow for a single horse pulling sleds and people on foot. When they widened to accommodate wagons, they were called a trace. The first church was a log structure located at the top of the hill. The present church was constructed in 1901. Worship services with singing is practiced. Primitive (or Regular) Baptists Articles of Faith adhere to strict rules of interpretation from the Bible, using it alone as the only rule of faith and order. Worldly adornments such as Sunday Schools, collections, mechanical music, and a paid ministry is not practiced. This simplicity is viewed as reflective of the beauty which Christ gave his church at the very beginning.

New Hope Primitive Baptist Church was combined with Wolf Creek in 2003. The bell is from the New Hope Church. When some bells were cast, silver dollars were thrown into the molten metal to give the finished product a distinctive tone. Just tap it lightly with your knuckles.

One of the early Brown family members is buried with an inscribed, legible marker in Brown Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery: John T. Brown, a veteran of the Black Hawk War, a brief conflict between the United States and Sac and Fox Indians in April-August 1838, who most likely is a close relative of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett.

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Reuben, Elizabeth and many descendants are buried at Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill.

Reuben’s Life in Virginia

   Reuben and his brothers John and Henry III are named in two surveys for deeds in Virginia relating to their father’s former plantation: a survey of Henry III’s newly inherited land and a survey of a small parcel of adjoining land for a neighbor, Robert Henson. Reuben, born 1757, was about age 23, and John, born 1764, was about age 16 in 1780.

   A resurvey of their father’s former plantation, requested by Henry III after his father’s death, which was recorded in Fauquier County in 1780 with an accompanying plat map, documents Reuben, John and Henry III’s connection to the land, each other and thus to their father, Henry Bramlett Jr. The 1780 resurvey record mentions Reuben and his brother John as chain carriers, their brother Henry III as the current new owner of the land, and their deceased father, “Henry Bramblett,” who died a suicide, as the former owner:

Northern Neck of Virginia. Lord Proprietor’s Office.To Mr. John Moffett–Whereas Henry Bramblett [III] of South Carolina hath set forth to this Office that there is a certain Tract of Land on the Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County containing by Estimation Two hundred and fifty Acres and formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett [Jr.], Father of Henry [III] aforesaid, which said Henry (the Father) [Jr.] died seized thereof in Fee simple but dying a Suicide the said Tract Escheated to the Lord of the Fee. And the Rules of the Office having been complied with as to issuing & affixing at the Court House of Fauquier County an Advertisement at three several Courts & no Person offering to shew Cause why the said Land should not be granted as Escheat to the said Henry Bramblett [III]. And the said Henry Bramblett [III] desiring a Warrant to resurvey the same in order to obtain an Escheat Deed being ready to pay the Composition & Office Fees. These are therefore to empower you to resurvey the said Land for the said Henry Bramblett [III] A Plat of which Resurvey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 5th Day of February next. Given under my Hand & the Office Seal the 5th Day of August 1780. B. Martin
Plat Map of Henry Bramblett’s [III] Land Area 231 Acres By virtue of a warrant from the Proprietors office to me Directed, I have surveyed for Henry Bramblett [III], of South Carolina, a tract’ of Land on Elk Marsh Run, in Fauquier County, formerly the Property of A Henry Bramblett [Jr.] father to the aforesaid Henry [III]; who dying a suicide, the said Land became Escheatable: the said Land being Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at a white oak corner to Jonas Williams, thence along the said Williams’s Line, S 31 E 60 Poles to B two Hicories, thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two Small hicories, thence N 35 1/2 W 21 6 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & Sundry saplings, thence Call 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G 2 small hicorys in the said Williams’s Line, thence along the same to the Beginning. Containing 231 Acres. J. Moffitt 20th Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett Chain Carriers

The above record is the only official documentation found so far for the biological connection between brothers John, Reuben and Henry III and their father, Henry Jr. (The Burditt Diary, a personal record of Bramlett Church history by an ordained minister, also refers to brothers Henry III, John, Nathan, and their mother, Margaret, who occupied the plantation in the early 1780s.) Close family members or neighbors traditionally participated as chain carriers in land surveys since they knew boundaries best and were in a position to protect the landowner’s (their relative’s or neighbor’s) interests. The original 1735 Bramlett-Ambrose deed for Henry Sr. lists the property as 250 acres more or less, but the new deed and plat map from the official resurvey for his grandson Henry III contains only 231 acres.

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Reuben and John also are named Nov. 1, 1780, in Fauquier Co., Va., as chain carriers for their neighbor John Henson’s survey of 12 1/2 acres of waste or vacant land adjacent to their father’s former Bramlett plantation. Henson had earlier obtained a warrant to survey the land on Nov. 8, 1779:

Northern Neck of Virginia Lord Proprietor’s Office No. 961. To Mr. John Moffett whereas Robert Henson of Fauquier County hath informed that there are about Four Hundred acres of waste land and ungranted Land adjoining Jennings, Bramlet & Dodd near the Head of Ratcliff Run in the said County. And desiring a Warrant to Survey the same in order to Obtain a Deed being ready to pay the composition and Office Fees — these are therefore to empower you to Survey the said waste and ungranted Land for the said Robt. Henson Paying due regard to your instructions a Plot of which Survey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 8th Day of May next given under my Hand and the Office Seal the 8th Day of November 1779. B. Martin.

The survey for 12 1/2 acres of the above mentioned land includes a small plat map that also contains a reference to “B” (Henry) “Bramblett’s Land,” which is adjacent the the surveyed acreage, as well as land owned by Jennings at “C” and Dodd at “D” “E” and “F”:

By Virtue of a warrant from the Proprietors Office, to me directed I have Surveyed for Robert Hinson of Fauquier County, a Tract of Waste Land, adjoining the Lands of Jennings, Bramblett, & Dodd near the head of Ratcliff’s Branch, in the said County, Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at A a white Oak & Black Oak by a glade corner to Bramblett, thence along the said Bramblett’s Line S 49 (degrees) E 132 Poles to B two small hicories in Jennings’s line, thence along the said Line – S 61 (degrees) W 20 Poles to C a hicory sapling, thence N 30 (degrees) W 3 Poles to D a hicory of fallen Red Oak Corner to Dodd, thence binding along the said Dodd’s Lines N 47 (degrees) W 66 Poles to E a Large Hicory stump & small white Oak by the road, thence N 42 (degrees) W 59 1/2 Poles to F a box Oak by the said Road, thence N 37 (degrees) E 9 Poles to the Beginning, Containing 12 1/2 acres … J. Moffett 1st Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett} Chain Carriers

This survey, recorded in the Land Office of the Northern Neck of Virginia Proprietary, 1725-1792, VLO Entry 117, Box 2, documents the residence of Reuben and John at home in Fauquier County on Nov. 1, 1780. The previous resurvey record quoted in this text above for Henry Bramlett III, which also names Reuben and John as chain carriers, documents their residence on Nov. 20, 1780. Reuben used his 1780 surveying experiences in Virginia later when he was asked to survey a road while living in Kentucky between 1805-1814.

Reuben and Elizabeth’s Life in South Carolina

   Reuben and Elizabeth moved their family from Virginia to Laurens Co., S.C., according to census data, by 1787 when their son Henry “Harry” Bramlett was born. Their son John most likely also was born there, and son Nathan definitely was born there in 1799. Reuben bought 100 acres of land on Durbin’s Creek, branch of Enoree River, from William Brown, perhaps his father-in-law or brother-in-law. He then sold the land to Benjamin Brown, perhaps his brother-in-law, for 30 pounds on Feb. 22, 1798 (DB-F:328). The land was part of Frazier’s grant, first conveyed to James Frazier, then to William Brown, then to the said Reuben Bramlett. It bounded on land owned by Francis Allison, John Deen, William Gilbert Jr. The deed was witnessed by Joseph Line and William Gilbert. Reuben may have bought other land from John Robinson and farmed in Laurens County until he sold it to William Brown on Sept. 2, 1800. (William Brown is most likely a close relative of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett, perhaps her father or brother?) The tract of land originally was granted to John Robinson on Aug. 10, 1797, and conveyed to Reuben Bramlett (Son of Henry II/Jr. and Margaret). Lewis Allison and Reuben’s brother “Nathan Bramblett” witnessed the 1800 deed. All were from Laurens County. (John Robinson/Robertson is husband of Martha Mary “Polly” Bramblett, sister of Mildred “Milley” Bramblett who married Menoah Robertson and sister of Reuben Bramblett Jr., who reported on his Revolutionary War pension application that he moved to Laurens County in 1794. The three siblings’ father, Reuben Bramblett Sr., named them in his 1806 will as residents of South Carolina.) Reuben sold the land he had purchased in Laurens County as he and Elizabeth and family were preparing to move to Christian Co., Ky. Reuben begins to appear in tax records there in 1801.

Reuben and Elizabeth’s Life in Kentucky

   Reuben and Elizabeth bought land from John Reeves and farmed it for about seventeen years before selling the property back to Reeves in 1818. Reuben paid taxes on the farm in 1802 for the year 1801 and in 1819 for the year 1818. “Reuben Bramblet” witnessed the will of John Brown, most likely a close relative of Elizabeth, in Christian County: “The last will and testament produced in Court of John Brown by William Brown one of the Executors therein named sworn to by Reuben Bramblet a subscribing witness thereto and ordered to certify.” The record appears between Oct. 14, 1805, and 1808 in Christian County Court Order Book B, page 256.

   “Reuben Bramlet” and son “Benjamin Bramlet” and three others are referenced in a Christian Co., Ky., court record to survey a road and report on it:

On the motion of Abram Morris it is ordered that Mathias Earley, Ezekiel Dunning, Reuben Bramlet, Benjamin Bramlet, and Reubin Cook or any three of them after being first sworn to be appointed viewers to view and mark a road from Earley’s Horse Mill to the Caldwell County line where the road that leads from Hopkinsville to Eddyville crosses said line and report.

The undated record appears between Oct. 14, 1805, and May 2, 1814, in Christian County Court Order Book B, page 332. Reuben’s son Henry Bramlett also is referenced in a later Christian Co., Ky., court record: “It is ordered that Henry Bramlett take into his care charge and custody Patsy Williams and infant orphan of ___ Williams deceased for the ensuing twelve months and that he receive therefore $30 to be laid off in the next levy.” The record appears in Christian Co., Ky., Court Order Book C, page 11. The relationship between Henry and the Williams family members is unknown.

   Reuben and family are enumerated in the 1810 U.S. Census for Hopkinsville, Christian Co., Ky., replicated below:  “Ruben Bramblet,” over 45, born before 1765, is listed as head of a family that include a female over 45 (wife, Elizabeth) and seven children: two males 16-25 (sons Benjamin, Henry), two males 10-15 (sons John, Nathan), a male under 10 (son Coleman Brown) and two females 5-10 (daughters Margaret and Elizabeth) (NARA Film M2532:9:88).

Reuben in 1810

Reuben’s Revolutionary War Service


Reuben and Elizabeth’s companion headstone in Brown Family Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery, ordered and installed by Deborah G. and Gary M. Dennis
Reuben Bramlett 1757-1844
Son of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr.

Reuben Bramlett of Fauquier County, Virginia and Gallatin/Saline County, Illinois:

Revolutionary War Service

By Deborah G. Dennis
(This article first appeared on http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/)

Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, served three tours of duty as a private from Virginia during the Revolutionary War in 1777-1781. His pension claim is documented in National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, D.C. His pension number is S.30896, and his pension certificate bears the number 7814. (His surname is spelled Bramblet, Bramlett and Bramlet in various pension documents, census data and estate records.) He is sometimes confused by family researchers with two other contemporary men named Reuben Bramlett/Bramblett–his paternal first cousins–who were associated with the war or other military action in Virginia and South Carolina or Georgia, respectively. Census data indicate that long after the Revolutionary War these other two men lived separately in South Carolina and Georgia during 1818-1840 while the subject of this biographical sketch, their first cousin Reuben, lived in Gallatin (now Saline) County, Illinois.¹

   Reuben’s pension claim provides the exact date and place of his birth–March 15, 1757, in Fauquier County, Virginia, as well as detailed information about his war service. (He actually was born in Prince William County before land boundaries changed and that area became Fauquier County when it was created two years later in 1759.) Additional biographical information is provided in a court document filed after Reuben died on September 11, 1844, in Gallatin County, Illinois. His seven children filed a survivors’ application for a final payment of his military pension there on March 21, 1845.2 The record names all seven children and indicates that, at the time of his death, Reuben had lived in Gallatin County, Illinois, for twenty-six years since moving in 1818 from Christian County, Kentucky.

   A legal brief filed by W. R. Turner with Reuben Bramlett’s pension application indicates “Reuben Bramblet, County of Gallatin, in the State of Illinois” made his declaration of Revolutionary War service before a court in Gallatin County, Illinois, when he was 75 years old. His service was documented by the court with records from the war department and with “traditionary evidence” given in court by Reuben Bramlett and by a clergyman and a neighbor who both stated Reuben was well known as a veteran of the Revolution in the neighborhood where he lived.

A Summary of Reuben Bramlett’s War Service

  Reuben Bramlett served as a private in the Virginia Line with General George Washington in Virginia and under Col. Williamson in South Carolina. Reuben first enlisted in the militia in Fauquier County, Virginia, in September 1777 and served three months as a private in Captain Samuel Blackwell’s Company in Colonel Armistead Churchill and Major Francis Triplett’s Regiment. Reuben said he marched with his unit through Maryland to Pennsylvania where they joined General George Washington’s army and were attached to the Third Virginia Regiment. He enlisted again in the spring of 1778 or 1779 in Fauquier County, Virginia, as a private and served three months in South Carolina in Captain William Berry’s Company in Colonel Williamson’s Regiment. While stationed at a fort on the Indian Line in northwest South Carolina, Reuben and two other soldiers were taken prisoner there by Tories commanded by Captain or Colonel Boyd when their officers and the other troops were out ranging. Reuben and the others were later released and left unharmed when the enemy took supplies and left the fort. After his discharge Reuben returned to Fauquier County and later enlisted there as a private for a third time in June 1781. He served three months under Captain William Triplett in Major/Colonel Francis Triplett’s Regiment in the Fauquier Militia before being honorably discharged in 1781 before Lord Cornwallis and the British surrendered at Yorktown. He applied for and received a pension based on his military service in 1832 while living in Illinois.

Reuben Pension

Reuben Bramlett’s Court Deposition

Declaration
in order to obtain the benefit of the act of congress passed June 7th 1832

State of Illinois}
Gallatin County}
On this 5th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the Hon. Thomas C. Browne Judge of the Circuit Court for the county aforesaid now sitting–Reuben Bramblet a resident of said county in the state of Illinois aged 75 years on the 15th day of Last March who being duly sworn according to Law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7, 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated. He first volunteered under Capt. Samuel Blackwell of Fauquier County Virginia for the Term of three months in what year exactly he does not recollect but it was the same year of the Battle of Brandywine for he recollects that while out and just after he had joined his Corps he was marched by the Battle ground to join Genl. Washington’s army with whom he remained until his three months had expired. He is pretty sure he volunteered in September of that year. The Col[onel] of the regiment that he started with was of the name of Armstead Churchill but he did not command them long, but went back on the march and the regiment was then conducted to Head Quarters by Maj. Francis Triplet. There was two companies–one commanded by Capt. Harrison (Benjamin he thinks) and the other by Capt. Blackwell. They marched from Fauquier County through Maryland to Pennsylvania where they joined the army under Genl. Washington not more than 15 miles from Brandywine river. After his arrival at Head Quarters they joined the 3d Virginia Regiment. He remembers a Col. Ennis but whether he commanded the 3d Reg[imen]t or not he does not know. He turned out under him to fight the Hessians who had landed on this side of the Schuyeskill but they run and no fight took place. He was discharged at the same place where he joined the army at the end of his 3 months. He volunteered a second time for three months a year or two afterward in the spring of the year under Capt. William Berry to go into South Carolina on the Indian line where he was stationed under Col. Williamson several companies at different places. Col. Williamson commanded them all but was not much with his company which was stationed at a Block House. Their march had been by Orange Court house, Guilford Courthouse, Sal[i]sbury, across Broad river, Catawba river & Inaree [Enoree] river where his time was all but out and Capt. Berry & the whole company, but three, were absent rangeing. Those three of whom this applicant was one were taken prisoners by several hundred Tories under the command of Capt. or Col. Boyd who was proceeding to join the British. He was not taken away but the Tories after taking what they wanted went on & left him & his comrades at the fort & when Capt. Berry returned from his rangeing expedition he was discharged his second Tour of three months being expired. he was in no battle during this Tour nor served with any Continental regiment or company.
We, Wilson Henderson a clergyman residing in the County of Gallatin state of Illinois and William Sutton, residing in the same hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Reuben Bramblet who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration. That we believe him to be 75 years of age that he is reputed in the neighborhood where he lives to have been a soldier in the revolution & that we concur in that opinion.
Sworn & subscribed the day and year aforesaid} Wilson Henderson Wm Sutton Leod. White cl[er]k
And the said court do hereby Declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department that the above named applicant served as he states and the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Wilson Henderson who has signed the preceding certificate is a clergyman resident in the County of Gallatin aforesaid and that William Sutton who has also signed the same is a resident in the same County and is a credible person and that their statement is entitled to credit.
I Leonard White Clerk of the Circuit Court in afor[e] Said County do hereby certify that the foregoing contains the original proceedings of the said Court in the matter of the application of Reuben Bramblet for a pension.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal of office this 5 day of September 1832 Leod. White cl[er]k²
He volunteered for a third term of three months the same year that Cornwallis was taken under Capt. William Triplett son of Maj. Francis Triplett before named. He entered the service this time in the month of June at Fauquier County Virginia and marched through Falmouth and Fredricksburgh to Little York where he joined the main army. He does not remember what regiment he was attached to on this occasion nor the names of his colonel or major, but recollects to have seen there Genl. Wayne and to have been commanded by him–was in no battle being discharged & returned home before the surrender of Cornwallis his three months being out & heard of the surrender of Cornwallis a few weeks after his return.

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Certificate of Pension Illinois 7.814

   “Reuben Bramblet of Gallatin in the State of Illinois who was a private in the company commanded by Captain Black[well] of the Regt. commanded by Col. Armstead [Churchill] in the Va. line for nine months” was inscribed on the Illinois Pension Roll in 1833. His pension amounted to “30 Dollars 00 Cents per annum, to commence on the 4th day of March 1831.” The certificate of pension was issued on April 6, 1833, and sent to Henry Eddy, of Shawneetown, Illinois, who paid Reuben $75. William R. Palmer, Clerk of the Gallatin County Commissioner’s Court, recorded the payment document in Book E, Volume 8, page 55.

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Reuben’s Survivors’ Application for Final Pension Payment

   Reuben died intestate at age 86 on September 11, 1844, in Gallatin County, Illinois. His youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlet, administered his estate, which was divided between all of his legal heirs, and recorded at the county courthouse. His seven children filed their survivors’ application for a final payment of his military pension on March 21, 1845:

State of Illinois}
Gallatin County}
Be it known that before me, James Murray, a Justice of the Peace, in and for the said county, personally appeared Benjamin Bramlett, Henry Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett, Coleman B. Bramlett, John Bramlett, Margaret Easley, & Elizabeth Baker, and made oath in due form of law that they are the children of Reuben Bramlet, deceased, who was the identical person who was a pensioner and is now dead, and to whom a certificate of pension was issued which is herewith surrendered. That the deceased pensioner resided in Gallatin County with his children for the space of twenty six years before his death, and that previously thereto he resided in Christian County in the State of Kentucky. Sworn to and Subscribed before me this 21st day of March, 1845 James Murray, Justice of the Peace [Signed] Benjamin Bramlet³ Henry Bramlet John Bramlet Nathan Bramlet Coleman B. Bramlet Margaret Easley Elizabeth Baker
Two witnesses who write} John M. Burnett Joseph Easley Know all men by these presents that we, Benjamin Bramlett, Henry Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett, Coleman B. Bramlett, John Bramlett, Margaret Easley, & Elizabeth Baker, of the County of Gallatin, State of Illinois, the children of Reuben Bramlett, deceased, who was a pensioner of the United States, do hereby constitute and appoint Erastus Wright our true and lawful attorney for us and in our names to receive from the agent of the United States for paying pensions in the State of Illinois the balance of said pension from the 4th day of March, 1844, to the 11th day of September, 1844, being the day of his death. Witness our hands and seals this 21st day of March, 1845 Benjamin Bramlet Henry Bramlet John Bramlet Nathan Bramlet Coleman B. Bramlet Margaret Easley Elizabeth Baker
Two witnesses who write} John M. Burnett Joseph Easley

Final Pension Payment Vouchers, showing Reuben’s death date, courtesy NARA

   Michael Hillegas Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution at one time placed a copper marker on Reuben Bramlett’s grave in the oldest section of Wolf Creek Cemetery, Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill. Elder descendants in the area in the late 1970s designated the copper marker and grave’s location from personal knowledge. The copper marker and its placement was not mapped or documented; and some time later the copper marker was removed, disappeared. Graves for Reuben and Elizabeth are now marked with an inscribed companion stone acquired by Deborah G. Dennis and late husband, Gary Michael Dennis, from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and installed in the old section of the cemetery next to the marked graves of their daughter Margaret and her husband, Joseph Easley, and the unmarked graves of some of their family members.

reuben-monument

Reuben Bramlett’s name is inscribed with others on a monument honoring Revolutionary War veterans buried in Saline County. The monument was first placed on the courthouse lawn there in Harrisburg by local D.A.R. and unveiled on Oct. 11, 1931. It was later moved to its current position at Sunset Lawn Cemetery in Harrisburg. The copper plaque inscription: “This Tablet Is Dedicated To The Memory Of The Revolutionary Soldiers Buried In Saline County, Illinois Reuben Bramlet Malachi Hereford Thomas Hamilton Lewis Howell William Roark Erected By Michael Hillegas Chapter D.A.R.” Mr. A. J. Cook and Mrs. Carl Rude unveiled the monument and the Rev. T. Leo Dodd and Mrs. David Peffer of Aurora, Illinois, D.A.R. State Regent, spoke at the ceremony.

Harriet J. Walker references Reuben in Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Illinois 1775-1850, first published in Los Angeles in 1917; however, Reuben went to Illinois from Kentucky in 1818, and when he died there in 1844, he was buried beside his wife, Elizabeth Brown Bramlett, at Brown Graveyard in Brown Block House, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery.Reuben burial

End Notes

1 Reuben Bramlett of Gallatin County, Illinois, is the son of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr. and grandson of Henry Bramlett Sr. of Fauquier County, Virginia. Two of his first cousins who share his given name were associated with Revolutionary War records in Virginia and South Carolina: 1) Reuben Bramblett Jr., the son of Margaret and Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Virginia and Bourbon County, Kentucky, who served in Elias Edmonds’ Company of the First Virginia Regiment of Artillery commanded by Colonel Thomas Marshall as a paid teamster in Virginia and later filed a pension application (R.1152) in South Carolina in 1832 that was twic e rejected, and 2) Reuben Bramblett, the son of William and Elizabeth Bramblett of Virginia and Laurens County, South Carolina, whose Revolutionary War or other military service is suggested in a reference to him as a Revolutionary War or Military pensioner aged 75 on an 1841 list created from the 1840 U.S. Census for Gwinnett County, Georgia. No record of Revolutionary War service or pension has been found for him. He may have served in a later war. Source: A Census of Pensioners for Revolutionary or Military Services. Washington, USA: Blair and Rives, 1841. 145. Reuben Jr. (1) moved from Fauquier County, Virginia, to Laurens County, South Carolina, in 1794 and lived there until he died after 1840. His cousin Reuben (2) moved from Laurens County, South Carolina, to Franklin County, Georgia, then to Gwinnett County, Georgia, circa 1820 and lived there until he died after 1840. Their cousin Reuben, the pensioner whose service is documented and featured here, moved from Virginia to South Carolina and Christian County, Kentucky, then to Gallatin (now Saline) County, Illinois, in 1818 and lived there until he died in 1844.
2 Reuben and Elizabeth (Brown) Bramlett and seven children all moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to Gallatin County, Illinois. Elizabeth, who died circa 1830 in Gallatin County, is the daughter of Mary Coleman and William Brown, according to family tradition. Elizabeth and Reuben’s marriage in Virginia circa 1783-1785 has not been documented due to lost parish records. Elizabeth’s mother and siblings also moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to Gallatin County, Illinois. (Her brother Coleman Brown was in the territory as early as 1814-1816 and bought land, built a blockhouse with brothers there on the site of present-day Eldorado.) Elizabeth and Reuben may have moved from Virginia into Tennessee or just passed through the state  before or while moving by 1787 to South Carolina where several of his relatives had relocated before and after the Revolution. (The 1850 census indicates his son Henry was born in South Carolina in 1787 and his son Nathan was born there in 1799.) Tax records show Reuben later owned a farm in Kentucky for several years, between 1802 and 1818, before he moved his family to Illinois. Elizabeth predeceased Reuben: She is not enumerated in the 1840 census, nor mentioned in Reuben’s pension application and estate records. Their seven children, who are named in Reuben’s pension and 1844-1847 estate records in Gallatin County, are 1) Benjamin Bramlett, who married his cousin Mary “Polly” Brown in Kentucky and died in 1830 (most likely buried at Wolf Creek Cemetery); 2) Henry Bramlett, who first married Liddy Stephens (first person buried at Brown Family Graveyard on Coleman Brown’s land, now Wolf Creek Cemetery, in present-day Eldorado, Illinois) and second married Malinda Easley (buried beside Henry with markers in Bramlet Cemetery), and died in 1865; 3) John Bramlett who most likely did not marry and died after 1847; 4) Nathan Bramlett who married Mary “Polly” Upchurch in Illinois in 1820 and died in 1858; 5) Coleman Brown Bramlet who married Susannah Upchurch in Illinois and died in 1889 (both buried with markers Bramlet Cemetery); 6) Margaret Bramlett who married Joseph Easley in Christian County, Kentucky, (both buried with markers in Wolf Creek Cemetery); and 7) Elizabeth Bramlet who married Elijah Baker in Gallatin County in 1829 (deaths and burial places unknown).
3 Reuben’s son Benjamin Bramlett did not actually, physically appear in court as stated since he was already deceased. He died of measles circa 1830 and definitely before his father’s estate was probated in Gallatin County in 1844-1847: Ben’s name, signed by his brother Henry with the same handwriting used for Henry’s own name, is included in the court record since Ben was a child/heir of Reuben. Benjamin’s children are named in their grandfather Reuben Bramlett’s probate records as recipients of their father Benjamin’s share of his father Reuben’s estate because Ben had already died.
4 Transcript of Reuben’s pension declaration is taken from three copies ordered over a period of a few years from NARA. Each when received had different blurred, illegible and legible sections, finally allowing a full transcript.

Author’s Note: Deborah G. Dennis is a fifth-great-granddaughter of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, descending through their son Coleman Brown Bramlet and his wife, Susannah Upchurch, and their son Thomas Brown Bramlett and wife, Rebecca Jane Hanley. Deb also is a fifth-great-granddaughter of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett’s brother Coleman Brown, descending through his son Marvel Brown and wife, Paletire Ellis Cox, and their daughter Susan Brown and husband, Montgomery Miner, and their daughter Mary Matilda Miner who married her cousin Henry Coleman Bramlett. Henry Coleman Bramlett is son of Thomas Brown Bramlet and grandson of Coleman Brown Bramlet and great-grandson of Reuben Bramlett and Elizabeth Brown. Deb is a native of western Illinois–the Land of Lincoln, Obama, and Clinton–who now lives in Charleston, S.C.–the land of ancestors, history, and beauty. For more information, contact debdenn@gmail.com.

A Roster of Revolutionary Ancestors of the Indiana Daughters of the America Revolution,Vol. 1, p. 70, submitted by descendant Betty Moore Harris

(Additions are marked below by brackets. –Deborah Dennis)

   “Bramblet, Reuben, b. [15] Mar. 1757, Fauquier Co., Va., d. [11] Sept. 1844, Gallatin Co., Ill., m. 1785, Elizabeth Brown, b. ca. [1760] Va., d. bef. 1832, ca. Ill. Service: Pvt., Va. bet. 1777-1781; 3 mos. in 1777 under Capt. Samuel Blackwell in Col. Armstead Churchill’s Reg. and 3 mos. in 1777 under Cpt. Berry of Col. Williamson’s Reg.; and 3 mos. in 1781 under Capt William Triplett of Col. Williamson’s Reg. Pvt. Children:  Benjamin, b. 1785; Henry, b. 1787; [misplaced  John, 1788-1797, who belongs here];  Nathan, b. 3-2-1799, m. Rebecca Upchurch;  Coleman B., b. 15-2-1802, m. Susannah Upchurch;  Margaret, b. 20-12-1804, m. Joseph Easley;  Elizabeth [b. 1804 Kentucky] m. [Elijah] Baker; [Betty lists three of Reuben’s grandchildren as children—however, they are not children: Lucy Mae, m. __ French; Hezekiah; Daniel] [and Betty names in her list with the grandchildren another son] John [who belongs above]. Descendant: Harris, Betty (Mrs. Charles M.), No. 505135.”

[Note: again, LUCY MAE m. __ French; HEZEKIAH; DANIEL are not children of Reuben and Elizabeth. They are grandchildren. Reuben and Elizabeth only had seven children, all named in his probate records and Final Pension Payment documents: Benjamin, Henry, John, Nathan, Coleman Brown, Margaret and Elizabeth Bramlett.]

[Note: Betty Moore Harris filed for her DAR membership in Indiana because she was a resident of that state at the time, not because her Revolutionary War ancestor Reuben Bramlett was a resident of Indiana as some have interpreted. Reuben never lived in Indiana. Betty is a native of Saline County and directly descends from Reuben’s daughter Margaret “Peggy” Bramlett who married Joseph Easley and their daughter Elvira Easley who married Fuel Moore. She could not provide a source for the name of Reuben’s wife, Elizabeth Brown, which was apparently correct family tradition documented in a published history. The source actually is Meeks Haley Bramlet, who provides the name Elizabeth Brown as Reuben’s wife in his 1924 history A Pioneer Family – Bramlet. Meeks is a direct descendant of Reuben and Elizabeth.) Elizabeth Brown by tradition is daughter of Mary Coleman and William Brown. Elizabeth and Reuben named a son Coleman Brown Bramlet to honor Elizabeth’s brother Coleman Brown, thus initiating a naming tradition–using Coleman and/or Brown for given names of Reuben’s descendants–that continued down through several generations. Coleman Brown Bramlet’s son Thomas Brown Bramlet named one of his sons Henry Coleman Bramlett. The tradition continued: Henry Coleman Bramlett’s son Matthew Montgomery Bramlett named one of his sons Coleman William Bramlett. In addition to other examples of Reuben and Elizabeth’s descendants, Reuben’s son Nathan Bramlett named one of his sons Thomas Coleman Bramlett.]

Reuben and Elizabeth’s Life in Illinois

   Reuben and Elizabeth and family moved to Illinois in 1818 from Christian Co., Ky., where they had been farming several years. Reuben and grown children bought land to establish Bramlett Settlement, a collection of farms in a community neighborhood between west of Eldorado and south of Raleigh, and began farming. Illinois Public Land Records indicate Reuben purchased 160 acres of land in Gallatin (now Saline) County for $320 on July 9, 1819:

Name: Reuben Bramlet
Section: NW
Price per Acre: 2.00
Total Price: 320.00
Date: 9 Jul 1819
Volume: 088
Page: 755
Type: FD
Sect: 25
Township: 08S
Range: 06E
Meridian: 3
Acres: 160.00
Corr-Tag: 0
ID: 154452
Reside: 030

      Rev. T. Leo Dodd in his Southern Illinois history mentions the Bramlett family as early settlers of Saline County:

“EARLY SETTLEMENTS — The Bramlet Family” in Kobweb Korners: A Network of History and Tradition Relating to Eldorado and Southern Illinois — T. Leo Dodd

…A very interesting and dramatic set of circumstances and events attach to the immigration of the first of the [Reuben] Bramlet family to Saline County and to the establishment of what came to be known and is now known as the “Bramlet Settlement.” Here it is. Most people who are interested in local history know the saga of John Rector, a government surveyor assigned to this area, that he was ambushed and killed and buried near the Rector Township Town House, some five miles north of Eldorado, while in line of duty. His name has been given to a creek, a township, a church, and a station on the L & N. 

But it is not well-known that among the members of his survey party was a young single man named Bramlet [reportedly Reuben’s eldest son Benjamin]. But such was the case. Mr. Bramlet witnessed the ambush of Mr. Rector and no doubt assisted in his burial. This was in 1814 [sic]. Of course the party had to disband since the official surveyor was dead. Mr. Bramlet returned to his parents’ home in [Christian County,] Kentucky, related the tragic event and described the beautiful, fertile country where he had been employed.

His description triggered the desire of his parents to see for themselves. Accordingly the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Bramlet, following surveyor, pioneer and Indian Trails, came [in 1818] to seek a place to make a home in these parts. After some considerable looking around, they decided upon an area combining such features as fertility, water, forest, and terrain which suited them better than any other. Mr. Bramlet “drove his stake” and immediately proceeded to file his claim and to buy up other land. The claim was granted in 1827 and it too bears the signature of President J. Q. Adams, and is a treasured possession of descendants of the pioneers.

Reuben Bramlet was the fifth son of William Bramlet [sic Henry Bramlett Jr.] [William or his father, Ambrose, was] the first to come to America from England. [Reuben] married [Elizabeth Brown] in [Fauquier County,] Virginia [circa 1783-1785 where son Benjamin Bramlet was born], migrated across the Cumberland Mountains, into Tennessee, [lived in South Carolina during 1787-1800 where sons Henry and Nathan and perhaps John were born], Kentucky [in 1801-1818 where children Coleman Brown Bramlet, Margaret Bramlet and Elizabeth Bramlet Baker were born], and finally to Illinois….

Such was the beginning of the Bramlet Settlement, located in the general area of Union Grove [Baptist] Church in Section 26, Raleigh Township, Saline County. Thank God for this great, fine family. No one can tell all the contributions for good made by the clan.

And many thanks to the late Rev. T. Leo Dodd for so kindly documenting our family’s early Illinois history. Rev. Dodd preached at Wolf Creek Church in 1919 and Brushy Creek Baptist Church 1924-1928.

    More recent Virginia research indicates Reuben is the son of Margaret “Peggy” and Henry Bramlett Jr., grandson of Henry Bramlett Sr. and great-grandson of the “immigrant” William Bramlett I/Sr., born before 1694 and died circa 1759-1762 in Bedford Co., Va. William Bramlett I/Sr. actually may have been born in British Colonial America, the son of immigrant Ambrose ‘Bamblet’ or ‘Bramblet‘ who arrived from England in 1690 to help populate New Kent Co., Va. No record has been located to document the relationship of father and son between Ambrose and William and William and Henry Sr. No evidence has been located to support the suggestion that Reuben and family stopped/lived in Tennessee. Illinois Probate/Pension records indicate Reuben only had seven children, who are named as Benjamin, Henry, Nathan, John, Coleman Brown, Margaret and Elizabeth.

   A biography of Reuben’s grandson John Daniel Bramlet in A History of Southern Illinois by George Washington Smith, 1912, relates the early history of the Reuben Bramlett family in the Illinois Territory:

“John D. Bramlett of Saline County, Illinois bears a name that has been a familiar one in this part of the country since back in the days when Illinois was a territory.

“Benjamin Bramlett, eldest brother of Nathan Bramlett, John D. Bramlett’s father, helped to survey Saline County, in company with John Rector, who in 1805 was killed by the Indians and was in the same squad with him. Benjamin at the time of the survey selected a tract of land for his father, Reuben Bramlett, of Kentucky, and hither in the fall of 1816 came Reuben’s two sons, John and Nathan, aged respectively nineteen and seventeen years, to begin the work of clearing and improving. They cleared a portion of the land and the following year put in a crop after which they returned to Kentucky and that autumn, 1817, piloted the rest of the family to the new location. In the spring of 1818, by the payment of $2.50 [sic] per acre, Reuben Bramlett received territorial certificate for the land and later secured deed from the state. The son John referred to became insane. He died here, unmarried. The father, Reuben, was 97 [sic 87] years of age at the time of his death. He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War, had served under Washington, and was rich in war and pioneer experience. Many were the interesting and thrilling stories he related to his children and grandchildren. He died here and was buried at Wolf Creek.

“Nathan Bramlett was born in Kentucky [sic South Carolina] in 1799 and as above outlined came to Illinois in 1816. Here in 1820 he married Mary Upchurch, daughter of Samuel Upchurch….

“Another brother of Nathan who owned land and made his home here was Coleman, the youngest [son] of the family. Coleman Bramlett lived on a farm adjoining that of his father. He bought [or inherited] his father’s homestead of 80 acres and [his nephew] John D. [Daniel Bramlett] in 1848 bought it from [Coleman].” (863-864)

Smith writes that when the family moved to the territory, Ben “made settlement one mile north of the present town of Eldorado. He lived in this county to a ripe old age, and died here, of measles” (863). Actually, Ben died circa 1830 at about age 45. The date of Ben’s survey trip to Illinois is stated as 1814 by Meeks Haley Bramlet in A Pioneer Family – Bramlet. However, that 1814 date is probably incorrect. Plat maps in Illinois Archives indicate the area where Benjamin bought land, in East Eldorado Township, Gallatin (now Saline) County, as well as all of the surrounding area in the township, was surveyed by William Dobbins in 1807. Dobbins must have been John Rector’s replacement. Meeks writes in his “Historical Sketches” that “….Rector, a Government surveyor, accompanied by one man, Bramlet, as a helper,” were surveying

north of the city of Eldorado, Illinois, as it now stands, not even a village or hardly a hamlet at that time, 1814 [sic 1805]…near what is now known as Rector Creek…and, as it is believed, Mr. Rector was killed by Indians. His body was buried near this little stream, which afterwards was called Rector Creek. Many people now living know of Rector Creek. Bramlet escaped death, getting away from the Indians and returning to his home in Kentucky, relating to his father and brothers of Rector’s death, and of his own escape. He also gave a description of the lay of the land, mentioning the kinds of timber. His father and brothers became interested. His father planned the return for the purpose of filing a Government land claim, and soon started over the old surveyor’s trail, after crossing the Ohio river…. (6)

A spokesperson for Illinois Archives at Springfield indicated there is no historical written information about members of John Rector’s survey party in state records there. Illinois land records state 1819 as the official ownership date of Reuben’s Saline County land.

   Meeks describes the Illinois wilderness:

When this land was first settled, it was timber land and no buildings, not even a hut. All improvements were to be begun. The ax, the maul, and the wedge were the necessary tools to be used in clearing land and in erecting buildings. Only log huts were the first, with stick and clay chimneys, with the old fireplace to burn wood, as the timber was heavy and much of it was burned in heaps in the clearing. Coal, gas and oil were not heard of, as grease in a spoon with a twisted rag soaked in the grease and gave light to work by nights. Soon the carding rolls and spinning wheels were put into action by the women folks. The tallow candle soon came into use for light by night. Year by year has brought many changes and improvements. The old pioneers are gone….

Reuben purchased his 160 acres of land, the northwest quarter of section 25, Township 8 South Range 6 East, Raleigh Township, in Gallatin  (now Saline) County, for $320 on July 19, 1819. Reuben received a copy of his Illinois land patent for eighty acres from the president of the United States in 1827:

John Quincy Adams, President of the United States of America. To all to whom these presents shall come, greeting: Know ye, that Reuben Bramlet, of Gallatin County, Illinois, having deposited in the General Land Office, a certificate of the Register of the land office at Shawneetown, Illinois. Whereby it appears that full payment has been made for the west half of the northwest quarter of Section 25 in Township 8 south, Range 6 east, containing 80 acres. Of the land directed to be sold at Shawneetown, by the act of Congress, relative to the disposal of the public lands in Illinois. There is granted by the United States, in pursuance of the act of Congress, in that case provided, unto the said Reuben Bramlet, and to his heirs, the half quarter section of land above described: To have and to hold the said half quarter section of land, with the appurtenances, unto the said Reuben Bramlet and his heirs and assigns forever.

In Testimony Thereof, I have caused these letters to be made Patent, and the Seal of the General Land Office to be hereunto affixed.

Given under my hand at the City of Washington, the seventeenth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America, the fifty first. By the President. J. Q. Adams.

Recorded in Volume 8, Page 1.

A page below from a booklet self-published in 1937 by Robert Franklin Cole contains several Illinois-related Bramlett references, which all refer to Reuben Bramlett and his family.

Bramlett Reuben Rev War cover pgCole's booklet 1937

Reuben and Elizabeth’s Grown Children in Illinois in 1818–Henry, Benjamin, John

Reuben 1818Reuben Bramlett’s sons Benjamin, Henry, John appear as heads of their families in the 1818 Illinois Census for Gallatin County, shown above. John, 21 and up, had an extra male of the same age, probably brother Nathan, in his house. Also listed are Elizabeth’s Brown family members: Coleman, Marvel, John, Thomas Brown. 

Elizabeth and Reuben and Grown Children in Gallatin County, Illinois in 1820–Reuben, Benjamin, Henry–and Elizabeth’s Brown Family Members

1820 REUBEN.jpg

“Reuben Bramblet” 45 and over, is listed as head of his family in the Aug. 7, 1820, U.S. Census for Gallatin Co., Ill., with a female 45 and over (wife, Elizabeth), and three males 16-25 (sons Coleman and John and son-in-law Joseph Easley), female 16-25 (daughter Margaret) and one female 10-15 (daughter Elizabeth) (NARA Film M33:11:56). Four persons were engaged in agriculture. Reuben’s sons Benjamin and Henry headed their own families. Also listed in 1820 on the same page: Elizabeth’s Brown family members: her brothers William, John, Thomas, Coleman, and nephews Marvel, Jesse Brown. 

union-grove-baptism

A baptism for Union Grove Baptist Church members in Saline Co., Ill., circa 1892

Elizabeth and Reuben in Illinois in 1830

Reuben 1830 census

“Ruben Bramblet,” 70-80, born 1750-1760, headed the family in Gallatin Co., Ill., in 1830 when wife, Elizabeth, female 60-70, born 1760-1770, was still living: a male 50-60 (son Benjamin) and a male 40-50 (son John) (NARA Film M19:22:273) Son Coleman Brown Bramlet lived next door and daughter Margaret Bramlett Easley and husband, Joseph, lived nearby. 

   Elizabeth Brown Bramlett, wife of Reuben, is listed with 13 others as a charter member in Bethel Creek Regular Baptist Church minutes on June 17, 1820. Two of her Upchurch in-laws–Mary and Rebecca–also are listed as charter members. The church, in Raleigh Township, was listed in an 1836 deed as being located in part of the northwest quarter of section 9, township 8 south range 6 east. Ministers from Bankston Fork Church, including Elder Wilson Henderson, a Revolutionary War veteran, organized circa 1818-1819 in Harrisburg, Ill., helped organize Bethel Creek Church. Bankston Fork Church records, incomplete like many early Gallatin and Saline County church documents, include members of the Bramlet, Moore and Upchurch families. The church ceased to exist in 1849. Bethel Creek Church membership rolls list Bramlet, Brown, Miner, Moore and Upchurch family members, including Mary Upchurch, Rebecca Upchurch, Elizabeth Bramlet. The rolls list Elizabeth Bramlett as deceased. She died in 1830 after the census and before her son Coleman B. Bramlet and her Brown relatives–Marvel Brown and Polly Brown–who all had joined later than charter members, left Bethel in June 1830 to establish Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church. Wolf Creek Church was organized in late June or early July 1830, many years after the adjoining cemetery had been established. Wolf Creek Church was first located in or near Coleman Brown’s Blockhouse. Coleman Brown, brother of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett, established the graveyard on his land after his nephew Henry “Harry” Bramlett’s first wife, Liddy Stephens Bramlett, died there in the illinois Territory circa 1814-1816. Later, Wolf Creek Church was organized about 14 to 16 years after that first burial in the graveyard. The church and the cemetery are now situated inside the city limits of Eldorado, Ill. The core member group met there in the blockhouse before a log church building was erected on the hill by the flagpole next to Kaskaskia Trail. The old trail runs through Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery, and still functions as part of the cemetery’s driveway. Jonathan Brown, son of Coleman and Nancy Brown, who lived on adjacent and encompassing property, deeded the land on which the cemetery and church building are located to Wolf Creek Church in 1846. The legal description of the land in 1846: part of the southeast quarter of the southwest quarter of section 17 in township 8 south range 7 east, 14 poles north of Jonathan Brown’s corner. There are many family members resting in Wolf Creek, including Bramlets, Browns, Easleys, Miners, Moores, Stricklins and Upchurchs to name a few. Coleman Brown Bramlet, named after his maternal uncle Coleman Brown, later in 1884 was a charter member of Union Grove Missionary Baptist Church in the Bramlet settlement. Coleman Brown Bramlet established Bramlet Cemetery circa 1837-1838, many years before Union Grove Church was organized in 1884. Coleman’s brother Henry “Harry” Bramlett and second wife, Malinda Easley, are buried at Bramlet. Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett’s daughter Margaret, named as “Sister Easley,” and her husband, Joseph Easley, in July 1833 were members of Lick Boundary Church, a satellite group of Lick Creek Baptist Church. Lick Boundary met at a school near North Fork and Crenshaw Mill, and the Easleys and others were dismissed from Lick Creek Church in July 1834 to constitute Lick Boundary Church. The latter church, with 20 members, joined Muddy River Baptist Association in 1837. Joseph Easley was one of the messengers to the association meeting that year. He and Margaret are buried in the oldest section of Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery, with existing inscribed tombstones. Some Brown and Moore family members also attended Brushy Fork Baptist Church near Harco, Ill.

country-seat

“Reuben Bramlett,” 80-90,  listed on page 2 as age 82, veteran, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Curran Pct., Gallatin Co., Ill., with two others: a male 30-40, born 1790-1800 (son John) and a male 40-50, born 1780-1790 (unknown) (NARA Film M704:60:31-32). None were employed; two were marked as “insane and idiots at private charge.” (John was known to be mentally impaired; the other person is unknown.)

Reuben 1840 1.jpg

Reuben 1840 p. 2.jpg

Last census record for Reuben below: “Reuben Bramlett,” 82, resident of Gallatin County, Illinois, and head of his family on June 1, 1840, is listed in the 1841 Census of Pensioners, created from the 1840 U.S. Census for Gallatin Co., Ill. (NARA Film M704:60:32).

Reuben 1841

Reuben’s Estate

   Reuben’s probate records, naming seven children in receipts for their shares of his estate, and containing an appraisement bill of his personal estate and payment receipts, indicate he was well invested in family and farm land. He owned 160 acres of land and vital necessities at the end of his life: oven and pot hooks, coffee mill, large kettle; a cow for milk and butter, hogs, steers, two horses with one saddle. He owned one plough, used by him and later by sons, to cultivate his land. His youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlet, administered the estate. Reuben died intestate at his home in Raleigh Township. He did not return to Kentucky in 1833 and die there, as Meeks Haley Bramlet erroneously reported or suggested in his 1924 family history.

“Illinois, Wills and Probate Records, 1772-1999”

1844-1847 Gallatin Co., Ill., Box 6-B

H. R. Coffee’s Bill “For 1 Coffin — $6.00” in September 1844 provides proof Reuben died and was prepared for burial in Gallatin Co., Ill. He and wife, Elizabeth Brown, rest in Brown Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery.

 

  Elizabeth and Reuben’s first child, Benjamin, was born in Virginia in 1785, according to a published historical account in Gallatin/Saline County, quoted below. They moved to Laurens Co., S.C., before their son Henry was born in 1787 and son John was born in 1797 and son Nathan was born in 1799. Reuben and Elizabeth moved the family to Kentucky. They began farming in Christian Co., Ky., in 1800-1801. Bible records indicate their youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlet was born in Kentucky in 1802. Their two daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth, were born in Kentucky as well. The entire family moved by 1818 into southern Illinois where they established Bramlett Settlement, a community of individual family farms south of Raleigh and west of Eldorado that eventually included a rural school, cemetery and church.

Bramlet Elementary 1.jpg

Bramlet Elementary School, Raleigh Township, Saline County, Illinois

Chapter 3:

Generation 5

William Bramlett and Unknown Hendricks/Hendrix

6d9ed-virginia2bseal

William Bramlett, perhaps child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born circa 1762-63 in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Lawrence Co., Tenn., circa 1830-1838. William married a woman named Hendricks/Hendrix before 1790 in South Carolina. They lived in Laurens County in 1790 and in Spartanburg County in 1800 before moving to Tennessee by 1810 and to Christian Co., Ky., by 1811-1812 and then settling in Tennessee.

   “William Bromlett,” white male over 16, is listed in the 1790 U.S. Census for Laurens Dist., S.C., as head of a family that includes three females (wife, two daughters–Nancy? or Elizabeth and Esther?) (NARA Film M637:11:446-447). William appears in the left column, three lines from the bottom.

Willliam Bramlett 1790 Census

   “Wm. Bramlet,” white male 26-44, is listed in the 1800 U.S. Census for Spartanburg Dist., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 26-45 (wife) and a female 10-15 (Elizabeth?), a female under 10 (Esther?), two males under 10 (Sanford, William W.) (NARA Film M32:50:188). William appears on line 5.

   William may be the young William Bramlett who purchased a state land grant of 387 acres in Laurens County in 1787. The tract, surveyed by Andrew Thomson for William Bramlet on Jan. 29, 1787, is situated on branches of Warrior and Beaver Dam Creek on Enoree River in Ninety-Six Dist., S.C. (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S213190, vol. 12, p. 86). (William Bramblett who owned the 1773 royal land grant there died in or before that year; and no other men named William Bramlett have been found in the early families who lived in Laurens County in/by 1787-1790. This William’s neighbors in February that year, 1787, are listed as Richard Richardson, Robert Henry Hughes, John Higgins (S213190, vol. 12, p. 110). The William Bramlett who lived in Laurens in 1790 and Spartanburg in 1800 farmed a few years in Christian Co., Ky., near Henry Jr.’s son Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, most likely his brother, around 1810-1813 before moving on by 1815 to Lawrence Co., Tenn. Census data indicate one son of William–Henry–was born in 1800 in South Carolina, and another–Joel–was born in Kentucky in 1810, and son Larkin was born in Tennessee. Two of William’s daughters may be Nancy Bramlett, born 1792 and died 1820, who married Theophilus Goodwin, and Esther Bramlett, born 1774 and died 1838, who married Reuben Beasley. Both were reportedly born Spartanburg Co., S.C., where young William and family lived in 1800. Another daughter may be Sarah Bramlett who married James Petty and lived in Maury Co., Tenn. Four of William’s sons–James, Henry, Joel and Larkin–left Tennessee before 1820, perhaps stopping briefly first in the Arkansas Territory to buy land before settling in White Co., Ill., which is adjacent to Gallatin/Saline County where Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, and Elizabeth Brown and family settled in 1818. A son of James was born in Arkansas; James bought land in White Co., Ill.; then returned to Tennessee in/by 1830.

   (Note: This William of Tennessee is sometimes confused with William Bramlett III, son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr., born in Bedford Co., Va., who settled in Darlington Co., S.C., circa 1800-1801 and lived there and in Sumter Co., S.C., until he died in 1840. William III married a woman named Sarah Jane, perhaps China but not Hendrix; and had several children, some named after his Bedford Co., Va., siblings, parents and extended family members: for example, Callaway, Ballard, etc.)

   William Bramlett of South Carolina and Tennessee married Unknown Hendrix, daughter of Frances Lea and James Hendrix Jr., in Laurens or Spartanburg Co., S.C. (The Hendrix family had daughters Annis/Anne, who married and James Cochran; Frances, deceased in 1802; Milly and Elizabeth.) On Sept. 1, 1806, William Bramlett of Spartanburg Dist., S.C., acting on his wife’s behalf, and William’s brothers-in-law–Elijah Hendrix and Larkin Hendrix also of Spartanburg, and John Hendrix and Abner Hendrix of Jackson Co., Ga.–gave power of attorney to their brother William Hendrix, farmer, of Spartanburg, in a recorded deed there “to obtain inheritance from Executors of William Lee (Lea), Decd.,” who is described in the document as “our grandfather,” of Person Co., N.C. (Spartanburg Co., S.C., Deed K:332). William Lea Sr., 1715-1803, left a will written Oct. 30, 1802, and a July 5, 1803, codicil when he died in Person Co., N.C. The will was probated in March 1804. William Lea Sr.’s wife, Frances White Lea, died there about Oct. 30, 1802. Their daughter is Frances Lea, 1741-1802, who married James Hendrix Jr., 1735-1783, and settled at a plantation on Two Mile Creek in Abbeville Dist., S.C. They had nine children, all named in his 1781 will, when James Hendrix died in July 1783. William Lea left land to his daughter Annis (Anne) Lea Cochran (wife of John O’Neil and James Cochran) and land and his dwelling house to daughter Eunice Lea Rose and the balance of his land to be sold and proceeds to be equally distributed to five heirs, including one-fifth of the balance of his estate to the “children of deceased daughter Frances Hendrix.” Frances Lea and James Hendrix Jr.’s children are William, Annis (Ann), Larkin Lee, Elizabeth, Abner, Elijah, Frances, James, John and Milly Hendrix.

Summary of the will of William Lea Sr. of South Hyco, Person Co., N.C.:

Mar 1804 – Will Probated in Person County, North Carolina: William Lea, of Person County, made his Will on 30 Oct 1802; named: daughter Eunice Rose; oldest daughter of grandson Benjamin Lea; balance of estate to son George Lea, 1/5th; daughter Elizabeth Lea, 1/5th; daughter Eunice Rose, 1/5th; children of deceased daughter Frances Hendrix, 1/5th; daughter Anniss Cochran and six children by first husband John McNeil. Executors: James Cochran, Alexander Rose, Sr., grandson Duncan Rose, Moses Bratcher (as Bradsher), and Loyd Van Hook… signed William Lea. Witnesses: Loyd Vanhook, Margaret Vanhook, Alexr Rose, Jr. Codicil to Will of William Lea, Sr., of South Hyco, made 5 Jul 1803; named: daughter Anniss Cochran to have land bounding tract sd Lea sold James Cochran; daughter Eunice Rose to have rest of the tract, including “my dwelling house. Balance of land, all on west side of South Hyco, to be sold and distributed per Will…” Signed William Lea. Wit: Loyd Vanhook, Margaret Vanhook, Elisha Sarrett (Person County, N.C., Will Book D:243).

Note: Family tradition holds that Capt. William Lea Sr. of South Hyco, Person Dist., N.C., was born in England circa 1715 and came to America before 1731 with parents, Ann Unknown, born 1684, and John Lea, 1677, both natives of Carlisle, Cumberland, England, who settled in King & Queen County, Virginia. William had a brother James and a sister Betsy Lea. Frances White and William Lea’s children are Elizabeth, Anness (Anne), Eunice, Frances and George Lea. For more information, see Rootsweb’s page with a William Lea family tree.

   William Bramlett and wife had a large family in Kentucky and Tennessee. William lived until about 1830-38 in Lawrence Co., Tenn. He is listed with wife and thirteen children/others enumerated with him in the 1820 Lawrence Co., Tenn., census: “William Bramblet,” over 45, and female over 45 (wife ? Hendrix) with female 26-45, 1785-94 (daughter); male (William W.) 16-26, 1794-1804; male (Sanford) 16-26; female (daughter) 16-26; male (son) 10-16, 1804-10; male (James) 10-16; male (Henry) 10-16; female (daughter) 10-16; male (Joel) under 10, 1810-20; male (son) under 10; male (son) under 10, male (Larkin) under 10; female (daughter) under 10 (NARA Film M33:123:209). “William Bramblet,” 60-70, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Lawrence Co., Tenn., with a female 60-70 (wife ? Hendrix), and five children: Son 15-20, Son 15-20, Son 15-20, Son 10-15, Daughter/Granddaughter under 5 (NARA Film M19:177:290).William 1830 census.jpg

   Some of William’s children lived in Lawrence, Maury, Hickman, Dickson and Humphreys counties. One son is William W. Bramlett who married Nancy Wells in Maury Co., Tenn., in 1818. Other sons are James, Henry, Joel and Larkin, some of the younger sons; and another son is named Sanford. The names of these sons and the fact that young William Bramlett of Spartanburg County and Sandford Bramlett, son of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, both left South Carolina about the same time and both eventually settled in Tennessee, suggest that young William may be the son of Elizabeth and William. (Their son Enoch Sr. had sons James, Henry, Joel; and their son Newton had a son named Larkin.) However, William of Laurens and Spartanburg also lived for a few years near Henry Jr.’s son Reuben, brother or cousin, in Kentucky; and later this William’s younger sons (James, Henry, Joel and Larkin) moved in 1828-1830 in White Co., Ill., which is adjacent to Gallatin Co., Ill., where Reuben and family settled in 1818 and still lived in 1820-1844. Records have not yet been discovered to conclusively document the connection between William and parents. William’s children include Nancy? and Esther? and Elizabeth? and Sarah, William W., Sanford, James, Henry, Joel, Larkin Bramlett

    Elizabeth Bramlett, possible child of William and Unknown Hendrix Bramlett, was born between 1785 and 1790 in South Carolina. She may be the Elizabeth Bramlett who married Frederick Reuben Burdette in Laurens County circa 1806, had six children and died there circa 1820.

   William W. Bramlett, child of William and Unknown Hendrix Bramlett, was born between 1780 and 1790 in South Carolina. He died in Tennessee. He married Nancy Wells on July 30, 1818, in Maury Co., Tenn. She was born circa 1800. She died after the 1880 census. William W.’s father, “William Bramblett” of Lawrence Co., Tenn., signed the marriage record as bondsman. William W. and Nancy lived in Hickman Co., Tenn., in 1830 and 1840 and Dickson Co., Tenn., in 1850 and in Humphreys Co., Tenn., in 1860. “William Bramlett,” 50-60, is listed as head of his family in the 1840 U.S. Census for Hickman Co., Tenn., with a female 40-50 (wife, Nancy Wells) and ten children: male 20-30, male 15-20, two males 10-15, two females 10-15, female 5-10, two males 5-10, male under 5. “Wm. Bramblett,” 50, birthplace unknown, cooper, and wife, Nancy, 50, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Middle Dist., Dickson Co., Tenn., with five children born Tennessee: Charlotty, 25; Elisabeth, 17; Henry, 15; John, 9; Sarah, 7/12 (NARA Film M432:876:152B). “William Bramlet,” 59, and wife, Nancy, 40, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Dist. 10, Humphreys Co., Tenn., with six children: Charlotte 27; Elizabeth, 22; Sarah, 12; Nancy, 8; Aaron, 3; William, 9; James, 5; Joel, 3. William and Nancy’s children include Son Newton Jackson, Charlotte, Elizabeth, Henry (“Harne”), John Jefferson, Sarah, Nancy, Aaron, William, James, Joel Bramlett.

   Son Newton Jackson? Bramlett, child of William W. and Nancy Wells Bramlett, was born 1824 in Tennessee. He died after 1870 and before 1880, probably in Humphreys Co., Tenn. He married Nancy Edwards on Feb. 6, 1849, in Dickson Co., Tenn. She was born circa 1820-33. “N. J. Bramlet,” 36, and wife, Nancy, 26, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Dist. 10, Humphreys Co., Tenn., with three children: Sanford, 12; Blanche, 6; William, 3. “Newton Bramlette,” 60, farmer, and wife, Nancy (Edwards), 50, keeping house, both born Tennessee, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Waverly, Humphreys Co., Tenn., with four children born Tennessee: Blanche, 16; William, 12, farm laborer; Charles H., 8; Martha C., 4. Nancy Bramlet, 53, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dist. 14,  HHumphreys Co., Tenn., with four grown and minor children: Samuel (Sanford), 27; (Charles) Henry, 19; Martha (Calline), 16; Sallie (Katherine), 8. Also listed: “Nancy Bramlet,” 70. All were born in Tennessee.

  Sanford “Samuel” Bramlett, child of Newton Jackson and Nancy Edwards Bramlett, was born 1849 in Tennessee.

  Blanche Bramlett, child of Newton Jackson and Nancy Edwards Bramlett, was born 1854 in Tennessee.

    William Wright Bramlett, child of Newton Jackson and Nancy Edwards Bramlett, was born June 12, 1859, in Waverly, Humphreys Co., Tenn. He died Jan. 21, 1938, in St. Louis, Mo., and was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, Hayti, Pemiscot Co., Mo. His obituary appears in the Jan. 28, 1938, edition of the Democrat Argus, Caruthersville, Mo.:

Funeral services were held at the Baptist Church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock for William Wright Bramlet. Herman McClanahan of Wardell conducted the funeral. Mr. Bramlet was born at Waverly, Tenn., June 12, 1859, and died January 21, 1938, at St. Louis at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Maggie Mangrum.  The deceased is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Mangrum of Watts, of this city and two granddaughters. Interment was in Woodlawn cemetery.

William married Nancy F. Edwards on 1878, in Dickson Co., Tenn. They moved to Missouri.
 
Charles Henry Bramlett, child of Newton Jackson and Nancy Edwards Bramlett, was born in Waverly, Humphreys Co., Tenn.
 
Martha Calline Bramlett, child of Newton Jackson and Nancy Edwards Bramlett, was born in Waverly, Humphreys Co., Tenn.
 
Sallie Katherine Bramlett, child of Newton Jackson and Nancy Edwards Bramlett, was born in Waverly, Humphreys Co., Tenn.

    Charlotte Bramlett, child of William W. and Nancy Wells Bramlett, was born 1825 in Tennessee.

   Elizabeth Bramlett, child of William W. and Nancy Wells Bramlett, was born 1833 in Tennessee.

  Henry “Harne” Bramlett, child of William W. and Nancy Wells Bramlett, was born 1835 in Tennessee. He may have died Jan. 12 or 18, 1862. He lived with parents and siblings in Dickson Co., Tenn., in 1850. He may be “Harne” or Henry Bramlet who served in the same Confederate unit as John Jefferson Bramlett, Company K, Fiftieth Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, and reportedly died during the Civil War/War Between the States. His Compiled Military Service Records indicate he enlisted at age 25 on Dec. 11, 1861, at Fort Donelson, Tenn. (NARA Film M268 Roll 319). He reportedly died there on Jan. 18, 1862, or on Jan. 12, 1862, at Dover, Tenn. Another source, John Berrien Lindsley’s The Military Annals of Tennessee – Confederate (Nashville: Lindsley & Co., 1886) reports “Henry Bramlett” of Company K, Fiftieth Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, died April 15, 1863.

Margaret C. (Saxton) Fowler and Susan (Knight) Gore provided some of the following.

Rev. John Jefferson grave  Rev. John Jefferson Bramlett, child of William W. and Nancy Wells Bramlett, was born Nov. 28, 1840, in Tennessee. He died at age 59 on Dec. 12, 1899, in Houston Co., Tenn., and was buried at Arlington Heights Cemetery, Erin, Tenn. 

On the night of December 12 Rev. J. J. Bramlett, who lived just one mile from here, was called to his reward. He had been confined to his bed for about a year and had been a great sufferer, but he bore it patiently. He was willing to abide by the will of the Lord. –Rev. A. R. Brown, pastor at Erin, Tenn., in The Cumberland Presbyterian, Dec. 28, 1899, p. 816

John was an ordained Cumberland Presbyterian Minister. An Extract of Minutes of Charlotte Presbytery on Oct. 7, 1887, published in The Cumberland Presbyterian on Oct. 27, 1887, reports “Rev. J. J. Bramlett, formerly of the Congregational Methodist, was received as a member and an ordained minister in Charlotte Presbytery.”

   John first married Nancy Unknown. She is listed with him in 1860. She was born circa 1830. She died by July 1865. He second married Sarah Elizabeth Hutchinson on July 3, 1865, in Humphreys Co., Tenn. She was born July 22, 1845, in Montgomery Co., Tenn., and died Nov. 12, 1895, in Houston Co., Tenn. Their children, born between 1866 and 1880, are Frances Emeline, Mary Louise, Willie Ann, John Riley, Alice Elizabeth Bramlett. John third married Sarah R. Cartright Glesner/Glasner, widow of a Civil War casualty, on April 4, 1896, in Houston Co., Tenn. She was born 1848. She died 1925. John served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. His Compiled Military Service Records indicate he enlisted at age 22 as a private in Company K, Fiftieth Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (NARA Film M268 Roll 319). The records indicate he joined the same day as Harne Bramlet, Dec. 11, 1861, at the same place, Fort Donelson, Tenn. He is listed as absent on sick furlough since the surrender of the fort and then later as “Deserted Jan. 1, 1862.” His wife, Sarah J. Bramlet applied for a Widow’s Pension, Application 1076.742, filed Oct. 4, 1916, in Tennessee.

John Jefferson marriage

“John Bramblett,” 9, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Middle Dist., Dickson Co., Tenn., with parents, Wm., 50, birthplace unknown, cooper, and Nancy, 50, born North Carolina, and four siblings born Tennessee (Charlotty, 25; Elisabeth, 17; Henry, 15; Sarah, 7/12) (NARA Film M432:876:152B). “John Bramlet,” 21, laborer, and (first) wife, Nancy, 20, both born Tennessee, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Waverly P.O., Civ. Dist. 11, Humphreys Co., Tenn. (NARA Film M653:1257:166B). “John J. Bramlet,” 30, farm hand, and (second) wife, Sarah, 32, keeping house, and one child (Frances E., 5), all born Tennessee, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for McAllisters Crossroads, Civ. Dist. 16, Montgomery Co., Tenn. (NARA Film M593:1551:432B). “John Bramlett,” 40, works on farm, and (second) wife, Sarah, 36, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dist. 9, Dickson Co., Tenn., with four children (Francis, 14; William [Willie Ann], 7; John R., 4; Allace E., 2/12), all born Tennessee to parents born there. Also listed: John Riggin, 30, Florida, brother-in-law, and wife, Mary Riggin, 24, Tennessee, sister-in-law, and three Riggen nieces all born Tennessee (Lucinda, 8; Sarah J., 5; Martha E., 3; Margaret, 1) and Perry Griffen, 40, Kentucky, black, other, works on farm (NARA Film T9:1252:374C). John’s widow (third wife) Sarah (Cartright Glesner) Bramlet, 50, born October 1849, and one grown child from her previous marriage (Jake Glacaner, 23, July 1876) and one other, perhaps a grandson? (George Glacaner, 12, July 1888), are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Civil Dist. 9, Dickson Co., Tenn. (NARA Film T623:1567:151A).

    Sarah Bramlett, child of William W. and Nancy Wells Bramlett, was born 1849 in Tennessee.

   Nancy Bramlett, possibly child of William Bramlett and unknown Hendrix/Hendricks, was born circa 1792-94 in Spartanburg Co., S.C. She married Bryant Wells, perhaps a maternal cousin, on July 14, 1814, in Maury Co., Tenn.

   Sanford Bramlett, child of William and Unknown Hendrix Bramlett, was born circa 1798 in Spartanburg Co., S.C. He died after 1860, perhaps in Lawrence Co., Tenn. He married a woman named Euphin. She was born circa 1801 in Kentucky. “Sanford Bramlitt,” 52, born South Carolina,  farmer, $350 real estate, and wife, Euphin, 49, born Kentucky, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 6, Lawrence Co., Tenn. (NARA Film M432:886:332B). Sanford second married Susan Patterson on Feb. 17, 1857, in Lawrence Co., Tenn. “Sanford Bramlett,” 63, born South Carolina, farmer, $130 real estate, and wife, Susan, 43, born Tennessee, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Dist. 6, Lawrence Co., Tenn. (NARA Film M653:1260:431).

  Sarah Bramlett, possibly daughter of William and Unknown Hendrix Bramlett, was born circa 1804 in North or South Carolina. She died after 1860, perhaps in Tennessee. She married James Petty circa 1824. He may have died by 1850 when she headed her family in the census: “Sarah Petty,” 46, born North Carolina, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 11, Madison Co., Tenn., with seven grown and minor children and a son-in-law: William H. Petty, 26, farmer; Sanford Petty, 18; Martha Petty, 17; Levi S. Petty, 13; Benjamin F. Petty, 8; Mary F. Petty, 6; Sarah (Petty) Bramlet, 16, and her cousin/husband Henry H. Bramlet, 22, farmer (NARA Film M432:889:317A-B). All were born in Tennessee. “Sarah [Bramlett] Petty,” 59, is listed in the 1860  U.S. Census for Waverly P.O., Civ. Dist. 7, Humphreys Co., Tenn., with three grown children: Sharp (Levi), 22; Beny or Berry [Benjamin F.], 19; Mary F., 16 (NARA Film M653:1257:145A-B). James and Sarah’s children include William H., Sanford, Martha, Sarah, Levi S. (“Sharp”), Benjamin F. (“Beny”), Mary F. Petty.

Note: Some Petty family members from North Carolina lived with Abraham Bramlett in Indiana in 1850: “Abram Bramlet,” 34, born in Kentucky, farmer, $500 real estate, and (first) wife, Nancy (Gamble), 36, born Kentucky, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 85, Parke Co., Ind., with six children born in Indiana (William J., 10; Henry H., 8; Benjamin H., 7; Mary L., 6; Reuben, 4; Milla, 1) and three others (Jonathan Petty, 38, born North Carolina; Nancy Petty, 10, Indiana; Angaline Petty, 4, Indiana) (NARA Film M432:164:265A). Abraham is believed to be a direct descendant of Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Fauquier Co., Va., and Bourbon Co., Ky.

   Son Bramlett, child of William and Unknown Hendrix Bramlett, had a son named Henry H. and a son named Charles of Tennessee who both lived in New Madrid Co., Mo., in 1870.

   Charles Bramlett, grandson of William and Unknown Hendrix Bramlett, was born circa 1828-1832 in Tennessee. He died after 1860, perhaps in New Madrid Co., Mo. He married a woman named Martha in Tennessee She was born there. 

   Henry H. Bramlett,  son of William W. Bramlett, was born circa 1828-1832 in Tennessee. He died after 1880 census, perhaps in New Madrid Co, Mo. He married Sarah Petty on May 9, 1849, in Dickson Co., Tenn. She was born circa 1834, the daughter of Sarah Bramlett and James Petty. Sarah Bramlett Petty was born circa 1804 in North Carolina. “Henry H. Bramlet,” 22, farmer, and wife, Sarah, 16, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 11, Madison Co., Tenn., living with her mother, Sarah (Bramlett) Petty, 46, and siblings: William H., 26, farmer; Sanford, 18; Martha, 17; Levi S., 13; Benjamin F., 8; Mary F. Petty, 6 (NARA Film M432:889:317A-B). All were born in Tennessee except Sarah Bramlett Petty, born North Carolina. “Henry Bramlet,” 28, and wife, Sarah, 24, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Dist. 7, Waverly P.O., Humphreys Co., Tenn., with four children: James, 9; Aaron, 7; George, 2; and Babe, 1/12 (NARA Film M643:1257:145). All were born in Tennessee. “Henry Bramlet,” and wife, Sarah, 34, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Big Prairie Twp., New Madrid Co., Mo., with children: Aaron, George, Richard, Gabriel, Charles, William, Mary. J., Frances. Henry and Sarah’s children include James, Aaron Morgan, George, Richard, Gabriel, Charles, William, Mary. J., Frances Bramlet.

   James Bramlett Sr., son of William Bramlett and unknown Hendrix/Hendricks, was born  circa 1785–1790 in Laurens Co., S.C. He moved with parents to Tennessee and was in Tennessee in 1810-1814, then in the Arkansas Territory early on, circa 1818-1823, before buying land in White Co., Ill. James Sr. and brother Sanford then moved on to New Madrid, Mo./Lawrence Co., Ark., in 1815, and then back to Obion Co., Tenn., again in or by 1830. He married by about 1808. His wife, enumerated in the 1830 census, was born circa 1780-1790. “James Bramlet,” free white male 40-49, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Obion Co., Tenn., with a free white female 40-49 (wife) and ten children/others: a female 20-29, 1801-10 (Daughter); three females 15-19, 1811-15  (Daughter, Daughter, Temperance), female 10-14, 1816-20 (Daughter); male 10-14, 1816-20 (Son); two males 5-9, 1821-25 (Son, Son); female under 5, 1825-30 (Daughter); a male under 5, 1825-30 (Son) (NARA Film M19:17:155). Two of his children, Isbun and Redmond, went to Washington and then to St. Clair and Randolph counties in Illinois. James Bramlett Sr.’s children include Daughter, Sanford (“Sampson”)Temperance (“Tempy”), Daughter, Daughter, Redmond, Isbun, James Jr., Rebecca J. and Larkin Bramlett.

   Daughter Bramlett, child of James Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1808. She is enumerated with parents in 1830 in Obion Co., Tenn.

    Sanford “Sampson” Bramlett, child of James Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1810. He married  Mathilda. They lived in  St. Clair Co., Ill.,  in 1860. Another wife is Julia.

    Temperance “Tempy” Bramlett, child of James Bramlett Sr., was born Jan. 28, 1811, in Tennessee or Arkansas. She died Sept. 27, 1862, in Clinton Co., Ill. She married Nathaniel Power on April 3, 1828. Her brother “Isbun Bramlett” is mentioned in the probate records of Isaac Ford, brother-in-law of Nathaniel Power/s, husband of Temperance Bramlett, in St. Clair Co., Ill., on March 24, 1846 (File Box 342, No. 591). Nathaniel Power/s served as administrator of the estate. He paid Isbun Bramlett $0.50, which Isaac Ford owed Isbun, and two other debts to one James Cook and to himself. Temperance lived in Washington Co., Ill., in 1860. Temperance’s daughter Louisa Jane Power married Elijah L. Boyett. Their children include John W. Boyett, who at age 71 was still living in Arkansas in 1930; Nathaniel Boyett; and Fannie Boyett.

   Daughter Bramlett, child of James Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1814.

   Daughter Bramlett, child of James Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1815.

   Son Bramlett, child of James Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1819.

   Redmond Bramlett, child of James Bramlett Sr., was born circa 1823 in Arkansas. He went to Tennessee with his parents by 1830; and when grown, he went to Illinois from Tennessee between 1850 and 1860, settling first in Fayetteville, St. Clair Co., Ill., by 1860 and then in Preston P.O., Randolph Co., Ill., by 1870 and was there in 1880. He married Candis Harris.  “Redmon Bramblet,” 27, born Arkansas, and wife, Candis, 29, are listed in 1850. “Redmond Bramlet,” 38, born Missouri (Arkansas?) and wife, Candace, 39, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Fayetteville, St. Clair Co., Ill., with one child: Windy, 15, born Tennessee. “Redimus Bramlet,” 52, born in Arkansas, farm laborer, $80 personal estate, and wife, Candice, 47, born in Illinois, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Evansville P.O., Township 5 Range 7 West, Randolph Co., Ill., with one grown child: Wincy A. Bramlet, 20, born in Illinois (NARA Film M593:272:364A).  “R. [Redmond] Braneblet,” 57, born in Arkansas, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Baldwin Precinct, Randolph Co., Ill., as head of a family that includes his wife, Sarah, 40; daughter S. J., 1; stepson W. W. Shaw, 11; and another couple, Charles Scudder, 45, and his wife, E. J. Scudder, 43, all born in Illinois. Redmond is considered to be the son of James Bramblett Sr., born in South Carolina in the 1780s, who lived in Tennessee in 1810-1814 and then in New Madrid Co., Mo./Lawrence Co., Ark., during 1815-30 and then in Obion Co., Tenn., in 1830.

   Isbun Bramlett, child of James Bramblett Sr., was born in December 1824 in Arkansas. He died in November 1901 in Preston, Randolph Co., Ill., and was buried there in Preston Cemetery. Also buried there is his wife, Franciska “Francis” Bramlett, born in July 1830 in Illinois. She died circa October 1892 in Randolph Co., Ill., and was buried at Preston Cemetery. Franciska and Isbun married in or before 1850. Isbun’s given name also is spelled variously in records and documents as Isbon, Ibson, Isburn, Isbarn, Isham, Islam, Isobel, Ismon, Ishburn Bramleltt. Isbun lived in St. Clair Co., Ill., in 1846. “Isbun Bramlett” is mentioned in the probate records of Isaac Ford, brother-in-law of Nathaniel Power/s, who married Temperance Bramlett, sister of Isbun, in St. Clair Co., Ill., on March 24, 1846 (File Box 342, No. 591). Nathaniel Power/s served as administrator of the estate. He paid Isbun Bramlett $0.50, which Isaac Ford owed Isbun, and two other debts to one James Cook and to himself.

   Meeks Haley Bramlet references Isbun as “Ismon” and a “brother” whom Meeks could not name in his 1924 family history A Pioneer Family – Bramlet:

Ismon Bramlet and a brother (name unknown) came into Randolph County, Illinois, one hundred or more years ago. The best information given me was that they were from Kentucky. They spent most of their days in Randolph County, and married and raised their families there. Some of the younger set live there yet. The writer was in Randolph County fifteen years ago and learned of them. Since that I had a letter from a daughter who lived in Nashville, Illinois. Personally, the writer never met one of the Randolph County Bramlets, but met people who knew them personally. On October 23, 1923, I met a man in Missouri who was raised in the same neighborhood as the Bramlets in Randolph County. He stated that he knew Ismon and his brother, but could not give the brother’s name. Therefore I give only a little sketch of this branch of the Bramlet family. (94-95)

Ismon or Isbon or Isbun was born circa 1824 in Arkansas. His father, James, lived in Tennessee before moving into Arkansas and later returning to Tennessee. Isbun and wife, Francis, lived in Washington Co., Ill., in 1850: “Isabel Broomlet,” 25, born in Tennessee (most likely Arkansas), laborer, and wife, Francis, 20, born in Illinois, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 20, Washington Co., Ill. (NARA Film M432:13:1172B). They lived near Evansville, Randolph Co., Ill., in 1870. Isbun lived there and in St. Louis, Mo., in 1900. “Isbarn Bramlet,” 46, born in Arkansas, farmer, $1,000 in real estate and $480 personal estate, and wife, Franciska, 39, born in Illinois, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Evansville P.O., Township 5 Range 7 West, Randolph Co., Ill., with one grown child: “Rebecca J. Kiefer,” 22, born in Illinois (NARA Film M593:272:357A). Also listed is Rebecca’s child “Alviette” or “Alvielle Kiefer,” 3/12, born in March in Illinois. Isbun is listed as “Inband” in the 1900 census: “Inband Bramlet,” 74, born in October 1825 in Arkansas to parents born in Ireland (actually South Carolina), (grand-) father-in-law of Joseph Young, widowed, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Evansville Precinct, Randolph Co., Ill., living with Joseph Young, 28, born in December 1872 in Illinois to parents born there, farmer, rents farm, head of the family, married seven years, and wife, Mary (M. Kieffer), 27, born in March 1873 in Illinois to a mother born there and a father born in New York, no children (NARA Film T623:338:204B). Also listed: Harley Nathan, 8, born in January 1892 in Illinois to a mother born in Illinois and father born in New York, adopted son of the Youngs, and Peter Kieffer, 17, born in August 1882 in Illinois to a mother born there and father born in New York, brother-in-law, farm laborer. (Mary Young is Peter Kieffer’s sister. Both are children of Rebecca J. Bramlet Kieffer.) “Isbun” or “Isbarn” or “Inband” is duplicated in the 1900 census: “Islam Bramlett,” 74, born in October 1825 in Arkansas to parents born in South Carolina, grandfather, widowed, also is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Central Township, St. Louis, Mo., living with his granddaughter “Alva Kieffer,” 30, born in March 1870 in Illinois to a mother born there and father born in Germany, dairy work, head of the family, and her sister “Rena Kieffer,” 25, born in October 1875 in Arkansas to a mother born in Illinois and father born in Germany, sister, housekeeper (NARA Film T623:888:240A). “Isbon” and Franciska’s child is Rebecca J. Bramlett.

   Rebecca J. Bramlett, child of Isbon and Franciska Bramlett, was born circa 1848 in St. Clair or Washington Co., Ill. She died sometime after 1882. She married John Kieffer on Jan. 16, 1867, in Randolph Co., Ill. (MB-B:367). He may have been born in New York or Germany. “Rebecca J. Kiefer,” 22, born in Illinois and child, “Aloiette” or “Alva” Alvielle Kiefer, 3/12, born in March in Illinois, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Evansville P.O., Township 5 Range 7 West, Randolph Co., Ill., living with her parents, Isbarn Bramlet, 46, born in Arkansas, farmer, $1,000 real estate and $480 personal estate, and Franciska, 39, born in Illinois, keeping house (NARA Film M593:272:357A). Rebecca and John’s children include Alvielle or Aloiette (“Alva”), Mary M., Irene (“Rena”), Peter A. Kieffer.

   Rebecca’s daughters Alvielle or Aloiette “Alva” Kieffer and Irene “Rena” Kieffer lived with their grandfather Isbun in 1900. He died the next year. “Isbun” or “Isbarn” or “Inband” is duplicated in the 1900 census as “Islam Bramlett,” 74, born in October 1825 in Arkansas to parents born in South Carolina, grandfather, widowed, also is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Central Township, St. Louis, Mo., living with his granddaughter “Alva Kieffer,” 30, born in March 1870 in Illinois to a mother born there and father born in Germany, dairy work, head of the family, and her sister “Rena Kieffer,” 25, born in October 1875 in Arkansas to a mother born in Illinois and father born in Germany, sister, housekeeper (NARA Film T623:888:240A). “Irene Kieffer,” 48 (wrong age?), born in Missouri to a mother born in Illinois and father born in New York, single, domestic servant, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Ward 14, St. Louis, St. Louis Co., Mo., living with J. S. Long, born in Indiana to parents born in Germany, church priest, head of the household, which also includes two other priests and two other domestic servants, most likely all unrelated to Rena.

    Rebecca’s daughter Mary M. (Kieffer) Young, 27, born in March 1873 in Illinois to a mother born there, father New York, and husband, Joseph (R.) Young, 28, born December 1872 in Illinois to parents born there, farmer, rents farm, head of the family, married seven years, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Evansville Pct., Randolph Co., Ill. (NARA Film T623:338:204B). Also listed: “Inband Bramlet,” 74, born in October 1825 in Arkansas to parents born in Ireland (actually South Carolina), (grand-) father-in-law to Joseph Young, widowed. Also listed: Harley Nathan, 8, born in January 1892 in Illinois to a mother born in Illinois and father born in New York, adopted son of the Youngs, and Peter Kieffer, 17, born in August 1882 in Illinois to a mother born there and father born in New York, brother-in-law of Joseph Young, farm laborer. (Mary Young is Peter Kieffer’s sister. Both are children of Rebecca J. Bramlett and John Kieffer.) “Mary M. Young,” 36, first marriage, married 17 years, no children, and husband, Joseph R. Young, 38, farmer, general farm, owner of a mortgaged farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Evansville Precinct, Randolph Co., Ill. (NARA Film T624:319:141B). Also listed is Mary’s brother Peter A. Kieffer, and his wife, Ethel M. Kieffer. The record indicates all were born in Illinois to parents born there. “Mary Young,” 46, born in Illinois to parents born in Ohio (actually Illinois and New York or Germany), and husband, Joseph Young, 48, born in Illinois to parents born there, farmer, general farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Evansville Precinct, Randolph Co., Ill., with one child: May Young, 2, born in Illinois to parents born there (NARA Film T625:396:109A).

   Rebecca’s son “Peter Keiffer,” 17, born in August 1882 in Illinois to a mother born there and father born in New York, brother-in-law, farm laborer, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Evansville, Evansville Precinct, Randolph Co., Ill., living with his sister Mary Young, 27, born in Illinois to a mother born there and father born in New York, and his brother-in-law Joseph Young, 28, born in Illinois, farmer, head of the family, and their adopted son, Harley Nathan, 8 (NARA Film T623:338:204B). Also listed is Peter’s grandfather, “Inband [Isbun] Bramlet,” 74, born in October 1874 in Arkansas, who is listed elsewhere in census records in 1870 as “Isbarn” Bramlet and duplicated in 1900 as “Islam” Bramlett. Peter married a woman named Ethel M. in 1910. She was born circa 1886 in Illinois. “Peter Kieffer,” 28, farmer, general farm, rents farm, first marriage, recently married, and wife, Ethel M., 24, no children, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Evansville Precinct, Randolph Co., Ill., living with his sister Mary M. Young, 36, and her husband, Joseph R. Young, 38, farmer, general farm, head of the family (NARA Film T624:319:141B).

    James Bramlett Jr., child of James Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1825.

    Rebecca J. Bramlett, child of James Bramblett Sr., was born 1827.

    Larkin Bramlett, child of James Bramblett Sr., was born 1828.

   Henry Bramlet, son of William Bramlett and unknown Hendrix/Hendricks, was born circa 1800 in South Carolina. He died in White Co., Ill. He moved with parents and siblings to Tennessee and settled in White Co., Ill., by 1830. He married Candace Myers on Aug. 17, 1829, in White County. She was born circa 1805 in New York. She died in White Co., Ill.

   “Henry Bramlet,” white male 30-40, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for White Co., Ill., with a female 20-30 (wife, Candace) and five children: male 10-15, two males 5-10, a female under 5 and a male under 5. “Henry Bramlet,” 50, born in South Carolina, farmer, and wife, Candas, 45, born in New York, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Grayville, 13th Dist., White Co., Ill., with six children born in Illinois: William, 20, farmer; James, 18, farmer; Sidney, 17; Willis, 14; Mary J., 12; and Adaline, 10 (NARA Film M432:132:312). Candice Bramlet, 63, born New York, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Carmi Twp., White Co., Ill., with two others: her son Thomas Bramlet, 23, born Illinois, and Elizabeth Bruce, 35, born Illinois. Candace Bramlet, 73, born New York, mother, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Hawthorne Twp., White Co., Ill., living with son Thomas, 34, born Illinois, farm laborer, and his nieces and nephews/her grandchildren: Mary J. Bramlet, 15, Illinois; Candace Bramlet, 11, Indiana; Patrick Greene, 15, Indiana; and Jane Hammontree, 6, Illinois (NARA Film ). Candace and Henry’s children include William, James, Sidney P., Willis, Mary Jane, Adaline and Thomas Bramlet.

    William Bramlet, child of Henry and Candace Myers Bramlet, was born in or near Carmi, White Co., Ill.

     James Bramlet, child of Henry and Candace Myers Bramlet, was born in or near Carmi, White Co., Ill.

   Sidney P. Bramlet, child of Henry and Candace Myers Bramlet, was born Nov. 4, 1834, in or near Carmi, White Co., Ill. He died there Dec. 20, 1869, and was buried in Maple Ridge Cemetery, Carmi, Ill. Sidney survived his military service as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States, but died five years after discharge. He enlisted Sept. 10, 1861, as a private in Company H, Forty Eighth Regiment, Illinois Infantry (NARA Film M539 Roll 9). Vital statistics in Illinois Archives indicate he was age 23, single and a farmer at enlistment, 5 feet 8 inches tall, with a fair complexion, red hair, black eyes. He married Elizabeth Payne Sherrill Harvey, a widow, in 1865 in White County. Elisabeth Bramlet, 30, keeping house, $1,200 real estate, $255 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Emma P.O., Prairie Precinct, White Co., Ill., with three children (William, 3; Alexander, 2; Lucinda, 1/12) and one other (Pamela Blagg, 18), all born Illinois  (NARA Film M593:289:476A). Elizabeth Moring, 40, born Illinois (Indiana?) to parents born Indiana, housekeeping, and (second) husband, James Moring, 45, born Illinois to parents born Alabama, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Hawthorn Twp, White Co., Ill., with three Bramlet children born Illinois to a mother born Indiana (Illinois?) and father born Illinois (Henry, 13; Samuel, 13; Lucinda, 12), and seven Moring children all born Illinois, except George who was born Alabama, to parents born Alabama (Mary, 15; Henry, 13; George, 10; Olive, 8; and children of Elizabeth and James: Eddie, 5; Emma, 3; Mattie, 1) (NARA Film T9:258:381C). About eight years after Sidney died, she married her third husband, James Moring, on June 7, 1874. Her first husband is William P. Harvey, whom she married April 3, 1859, in White Co., Ill. He was born circa 1836. He enlisted as a private in the same Union unit as Sidney on Aug. 15, 1862, at age 25 and may have died while serving in 1862. Elizabeth survived Sidney and later died in Indiana and may be buried there. Elizabeth and Sidney’s children include William Henry, born July 6, 1866, and died Sept. 1, 1894, buried Maple Ridge; Samuel Alexander; Lucinda Bramlet Strickland, born 1875, buried Maple Ridge.

Willis Bramlet grave   Willis Bramlet Sr., child of Henry and Candace Myers Bramlet, was born Sept. 20, 1837, in or near Carmi, White Co., Ill. He died Jan. 26, 1892, at Mcleansboro, Hamilton Co., Ill., and was buried at Maple Ridge Cemetery, Carmi, Ill. “Willis Bramlet,” 14, born Illinois, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census or Grayville Dist., White Co., Ill., with parents, Henry, 50, born South Carolina, farmer, $150 personal estate, and Candas, 45, born New York, and six siblings born Illinois (William, 20; James, 18; Sidney, 17; Mary J., 12; Adaline, 10; Thomas, 5) (NARA Film M432:132:312). “Willis Bramlett,” 22, born Illinois, farm laborer, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Carmi, White Co., Ill., living with Solomon Bryant, 50, born Tennessee, farmer, and family (NARA Film M653:236:364). Willis served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company H, 48th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, on Sept. 10, 1861, at Carmi, White Co., Ill., his residence. Vitals: age 25, born White Co., Ill., light complexion, dark hair, hazel eyes, 5 feet 10 inches tall, married, farmer. Re-enlisted Aug. 14, 1862; served 1861-63; survived and returned home from the war. Willis Bramlet filed  an Invalid’s Pension, Application 814.253 Certificate 589.956, on July 15, 1890, in Illinois for his military service (NARA Film T289C Roll 567). His wife, Mary A. Bramlet, filed a Widow’s Pension, Application 540.314 Certificate 357.666, on Feb. 9, 1892, in Illinois. Willis is not yet located in 1870. Willis married Mary Ann Hammontree. She was born Jan. 11, 1841, in Tennessee. She died Aug. 20, 1910, and rests at Maple Ridge Cemetery. “Willis Bramlet,” 42, born Illinois to a mother born New York and father born South Carolina, farmer, and wife, Mary (Ann Hammontree), 40, born Tennessee to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Hawthorn Twp., White Co., Ill., with three children born Illinois (Mary Ida, 18; William, 12; James, 9) (NARA Film T9:258:381C).

   Mary Jane Bramlet, child of Henry and Candace Myers Bramlet, was born in or near Carmi, White Co., Ill.

   Adaline Bramlet, child of Henry and Candace Myers Bramlet, was born in or near Carmi, White Co., Ill.

   Thomas Bramlet, child of Henry and Candace Myers Bramlet, was born in or near Carmi, White Co., Ill.

   Joel Bramlet, son of William Bramlett and unknown Hendrix/Hendricks, was born in 1810 in Kentucky. He died in White Co., Ill. He moved to Tennessee with parents and siblings and settled in White Co., Ill., by 1830. Joel married Elizabeth Brasher on Feb. 28, 1832, in White Co., Ill. She was born circa 1812-13 in Georgia. She died in White Co., Ill. “Joel Bramlet,” 20-30, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for White Co., Ill., with a female 20-30 (wife, Elizabeth) and three children: a female 5-10 and two females under 5 (NARA Film ). “Joel Bramlet,” 39, born in Kentucky, farmer, and wife, Elizabeth, 37, born in Georgia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Grayville, 13th Dist., White Co., Ill., with six children born in Illinois: Rebecca, 17; Candas, 15; Letta, 13; Caroline, 11; William, 5; Richard, 3 (NARA Film M432:132:308B). “Joel Bramlet,” 50, born in Kentucky, farmer, and wife, Elizabeth, 46, born in Georgia, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Carmi, White Co., Ill., with six children born in Illinois: Lutisha (Leticia “Letta”), 22; Nancy (Caroline), 18; William, 14; Richard, 12; Mary, 9; Charles, 1 (NARA Film M653:236:477). Joel and Elizabeth’s children include Rebecca, Candace, Leticia (“Letta”), Nancy Caroline, William David, Richard, Mary, Charles Bramlet.

   Rebecca Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Brasher and Joel Bramlet, was born 1832 in White Co., Ill.

   Candace Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Brasher and Joel Bramlet, was born circa 1835-38 in Tennessee, probably when Joel and Elizabeth went back to Tennessee to settle his father’s estate. Candace Bramlett married William Henry Calvin Jr. on Jan. 20, 1856, in White Co., Ill. He was born circa 1838 in Kentucky, the son of First Wife and William Henry Calvin Sr. He may have died in White Co., Ill. Their children include Joel, Susie Lutitia, William Henry, Mary M., James Calvin. William H. Calvin Jr. second married Mrs. Elizabeth Ward on Dec. 20, 1877, in White County.

   Leticia “Letta” Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Brasher and Joel Bramlet, was born circa 1838 in White Co., Ill.

   Nancy Caroline Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Brasher and Joel Bramlet, was born circa 1842 in White Co., Ill. 

   William David Bramlet, child of Elizabeth Brasher and Joel Bramlet, was born 1845 in White Co., Ill. He died after 1870. “William Bramlet,” 5, born Illinois, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Town of Grayville, Dist. 13, White Co., Ill., with parents, Joel, 39, born Kentucky, farmer, $200 real estate, and Elizabeth, 37, born Georgia, and five siblings born Illinois (Rebecca, 17; Candas, 15; Letta, 13; Caroline, 11; Richard, 3) (NARA Film M432:132:308B). “William Bramlet,” 14, born Illinois, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Carmi P.O., Township 5 South Range 9 East, White Co., Ill., with parents, Joel, 50, born Kentucky, farmer, with $500 real estate and $200 personal estate, and Elizabeth, 46, born Georgia, and five siblings born Illinois (Lutisha, 22; Nancy, 18; Richard, 12; Mary, 9; Charles, 1) (NARA Film M653:236:477). William served as a Union soldier during the Civil War. He enlisted as a private in Company E, Thirteenth Consolidated Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, on Dec. 21, 1863, at Carmi, White Co., Ill., his residence, by David Slinger. He was mustered in on Jan. 20, 1864, at Camp Butler, Springfield, Sangamon Co., Ill. His military records indicate he was a farmer, age 18, born in Carmi, Ill., 5 feet 5 inches tall, with light hair, blue eyes, fair complexion. He was mustered out on Aug. 31, 1865, at Pine Bluff, Ark., and discharged Aug. 31, 1865, at Pilot Knob, Mo. William was summoned by the Will Co., Ill., sheriff to answer a charge of manslaughter in 1866; he was convicted and imprisoned at Joliet, Ill., until at least 1870; he did not receive inheritance from his mother in 1868. “Wm. D. Bramlett,” 25, born Illinois, farmer, Illinois State Penitentiary Convict, 1870 Joliet, Will Co., Ill., census (NARA Film M593:291:140B). William is not yet located in 1880.

   Richard Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Brasher and Joel Bramlet, was born 1848 in White Co., Ill.

   Mary  Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Brasher and Joel Bramlet, was born 1851 in White Co., lll.

  Charles Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Brasher and Joel Bramlet, was born  1859 in White Co., Ill.

   Larkin Bramlett, son of William Bramlett and unknown Hendrix/Hendricks, was born in Tennessee. He died. He settled with brothers Henry and Joel in White Co., Ill., circa 1828. Larkin married Caroline Lydia Berry there in 1830. She was born circa 1814. Their children are Sanford, Sarah E. and Edwin M. Bramlett. After Larkin died, “Caroline Bramblet” (Lydia Berry) married Felix G. Harris on March 14, 1844, in White County. He was born circa 1812 in Illinois. Lidda C. (Lydia Caroline Berry Bramlett) Harris, 36, and her second husband, Felix G. Harris, 38, head of the family, farmer, $100 real estate, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 13, Grayville, White Co., Ill., with three children: Sarah E. (Bramlett), 16; Edwin M. (Bramlett), 14; Dolly J. Harris, 2, all born Illinois (NARA Film M432:132:356).

Sanford Bramlet grave

Sanford U. Bramlett’s military marker, northwest of Carmi at Sumpter, Ill.

   Sanford U. Bramlett, child of Lydia Caroline Berry and Larkin Bramlett, was born March 27, 1831, in White Co., Ill. He died Oct. 11, 1875, in Carmi, White Co., Ill., and was buried at Sumpter-Dosher Cemetery, Sumpter, White Co., Ill., with a soldier’s headstone inscribed “Co. B 29 Ill. Inf.” Sanford died of disease contracted in the war, according to his widow, Mary (Sumpter) Bramlet. Sanford first married Mary Ann Sinks in 1853. She died of pneumonia in the fall 1855 in Jersey Co., Ill., and was buried there. Sanford was living in Jersey County to work on the railroad. On July 6, 1856, he married Melissa Wade. A marriage is recorded for them there. They divorced before he returned to White County and married Mary Sumpter in 1859. Her marriage certificate is attached to her widow’s pension file: “Sanford Bramblet” and “Mary Sumpter” were married June 28, 1859, by Samuel Williams, M.G., in White Co., Ill.

 “Sanford Bramlet,” 27, farmer, $100 personal estate, with (third) wife, Mary (Ann Sumpter), 24/26, both born Illinois, and two children born Illinois (Henry, 5; Edward, 4/12) and four others born Illinois (Wm. E. Patrick, 24, farmer; Elizh. A., 29; James R., 4; William F., 2), 1860 Carmi P.O., Township 4 South Range 9 East, White Co., Ill., census (NARA Film M653:236:599. Not yet located in 1870. Mary Bramlet, 49, born Illinois to a mother born Virginia and father born Pennsylvania, widowed, keeping house, and three sons born Illinois (Henry, 25, farm laborer; Edwin, 20, laborer; Sanford [Jr.], 19, laborer), 1880 Carmi, White Co., Ill., census (NARA Film T9:258:360D). Mary Bramlet, 69, born July 1830 Illinois to a mother born Virginia, father born Pennsylvania, widowed, mother of two children, one living, living with son Samuel (Sanford Jr.) Bramlet, 38, born January 1862 Illinois to parents born there, widowed, day laborer, rents home, and his three children (William H., 12, August 1887; Edward, 10, January 1889; Thomas, 6, February 1894) and brother (Henry Bramlet, 45, August 1855, farm laborer, widowed), 1900 Carmi Township, White Co., Ill., census (NARA Film T623:351:57).

   Sanford first served as a soldier during the Mexican War. He then later served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.

    “Samuel [Sanford] Bramlet Sr.” was “a Mexican War Veteran, a cavalry soldier. He was a married man and had one son, Samuel [Sanford], Jr.,” Meeks Haley Bramlet wrote in A Pioneer Family – Bramlet. Sanford Bramlet enlisted in Capt. Lawler’s Independent Company of Cavalry at age 16 on Aug. 13, 1847, at Shawneetown, Gallatin Co., Ill., during the Mexican War. The History of Gallatin County, Illinois also indicates Captain Lawler organized Aug. 13, 1847, at Shawneetown a company of cavalry, which was sent to Mexico for service by the way of New Orleans. “It had one skirmish with Mexican cavalry at Horcasita, on December 1, 1847, and after the end of the war, was used to guard government trains in Texas. It was discharged at Shawneetown on October 26, 1848…” (301).

    During the Civil War, Sanford first joined and enrolled as a corporal in Capt. Jamison’s Company, Capt. McKenzie’s Company B, Twentieth Regiment, Illinois Infantry Volunteers, on Aug. 12, 1861, in Carmi, White Co., Ill., his residence, for three years. He was mustered in the same day on Aug. 12, 1861, at Camp Butler, Springfield, Sangamon Co., Ill. Vitals: age 30, 6 feet tall, light hair, blue eyes, fair complexion, single, farmer, born Carmi, White Co., Ill. He spent most of his service as a teamster and was captured, held as a prisoner of war in 1863. Records: Sanford Bramblet, Corporal, Capt. Jamison’s Company, Illinois Volunteers, Present, Muster-in Roll dated Aug. 27, 1861, Camp Butler near Springfield, Ill.: age 21, joined for duty and enrolled Aug. 13, 1861, at Carmi for three years. Sanford Bramblet, Present, Company Muster Rolls dated Aug. 12-Sept. 1 and Sep-Dec 1861. Sanford Bramblet, Teamster, Absent “on extra or daily duty” January 1862, Jan-Feb 1862 CMR. He contracted smallpox, “Chronic Diarrhea and Hemmoraga of the Lungs” which affected his vision and overall health until he died. Sanford Bramblet, Present Mar-Apr 1862 CMR. Sanford Bramblet, Present, May-Jun 1862 CMR. Sanford Bramblet, Company Teamster, Aug. 18, 1862, Special Muster Roll. Sanford Bramblet, Company Teamster “on extra or daily duty” Jul-Oct 1862 CMR. Sanford Bramblet, Absent, “On detached service with supply train” Nov-Dec 1862 CMR. Sanford Bramblet, Present Jan-Feb 1863 CMR: “Comp. B. 29 Ill. attached to Comp. D. by order of Lt. Col. Kent, Dec. 27, 1862.” Sanford Bramblet, Absent, POW, “In the field not paroled,” April 10, 1863, Special Muster Roll. Sanford Bramblet, Present Mar-Aug 1863 CMR. Sanford Bramblet, Absent on furlough, July 24, Cairo, Ill.: “Transf’d from Gun Boat July 14” (Note: regiment from April to July was on gunboats Tuscumbia, Tyler and Petrel, Mississippi Squadron, for passage of Grand Gulf batteries.) He was re-enlisted as veteran volunteer on Jan. 4, 1864, at Natchez, Miss., by Lt. J. S. Armstrong for three years; mustered in Feb. 29, 1864, Natchez, Miss. His military records at that time indicate he was married. The Company Descriptive Book indicates he was 30/33 years old, 6 feet tall, fair complexion, blue eyes, light hair, farmer, born Carmi, Ill. Remarks: “Served 15 months in the Mexican War. Re-enlisted as veteran volunteer Jan. 4/64.” He was mustered out Nov. 6, 1865, at Hempstead, Tex., as a veteran. Sanford filed for an Invalid’s Pension, Application 171508 Certificate 28646, based on his Civil War service on Jan. 5, 1878, in White Co., Ill. (NARA Film T289A Roll 37). He made his Declaration for Pension of an Invalid in White County Court on Dec. 27, 1871:

Sanford U. (his X mark) Bramlet self description: age 41, 6 feet tall, fair complexion, light hair, blue eyes; enlisted as a veteran Jan. 14, 1864, Natchez, Miss., as a private and was discharged Nov. 6, 1865; was “treated in General Hospital at Cairo Ills…also in Genl. Hospital Tents at different times–also in Smallpox Hospital at Natchez Miss and in other hospitals” and that “he took a violent cold at Fort Donalson Tenn on or about the 13 day of February 1862 from exposure at the battle of Donaldson which settled on his lungs from which he never has recovered. He contracted Chronic Diarrhea at Cairo Ills in January 1862 with which he is still suffering. That at Natchez Miss about 1st March 1864 he was attacked with Small Pox which settled in his eyes rendering them very weak and otherwise injured him. From the effect of which diseases he is now and has been all the time suffering and his present condition is such that his lungs are badly affected and his eyes very weak & he also still has chronic diarrhea and several debility.” G. W. Johns was one witness to the declaration before James H. Shipley, White County Clerk. Sanford said he had lived in White County and farmed when able since his discharge from the military. “Sandford U. Bramlet” appeared before Notary Public George W. Johns in Carmi, Ill., March 22, 1872, and made his mark to profess “he is the identical Sandford U. Bramlet late a private in Co. ‘B’ 29th Regt Ills who has made an application for Pension No. 171508. That he has not been in the military or naval Service of the United States since his discharge there from Nov. 6th, 1865.” J. Theo Parker and David Rose witnessed the document.

A health deposition on Aug. 8, 1873, by Alfred Baker, M.D., of Enfield, White Co., Ill., before Notary Public W. V. Johnson, indicates Dr. Baker was “well acquainted with Sanford U. Bramlet late of Co. ‘B’ 29th Regt Ill Inf and was acquainted with him at time of his joining the army in about August 1861–and have been acquainted with him ever since his discharge in November 1865–”

“That said soldier was sound and in good health at time he enlisted and had no disease of the lungs nor chronic diarrhea nor disease of the eyes and was in good health at enlistment. That affiant has treated said soldier for said diseases ever since his discharge about November 6th 1865. That immediately on said soldier’s return from the army affiant was called to treat him and he was suffering from Chronic Diarrhea, weak eyes and weak lungs and general derangement of the system. Affiant has seen him frequently and treated him for said diseases ever since his discharge. The soldier is still suffering said diseases and has been ever since his discharge. That said diseases have not been nor are they now aggravated by or prolonged by intemperate or other bad habits. That he has been the soldier’s family physician for many years.”

Declaration of a Widow for Pension, July 3, 18(80?), in White County Court:

Mary Bramlet, 49, of Carmi, Ill., widow of Sanford Bramlet who enlisted at Carmi Jan. 4, 1864, as a private in Company B, 29th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Veteran Volunteers, in the War of 1861: Sanford “Contracted Chronic Diarrhea and Hemmoraga of the Lungs” at Natchez, Miss., “in the month of February 1864, from which he never recovered and died at Carmi White County Illinois on the 11th day of October A.D. 1875.” She married under the name Mary Sumpter to said Sanford Bramlet on June 28, 1859, in White County. Samuel V. Williams of White County performed their marriage ceremony. Her husband had been previously married and his former wife (Mary Ann Sinks) died circa 1855. Legitimate surviving children of Sanford under age 16 at his death who were still under Mary’s care: Edwin Bramlet, born April 7, 1860, and Sanford Bramlet, born Jan. 28, 1862. (Note: the declaration indicates Edwin and Sanford Jr. are children of Sanford and Mary Sumpter. Sanford and his first wife’s oldest son, Henry, born circa 1855, was a year over age 16 and not a minor when Sanford died in 1872 so he was not named in the document.) Signed Mary (her X mark) Bramlet. Elizabeth Berry and Susie Brooks witnessed the declaration.

Sanford and Mary Ann Sinks Bramlet’s child is Henry Bramlet. Sanford and Mary Ann Sumpter Bramlet’s children are Edwin and Sanford Bramlet Jr.

   Henry Bramlet, child of Mary Ann Sinks and Sanford Bramlet Sr., was born circa 1855 in Illinois.

   Edwin Bramlet, child of Mary Sumpter and Sanford Bramlet Sr., was born April 7, 1860, in White Co., Ill. An affidavit by Phebe Sumpter, June 2, 1881, for his mother’s pension application indicates she “was acquainted with Edwin Bramlett” son of Mary and Sanford, and assisted as midwife at his birth on April 7, 1860. James Sumpter and Mary F. Sumpter witnessed the document before Notary Public Nathaniel Holderby. Another  affidavit by Frank J. Foster, M.D., of White Co., Ill., June 3, 1881, before Notary Public Nathaniel Holderby indicates “…That he knew Edmond [Edwin] Bramlett a son of Sandford & Mary Bramlett. That he is the Physician that attended the said Edmond Bramlett in his last illness, and that he died on the 28th day of February A.D. 1881 of Cerebro Spinal Meningitis….”

    Sanford “Samuel” Bramlet Jr., child of Mary Sumpter and Sanford Bramlet Sr., was born Feb. 28, 1862, in White Co., Ill. An affidavit June 2, 1881, by Clementine Fulford, 57, of Carmi, White Co., Ill., for Mary Sumpter Bramlet’s pension application indicates she was “well acquainted with Sanford Bramlett, son of Mary Bramlett the claimant herein” and assisted as midwife at his birth on Feb. 28, 1862. Charles DeWiert and James Sumpter witnessed the document, which was signed with Fulford’s mark. “Samuel Bramlet,” 38, born January 1862 Illinois to parents born there, widowed, day laborer, rents home, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Carmi Township, White Co., Ill., with three children born Illinois (William H., 12, August 1887; Edward, 10, January 1889; Thomas, 6, February 1894) (NARA Film T623:351:57).

   Sarah E. Bramlett, child of Lydia Caroline Berry and Larkin Bramlett, was born circa 1834 in White Co., Ill.

   Edwin M. Bramlett, child of Lydia Caroline Berry and Larkin Bramlett, was born circa 1835 in White Co., Ill. He died Jan. 30, 1870, and as buried in Enfield, White Co., Ill. “Edwin M. Harris” (Bramlet), 14, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 13, Grayville, White Co., Ill., with mother, Lidda C. (Caroline Berry Bramlet) Harris, 36, and her (second) husband, Felix G. Harris, 38, head of the family, farmer, $100 real estate, and two (NARA Film M432:132:356). Note: Lydia Caroline Bery first married Larkin Bramlet in 1830 in White Co., Ill. “Caroline Bramblet” married Felix Harris March 14, 1844.) Ed married a woman named Sarah by 1860. She was born circa 1829 in Tennessee. They lived in Enfield, Ill., in 1860. “Ed Bramlett,” 25, born Illinois, farmer, $300 real estate, $300 personal estate, and wife, Sarah, 31, born Tennessee, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Enfield P.O., Township 5 South Range 9 East, White Co., Ill., with two others (Wm. A. Buchanan, 18, Tennessee; George Johnson, 9, Illinois) (NARA Film M653:236:499). Edwin served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. His Military Service Records indicate he enlisted as a private in Company H, Third Battalion, Fourteenth Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, about Feb. 6, 1863, in Carmi, White Co., Ill., his residence and birthplace, for three years (NARA Film M539 Roll 9). He was mustered in on Feb. 6, 1863, in Peoria, Peoria Co., Ill. He served two years and was mustered out July 31, 1865, in Pulaski, Tenn. The Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database describes Edwin as a farmer, age 20, 5 feet 6 inches tall, with sandy hair, blue eyes, sandy complexion.

Chapter 3:

Generation 5

John Bramlett and Mary Peak

Children: William, Margaret, Nathan, Nancy, Reuben, Alcey, John Wesley, Mildred, Rosa, Mary, Henry, Susannah, Elias
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Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

    Father John Bramlett, child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born May 15, 1764, in Fauquier Co., Va. His full birth and death dates are inscribed in a Bramlett Bible owned by one of his sons and on his tombstone. The monument indicates he was born in Virginia. He died at age 91 on July 28, 1855, at home on his farm south of Greenville, S.C., close to his church and was buried beside his wife, Mary Peak, there, in Bethel Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church Cemetery, near Simpsonville, S.C. One side of John’s tombstone is inscribed “John Bramlett Born Virginia May 15, 1764. Died July 28, 1855. Mary Peak May 16, 1763 June 23, 1853.” The other side of the monument memorializes “Susan His Daughter” and praises “John Bramlett For 73 Years A Leader in Christian Work” and “The founder Of Bethel Church. He Had The Witness That He Pleased God.” The church honors John each year by laying a wreath on his grave during its Founder’s Day celebrations. Co-founders Solomon Holland and Devereaux Yeargin with family members also played important roles in the establishment and early development of the church. John also co-founded with his mother and siblings Bethel’s mother church, Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church, near Gray Court, Laurens Co., S.C., in 1780-1781. John, who joined the Methodist Church at age 16 in 1780 at his widowed mother Margaret’s home in Virginia, was a revered lay minister deeply devoted to God, church and family.

John and Mary

John and Marys tombstone in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville, S.C.

     A Sunday feature article about Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church, published in The Greenville News, was written by church member Mrs. Samuel Townes (Florence Isola McHugh) Holland. Florence Isola McHugh Holland was born March 20, 1888, the daughter of Nettie Smith and James Alexander McHugh. She and her husband both died from injuries sustained in a car accident on Nov. 30, 1958, and rests there at Bethel. Bramlett descendant James T. Hammond located the feature in NewspaperArchive.com. Florence’s husband is a descendant/relative of Bethel charter members Solomon Holland and Deavereaux Yeargin. Samuel, born May 22, 1883, is the son of Margaret Anna Smith and Benjamin Perry Holland Jr. The latter is son of Mary Washington Yeargin and Benjamin Perry Holland Sr. Mary Washington Yeargin Holland is daughter of Permelia Shell and Daniel Devereaux Yeargin, a descendant of Bethel charter member Devereaux Yeargin. Benjamin Perry Holland Sr., his father, Solomon Holland, and other Hollands are included on the following “incomplete list of charter members” of Bethel Church, which list is provided in the feature article by Florence Holland:

John Bramlett, Solomon Holland, Deavereaux Yeargin, William Austin, Bartlett Yeargin, John Holland, William Bramlett, Benjamin Holland, W. T. Ashmore, Steven Yeargin, W. L. M. Austin, Smithy Hamby, Robert Holland, Polly [Mary] Holland, Jane Austin, Mrs. Deavoreaux Yeargin, Mrs. John Bramlett [Mary Peak], Mary Watson, Lucy Stokes, Reubin Bramlett, Dr. Thomas Austin, Mrs. John Holland, and Nelson Austin. (p. 1, section D)

Mrs. Holland’s list of church trustees in September 1811 include “Solomon Holland, John Bramlett, Deavereaux Yeargin, Nathan Bramlett” (son of John and Mary). Trustees on Aug. 17, 1852: “W. C. [Billy] Yeargin, W. L. M. Austin, J. W. T. Holland, Thomas Garrett, Reubin Bramlett, [son of John and Mary] Benjamin Holland, W. T. Ashmore” (pp. 1-2, section D). L. P. (Lovic Pierce) Burdette, a descendant of Marianne Bramlett Burdette, was a Bethel trustee in 1938. And descendants Toy Burdette and J. C. Burdette were stewards during 1919-1938. J. G. Burdette is mentioned as a Sunday School superintendent.

   Mrs. Holland indicates the historic Bethel Church, organized by revered Methodist Bishop Francis Asbury, founder of American Methodism and first bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church in America, was 125 years old in 1938, thus founded circa 1813. However, Father John Bramlett, member of the core religious founding group and lay minister at Bethel and a co-founder and former member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court, moved into Greenville County from Laurens County circa 1799, before the 1800 census and no doubt continued worshipping as a devotee home until a church building could be constructed. Mrs. Holland also mentions annual camp meetings early in the history of the church were held in August from Tuesday to Thursday, including the third Sunday of the month. The camp meetings were suspended for a time and then revived in 1851 and briefly suspended during the Civil War/War Between the States and then finally ended in 1897. The arbor was used for worship services and as a wedding venue.

John’s Life in Virginia

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Henry Bramlett III’s plat map of his father’s former Bramlett Plantation on Elk Marsh Run

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Map of Hamilton Parish where John and siblings grew up on Bramlett Plantation in Fauquier Co., Va.

  John and his brother Reuben are named together in another separate Fauquier County land record in 1780. “John Bramblett” and “Ruben Bramblett” served as chain carriers for a Nov. 1, 1780, survey of wasteland or ungranted land which was requested by Robert Henson of Fauquier County:

By Virtue of a warrant from the Proprietor’s office, to me directed I have Surveyed for Robert Hinson of Fauquier County, a Tract of Waste Land adjoining the Lands of Jennings, Bramblett, & Dodd near the head of Ratcliff’s Branch, in the said County, Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at A a white Oak & Black Oak by a glade corner to Bramblett, thence along the said Bramblett’s Line S 49 E 132 Poles to B two small hicories in Jennings’s line, thence along the said Line–S 61 W 20 Poles to C a hicory sapling, thence N 30 W 3 Poles to D a hicory & fallen Red Oak Corner to Dodd, thence binding along the said Dodd’s lines N 47 W 66 Poles to E a Large Hicory stump & small white Oak by the road, thence N 42 W 59 1/2 Poles to F a box Oak by the said Road, thence N 37 E 9 Poles to the Beginning, Containing 12 1/2 acres. Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett Chain Carriers J. Moffett 1st Nov.r 1780.

Robert Henson may be a relative by marriage, or Reuben and John were designated chain carriers because they were qualified and neighbors living right next to the Henson land according to the plat map.

   John is identified as the brother of Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, of Illinois by Meeks Haley Bramlet in his 1924 history A Pioneer Family – Bramlet while providing information about J. Mims Bramlett, a descendant of John:

J. Mims Bramlet resides at 2013 Portner Place, N. W., in Washington, D.C. He has lived in Washington about twenty-five years….His father was Robert H. Bramlet, whose brothers were Turner, Joe and Nathaniel. Their father was Reuben Bramlet, whose brothers were Elias and Nathaniel. Their father was John Bramlet, who went to Greenville County, South Carolina, from Fauquier County, Virginia….Most of his relatives live in South Carolina. John was a brother to Reuben Bramlet, who was head of the Illinois branch of the family….” (96)

John and Mary’s Marriage in Virginia

   John married Mary Peak in Fauquier Co., Va., circa 1783. No marriage record has been found for them since their parish records are lost and marriages were not routinely recorded until after the American Revolution; however, John’s 1855 obituary in The Southern Christian Advocate indicates John and Mary had been married seventy years when Mary died in 1853. Their Bramlett Bible, once owned by John’s son Reuben, lists Mary as the “wife of John Bramlett” and records her birth date as May 16, 1763. Her grave marker in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, which she shares with John and daughter Susan, identifies her as “Mary Peak,” wife of John Bramlett, and is inscribed with her full birth and death dates. Peak/e researchers determined that Mary’s parents probably are Barbara Thorne or Carter who died in 1816 and William Peak/e, born in 1725 and died in 1816. Mary was born in Fauquier Co., Va., where one William Peak/e bought land on June 3, 1767 (DB-2:669). Mary died at age 90 on June 25, 1853, according to the inscription on the grave marker and in her son Reuben’s Bible, most likely at home in Greenville County.

John and Mary’s Life in South Carolina

   After moving from Virginia, John and Mary first lived in Laurens County in South Carolina. Their first child, William, was born in South Carolina in 1786; and William and family are enumerated in the 1790 Laurens County census. “John Bramlett,” free white male 16 years and over, is listed in 1790 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes two free white males under age 16 (sons William and Nathan) and three free white females (wife, Mary, and two daughters: Margaret and Nancy) (NARA Film M637:11:446). (Several other family members, including John’s mother, Margaret, and brother Nathan lived nearby.) Laurens County deeds also place John Bramlett in the area in 1791. John and his brother Nathan signed as witnesses on a deed in May that year when their widowed mother, Margaret, of Laurens County bought fifty acres of land on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River from Ezekiel Griffith (DB-D:5). John and Nathan also witnessed a deed on May 10, 1791, when Griffith sold some land on Beaverdam Creek to William Stone (DB-F:220). 

   By 1799 John and Mary were living in Greenville County where he became a prosperous farmer and prominent religious and community leader. Although members of the core group of John and Mary’s church–Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church–including Devereaux Yeargin and Solomon Holland and others, were holding religious meetings in their homes in Greenville District by 1799, the church was formally organized on Monday, Oct. 19, 1801. The organizational meeting and a quarterly meeting were held at John Bramlett’s house, ten miles southeast of Greenville. Dr. W. L. M. Austin in John’s obituary named John as “the founder of the church at Bethel,—the class for many years meeting at his house for worship. Bishop Asbury and the preachers of the olden times, who passed through this part of the State, preached and rested under his roof.” After the church was established in 1799, a house of worship was then constructed by 1801, and land was transferred to secure the existing church building. John in 1811 donated four acres of land “beginning on a Maple in a branch turning 212 yards South to a black Jack thence 91 yards East to a black Jack thence N215 yards to a White Oak thence 110 to the Maple where we started” to the trustees of Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church. “John Bramlet of the District of Greenville, S. C.,” transferred the property to “Solomon Holland, John Bramlet [himself], William Bramlet, Nathan Bramlet & Derix Yeargin, trustees,” for the use of the church on Sept. 18, 1811. The deed was later recorded in Greenville District on March 28, 1836 (DB-S:104). The trustees William Bramlet and Nathan Bramlet are John’s sons, at that time aged 25 and 22 respectively. William later became a local Methodist Minister in 1820 and served a congregation at Jackson Grove, S.C. Nathan in the late 1830s was involved in the founding and development of Hopewell Methodist Episcopal Church after he and his family had settled near Murrayville, Hall Co., Ga. (Nathan and William are not to be confused with their Uncle Nathan Bramlett and Great-Uncle William Bramblett. Uncle Nathan, brother of John Bramlett, did not live in Greenville District in 1811–he lived in Laurens District and was a founding member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church. Great-Uncle William Bramblett, John’s uncle, the brother of Henry Bramlett Jr., was not living in 1811. He had been a resident of Laurens District until he died in or before 1787; and, according to Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt’s Diary, William and his family also were early members of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church there.) The first Bethel Church building was a log structure built on poles.

John and Mary in Census Data

   John is included as head of a family in the 1800 U.S. Census for Greenville District but perhaps not in 1810 (the census taker may have missed them). John and Mary and family also are listed or enumerated in 1820-1850 census records. “John Bramblet,” 26-44, is listed in the 1800 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., as head of family 1404 which includes a female 26-44 (wife, Mary), and ten children: one female 10-16, born 1784-1790 (Margaret); two males 10-16, born 1784-1790 (William, Nathan); five females under 10, born 1790-1800 (Nancy, Alcey, Milley, Rosanah/Rosa/Rosey, Mary) and two males under 10, born 1790-1800 (Reuben, John Wesley) (NARA Film M32:47:280A). “John Bramlet,” white male 45 and over, born before 1775, engaged in agriculture, is listed in the 1820 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over, born before 1775 (wife, Mary) and another female 45 and over (sister? sister-in-law?), six children and perhaps two daughters-in-law and three grandchildren: two females 26-44, born between 1776 and 1794 (daughters-in-law Sarah Dacus and Elizabeth Griffith? or daughter Milley?); one female 16-25, born between 1795 and 1804 (daughter Rosa? or Mary?); two females 10-15, born 1804-1810 (daughter Susan and a granddaughter Mary?); two males 26-44, born between 1766 and 1794 (Reuben and John Wesley); two males 16-25, born between 1795 and 1804 (Henry); one male 10-15, born between 1805 and 1810 (Elias); and two males under 10, born between 1811 and 1820 (grandsons Thomas W. and Josiah?) (NARA Film M33:120:160).

   “John Bramlet,” 60-69, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 60-69 (wife, Mary), four children and perhaps some grandchildren: one female 40-49, born between 1781 and 1790 (daughter Margaret?); two females 15-19, born between 1811 and 1815, mismarked? (daughter Susan, who never married, and daughter Mary?); one male 20-29, born between 1801 and 1810 (Elias); and four younger people who could be grandchildren: one female 10-14, born between 1816 and 1820; one female 5-9, born between 1821 and 1825; one male 15-19, born between 1811 and 1815 (Nathan, son of William?); and one male 10-14, born between 1816 and 1820 (Abner G., son of William?) (NARA Film M19:172:284). Some or all of these younger people may be children of Nancy S. Dacus and William Bramlett, John and Mary’s daughter-in-law and son, who lived near them. The grandchildren may have been helping their grandfather–then age 66–farm his land. “John Bramblett,” 70-80, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Greenville Dist., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 70-80 (wife, Mary), and one female 30-40, born between 1800 and 1810 (daughter Susan who did not marry) (NARA Film M704:512:200).

1840 Greenville Co., S.C. census

“John Bramblett,” 86, blind, and wife, Mary, 87, both born in Virginia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with one grown child: daughter Susana, 45, born in South Carolina (NARA Film M432:853:458B). “John Bramblett” also is listed in the Nov. 30, 1850, Agricultural Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with fifty improved acres and fifty unimproved acres worth $1,000 and $246 worth of livestock (SCDAH Film M2:1:781-782).

John’s Obituary

   John’s obituary, written by Dr. W. L. M. (William Lawrence Manning) Austin, a member and trustee of Bethel Methodist Church, appears in the Oct. 25, 1855, edition of the Southern Christian Advocate:

Died, at his residence, “on the hill,” near the Bethel Camp ground, Greenville Dist., S.C., July 27th, John Bramlett, aged 91 years. The venerable patriarch has gone to his reward. The old christian who for more than 73 years “had the witness that he pleased God”—who was always ready to join the worshippers in the house of prayer, the very pictuaged saint, now mingles with angels and adores the Redeemer in Heaven. Father Bramlett was born in Fauquier co., Va., May 13th, 1764. [His grave marker and the Bible record say May 15.] In his 18th year, [1781-1782] he joined the Methodists, and one year afterwards, while conducting family devotion at the house of his widowed mother, he was powerfully converted. From the hour of regeneration until the angels escorted him to heaven, during a very long life of temptation and trial, he maintained his confidence in Christ, and to use his own words “never lost the witness.” All who knew John Bramlett believed in him. A more heavenly minded man, the writer never knew. Shortly after his conversion [1782-1783], he married and removed to S.C. where he passed 70 years of his life, universally respected. A generous, whole-souled and devoted follower of the Saviour, he never disgraced the church by the exhibition of an unworthy spirit. Full of faith, he gave glory to God,—full of love, he cared for his neighbor. God was his Father, heaven his home,—he knew that, and was happy. What Methodist minister ever visited Greenville circuit, and did not admire and love Father Bramlett? Always at his place in church, until his infirmities made it impossible, how hearty and sincere was his worship! O! it was refreshing to see the dear old man, in church. He entered into the services with his whole heart—tears of love and joy flowing from his dimmed eyes, and expressions of gratitude and rapture falling from his lips. To see that white haired disciple, blind, and trembling with the weight of 90 years, so hopeful and so happy, was a privilege and a benefit. He was the founder of the church at Bethel,—the class for many years meeting at his house for worship. Bishop Asbury and the preachers of the olden times, who passed through this part of the State, preached and rested under his roof. Father Bramlett brought up a family of 13 children, all of whom lived to become parents, [except one – Susan never married] and all joined the church of their father and mother. One year before Father Bramlett’s death, his aged consort was taken from his side. She too was 91 at the time of her death, having been for 70 years, his faithful and pious companion. Permit me, to tell you of the old patriarch’s “bower of prayer” before concluding this imperfect sketch. He had a place, a sheltered and retired spot, where he used to pray. When he was blind and extremely feeble, it was most affecting to see him groping his way to his loved retreat. There, he prayed and sang and rejoiced, communing with his God every day. He waited for death as for the coming of his best friend, and passed away, at the very time he would have chosen to go, when the Camp ground, a few hundred yards from his house, was filled with his neighbors and acquaintances, praising God. W. L. M. Austin. (SCA, Vol. 19, No. 21, p. 84, col. 2)

Camp meetings became an annual tradition during the early 1800s when outdoor religious services were held in a large brush arbor constructed on four acres of land beside Bethel Church. The arbor itself was constructed of hand-hewn logs and benches. It was first covered with brush and branches and much later covered with shingles. Church trustees and members petitioned the South Carolina General Assembly to incorporate Bethel Church, and adjacent Arbor and Camp Ground. Among the many Sundry Citizens who signed the undated petition are Jesse Burdett, R. H. (Robert Hugh/Hulet) Bramlett, Reuben F. Burditt, J. W. Burdett, James Bramlett, Wm. L. M. Austin, several other members named Austin and Holland (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S165015).

Bethel Pet 1

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To the Honourable The Senate & House of Representatives of the State of South Carolina.

The Humble petition of the undersigned Sheweth to your Honourable Body that the Methodist denomination of Christians have a church in Greenville District and State aforesaid. Situated about ten miles from Greenville Court House, called “Bethel Church”–

The membership of said Church is large and the congregation of the same have constructed comfortable tents around said Church and created a large frame arbor within the Camp ground and for several consecutive years past have holden camp meetings there at which meetings are attended annually by several thousand persons. Your Petitioners feel confident that it would contribute essentially to the peace and good order of said meetings to have said Bethel Church and the Camp ground adjacent thereto incorporated and earnestly solicit your Honourable Body to enact a Statute incorporating the same with such powers as will protect the congregation thereof and that you will appoint Wm. L. M. Austin B Holland Tho. Garrett Tho. E. Austin Jesse Burdett W. T. Ashmor & S. Stokes Trustees or officers of Said Church and Camp ground so incorporated And your petitioners will ever pray etc.

bethel-arborThe Arbor at Bethel Campground was constructed in the early 1800s and used for outdoor religious meetings and services until it was dismantled for recycling about 1943 when building materials became scarce during World War II. This image copied from Samuel M. Green’s 1884 Methodist history An Historical Outline of Greenville Circuit.

Children and Descendants of John and Mary Peak Bramlett

   John and Mary’s children are William, Margaret, Nathan, Nancy, Reuben, Alcey, John Wesley, Mildred, Rosa, Mary, Henry, Susannah and Elias Bramlett.

 

Chapter 3:

Generation 5

Nathan Bramlett and Elizabeth Gray

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Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Father Nathan Bramlett, child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born July 20, 1766, in Fauquier Co., Va. He died at age 74 on March 19, 1841, in Laurens Co., S.C., and was buried in the old section of Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery near Gray Court. He married Elizabeth Gray circa 1789 in South Carolina. Elizabeth was born in January 1765, the daughter of Ailsa Hiatt and John Gray Sr. Elizabeth and her sister Ailsey, who married Reuben Bramlett, son of Elizabeth and Henry Bramlett III, are named as heirs in their father John’s estate records in Union Co., S.C. Their brother Jesse Gray administered the estate and other siblings were named as heirs as well. Elizabeth died July 17, 1844, and was buried beside Nathan in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery. Elizabeth and Nathan each have an inscribed tombstone, provided by the church. Nathan’s inscription indicates “at the early age of 16 he attached himself to the Church” (in 1781 or 1782, the approximate date of the founding of Bramlett Church, according to information sent to Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette by Nathan’s brother, Father John Bramlett of Greenville County.) Nathan and his brother John most likely both joined the church about the same time in Virginia. John served as chain carrier for his brother Henry III’s resurvey of their father’s plantation in 1780. John and Nathan both probably did not move to South Carolina until about 1783-1785. It is possible Nathan went to South Carolina earlier, in 1780, with his brother Henry III, but he did not buy land there until 1789. Henry III is included in Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette’s Diary as a co-founder of the church. If Henry III converted to Methodism in Virginia in 1780 and returned to South Carolina with Nathan, he and Nathan would have actually and literally founded the church, unless their brother John and mother Margaret also physically visited South Carolina at the same time to establish the church and then return to Virginia. (This Bramlett family tended to travel back and forth from Virginia to South Carolina fairly often between 1773 and 1790. Margaret occupied the Bramlett plantation after her husband, Henry Jr. died, and paid the taxes for her son Henry III until he sold the property to the Dobeys in 1784. She settled in South Carolina in  1790.

Nathan Bramlett’s tombstone in the old section of Bramlett Church Cemetery, courtesy Robin Farley Dixson. Since Nathan and Elizabeth did not have children, the stone and inscription was provided by Nathan’s heirs–his wife and the South Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church South.

Nathan Bramlett’s tombstone before cleaning in Bramlett Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis

SACRED to the memory of NATHAN BRAMLETT who was born on the 20th day of July, 1766, and died on the 19th day of March, 1841, leaving an affectionate wife and many relations and friends to bemourn their irreparable loss. At the early age of sixteen he attached himself to the Church and lived an humble follower of Jesus Christ. For fifty years he was a pious Class Leader of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a kind & affectionate husband, a sincere friend and a devoted Christian. He attained in society an enviable station, as a neighbour he was kind & obliging, as a Christian meek and humble, as a husband he was tender and affectionate through all the various changes in life. He maintained a high dignified and spotless character. He dedicated his whole estate to the support of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and finally died in the triumph of that Christian faith which he so eminently possessed.

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 ELIZABETH GRAY BRAMLETT

Detail above from Elizabeth Gray Bramlett’s tombstone in the old section of Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery features a chrysalis and butterfly, symbolic of religious and spiritual development from youth to adulthood as a beautiful metamorphosis. Inscription: “It is sown a natural body. It is raised a spiritual body. Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Bramlett. Born January 1765 Died July 17th 1844. She Was a Member of the Methodist Church Fifty Five Years And After Adorning Her Character With a Christian Life She Died in the Faith. This Stone Is Erected By Order Of The So. Ca. Conference Of The M. E. Church South And let her own good works praise her in the gate.” Image by Deborah G. Dennis

 

   Nathan and Elizabeth apparently did not have children who survived. No children are enumerated with them in any census data between 1790 and 1840 or named or mentioned in Nathan’s estate or will, in which he names two slaves who are not identified as heirs: James and Billy (Will Papers, 495; Estate Papers, Packets 89-91, 92-111). The two slaves and four others are named in the inventory and appraisal of Nathan’s estate, below.

Nathan’s March 11, 1839, Will

Nathan WIll

Nathan Will 2

   Nathan’s March 11, 1839, will bequeathed his entire personal and real estate to his wife and at her death to the Methodist Episcopal Church South, prompting a lawsuit by some of his sister Marianne Bramlett Burdette’s surviving grown children after Nathan died in 1841 in Laurens County. The following persons were cited to appear in court March 9, 1842, to participate in the lawsuit: Elizabeth Bramlett (wife of Nathan) and the Burdett “Heirs at Law”: John Burdett, Molly Burdett, Elsey (Ailsey) Burdett, William Burdett and Elizabeth [Burdett] Hand (wife of) Robert Hand as well as witnesses David Higgins, James French and James B. Higgins, who represented the church. (The Burdetts are documented in Bible records as children of Marianne and Frederick.) The initial Burdett court filing, titled “In the Matter of N. Bramblett’s Will} Protest & Grounds,” was presented by the law firm Irby & Young:

…one of the Heirs at Law of Nathan Bramblett decd protests against the paper presented for probate bearing date the 11 March 1839 being established according to law as the will of the said Nathan Bramblett upon the following grounds: — 1st Because the said paper is not the last will and Testament of the said Nathan Bramblett — 2nd Because the said Nathan Bramblett became of old age and imbecility of mind was incompetent at the time of Executing said paper to make a will — 3rd Because the Execution of said paper was procured by improper and undue influence — 4th Because the said Will is void for uncertainty….

Since Marianne’s five grown children were identified by attorneys Irby & Young as Nathan’s legal “Heirs at Law,” they therefore were close biological relatives–nieces and nephews. The Burdett heirs may have helped their Uncle Nathan farm in his later years and apparently believed he would leave his estate to them. However, they lost their lawsuit, and the church inherited the entire estate when Elizabeth died in 1844. An Inventory of the Estate of Nathan Bramblett, deceased, which was appraised on June 16, 1842, was filed in Laurens County Court on June 21, 1842, by James B. Higgins, David Higgins and James French. The inventory and appraisal included Nathan’s shotgun 15.00, a waggon and kind gear 35.00, a gig and harness 20.00 and the following:

Land: 64 acres of land $1640.00 Slaves: 1 negro man James 125.00 – 1 Do William 200.00 – 1 Boy Harrison 500.00 – 1 Do William 300.00 – 1 Do Robert 275.00 – 1 negro woman Sarah 400.00 Livestock: 4 horses 195.00 – 31 hogs appraised at $46.50 cts – 8 head cattle 36.00 – 8 head of sheep 10.00 Farm Equipment: 1 set blacksmith’s tools 15.00 – 2 scythes & ? 3.00 – 4 augers, foot adz, handsaw, 3 drawing shives, pr steelyards, square fork, 2 chisels, 5 harrow teeth 3.00 – 6 axes 11 hoes 11.37 1/2 – 3 pr. gears 2.00 – 1 fan & 1 cutting knife 12.00 – 1/2 cross cut saw 1.50 – 2 shovels and log chains 2.50 – 4 hogs heads & barrel 2.50 Household Items: 3 spinning wheels 5.00 – 1 loom 1.00 – 1 walnut chest 10.00 – 1 Do bureau 15.00 – 1 candle stand 2.00 – 1 folding leaf table 8.00 – 9 chairs 4.00 – 1 cupboard & contents 25.50 – 4 beds & steads and furniture 50.00 – kitchen furniture 15.00 – 1 pr andirons, shovel & tongs 2.00 – 1 clock 15.00 – 1 lot books 5.00

The church’s “Petition & Order of Sale on the Estate of Nathan Bramblett, Deceased” was filed July 29, 1844, ten days after Elizabeth’s death (South Carolina Wills and Probate Records, p. 516). Hopefully some of his Burdette relatives were there to purchase the items and possibly the slaves: James Bramlett, William Bramlett, Harrison Bramlett, William Bramlett, Robert Bramlett, Sarah Bramlett.

    Nathan Bramlett purchased his South Carolina plantation, 225 acres of land “where sd N. B. now lives” on “Zeack’s” Branch (Beaverdam Creek) of Enoree River in Laurens County, from Richard Fowler and wife, Debby, on Nov. 28, 1789, for “45 pounds proclamation money” (DB-C:131). The land was originally granted to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789. Witnesses: Fredk. Burdett, William Stone and Reuben Bramlett. (This Reuben is most likely the brother-in-law of Frederick and brother of Nathan Bramlett and Marianne, who went on to Kentucky and settled in Illinois, since Reuben Jr., son of Reuben Sr., did not move to Laurens District until 1794, according to his 32 pension application. The other Reuben in Laurens County at that time, son of Elizabeth and William, born circa 1775, may not have been old enough to witness a deed in 1789. He was a military pensioner, probably from the War of 1812, in Georgia in 1841. Based on the acreage they received, 300 acres, when they applied in 1773-1774 for their royal South Carolina land grant, William and Elizabeth only had three minor male children when they moved to South Carolina in 1774, including their eldest son, Enoch Sr., born 1757, and sons Newton and Sandford; and their son Reuben was one of the youngest in the family, born in South Carolina circa 1775. He would not have been old enough to serve in the Revolution or sign a deed as a legal witness, aged at least 21, in 1789. The William Bull royal land grants from King George III, which promoted the settlement of whites in Indian territory, granted the head of the family 100 acres, the spouse 50 acres, and 50 acres for each minor child/son.) Nathan’s land deed was recorded March 16, 1790.

    Nathan and Elizabeth Gray Bramlett sold John Burdett 100 acres of land in Laurens  County to nephew John Burdett for 25 pounds on April 23, 1801 (DB-O:199). The deed was not recorded until April 6, 1844, after Nathan and Elizabeth had died. The land, located on the south side of the Enoree River, was part of an original grant by Gov. Charles Pinckney to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789. In 1801 it was bounded by property owned by Elias Stone, (Amos?) Critchfield and Margaret Bramlett (Marianne’s mother), “along stony ridge.” “Fredk. Burdett” and Samuel Ansley and Zachariah Gray witnessed the 1801 Bramlett-Burdett deed.

Nathan’s Devotion to the Methodist Church

   Nathan, who gave his entire estate to the church, was devoted to his religion. Nathan and his brother John officially joined the Methodist Church in 1780-1782 in Virginia. Recorded deeds indicate Margaret and sons Reuben and John were in Virginia in 1780 when or shortly after Henry II/Jr. died and their eldest son, Henry III, inherited the family plantation. She may have been in South Carolina and returned to Virginia after her husband died to help deal with legalities involving her home and Henry II/Jr.’s estate. John’s obituary says he joined the Methodist Church at age 16 (1780) and experienced a “powerful conversion” at age 18 (1782) at the home of their widowed mother (Margaret) who lived in (Fauquier County) Virginia. Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt’s Diary states Nathan with brothers Henry III and John and their mother, Margaret, founded Bramlett Methodist Church in 1780 or 1781. That is when Henry Bramlett III and his sister Marianne Bramlett Burdette were living in South Carolina. Margaret and her younger children were in Virginia in 1780, but she may have been in South Carolina earlier in the same year visiting grown children when Bramlett Church was founded there. Nathan is considered by some today to be the founder of the church since he and George Sims on June 2, 1807, sold to the trustees for $5 two acres of land to secure the church meeting house already in existence on the property. The building was situated on property owned by Nathan or once owned by Margaret after she relocated from Virginia in 1790 and bought a small farm adjacent to Nathan’s property, which he had settled on in or before 1789. Methodist Episcopal Bishop Francis Asbury in his Journal referred to the church in 1801 as “widow Bramblet’s meeting-house” and in 1802 as “Bramblet’s Chapel.” Nathan’s original church land deed, recorded June 6, 1807, in Laurens County, documents the transfer of two acres on Zak’s Creek near Enoree River and the existing church building from trustees Nathan Bramlett and George Sims to Nathan’s brother-in-law and trustee Frederick Burditt/Burdette and other church trustees (DB-26:235).

Original Deed:

State of South Carolina 

Know all men by these presents,

That we Nathan Bramlett and George Sims — both of the state aforesaid and District of Laurence, for and in consideration of the Sum of five Dollars, to us paid, by Frederick Burditt – Joel Fowler – Raughley Stone, Trustees, have granted, bargained, sold and Released, and by these presents do bargain, sell and Release, unto the sd Frederick Burditt, Joel Fowler, and Raughley Stone, Trustees, Two acres of Land Situate in the District of Laurence, and near the Enoree River and on a Creek called Zak’s Creek, beginning on a Turkey Oak, from thence to a White Oak, and from thence to a Spanish Oak, from thence to a White Oak, from thence to a Sassafras, the same being two Acres more or less, Together with all and Singular, the Rights, members, herediterments, and appurtenances to said premises, before mentioned, belonging or in any wise incident as appertaining, to have and to hold all and singular, the premises before mentioned, unto the Said Frederick Burditt, Joel Fowler, and Raughley Stone Trustees; and their successors in office for ever, for the purpose of Secureing a Meeting house, thereon Standing and to Remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

And we do hereby bind ourselves our heirs Executors and Administrators, to warrant and ever defend the title thereof – in fee simple, and the said Frederick Burditt Joel Fowler and Raughley Stone, Trustees, and their Successors in office for the use within mentioned, Witness our hands and Seals, this Second day of June, In the year of our Lord one thousand Eight hundred and Seven, and the thirty first and Second of the Independency of America – Signed and sealed …Nathan Bramlett {Seal} George Sims {Seal} And delivered in Presents of us [Witnesses] Benjn Tradewell and John Burditt.

Nathan’s brother-in-law and church trustee Frederick Burditt is the husband of Marianne Bramlett, and John Burditt is their son, the nephew of Nathan. The deed was recorded in Deed Book 26 on page 235 of Laurens County: 

State of South Carolina} Laurens District} Personaly appeared John Burditt before me and made oath in due form of law and saith that he was personaly present and Saw the within named Nathan Bramlett and George Sims sign and as … and deliver the within conveyance to the within named Frederick Burditt Raughley Stone and Joel Fowler for the use within mentioned and that the Reverend Benjamin Tradewell signed his name as witness to the same with himself Sworn to before me this 16th day of June 1807 John Burditt Sterling Tucker South Carolina} Laurens District} Registers Office I do hereby certify that the within Deed is duly recorded in Book 26 Page 235 as the law directs Examined & Certified this 6th day of June 1807 — John Garlington…” 

A copy of the original June 2, 1807, deed, which was donated to the South Carolina Methodist Archives in 1912, includes a note at the bottom, which indicates the bishop visited Bramlett Church in 1799:

“A Quarterly Conference was held at Bramletts by Bishop Asbury Nov. 9th and 10th, 1799 — 113 years ago. Rev. Benj. Blanton was also present. This document by the consent of the trustees of Bramletts Church is tendered the Historical Society of the S.C. Conference. Nov. 26th 1912. J. M. Fridy”

The page also was stamped with “Historical Society Commission on Archives & History South Carolina Conference The United Methodist Church Archives: Wofford College Sandor Teszler Library Spartanburg SC 29303-3663 April 3 1997 May 23 1997”

Note: Not much other information yet on George Sims, trustee who co-signed the deed with Nathan Bramlett to sell land to the church. The 1962 Church Journal identifies him as a “friend” of Nathan. George Sims witnessed a deed on Nov. 12, 1811, when “Henry Burdett” bought 100 acres of land for $300 from Joel and Sarah Fowler. The deed, recorded Dec. 22, 1820, indicates the land, originally granted to John Fowler, was located on Durbin Creek next to property owned by Henry Burdett’s brother-in-law Hezekiah Gray and bounded by other property owned by Mary Fowler, Daniel Bragg and Joseph Downey. Mary Patterson also witnessed the document (DB-K:309) Raughley Stone, trustee of Bramlett Church, and his Stone relatives who probably were early members of Bramlett Methodist Church came from Prince William/Fauquier Co., Va., circa 1773 to settle on land situated on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River in present day Laurens County. Their relationship to the Bramlett family is unknown. The Laurens County Stone family was headed by Mildredge “Mildred” “Millie” Corder (1730–1822) and John Stone (1727–1800). (Researchers believe John is the son of Nancy Bronaugh and Thomas Stone of Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va.) John and Millie purchased 200 acres adjacent to William Bramblett’s 1773 land grant from William and Barbara Vaughn in 1775. As a Revolutionary War veteran, John Stone later also purchased 442 acres on a Branch of Beaver Dam Creek on Enoree River in Ninety-Six District on June 6, 1791 (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S213190, vol. 27, p. 157). John and Millie had several children named in his Jan. 26, 1797, will, proved March 17, 1800, in Laurens County: Nancy, William, Reuben, Raughley, Elias, Lewis Stone (Will Book A-a: 233).

   Church Minutes indicate Nathan Bramlett with John “Birdett” and William Fowler were appointed to a building committee in 1833 to construct a new building for Bramlett Church. Excerpt of record is included below, from Methodist Archives, courtesy historian Judy Riddle, church member and adult Sunday School teacher, financial chair and secretary of the Administrative Council.

1833 Bramlett Building committee

   Following are names of Bramlett and Burdett relatives listed as members in Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church Class Books, saved by Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette in his church and family papers, courtesy of Martha Anne Curry Duke. (Key: Member Number, State in Grace (Baptised or Joined), Name of Member, State in life [Married/Single/Deceased, etc.], Remarks.) Note: in some cases the numbers are missing or not sequential.

1842 Female Bramlett/Burdett Members

1 B Elizth Bramlett M deceased

Deceased July 19th, 1844

2 B Ailsy Burditt S

3 B Molly Rhodes M

4 B Elibth Hand M

5 B Frances Burditt M John M. Zimmerman

7 B Elisth Burditt M

10 B Perchis B. Gray M

11 B Frances Burditt S

12 B Ailscy Barnett M

17 Elisa A. Burditt S joined July 31st

23 B Milly Burditt S

24 B Nicey Ba[r]ker M

1842 Male Bramlett/Burdett Members

1 B John Burditt M

2 B Hezekiah Gray M

3 S Nathan B. Burditt S removed

6 B Reuben Burditt M joined Sep. 29

7 S Joseph T. Burditt S joined April 24th

8 S John F. Burditt S joined April 24th

9 S Reuben T. Burditt S joined April 24th

11 B John R. Ba[r]ker M

Nov. 21, 1844, Female Bramlett/Burdett Members

1 B Ailsey Burditt S

2 B Molly Rhodes M

3 B Elizt. Hand M

4 B Frances Burditt M

5 B Elizt Burditt M

9 B Frances P. Burditt S

10 B Ailsey Barnett M

15 S Eliza A. Burditt S

19 B Milley Burditt S

20 B Nicey Barker M

Nov. 21, 1844, Male Bramlett/Burdett Members

1 B John Burditt, C. L. M

4 B Isekiah Gray M

5 B Reuben Burditt M

6 B Nathan Burditt M

7 S Joseph T. Burditt S

8 S John F. Burditt S

9 S Reuben T. Burditt S

11 B John R. Ba[r]ker M

Nov. 4, 1845, Female Bramlett/Burdett Members

2 B Ailsey Burdett S

3 B Molly Rhodes M

4 B Elizabeth Hand M

5 B Frances Burdett M

6 B Elizabeth Burdett M

9 B Frances T. Burdett S

10 B Aisley Barnett M

13 S Eliza An Burdett S

15 B Milley Burdett S

Nov. 4, 1845, Male Bramlett/Burdett Members

1 John Burditt, L. C. M

3 B Isekiah Gray M

5 B Reuben Burdett M

6 B Nathan Burdett M

7 S Joseph T. Burdett S

8 S John F. Burdett S

9 S Reuben T. Burdett S

1847 Bramlett/Burdett Members

[1] Elizabeth Burdett Aug. 1847

[2] Elizabeth A. Wells Nov. 14, 1847

[3] Frederic H. Burdett Nov. 1847

May 13, 1848, Female Bramlett/Burdett Members

1 Frances Burdett M

3 Aisly Burdett S

4 Molly Rhodes M

5 Elizabeth Hann M

6 Frances T. Burdett S

7 Elizabeth Burdett M

11 Elizabeth Burditt S

12 Elisa Curry M

15 Elisa Ann Wills removed

19 Aelsy Barnett M

May 13, 1848, Male Bramlett/Burdett Members

1 John Burditt, C. L. M

2 Isekiah Gray, C. L. & Stewart M

5 Reuben Burdett M

6 Joseph T. Burdett S

7 John F. Burdett S

8 Reuben T. Burdett S

10 Frederick H. Burdett

1850 Female Bramlett/Burdett Members

1 B Frances Burdett M

3 B Molly Rhodes M

4 B Elizbth. Hands M

5 B Elizbth Burdett M

10 B Alcy Barnett M

12 B Alcy Burdett S

13 B Frances P. Burdett S

14 B Elizabeth Burdett

1850 Male Bramlett/Burdett Members

1 B John Burditt, C. L. M

2 B Isekiah Gray M dead

5 B Reuben Burdett M

6 B Joseph T. Burdett S

7 B John F. Burdett S

8 B Reuben T. Burditt S

10 B F. H. Burdett S

Other Gray church members: Patty Gray, married, 1842; Jesse Gray, single, removed 1842, attended 1844, removed again 1844; Caroline Gray, single, 1842-50; Margaret Gray, married, 1842-44; Martha Gray, married, 1844-47, died Feb. 16, 1847; Ann C. Gray, married, 1848-76; Emily F. Gray, 1848-50; “Richardson Gray joined July 28th, 1847, and died the next day in the faith”; Hugh H. E. Gray, married, 1861-75, Asst. Class Teacher and Committee Member; Walter S. Gray “Joined August 8, 1864” and was a member 1866-75, withdrew 1877; Arena Gray, 1861-67; Susan Gray, 1861-76; Martha Gray, 1861; Mattie A. Gray, 1875-76; Sarah Gray, 1861; Nancy Gray, 1861-66, “Infirm Died July 14, 1866”; Mary F. Gray, 1864-66, “Removed and took no letter” 1866 and “Removed by letter” 1867; Madora Gray, 1864-76, paid quarterage 1864 and 1872.


Garrett – Bramlett Connections in South Carolina

From the Garrett Day Book and the Elrod Note Book

COURTESY LAWRENCE C. HOLCOMBE

   Following is a transcript of four pages from a Note Book kept by the late Agness Elrod, including introductory genealogical material about the Catletts and Garretts and Garrett Bible inscriptions.

   The Garrett Day Book Bible inscriptions mention two Garretts who married Bramletts: William Garrett married Nancy Bramlett and Nicholas Ware Garrett married Sarah Bramlett. Both Garretts are sons of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett II, and both Bramletts are believed to be daughters of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr.

   Back Story — Edward Garrett II first copied information from his mother’s Garrett Bible into his own Garrett Bible. (Edward Garrett II, son of Edward Garrett I and Elizabeth Catlett, married Anne West Owsley, and they settled in Laurens County. Two of their children married Bramletts.) Before he died, Edward Garrett II inscribed the Bible information in a Day Book. Someone else, most likely his wife, Anne West Owsley Garrett, added names of spouses in different handwriting. The Garrett Day Book was passed down through several generations. (Current location is unknown.) Agness Elrod copied inscriptions from the Garrett Day Book onto numbered pages of her Note Book many years ago, most likely in the 1950s.

   Lawrence C. Holcombe of Liberty, S.C., shared a copy of Agness Elrod’s notes and her transcription of Edward Garrett II and Anna West (Owsley) Garrett’s Day Book. The material was donated by Deborah G. Dennis and posted on Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center.

   An exact transcript, verbatim, of what Agness Elrod wrote in her Note Book (four pages) is provided below (with a few brackets containing page numbers, bold face type to mark the Bramlett references, and one ellipsis to mark an undecipherable word written under “Edgefield”).

Garrett 13

The compiler has made no attempt to trace the Catlett line but by 1790 one of the Catletts (John Catlett) had settled in Cheraw Dist., S.C. In the early days of Anderson Co SC one of the well known merchants was Pinckney Catlett.

Elizabeth (Catlett) Garrett was probably the daughter of Thomas Catlett of Caroline Co., Va. We find him as a witness to a deed in 1730 of John Garretts grandfather Richard Buchner. Thomas Catlett died in Caroline Co Va in 1739. Two other early Catlett estates there were John Catlett d 1742 & another Thomas Catlett, d 1744.

Edward Garrett I then Sr., died in 1751 between Feb. 1, 1751, and Dec. 20, 1751, when his estate was filed. He left a large family, several sons were under age. By 1757 the son Edward was 24 yrs of age & o ld enough to administer on the estate. Young Edwards mother Elizabeth (Catlett) Garrett (the widow of Edward Garrett I) married 2nd in Fairfax Co Va before 1755 to Richard Nelson & became the sister-in-law of of Gov. Wm. Nelson of Va. The administration papers of the estate of Edward Garrett I (called then Sr.) show the inventory was taken by Thomas Triplett, John Adams & Edward House.

When the estate of Edward Garrett I was about settled in 1757 Edward II decided to make a home of his own so he courted and married on Feb. 6 1759 Anna West Owsley called Ann the daughter of Thomas Owsley & his wife Ann West, Ann being the daughter of John West of Virginia.

On April 14, 1766 in Loudon Co Va Edward & Ann Garrett sold their land on Goose Creek to Thomas Middleton Jr. The land originally granted to Edward’s father Edward on Dec. 27, 1742. (See deed bk E, page 7). The early part of 1766 Edward Garrett with his wife Anna & their five children and with two of Edwards brothers, Thomas & John left Virginia & migrated to 96 District, South Carolina the part that later became Laurens & Abbeville County & Edgefield cos [….] To preserve the history of the family in a new country, Edward transcribed from his mothers Bible in Virginia the dates

Garrett [14]

and names of his brothers and sisters. These he he copied in his own Bible, and before he died he copied this data in an old day book which has been handed down from generation to generation in the Edward Garrett family. In addition to the records Edward copied from his mothers Bible, he added the names and birth dates of each of his 16 children. In a different handwriting, supposedly by Edward’s wife Anna called Ann, was added the names of those whom the 16 children married.

Bible Records

Edward Garrett, born 31 August 1733 [died 24 Aug 1794 Laurens]

Anna West Owsley born 3 June 1744 [died 1823]

Edward Garrett and Anna West Owsley married 2 June 1759

Sister — Margaret Garrett, born 4 June, 1735

Sister — Frances Garrett, born 30 July, 1737

Brother — Stephen Garrett, born 1 August, 1740

Brother — Thomas Garrett, born 11 November 1744

Brother — John Garrett, born 18 January 1747

Garrett 15

Our Children: (marriages added by Anna)

I Elizabeth Garrett, born 2 [20?] October 1760 married John Ashley [b 25 Jan 1759 NC – 13 Dec 1830 Laurens, Warrior Creek, Rev War vet SC Pack Horseman, Col. Roebucks’ Regt, enlisted 8 Sep 1782 discharged 25 Oct 1782 [d 10 Nov 1826 bur Warrior Creek]

II. John Garrett, born 7 January 1762 married Sallie Mauldin [died 1844]

III Capt. William Garrett, born 9 September 1763 married Nancy Bramlett

IV Nicholas Ware Garrett, born 11 March 1765 married Sarah Bramlett [died 1846]

V Jesse Garrett, born 2 February, 1766 married Elizabeth illegible Henderson) [died 29 Sep 1853] [grave says b 9 Sep 1766]

VI Frances Garrett, born 11 May 1768 married Pleasant Sullivan

VII Rhoda Garrett, born 24 November 1769 married George Hughes

VIII James Garrett, born 24 August 1771 married Nancy Wright (copy & erase some desc called her Dorcas)

[On back of page 15]

IX Dorcas Garrett, born 12 April, 1773 married Stephen Mullins [died 25 Jul 1842 Blount Co, AL]

X Stephen Garrett, born 16 April 1775 married 1st Sarah Smith, 2nd (Drucilla) Elizabeth Putnam [Putman] [d 5 Jan 1845 Chattooga Co, GA]

XI Mary Garrett, born 12 April 1777 married 1st Austin Moore, 2nd Lodowick Doolin [died 14 Jun 1853 Christian Co, KY]

XII Martha Garrett, born 28 November 1778 married William Nelson Kelly [d 17 Dec 1827 Bedford Co, TN

XIII Ann Garrett, born 23 August 1780 married John Harris [d 25 Aug 1839 Perry Co, IL]

XIV Hosea Garrett, born 18 October 1782 [d 17 Dec 1827 Bedford Co, TN bur Keller Cem]

XV Irene Kiziah Garrett, born 8 March 1785 married Robertson Moore [d: 12 Oct 1866 Laurens Co, SC]

XVI Edward Garrett, Jr., born 13 September 1787 married Eleanor Higgins [dau of Wm Higgins] [died 3 Apr 1864 bur Warrior Creek Bapt Ch Cem]

End of Bible Record

Bramblett descendant Lawrence C. Holcombe cites another Bramlett–Garrett connection: One Malinda Bramlett married William Henry Harrison Garrett, son of Eleanor Higgins and Edward Garrett Jr. and grandson of Anna West Owsley and Edward Garrett Sr.

Chapter 3:

Generation 5

Sarah Bramlett and Nicholas Ware Garrett

6d9ed-virginia2bseal

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Sarah “Sally” Bramlett, most likely child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born April 8, 1769, in Fauquier Co., Va. She died Dec. 30, 1851, in Laurens Co., S.C., and was buried at Warrior Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. She married Nicholas Ware Garrett on Dec. 22, 1786, in Laurens County. He was born  March 11, 1765, in Fairfax, Va., the son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett II/Jr. Nicholas died Jan. 2, 1846, in Laurens County and was buried at Warrior Creek Baptist Church Cemetery.

Sarah and Nicholas rest in Warrior Creek Baptist Church Cemetery, Gray Court, S.C. “SACRED To the memory of SARAH GARRETT, who was born April the 8, 1769, and departed this life Dec. the 30, 1851, age 82 years, 8 months, and 22 days.” “SACRED To the memory of NICHOLAS GARRETT, who was born March the 11, 1765, and departed this life Jan.y the 2, 1846, age 80 years, 9 mos. and 21 days.

 

Chapter 3:

Generation 5

Nancy Bramlett and William Garrett

6d9ed-virginia2bseal

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Nancy Bramlett, most likely child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. She married Capt. William Garrett, son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett II/Jr. He was born Sept. 9, 1763, in Virginia. Nancy is listed as the wife of William in “The Garrett Day Book,” a record of Garrett Genealogy and Bible inscriptions of Edward and Ann and children referenced in full above. Researcher Agness Elrod transcribed the text into a notebook in the early 1950s. One child is Harmon Garrett.

Harmon Garrett, child of Nancy Bramlett and William Garrett, was born in Laurens Co., S.C. He married Martha Higgins. Their child is William Housley Garrett. One descendant is Rob Wigley of Dallas, Tex.

William Housley Garrett, child of Martha Higgins and Harmon Garrett, was born circa 1847 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died in 1927 in Texas. He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. His Compiled Military Service Records indicate he first served as a private in Company L, First (Charles W. McCreary’s) (Col. Maxey Gregg’s) Regiment, South Carolina Infantry Volunteers, First South Carolina Provisional Army. He was wounded in the leg while fighting near Richmond, Va. He first married Francis Sophie Glenn and second married Belle __?  “Wm. Housley Garrett,” 22, with wife, Frances M., 23, and three children (William, 4; Edwin, 2; James, 8/12), all born South Carolina, 1870 Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C., census (NARA Film M593:1501:131A). His children include William, Edwin, James Garrett.

Mystery: Nancy Bramlett Goodwin

   Nancy Bramlett, possible descendant of Henry Bramlett Jr., was born circa 1798-1800 in Spartanburg Co., S.C. She died in Alabama. She married Theophilus Goodwin.

  One of Nancy and Theophilus Goodwin’s descendants, Joshua Richard Goodwin Jr., was serving as a Confederate soldier in Alabama when the Hunley Submarine was constructed near Mobile and then transported to Charleston for service against the Union blockade of Charleston Harbor. The Post & Courier newspaper ran a feature article about Joshua in its special section about the Civil War on Dec. 11, 2010, which is reprinted here:

Joshua Richard Goodwin and Cynthia Glover

Charleston resident’s relative served in Alabama unit that oversaw construction of Confederate submarine Hunley

by Deborah G. Dennis of James Island Associated Press — Dec. 11, 2010

 

Chapter 3:

Generation 4

WILLIAM BRAMBLETT and ELIZABETH UNKNOWN (GIST?)

(Children: Elizabeth, Enoch Sr., Sandford, Newton, Reuben, Henry)

6d9ed-virginia2bseal

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

William Bramblett, child of Unknown Wife and Henry Bramlett I/Sr., was born circa 1732 in Colonial Virginia. He died after 1779 and before Nov. 12, 1787, most likely in Laurens Dist., S.C., where he lived with his family. His burial place is unknown. He married a woman named Elizabeth, perhaps Gist or Gest, in Fauquier or Fairfax Co., Va. The house of one William Bramlett is mapped on a March 12, 1755, survey of Fairfax County land, adjacent to Prince William/Fauquier, which also includes the house of “widow Gist.” Widow Gist may be the mother of William’s wife, Elizabeth, whose first name, Elizabeth, is documented on a 1787 deed in Laurens Co., S.C., and who appears later as head of a family there in 1790. The possible surname Gist originates in references on a 1755 resurvey recorded in Fairfax County. The houses of William Bramett or Bramlett and Widow Gist are designated on a plat map for the March 12–May 20, 1755, resurvey of 1,648 acres on the north side of Potomack River, beginning on the southwest side of the south branch of Little Hunting Creek and Dogue’s Run in Fairfax County (previously Stafford County) granted to George Mason, with one John Gist showing the corners of the tract to the surveyor, George West (Virginia Northern Neck Grants I, 1757-1781, pp. 43-44). The land was part of a tract of 1,906 acres in Stafford (later Fairfax) County, that was granted Jan. 12, 1677, to Mathew Thompson (Virginia Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679, p. 631). The land in 1677 was near property owned by John Mathews. In 1755 the land was adjacent to land owned by the same or a different John Mathews, Daniel French, Spencer and Darrell (Daniel? or Darnell?), Sampson Danell (Daniel), James Noland