bramblettefamilyinamerica

July 10, 2018

Bramblette Family in America

ANGEL OAK, A BEAUTIFUL, TREASURED, COLONIAL-ERA, LIVE OAK TREE STILL STANDING AND GROWING AT FORMER ANGEL PLANTATION ON JOHN’S  ISLAND, CHARLESTON, S.C., BELIEVED TO BE BETWEEN 400–TO  1,400–2,500 YEARS OLD, REPRESENTING A VALUED SPECIMEN OF AMERICA’S EARLY ANCIENT NATURAL HISTORY AND SYMBOLIZING MYRIAD, LIVING LIMBS AND LEAVES OF OUR SUB- STANTIAL, VENERATED, STURDY, GROWING, LIVING, AMERICAN FAMILY TREE.cropped-cropped-angel-oak1

COPYRIGHT 2016-2018 DEBORAH G. DENNIS

Charleston, South Carolina

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INCLUDING

THE RIGHT OF REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR PART IN ANY FORM:

Permissions are Considered,

Please Contact Blogger for Permissions Before Copying: debdenn@gmail.com

 

BRAMBLETTE FAMILY IN AMERICA:

 

Descendants of Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet and/or William Bramlett I/Sr.

Replica “Caravel Discovery Ships” digital image by Deborah G. Dennis, 2014, Cooper River, Charleston, S. C.

NinaPinta-4

 

AN EXACT PROSPECT

“Charleston, You Are Beautiful!” courtesy Chad Matthew “Chad Wick” Dennis

One View of Charleston at Christmastime

 

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bramblettefamilyinamerica

June 22, 2016

ANGEL OAK, A BEAUTIFUL, TREASURED, COLONIAL-ERA, LIVE OAK TREE STILL STANDING AND GROWING AT FORMER ANGEL PLANTATION ON JOHN’S  ISLAND, CHARLESTON, S.C., BELIEVED TO BE BETWEEN 400–TO  1,400–2,500 YEARS OLD, REPRESENTING A VALUED SPECIMEN OF AMERICA’S EARLY ANCIENT NATURAL HISTORY AND SYMBOLIZING MYRIAD, LIVING LIMBS AND LEAVES OF OUR SUB- STANTIAL, VENERATED, STURDY, GROWING, LIVING, AMERICAN FAMILY TREE.cropped-cropped-angel-oak1

COPYRIGHT 2016-2018 DEBORAH G. DENNIS

Charleston, South Carolina

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INCLUDING

THE RIGHT OF REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR PART IN ANY FORM:

Permissions are Considered,

Please Contact Blogger for Permissions Before Copying: debdenn@gmail.com

 

BRAMBLETTE FAMILY IN AMERICA:

 

Descendants of Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet and/or William Bramlett I/Sr.

Replica “Caravel Discovery Ships” digital image by Deborah G. Dennis, 2014, Cooper River, Charleston, S. C.

NinaPinta-4

 

AN EXACT PROSPECT

“Charleston, You Are Beautiful!” courtesy Chad Matthew “Chad Wick” Dennis

One View of Charleston at Christmastime

 

Please scroll down for text and/or use your search engine to locate individuals or topics in the following emerging, consecutive chapters. Or continue reading…

 

PREFACE

The numerous ancestors and descendants presented in this genealogy are limited, mainly spanning the earliest possible ancestors in the 1690s to those who parented children born during 1860-1865, or shortly after the Civil War/War Between the States era.

BRAMBLETTE FAMILY

The Bramblette family in America appears to have originated with William Bramlett I/Sr., born in/before 1694, most likely in Colonial Virginia, and perhaps his father, Ambrose “Bamblet” or Bramblet, probably born in western Europe, who reportedly immigrated to America from Great Britain in 1690. Unfortunately, the names of Ambrose’s wife and William I/Sr.’s first wife are unknown. William I/Sr. second married Elizabeth Callaway, who is the mother of some of his younger children. With few Bibles, wills and probate records to fully document the early Bramblette generations, we find only thin trails and hints of trials of historical existence and life struggles, tragedies and triumphs in a few Virginia deeds, plat maps, tax records and other court documents. We piece together what we can and conclude, while the nuggets of information are interesting and valuable to us alone, the ancestors’ true legacies live on in the DNA of thousands of descendants with the name Bramblette, Bramblett, Bramblet, Bramlet, Bramlett, Bramlette and other variations and different allied surnames. Hopefully, DNA comparisons, while helpful in genealogy, will someday be replaced or improved by a better mechanism of comparing our paper trails with matches and measuring/making correct connections of relatives. Our familial multitude of thousands in the past and today populate the records of many areas of the country from the original Thirteen Colonies to California and states between. Many of us honor the early ancestors with respect and gratitude after learning about their hardships and realizing how fortunate we are to have been born at all, and born into such a courageous, adventurous, prosperous family, and then how we miraculously survived childhood as blossoms in the Rose Garden of Life. “Gather Ye Rosebuds While You May.”

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 (not yet fully uploaded)

 

English Immigrant to Colonial America 1690

Chapter 1: Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet I/Senior Born in/before 1670 Western Europe

English Colonist, American Born in/before 1694

 

Chapter 2: William Bramlett I/Senior

American Born in/before 1710

 

Chapter 3: Henry Bramlett I/Senior

Chapter 4: Henry Bramlett II/Junior

Chapter 4: William Bramblett

Chapter 4: Reuben Bramblett I/Senior

Chapter 5: Rev. William Bramblett II/Junior

 

Chapter 6: Sarah Bramblett

 

Chapter 7: James Bramblett

 

Chapter 8: Nancy Bramlett

Chapter 9: Ambrose Bramlette

 

Chapter 10: Agatha “Aggie” Bramlett

 

Chapter 11: Elizabeth “Betty” Bramlett

Afterword

 

Acknowledgements

Thank you everyone and all for sharing family information.

Much appreciation is offered to the core group of researchers I worked with in the 1990–2000s to investigate the lives of William Bramlett I/Sr., his son Henry Bramlett Sr., and his grandson Henry Bramlett Jr.: the researchers are three direct descendants of Mary Peak and John Bramlett–Robert Sidney Bramlett of Texas, Patti Hendrix Eckhoff of Washington State, and Sammie Jean Holley Day of Indiana, the latter being the first active researcher to connect us to our ancestor Henry Bramlett I/Sr., a  planter in King George Co., Va., who settled in Prince William County, Va., in 1735. I do take credit for finding the key to open the mystery in separating and connecting the many generations of Henry Bramlett Sr.’s family: I found a group of three first cousins in the same generation named Reuben Bramlett, including my direct ancestor, who have to be grandsons of Henry Bramlett Sr. and thus each a son, respectively, of Henry Bramlett Jr., William Bramblett, and Reuben Bramblett Sr. The search for connections of these three first cousins named Reuben led us to family in many states, first Virginia, then the Carolinas and Georgia, Kentucky and Illinois, and finally, across the nation as adventurous family members in later generations began to populate parts of the entire country, including California. We can only estimate the influence of Micheal TheronMike” Bramblett, of Florida, descendant of Henry Bramblett III and Elizabeth Moss. His generous contributions to the family, in the form of documents, census data, stories, photos, and other memorabilia on Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center online, are immeasurable. In later years I have worked with James Thomas Hammond, a retired journalist-editor and respected historian and author of Tom’s War, an historical memoir of his father’s military service as a World War II combat pilot, still available wherever we buy books. I have also worked extensively with my beloved but query-weary cousins, family historians and paragons of patience and virtue, Martha Anne Curry Duke of Texas and Franklin Donald Burdette of Florida, whose documentary contributions were the keys to pieces of evidence connecting Marianne Bramlett Burdette to her siblings Henry III, John, Nathan and Reuben Bramlett and thus she and the brothers to their parents, Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr. (I can only hope my research contributions to Martha and Franklin equal the answers they have so freely given to me over the years.)

Dedicated Bramblette-Burdette Researchers: Our Fond “Partners in Time”

Frank and MarthaEloise and Franklin Donald Burdette of Florida, and Martha Anne Curry Duke of Texas, Credited with documenting Burdette Family History and the History of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church and Cemetery and  identifying its co-founders: Henry Bramlett Jr.’s wife, Margaret, and three of their sons--brothers Henry III, John, and Nathan Bramlett. Franklin and Martha’s documentary and genealogical contributions, Thank God, were the keys to unlocking mysteries in evidence that connects Marianne Bramlett Burdette to her siblings Henry III, John, Nathan and Reuben Bramlett and their parents, Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr.

Marianne Bramlett Burdette most likely was an early/charter member and probably a co-founder of the church in 1780-81 as well, along with her husband, Frederick Burdette, who  were married and living in Laurens Dist./Co., S.C., as early as 1775. Frederick also is documented there as a church member and named as a church trustee there with Nathan Bramlett and others in an 1807 recorded deed when Nathan and George Simms donated the Church and land to the trustees. Nathan bought his mother Margaret’s small 50-acre farm near the church in 1809 and lived in the vicinity the rest of his life. He and wife, Elizabeth Gray, rest in marked graves at the church’s old Graveyard. John and his family moved by 1810 about ten miles away from Laurens into adjacent Greenville County where they were instrumental in the founding  and early development of Bethel United Methodist Church and Cemetery at Simpsonville.

Research Partner and DESCENDANT OF MARY PEAK AND JOHN BRAMLETT
Jean Holley Day Grave photo

Rest in Eternal Peace, Sammie Jean Holley Day, late of Danville, Ind.

.

Research Partner and DESCENDANT OF MARY PEAK AND JOHN BRAMLETT

Hmmond

James  Thomas Hammond, above, a native of South Carolina, Husband of  Elizabeth and Father of two grown children, identifies himself as “an ink stained wretch” on Social Media, while others chuckle and otherwise describe him as a Respected Newspaper Journalist and Editor, Historian and Novelist, a Writer and Reader, of Greenville, S.C. He is a well traveled, happy man of many interests. He also is a DNA Match to Richard “Rick” Womack of San Francisco, a direct descendant of Reuben Bramlett, 1757–1844, brother of John Bramlett, 1764-1853, both sons of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr. In addition, cousins Rick Womack and Deborah Dennis of Charleston, also are both documented as direct descendants of Reuben Bramlett who settled in Illinois in 1818, as well as identified DNA Matches to each other on Ancestry.Com.

 

Historical Illinois State Seal

Illinois Historical seal

Blogger, Family  Researcher Deborah G. Dennis, twelfth BRAMLETT generation in AMERICA, visiting  the graves of ancestors Susannah Upchurch and  Coleman Brown Bramlet in the 1980s at Bramlet Cemetery,  Saline County, Illinois.

Deb in Bramlet cem

Author’s Bramlett DNA Connection — Mother, Dorothy Willadee Bramlett Ferguson:Willadee

 

 

FIFTEENTH  GENERATION in AMERICA — “SELLY”

One of the youngest Bramblette Descendants in 2018: Anselmaria Amunet “Selly” Knisley, Shown below, at Age 1 Year, Representing the Fifteenth Generation of Bramblettes in America, First Great-Great Grandchild of Dorothy Willadee Bramlett, First Great-Grandchild of Deborah Gail  Dennis, First Grandchild of Cassie Gail Dennis Cirimotich, and First Child of Veronica Josephine Cox and  Thorne Micheal Knisley: The smartest, happiest, most beautiful preemie baby and toddler in the entire world.

 Anselmaria Amunet “Selly” Knisley, Age 1

 

Selly: Reading Her Books

Selly, above, and All  of Our Older Grand Children are Our Most Valued Treasures

 

Dressed for A First Visit to the Pediatrician after her release from NICU, June  2017:

Dainty  Baby  Anselmaria Amunet “Selly” Knisley

Selly Newb dress

Newborn Selly, 2  pounds, 8 ounces, 5  May 2017, and her NEW Monkey in NICU, and don’t anyone try to take that Monkey, LOL

No, My Monkey -- Newborn Selly

 

ALL FOUR GRAND CHILDREN WITH “NANNY DEBBA” IN A GROUP PHOTO FOR EASTER.

Christmas in Charleston, S.C.

DEB AND CHAD AND KIDS.jpg

From left: Chad Dennis, Nannie Debba, Beck, Tay, Ellie

 

 

Chad Dennis, left, and son, Taylor: So Cute

Taylor

Then (above): Chad and Tay, and Now (below): Taylor and Miranda

Handsome Tay and Beautiful Mir

Grand Dog Molly Dennis

Molly Use

GRANDDOG

Logan’s LAMBCHOP CIRIMOTICH

Lambchop

L  A  M  B  C  H  O  P

LAMBCHOP

Chapter 1: 

Generation 1

AMBROSE BAMBLET/BRAMBLET I/SENIOR

(Possible Immigrant Ancestor 1690; Possible Patriarch of DNA Related Bramblettes in America)

(Children: William I/Sr.? Others?)

;

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

Probable Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis

AMBROSE BAMBLET” (or “BRAMBLET”) I/SR., parents unknown, was born before 1690 when he apparently immigrated to America from Great Britain. Assuming he was an adult at the time, he was born circa 1669-1672 or earlier. One immigration document recorded in  Virginia Land Patents indicates Ambrose was transported from England in 1690, apparently alone without wife or other close relatives, to help populate New Kent Co., Va. It is not known if he actually boarded the ship, survived the journey and arrived in America. His name, “Ambrose Bamblet,” which appears on a Virginia Land Office Patent connected to John Lyddal, is the only evidence yet found Ambrose’s existence. In the land patent record, the scribe may have just misspelled the surname by omitting the R from Bramblet, a common variant spelling. Ambrose reportedly was one of forty-five persons transported to America by John Lyddal, who received 648 acres of land in St. John’s Parish, New Kent Co., Va., for bringing in the new settlers. St. John’s Parish was created in 1680. The original handwritten patent, difficult to decipher, contains a description of the land and indicates it may have been part of more than 2,200 acres previously granted to Capt. Geo. Lydal and others.

“To all &tc. whereas &; Now Know ye that … lying and being in New Kent County in St. John’s Parish … 1690 beginning on south side of Black Creek at mouth of the south branch about 35 two pole chains below the new mill adjacent to … &tc now or late, of Mr. Napier &tc … acres granted to Capt. Geo. Lydal … & deserted granted to Mr. John Langston … March 1672/3 but never present & deserted & granted to sd. John Lyddal by order &tc court 648 acres bering date of 17th of October 1689 by and for the importation of forty-five persons into the Collony, whose names…to have and to hold…the 21st of April anno dom 1690….Ambrose Bamblet….” (Virginia Land Patent Book 8, p. 45)

From  U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s

Digital Record of John Lyddal’s 1690 Virginia Land Office Patent naming the immigrant “Ambrose Bamblet,” courtesy Library of Virginia

 

MicroForm

The name “Ambrose Bamblet” is located above at the bottom, left, last line.

Ambrose Bamblet
[Ambrose Bramblet
Arrival Year: 1690
Arrival Place: Virginia
Primary Immigrant: Bamblet, Ambrose
Source Publication Code: 6221
Annotation: Date and place where land was patented and record was created listing those transported/imported. Only the names of those to be transported were indexed. Abstracted from Patent books 6 through 8, from the Land Office records located at the Virginia State Library.
Source Bibliography: NUGENT, NELL MARION. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants. Vol. 2: 1666-1695. Indexed by Claudia B. Grundman. Richmond, VA: Virginia State Library, 1977. 609 pages.
Household Members:
Name Relation
Ambrose Bamblet

Our individual Immigrant’s name and surname, “Ambrose Bamblet,” like names of many immigrants, was most likely recorded as it was heard, phonetically, and spelling was not yet standardized, so Ambrose and other immigrants may not have known how to spell their surnames. Thus, spelling variations of names were common, and members of the same family arriving at different times or places may be found in immigration records under different surname spellings.

   The land patent identifies 44 other immigrants with different surnames; no wife or children or other relatives are listed as transports with Ambrose. Without later records with the same names, we have no way of connecting the other persons to Ambrose. The other immigrants and Ambrose were most likely indentured servants who planned to work as farmers for a specific amount of years without pay in exchange for transportation to the new land. Ambrose apparently came to America to become a farmer in Virginia. No record of the exact plot of land he planned to farm or actually farmed in St. John’s Parish has been found. No marriage record or other public or official or private record of him has been yet located in existing documents: New Kent is a burned county with few surviving early records. No other details of his life are known. The cause of his death, his death date and place and burial place are unknown. The name of his wife, if he married, is unknown. The names of his children, if he had any, are undocumented. However, he may be father of William Bramlett I/Sr., most likely born as an English citizen before 1694 in Colonial Virginia, then ruled by Great Britain. Ambrose and William I/Sr. do have geographical proximity in common: New Kent County, created 1634, where Ambrose reportedly lived, is very close–only two narrow counties away–from Essex County, created 1692, where William I/Sr., lived in 1715-1716. No definitive record of immigration has been found for William. (One of William’s sons is named Ambrose Bramlett, perhaps a namesake of this paternal grandfather, “Ambrose Bamblet”? –the 1690 immigrant from England.)  If the latter had other children, in addition to William Bramlett I/Sr., they are not yet known.

Chapter 2:

Generation 2

WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR. and UNKNOWN FIRST WIFE and ELIZABETH CALLAWAY

(Patriarch of Essex, Caroline, Lunenburg, Bedford and Most Likely King George, Prince William, Fauquier Bramblettes)

(Children: Henry Sr., William Jr., Sarah, James, Nancy, Ambrose, Agatha, Elizabeth)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

Most Likely Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis

WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR., perhaps child of Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet I/Sr. and unknown mother, was born in 1694-1695, most likely in Colonial Virginia (i.e., England, since Great Britain claimed and governed America at the time). He witnessed a deed in 1715-1716, which suggests he probably was  age 21 (at least age 14) and born in/by 1694-1695. Much later he successfully petitioned the Bedford County Court for an exemption from levies at about age 60 on Nov. 25, 1755, which suggests he indeed was born in 1694-1695. With an exemption, he was no longer required to pay taxes or work on roads or participate as an active member of the county and state militias. Although William I/Sr. has long been identified as our “immigrant ancestor,” no clear evidence of immigration has been found for him: He most likely was born here, in Virginia, to Ambrose “Bamblet” or Bramblet who reportedly arrived here in 1690 to help populate land in New Kent Co., Va. The name of William I/Sr.’s mother and first wife are unknown. William I/Sr. died between 1759 and 1762 in Bedford Co., Va. He probably died shortly before Nov. 26, 1759, the recording date for a deed he wrote six months earlier on May 3 that year. His burial place is unknown. He may be buried in the lost family graveyard on Bramblett land that later became Cedar Hill Plantation in Bedford, Va., the plantation established by his son Rev. William Bramblett Jr. in 1760-61. An historical survey of Cedar Hill documents the existence of the graveyard. Or William Bramlett I/Sr. may be buried at one of the church cemeteries nearby or at Callaway-Steptoe Cemetery.

   William Bramlett I/Sr. and his daughters and sons are all early settlers of Bedford since they already were living there by 1754 when the county was founded and created from Lunenburg. At some point, between 1747 and 1768, Bramblett Road was surveyed and cleared by William I/Sr. and/or some of his sons, perhaps including Rev. William Jr., to facilitate travel along or through an area now known as the former Cedar Hill Plantation in present day Bedford, Va. William Bramlett I/Sr., a surveyor living in Caroline County at least until late 1747 and living by 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg that became Bedford County in 1754, no doubt was involved in building his own road on his land or wherever he lived there. He did not retire until 1755, and Bramblett Road ran right past or through his son Rev. William Jr.’s Cedar Hill property: today it is known as West Main Street. The road existed on April 26, 1768, when son Rev. William Jr. was appointed surveyor for a road “from Bramblett’s [Road or house] to Augusta Road” (CB-3:424). Celebrated local historian Lula Eastman Jeter Parker describes the thoroughfare but offers no date for its creation in Parker’s History of Bedford County, Virginia:

“‘Bramblett’s Road’ is the first road of importance mentioned in Bedford County records. This was an east-to-west thoroughfare passing through New London, and what was later the town of Liberty, and on to the Botetourt County line. It was probably the same route as that followed by the Lynchburg and Salem Turnpike, built in the early 1830s, and practically the same, from Bedford to Roanoke, as State Highway 460 of today.” (85)

Lula is a direct descendant of William Bramlett I/Sr. through his daughter Elizabeth Bramlett, also an early settler of Bedford County in 1754, who married Col. James Buford. Able-bodied landowners and their family members and neighbors, non-exempt male residents, were asked/required to clear and construct roads for their and public use by county courts in colonial and early America. County orders to “view a road” (meaning to suggest a location and/or survey the site) are common in early records.

William I/Sr.’s Marriages

   William I/Sr. married at least twice and had at least eight children. He probably married his first wife, name unknown, perhaps Catherine, circa 1710. She most likely is mother of Henry I/Sr., Rev. William Jr., Sarah, James, and Nancy. William I/Sr. married his second wife, Elizabeth Callaway, circa 1732 in Essex or Caroline Co., Va. She most likely is mother of Ambrose, Agatha “Aggie” and Elizabeth “Bettie” Bramlett. Elizabeth Callaway, daughter of unknown mother, possibly Catherine, and Joseph Callaway, was born circa 1710 in Virginia, according to the late Bobbie Callaway, former Callaway Association Historian. (Elizabeth cannot be mother of William I/Sr.’s probable eldest son Henry I/Sr. since Henry I/Sr. and his stepmother Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett share the same birth year–1710.) Elizabeth died before 1759, probably in Caroline, Lunenburg or Bedford County, since she is not mentioned in the deed of gift dated that year which William I/Sr. wrote to transfer property to his son-in-law Stephen White, husband of Agatha “Aggie” Bramlett. He would have made living arrangements for Elizabeth as well if she were still alive. William I/Sr. wrote a will in 1758 that names heirs and legacies; however, unfortunately, its location is unknown and it apparently was not recorded at the local courthouse.

William’s Life in Colonial Virginia

   William Bramlett I/Sr. is the oldest definite Bramblette found so far in existing records, not counting Ambrose I/Sr., the immigrant. William I/Sr. first appears as an adult, at least age 21, as a witness on a Feb. 16-17, 1715-1716, deed recorded in Essex County (DB-11:62). “William Bramlit” signed the deed, which records the lease or sale of 53 acres of land in St. Mary’s Parish, Essex Co, Va., by Matthew Collins to John Morgan, both of Essex County. George Robinson and John Smith also witnessed the document, which was recorded March 20, 1715-1716. The land, adjacent to a corner of John Ellitt’s land and the south fork of Peumansend Creek swamp called the Beaverdam branch, was formerly granted/patented April 17, 1667, to Henry Peters who was deceased. The land was located in an area of St. Mary’s Parish that later became Caroline County. Essex County, created 1692, is near New Kent where Ambrose “Bamblet” I/Sr. reportedly settled in 1690. Since William I/Sr. was required to be at least age 21 to legally witness the 1715-1716 record, the signature allows us to calculate his birth year as in/before 1694-1695. Essex County also is adjacent to King George County, created 1721, where planter Henry Bramlett I/Sr., believed to be son of William I/Sr., was living in 1735. The early found and documented Bramblettes in 1690-1715-1735–Ambrose I/Sr., William I/Sr., and Henry I/Sr.–lived in relatively close geographical proximity to each other, within the same small region in three counties of eastern Colonial Virginia. William I/Sr. is mentioned in several Essex and Caroline County records, a few times as a witness to land transactions and a few times as the plaintiff and defendant in court cases. He and John Sanders witnessed a deed on Feb. 18-19, 1716, when Thomas Griffin leased or sold 100 acres of land in Essex County to George Robinson (DB-11:64). He also witnessed a deed on July 13-14, 1722, when Allin Frazier of Essex County sold land to William Blanton of the same county (DB-11:84). Thomas Smith, George Robinson and Joan Frazier also witnessed (made their marks on) the document. William I/Sr. also served on several Caroline County juries between 1733-1736. He most likely lived in a portion of Essex that became Caroline in 1728, based on a legislative act of 1727. It is not known if he owned land in Essex and/or Caroline County, but it appears he lived on and farmed land that was adjacent to property owned by his father-in-law Joseph Callaway II. Exactly which land he owned in Lunenburg/Bedford County is not known, but the items in his personal possession that he listed the White Deed in 1759, including livestock and household goods, suggest he owned a home and land and his occupation was planter and farmer. He may have first owned the land his son Rev. William Jr. acquired or inherited from the mysterious will, with a majestic view of the Peaks of Otter, perhaps part of more than 700 acres of land used to establish Cedar Hill Plantation circa 1760-1761. William I/Sr. was exempt from paying taxes in 1755, so he does not appear on tax lists in Bedford County. Cedar Hill, located  on the north  edge of Bedford, was close to land owned by Callaway family members.

   An important court record involves William I/Sr. and the Joseph Callaway II/Jr. family:

   Ann Callaway, sister of Thomas Callaway, petitioned the Caroline County Court to choose “Wm. Bramblitt” her guardian on Oct. 12, 1732. (Ann would have been at least age 12 and under age 18, thus born between 1715-1720, in order to legally choose a guardian in Virginia in 1732.) Thomas Callaway was summoned by the court to answer the petition (OB-1732-1740:43). Both Thomas and Ann are children of Joseph Callaway II/Jr. of Essex County, who, with wife and younger son Joseph III, reportedly died of a fever in 1732, according to family tradition. His other children include Elizabeth Callaway, born in 1710, second wife of William Bramlett I/Sr, and Richard Callaway, a resident of Essex/Caroline County who moved to Lunenburg County by 1752. “Rich. Callaway” is included in the Tithe List that year living near William Bramlett I/Sr. and with the latter’s son “Amb. Bramlet” (Ambrose) as a tithable, a white male over 16, in his Callaway house. Richard paid three tithes. Thomas Mosely created the list for John Phelps. (Richard Callaway and brother William Callaway were among the first justices appointed in Bedford County in 1754. Their brother also is Col. James Callaway Sr. who married Sarah Bramblett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr. Richard Callaway later moved to Fort Boonesboough, Ky., and was killed at his ferry by Indians in 1780.) “Wm. Bramlet Jr.” is listed as a tithable with his father, William I/Sr., on John Phelps’ list of residents whose names were collected by Matthew Talbot for Lunenburg County in 1752. William and Richard also may be on other tithe lists for earlier and later years. (This Ambrose later married Jane “Janny” Woodson and moved to North Carolina and Georgia; he is not the elder Ambrose “Bamblet,” an immigrant in 1690, who would have been at least 80-85 in 1755 if still alive, and exempt, thus not of tithable age.) Ann Callaway is the youngest sister of Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett, the reason Ann selected William Bramlett I/Sr., her brother-in-law, as her guardian. There is no other documentation yet found for the marriage of Elizabeth and William I/Sr., but he and his sons are named with Callaways in several other Virginia records as well.

   Thomas Callaway and William Bramlett were named as defendants in a March 8, 1732/33, Petition filed by John Ralls. Judgment was granted to the plaintiff, Ralls, for 920 pounds of tobacco. The case was recorded in Caroline County, Virginia, Court Order Book 1732-1740, Part I, p. 54. Ralls and William I/Sr. and others are named in two other court cases filed and recorded in Caroline County on June 14, 1733, pages 78 and 80.  William “Bramblett” and Ralls were seated on the jury who found for the defendant, Downer, when Joseph Powell sued John Downer Jr. The other case on the same date involved the estate of James Gough. He did not name an executor in his last will and testament, which was proved by witnesses and his “relict” or widow, Ann Gough (Goff), who provided the will and obtained letters of administration. William Bramblett and John Ralls and others were ordered by the court to appraise the estate.

  An important family connection of William Bramlett I/Sr. and Henry Bramlettt Sr. is  evident between Goughs and Brambletts named in Caroline County and Fauquier County records.

   Ann and James Gough’s relative Gladys “Glady” “Gladah” Gough later married Henry Bramblett, son of Reuben Bramblett Sr., on Dec. 30, 1785, in Fauquier Co., Va., and relocated to Bourbon Co., Ky., circa  1794-96. “Glady” Bramblett, age 81, is listed as head of her household in the 1850 census in Bourbon County. Their son Lewis Goff Bramblett, born in 1824 in Bourbon County, lived in nearby Nicholas Co., Ky., in 1860-1880.

    John Ralls was Caroline County Surveyor in 1741 when William Bramlett I/Sr. was named as his successor.

   William I/Sr. and Elizabeth, if still living, resided in Caroline County until at least 1747 before moving south into Lunenburg County by 1752. On Nov. 13, 1747, “The Court proceed to lay the County levy” and paid William Bramlett 300 pounds of tobacco, perhaps for surveying. The court had appointed William Bramlett surveyor “in the room of” (to replace) John Ralls in Caroline County on April 10, 1741.

 

   William I/Sr. moved his family after November 1747 and by 1752 to a portion of Lunenburg Co., Va., that became Bedford County in 1754. He was considered an early settler of Bedford County since he was living in the area when land boundaries changed to create Bedford. He was still living in Bedford a few years later when the county court on Nov. 25, 1755, gave him the above mentioned tax exemption due to his age: 60 years or older.

  “Wm. Bromlet Senr.”–either William I/Sr. in 1762 or his son Rev. William Bramblett Jr. in 1766 — is referenced as a creditor who was due 5 shillings in the Bedford Co., Va., estate of William Boyd, dated between 1762 and Sept. 23, 1766 (WB-1:21-24). By the latter date, Rev. William Bramblett may have been the senior William “Bromlet” in Bedford. The scribe/clerk would not have referenced William Bromlet Senr.’s estate because there was no estate: William Bramlett I/Sr. had deeded his property to son-in-law Stephen White in 1759 and bequeathed other legacies to heirs named in his mysterious, lost 1758 will, which was not recorded, before he died. The deed of gift to his son-in-law was not a probate record and does not name the heirs of those legacies or the items bequeathed in the 1758 will. The will and the legacies were not  recorded for any probate file.

   “William Bramblet Sr.” signed the bill of sale for livestock and other property to son-in-law Stephen White on May 3, 1759, and it was recorded as a deed of gift in Bedford County in 1759:

Bramlet to White Bill of Sale: Know All Men by these Presents that I William Bramlet Senr. of the County of Bedford & Parish of Russel, do Bargain, Contract & Deliver unto Stephen White for a Valuable Consideration, that is to say for my maintainanse in a Decent and Wholesom manner with Clothing agreeable to my age, diet, washing Lodging in a good & Wholesom & becoming Manner During Life, all & singular my Stock of Cattle & Hoggs & Horses, Household goods & all other appertenance to me Belonging of what Nature or Kind soever after the Legacies mentioned in my Will bearing date 6th of February 1758 are paid as I give this Bill of Sail only to Stringthen the Right & … Impower the said Stephen White in his Part and do warrant the same from myself and from any Person or Persons Whatsoever given under my Hand this third day of May 1759 William Bramlett” (DB-A-1:238)

John Robinson and William and Anester Young or Going witnessed the document, which was recorded Nov. 26, 1759, in Bedford Co., Va. Mortimeyer and Revesz read the Young surname as “Gowing” and note the Gowing family name has evolved to Gowan, that some of William and Anester’s descendants may have moved from Virginia to Bedford Co., Tenn. (201). 

   William I/Sr.’s children are listed in an unpublished manuscript titled “Bramblett” written by Bedford County historian and Bramblette-Buford descendant Lula Eastman Jeter Parker in Bedford County on Sept. 28, 1933. Parker and the late Mrs. Sarah A. Bell Buford (second wife of Rowland Dabney “R. D.” Buford), who was then in 1933 deceased, “both searched the records of Bedford County, Va., for data of the Bramblett family, and often talked over [their] findings.” Parker deposited her brief history with the Bedford County clerk. She writes, 

“We concluded that William Bramblett, Sr., settled in Brunswick County in the early 1700’s, perhaps in territory that was cut off into Lunenburg in 1748, and into Bedford in 1754; and that, since we found no other Bramblett who could have been his contemporary, he must have been the progenitor of the family in Virginia, and that he was the father of all of the older Brambletts in this section. He died after November 26, 1759, when he made a Bill of Sale to Stephen White, and perhaps before 1761, when his daughter, Elizabeth, (my ancestress) married James Buford, for she signed her own marriage bond.”

William I/Sr.’s 1759 deed to Stephen White was written in May and recorded Nov. 26, so he may have died before or on the latter date. The two  family sleuths mentioned above, Parker and Buford, focused mainly on their beloved Bedford records for Bramblettes and did not check other Virginia counties, which would have introduced them to a whole new world of family activities in Essex, Caroline, King George, Prince William and Fauquier. They would have discovered in Caroline County Court records William Bramlett I/Sr.’s residence was not Lunenburg County when it still was Brunswick County–before May 1, 1746; recorded documents at that time prove he was living in Essex and then Caroline County until at least November 1747. However, he did live in 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg, formerly Brunswick, that became Bedford in 1754. Historians in the 1930s did not have the easy access to the large amount of information that we enjoy today, but Parker and Mrs. (Mary A. Bell) Buford did have easy access to Bedford records because Mrs. Buford was the wife of the county clerk. Rowland Dabney “R. D.” Buford, 1827-1921, served 32 years in that capacity. (Mary A. Bell Buford was born in 1838 and died in 1930. She and Rowland are buried in Longwood Cemetery.)

   Parker lists the following children for William Bramlett I/Sr. in her brief history:

1) William Bramblett Jr., who married Anna Ballard and died in 1779; 2) Ambrose, who lived in North Carolina in 1779; 3) James who married a woman named Winifred and died in 1758; 4) Elizabeth who married Capt. James Buford in 1761; and 5) Nancy, mentioned in her brother James Bramlett’s 1758 will. [Parker also lists as possible children of William I/Sr.:] 6) Lucy who married Thomas Lumpkin on March 4, 1778; 7) Molly who married Stephen Dooley on July 24, 1781; and 8) Aggy, wife of Stephen White. 

However, Lucy and Molly were born and married much later, between seventeen and twenty years, respectively, than Elizabeth Bramlett Buford. Molly [Bramlett] Dooley is a grandchild of William Bramlett I–the daughter of Rev. William II/Jr. and Anna, according to their estate records. Lucy [Bramlett] Lumpkin also is probably a grandchild of William Bramlett I: She may be the only child of James Bramlett who died in Bedford County in 1758 and his wife, Winefred. She is not the daughter of Ambrose Bramlett: He names all of his children in his 1804 will. Nor is she the daughter of Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. and Anna: Their daughter Lucy married Patrick Nenney in 1796 in Bedford County and moved to Tennessee. (No daughters have surfaced for Henry I/Sr. of Prince William/Fauquier.)

   Other children of William Bramlett I/Sr. not mentioned by Parker are Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett who first married James C. Callaway, son of Joseph Callaway II/Jr., and then second married Leonard “Linus” “Lynah” “Liner” “Leo” Brown, and Henry Bramlett Sr., a planter living in King George County, Va., in 1735 when he bought land in a portion of Prince William County that later became Fauquier County, whose wife is unknown. (King George County in 1735 was adjacent to a portion of Essex County that later became Caroline County where William Bramlett I/Sr. lived from 1715 to 1747.)

   (Note: Lula Eastman Jeter Parker’s 1930s history books, although out of print, are still in high demand and treasured today. She and her White family cousin Mary Denham Ackerly co-authored a wonderful book, Our Kin, which includes Bramblettes and Boones, Callaways, Bufords, Whites and other allied relatives.) 

 Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages of America: A Collection of Genealogical Studies, Completely Documented and Appropriately Illustrated, Bearing Upon Notable Early American Lines and Their Collateral Connections (New York: American Historical Company, 1939) contains the following information about the sons of William Bramlett I/Sr. in a section entry titled “Bramlette”:

   “William, Ambross and Amhus Bramlette or Bramlett were early bearers of the name in Bedford County, Virginia. It is possible that they were brothers.…In the militia rosters contained in Hening’s ‘Statutes at Large’ is found a Bedford County list of September, 1758, in which appear the names of Ambrose Bramlett, sergeant; Amhus Bramlett, and William Bramlett.” [Note: Their brother James died 1758 also is listed in the record as a soldier.]

William Bramlett was “one of the oldest settlers in Bedford County, and a sergeant in the Colonial Army. He was father of Elizabeth, who married, July 4, 1761, in Bedford County, James Buford, son of John and Judith Beauford, of Culpeper County, Virginia. After carefully considering the land transactions…between Ann Bramlette (widow), her sons, James and Reuben Bramlette, and James Buford, it seems highly probable that William Bramlette, the sergeant, was also the father of William Bramlette [husband of Anna]….” (209-210)

Actually, Hening’s Statutes does not designate William I/Sr. or II/Jr. as sergeant, and since William I/Sr. was age 60 in 1755, it seems unlikely he would have served as a sergeant in the military at age 63 in 1758; but perhaps he served as a sergeant during an earlier time. In either case, William I/Sr.. was an early settler of Bedford, as were his children, when it was created in 1754, and he was the father of William II/Jr., James who died 1758, Ambrose, Elizabeth and others. “Amhus” may be a misspelling of Ambrose (Ambus/Ambros); no other reference to “Amhus” has yet been found.

   Since Bible and probate records have not surfaced for some of the early generations, extensive research in official Virginia and South Carolina records has been used to reconstruct William Bramlett I/Sr.’s family of at least eight  children: Henry Bramlett Sr., Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr., Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett Callaway Brown, James Bramlett, Nancy (Ann?) Bramlett, Ambrose Bramlett, Elizabeth Bramlett Buford and Agatha “Aggie” Bramlett White.

End Note

In addition, the Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages biography in a footnote incorrectly identifies Reuben, brother of James and son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr., as Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky.: but the two Reubens lived in different areas in Virginia and definitely are not one and the same. The biography quotes an abstract from Reuben Sr.’s will: “Reuben; his will, dated December 10, 1806, and proved in January, 1807, in Bourbon County, Kentucky (WB-C-198), mentions wife, Peggy; son-in-law, John Grinstead; son Hugh; three children in South Carolina: (Reuben, Jr., Milly Robertson and Polly Robertson); son William; son Lewis; land I claim from heirs of Martin Pickett, deceased; son Henry. Executors, John Grinstead, Henry and Hugh Bramblett. Witnesses, Will Mitchell, Edward Riley, Reubin Bramblett, Jr.” (209-10). The following portion of the footnote, citing marriages from two different Reubens as the marriages of one Reuben, is incorrect: “Reuben Bramlette married (first) December 10, 1789, Sally Ashton [Abston]; probably (second) Margaret (‘Peggy’).” Reuben, son of Anna Ballard and William Bramlett Jr., returned to Bedford Co., Va., from Fayette Co., Ky., and married Sally Abston; they remained in Virginia, appearing in census records in 1810 and 1820 and court records in 1830. Census records indicate Reuben lived there in 1810 and 1820. Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky., is the son of Henry Bramlett Sr. of Prince William (later Fauquier) Co.,Va., and grandson of William Bramlett I; Reuben Sr. never lived in Bedford County and never married Sally Abston. Reuben Bramblett Sr. married a woman named Margaret “Peggy,” surname unknown, perhaps Darnell/Darnall, and went to Bourbon Co., Ky., from Fauquier County in 1794-95 after trading his Virginia land to Martin Pickett, as documented in Fauquier County deeds and the 1796 tax list for Bourbon Co., Ky. (DB-12:145; DB-12:324). A completely different man, not Reuben Sr. of Bourbon, the Reuben who married Sally Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, may have first applied for a marriage license to wed Lucy Abston, also a daughter of Jesse Abston and sister of Sally Abston, whom Reuben married in 1790. (Jesse Abston signed as surety.) Or Bedford County may have made a mistake, wrote Lucy instead of Sally, when they entered the following record: Dec. __, 1790, Reuben Bramblett and Lucy Abston Married by Joseph Drury.” If Reuben and Lucy did marry, their marriage was later annulled: Lucy Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, later married Joel Callaway in Bedford County on Dec. 27, 1793. Alderson Weeks performed their marriage ceremony. Lucy and Joel applied for their marriage license on Dec. 24, 1793. Thomas Pullen signed as surety, and Lucy is named as the daughter of Jesse Abston. So, Reuben Sr. of Bourbon County is not the son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr.; however, as a son of Henry Bramlett I/Sr., Reuben Sr. is considered a grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr., as is Reuben, son of Rev. William II/Jr., who married Sally Abston in Bedford County. (No son named Reuben has yet been found for William Bramlett I/Sr.)

Chapter 3:

Generation 3

HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR. and UNKNOWN

(Known Children: Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr., William Bramblett, Reuben Bramblett Sr.)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants
Definite Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis

HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR., believed to be child of Unknown First Wife and William Bramlett I/Sr., was born in or before 1710, most likely in Colonial Virginia. No documentary evidence has been found to connect Henry I/Sr. and William I/Sr. as father and son; however, they lived near each other and William I/Sr. is the only known documented Bramblette who was old enough to have been Henry I/Sr.’s father. Henry I/Sr. probably died intestate between 1752 and 1758, in Prince William (later Fauquier) Co., Va., after he was replaced as constable there in 1752 and before his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture and began paying taxes on it for 1758 in 1759. No will, probate or Bible records have surfaced for Henry I/Sr. His burial place is unknown. The name of his wife is unknown.

Henry Bramlett Sr.’s Life in Virginia

   Henry I/Sr. was a planter living in Brunswick Parish, King George Co., Va., in 1735 when he purchased half of a contiguous tract of 500 acres–250 acres–of land in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., from a man named John Ambrose. The recorded “lease” or first deed of their transaction indicates “John Ambrose of Brunswick Parish King George, planter” sold 250 acres on Elk Marsh Run adjacent to Jonas William’s line to “Henry Bramblet of same, planter” for twenty-five pounds sterling. John Ambrose owned about 500 acres of land in Prince William County, which he may have inherited. He sold half of it to Henry Bramlett I/Sr. John Ambrose then acknowledged the sale to “Henry Bramblet” in a “release” or second deed for the land, which was recorded in Prince William Co., Va., Court on Sept. 17, 1735 (DB-B:480-482). The transaction was witnessed by George Harrison, John James and Hugh West. (In Virginia in the early 1700s, one deed, known as a bargain and sale–or two deeds–a lease and release–could be prepared and recorded to transfer a full title when land was sold or traded.) Available land at that point was scarce in Virginia and generally sold or transferred to family, so it is conceivable to consider a familial relationship by blood or marriage between Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and/or William Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose and/or his wife, Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington. John Ambrose was born in Rappahannock Co., Va., circa 1684, according to a 1747 deposition stating his age as 63, (making him a contemporary of William Bramlett I/Sr.) and died at about age 72 in 1756. Elizabeth Ambrose states her age as 36 in her 1747 deposition, which meaans she was born circa 1711-1712 (DB-L:12-13). They were deposed witnesses in a case regarding a land title dispute between neighbors. Planter Henry I/Sr. and planter and church warden John Ambrose both moved their families from King George County and farmed adjoining tracts of land on Elk Marsh Run, Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, beginning in 1735.

   John Ambrose and John Champe, relationship unknown, possibly only neighbors, both Church Wardens of the Parish of Brunswick, King George Co., Va., bought 200 acres of land in Parish of Brunswick, King George Co., Va., for 100 pounds sterling money of Great Britain from Hugh French, Gentleman, of Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., Va., on May 31, and June 1, 1733 (DB-1729-1735:260-262/DB-1A:260-262). Deeds of lease and release with receipt of money were recorded June 1, 1733. Hugh French’s wife on May 4, 1733, appointed a representative for her dower release: “Know all men I Mary French, wife of Hugh French appoint Thomas Turner my lawfull Attorney” in the “sale of 200 acres conveyed by my husband to John Champe & John Ambris [Ambrose] Church Wardens for a Glebe for the said Parish of Brunswick” in order to “relinquish my right of dower.” The power of attorney was recorded June 1, 1733. Mary French, daughter of Original and Jane (Brooks) Browne and wife of first husband, Francis Triplett, died after the above record and before Oct. 5, 1736, when Hugh French wrote his will in Stafford County and named children but no wife (WB-M:247).

  “Henry Brinbett” is included on a 1738 Virginia Rent Roll.

   Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose’s residences are mentioned as landmarks in several recorded deeds, and Henry I/Sr. witnessed a few documents in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., during various years from 1735 to 1750-51. They lived near Tinpot Run and Elk Marsh Run and Licking Run and Welches’ Rolling Road. Henry Bramlett I/Sr.’s property is mentioned as a landmark on a deed written March 16, 1744, when James Genn bought some land for his neighbor Catesby Cock/e of Fairfax County. The land, situated on Elk Marsh Run and Tinpot Run and Welches Rolling Road, was adjacent to property already owned by Catesby Cock/e and adjacent to property then owned by Henry Bramblet, Jonas Williams, Morgan Darnall, Nathaniel Dodd, John Bush and someone named Garner, Gardner or Gardiner. James Genn surveyed the property. Daniel Marr, Nathaniel Dodd and William Cairn witnessed the deed, which was recorded in Prince William County on Aug. 30, 1745 (DB-1745/46). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on Aug. 21-22, 1746, when James Genn of Prince William County sold to John Higgins some property in Hamilton Parish on the branches of Elk Marsh and Tinpot runs. The property “bounded…along the land of Morgan Darnall to a Hickory and one red and 1 box Oak corner of said Darnall & Jonas Williams then with Williams line N. E. to a black Oak & Hickory in the said line Corner of Henry Bramblets land thence with Bramblets line N.W. to a large marked Hickory another of Bramblets corners thence No. W. to a box Oak by Welches Roling Road Corner of said Bramblet thence with another of his lines No. E. to a Spanish Oak on the side of a stony Ridge thence N. Wt. to a large live Oak in a Pond…” (DB-1745/46:173-77; GB-F:244). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on March 11, 1745, when Augustine Jennings, planter of Prince William, bought property next to him from Honer and planter Jonas T. Williams: a “parcel of land containing One hundred and eight acres being in the Parish of Hamilton and County of Prince William adjoyning to a tract of land one part whereof in possession of John Ambros the other part whereof in possession of Henry Bramlet….” The acreage was granted to Jonas Williams on March 6, 1718, and was currently in possession of Augustine Jennings as a result of a one-year indenture. The cost was 3,000 pounds of lawfull Tobacco Current money of Virginia. Jno. Crump and John Bohanan witnessed the deed on March 24, 1745 (DB-1745/56:36-40). Henry Bramlett later witnessed Augustine Jennings’s will on Dec. 13, 1776, in Hamilton Parish, Fauquier County, and it was probated there Aug. 24, 1778 (WB-1:348). (Peter Barker and Lucretia Russell also witnessed the document. Heirs include wife Hannah, daughter Betty, daughter Hannah, daughter Sally, daughter Jemima Hudnall, daughter Nancy Weathers, son William, son Benjamin, son Baylor, son George, son Berryman, son Lewis, son Augustin Jennings. One Jennings daughter, Fanny, married circa 1767 Thomas Obannon, son of Samuel Obannon, nephew of Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington. One of Thomas Obannon’s sons is named John Ambrose Obannon.) Henry I/Sr.’s property is again mentioned as a landmark in a deed written March 30, 1748, when William Kernes bought some Prince William County land nearby. The land, situated on Licking Run, adjoined property then owned by someone named Page, Major Catesby Cocke, Thomas Stone, Henry Bramblet and John Ambrose who farmed adjoining tracts of land, and Colonel Carter. The deed was recorded April 2, 1748, in Prince William County (DB-1745/56:42). Henry I/Sr. also is listed on the 1751 Prince William Co., Va., tithable list, which records taxes for certain tithables and particular items of personal property. Henry I/Sr. witnessed a deed on Feb. 5, 1750/51, which records a transaction between John Darnall and Morgan Darnall regarding the dividing line of property left to them by the Darnall’s deceased father, Morgan Darnall Sr., in Hamilton Parish of Prince William County. The bond later was recorded Feb. 28, 1760 (DB-1759/78:59-60).

   One recorded reference to Henry I/Sr. in Prince William County Court documents indicates that, in addition to being a planter, he also was the constable there in 1752 when he was replaced. No reason was given. An entry in Prince William County Court Minute Book on Nov. 27, 1752, indicates Thomas Gardner was appointed constable “in the Room of Henry Bramlet.” Gardner was ordered that day to “go before some Justice of the peace and be sworn accordingly” there (MB-1:77). Although no reason is given in the court record, the act of replacement suggests Henry I/Sr. may have been seriously ill or already dead. At about age 42-50, he probably was not ready to retire due to old age. No other existing court, land or tax records have been found that refer to him as being alive or dead in Prince William or Fauquier County or any other place in Virginia after 1752. It appears his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture by 1758. Tax records indicate Henry I/Sr.’s other two sons–William and Reuben Sr.–had their own separate land in 1759. Henry I/Sr.’s three sons also owned their own land in Fauquier Co., Va., in 1770, according to the Rent Roll, which lists Henry Bramlett (Jr.) with 250 acres, his father’s former land, Reuben Bramlett with 150 acres and William Bramlett with 123 acres. Henry II/Jr. apparently did not farm the plantation while living next to John Ambrose since the latter died circa 1756. The latter’s wife, Elizabeth Obannon, married again to John Etherington (a.k.a. Edrington) circa 1762, and he also died before October 1769, before Nov. 29, 1776, when she wrote her will as Elizabeth Etherington in Fauquier County (WB-1:323). Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr. witnessed her will, which was probated March 23, 1778. (Elizabeth’s heirs include Catherine Nelson, Betty Allen, Catherine Duncan, Benjamin Russell, nephew Thomas Obannon son of her brother Samuel and wife, Stelle Obannon, Capt.. John Wright. Elias Edmonds Sr. and Jeremiah Darnall were named executors; other witnesses: Berryman Jennings, James Wright.) Elizabeth Obannon was born circa 1716-1720, the daughter of Bryant Boru Obannon, as he named himself in his will, reportedly an immigrant from Ireland, and, according to family tradition, first wife, Zena Sarah Isham. (Daughter Elizabeth Ambrose is named as an heir of 60 pounds current money and horses in Bryant Boru Ambrose’s 1760 will [WB-1:41].)

   Henry I/Sr. and wife had three known sons: Henry Jr., William and Reuben Sr. If he had daughters, unfortunately, their names and histories are unknown.

Chapter 4:

Generation 4

Henry Harry” Bramlett II/Jr. and Margaret “Peggy”Unknown

(Children: Marianne, Benjamin, Jalilah, Henry III, Reuben, William, John, Nathan, Sarah, Nancy)

Virginia State Motto: Thus Ever to Tyrants

Patriot of the  Revolution: Three Sons Served from Virginia and South Carolina

Definite Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis

Henry Harry” Bramlett II/Jr., child of Unknown and Henry Bramlett I/Sr., was born circa 1730 in Colonial Virginia. Since Henry II/Jr. had possession of his father’s former plantation in 1780 in Fauquier County and Henry Sr. died intestate under the laws of primogeniture, Henry II/Jr. can be considered the eldest son and heir to his father’s property. Henry Jr. died in 1779 or 1780, definitely before Aug. 5, 1780, most likely in Virginia. His burial place is unknown. Recorded Virginia deeds indicate Henry Jr. died a suicide but do not indicate where or why. No documentation has been offered or independently discovered, but family tradition holds that Henry II/Jr. became distraught and inconsolable and took his own life after the death of his eldest son, Benjamin, who reportedly perished as a soldier or patriot while being held on a British prison ship during the American Revolution.

   Henry II/Jr. married Margaret Unknown circa 1750, probably in Virginia. Her birth date and place and parents are unknown. She died sometime after she sold her Laurens Co., S.C., farm to her son Nathan in 1809. Her burial place is unknown, but she may rest near Gray Court, S.C., in the old cemetery section of Bramlett United Methodist Church, which she co-founded, next to the graves of her son Nathan and his wife, Elizabeth Gray, whose graves are still marked with inscribed tombstones and footstones: N. B. and E. B. There are three field or native stones without inscriptions next to Elizabeth and Nathan’s graves. They may be the graves of Nathan’s mother, Margaret, and his sister Marianne Bramlett and her husband Frederick Burdette. All three also were members of the church.

   Henry II/Jr. was a planter who inherited his father’s 250-acre Bramlett Plantation through primogeniture between 1752 and 1758. Henry II/Jr. and his brother Reuben Sr. witnessed a deed for Morgan Darnall, perhaps one of Reuben Sr.’s in-laws, in 1760 in Fauquier County (MB-1:92). Henry “Harry Bramblett” II/Jr. witnessed neighbor Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington’s will, which was proved in court in 1778 (MB-5:307). Henry II/Jr.’s relationship to her is not given in the document, but family or close friends traditionally witnessed important documents such as wills and deeds. The will identifies her as the widow of John Etherington deceased and names a nephew with the surname Obannon as one of her heirs. Elizabeth may not have had children who survived since none were named as heirs in the will.

   After Henry II/Jr. died by Aug. 5, 1780, and his son Henry III inherited Bramlett Plantation, the land was resurveyed as a tract of 231 acres. Henry II/Jr.’s widow, Margaret “Peggy” Bramblett/Bramlett paid taxes on the property in the county from 1782 to 1784. When the land was sold by Henry Bramlett (III) of “96 District, S.C.” to James and Ann Dobie/Dobey in 1784, the deed indicated the widow, Margaret Bramlett, was occupying the plantation (DB-9:144). Margaret then moved to live on a different tract of land there–50 acres–until 1790 when she left the state. She lived in the land tax district of B. Edward Humston, Fauquier County Tax Commissioner. Margaret Bramlett paid her taxes–125 pounds or 18 shillings 9 pence after deducting quitrents–on 250 acres, her former husband’s plantation, in 1783. On the smaller property after she moved, she was assessed to pay 17 pounds 18 shillings 4 pence in taxes on the 50-acre tract in 1790–but only paid 5 shillings 4 pence after deducting quitrents. She last paid taxes in the same amount on the second property in 1791 for the year 1790. When the Dobies later sold the Bramlett Plantation and additional property, amounting to 244 acres, in 1794 to Benjamin Dodd, the deed described it as once belonging to “Henry Bramblet, a suicide” (DB-12:60).

Margaret Bramlett, Wife of Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr.

Resident of Virginia, Patriot of the Revolution, Resident of South Carolina, Methodist Leader 

Patriot of the Revolution

Margaret Bramlett, Wife of Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr.

   Not much is known about Margaret, but she is highly regarded by family today as a Patriot of the Revolution and an individual with deep religious convictions. Margaret, named as “Peggy Bramlett” and “Margaret Bramlett,” is documented as a Patriot of the Revolution in Fauquier County “Publick Claims” that she filed after the war for providing supplies–beef and brandy–to Gen. George Washington’s Continental Army. “Peggy Bramlett” first presented a certificate and applied for compensation for the listed provisions “At a court held for Fauquier County 24 March 1782 and continued by several adjournments till 3 May following. The court pursuant to the act of Assembly entitled ‘an act for adjusting claims for property impressed or taken for public services’ [by the military] examined the…claims and valued each article in specie viz Beef at the rate of 3p [pence] per pound….” Peggy Bramlett 225 (1). The claims lists also indicate “Margt. Bramlett” also presented on Nov. 25, 1785, a certificate granted by Col. William Edmonds for compensation by the county for earlier providing 3 1/2 gallons of brandy to the American troops (13).

   Shortly before or just after husband Henry Jr. died, Margaret and her children joined the Methodist Church in Virginia and in 1780 or 1781 founded their own meeting house and core religious group which became Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court, Laurens Co., S.C. Margaret and sons Henry III, Nathan, and John were the co-founders of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church. Margaret had a meeting house/church building/structure near the present-day location of Bramlett Church after she relocated from Virginia in 1790. Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) is the mother church of John Bramlett’s meeting house, Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church, founded after John left Laurens County circa 1799-1801 near Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C.

One of the most important records yet found for Henry II/Jr. and Margaret’s family: a Diary kept by their grandson Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette. The Burditt Diary was located in family papers in South Carolina and preserved and shared, Thank God, by Martha Anne Curry Duke of Texas. The Burditt Diary not only documents the early founding year of Bramlett Church and the names of the founders and surnames of some members, but also provides documentation for the connection between Henry III, John and Nathan as biological brothers and sons of Margaret. (Other records definitely connect the brothers with their father, mother and siblings, including Marianne and Reuben.) Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt is the son of Frederick Reuben Burdett and second wife, Sarah Elizabeth Rhodes. Born in 1833, he died in 1892 and rests in the old section of Bramlett Church Cemetery with a tombstone that identifies him as Rev. F. H. Burdette. He was a resident of Laurens County, a member of the church and acted as a lay minister before being officially ordained in 1866 after he returned to the community from serving as a soldier during the War Between the States. He apparently wrote or dispatched a verbal question via a messenger to his Great-Uncle John Bramlett in Greenville County before John died in 1855 and got a reply that John “sent” to a question about the origins of the church. A transcript of the original diary entry, below, follows:

“First Qurt. [Quarterly] Confer[ence] in 1783 John Bramlett sent. from the best information the church had been organized three years before Preachers who they were is unknown only as we remember hearing old people speak such as Bingham, Travice, Tarply, Hillyard Judge, Stafford, Asbury and others. The members consisted of three or four families viz Willm. Bramlette, Dacus, Robertson and perhaps Stone. John, Nathan or Henry Bramletts were the founders with their Mother in the year 1780 or 81 but the best information say[s] in 80 by what minister is unknown. Some suppose Asbury others Travice while others Hillyard Judge, but the last name lived some where  [else] from 1800 to 1820.”

Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette’s DiaryExerpt #3 from the diary of Frederick H. Burdette's diary.Exerpt #4 from the diary of Frederick H. Burdette's diary

Burditt Diary Cover

Diary of Frederick H. Burdette

The given name of the Mother of Nathan, John, and Henry, and Church Co-Founder is not written on the Diary page, but other South Carolina and Virginia records doname her in connection with her husband and children as Margaret, widow of Henry Bramlett II/Jr. The diary entry itself is not dated. Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt could have written it anytime before he died in 1892, but

John Bramlett provided the date of the church’s founding before he died in 1855.  in the early 1850s before John Bramlett died in 1855.

Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (Now United Methodist) Church

Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church was co-founded in 1780 or 1781, according to Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt and Father John Bramlett, by John, his mother, Margaret Bramlett, and one or two of her other sons, “Nathan and or Henry” (III). The church still holds services on the same property deeded by Nathan Bramlett and George Sims and sold to the trustees for $5 in 1807.

Holiday Decorated Sanctuary in the current Bramlett United Methodist Church Building, courtesy Judy RiddleBramlett Church sanctuary

1833 Bramlett Building committee

Margaret was recognized as leader of Bramlett Church in Laurens County in November 1801 by Methodist Episcopal Bishop Francis Asbury in his Journal: “Wednesday [November] 21. We rode sixteen miles to the widow Bramblet’s meeting-house.” This was a church building or her home on her property or on Nathan’s adjacent land near the site of the current church. Two days earlier the Bishop visited Margaret’s son John Bramlett at Bethel Church in Greenville County: “Monday [November] 20. At John Bramblet’s, Greensville. After meeting, we rode to …Reedy River” (p. 40). This may have been the visit during which the Bishop formally organized Bethel Church. In his 1802 Journal, the Bishop recognized Margaret’s son Nathan Bramlett as leader of Bramlett Church, which he once called “Bramblet’s Chapel”: “Wednesday 22….Next day I went to Nathan Bramblet’s….Sunday 27. At Bramblet’s chapel I spoke on Acts ii. 37-39.”

   Nathan, born in 1766, and John, born in 1764, were not adults and possibly not technically old enough to found a church in 1780 or 1781, the date in the diary provided by John; however, it is known from Nathan’s tombstone inscription and John’s obituary that they both joined the Methodist Church when they were young men, John specifically about that time–1780–when he was age 16, and Nathan about age 14; so they were very early/charter members of Bramlett Church. Henry III was born earlier, was the eldest son in 1780 since he inherited through primogeniture his father’s former Virginia plantation. Henry III was born circa 1755, before his brother Reuben, who was born March 15, 1757. Henry III would have been an adult and old enough to organize and found a church with his mother, Margaret, in 1780; and recorded Virginia deeds indicate Henry III was living in Laurens County at exactly that time. Henry III also was in South Carolina earlier, in 1775-1776 when his son Reuben and daughter Margaret were born there and while he served as a soldier during the Revolution. Henry III and possibly other members of his close family may have traveled to Laurens County with his Uncle William Bramblett and family, who were early members of Bramlett Church and settled on his land grant there in 1774. That year, 1774, appears as a possible organizational or founding date for Bramlett Church in “A History of Bramlett,” co-written by member Ruth Wallace Cheshire and pastor Rev. George B. Wilson for The 1962 Church Journal. They quote a respected, long-time member as the source of some interesting details about the church’s early organization. “C. R. Wallace (1856-1916), a venerable and diligent servant of God, has bequeathed the following information:”

   “About 1774, or two years before the Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson, just thirty years after the first Methodist Conference was held in the old Foundry Church in London, England, a few people living in this community who were strong adherents of the Methodist faith, met in the home of a family who lived a few hundred yards west of where the house (the church building/Arbor) was/is located, and held religious services. The services were conducted at regular intervals for two or three years. As interest in these meetings increased the need for more room was felt, and they decided to change the place of meeting. A log house was built. This log house was located one-fourth of one mile and a little south of east from this point. There the services were continued for several years. For four years after these meetings began, there was no organized society here. It was not until 1779 that this church was organized. In the little graveyard just across the road from this house is the sleeping dust of him whose name it bears.”

The man referenced as the church namesake, of course, is Nathan Bramlett, whose inscribed tombstone still memorializes him in the old section of the cemetery, and who gave land to the trustees in 1807 “for the purpose of Secureing a Meeting house, thereon Standing and to Remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church.” This part of the recorded deed indicates a church building was already in existence on the site, which means the church was founded before the 1807 date of the document. The namesake family referenced, of course, is the family of Henry Bramlett Jr. and Margaret, especially Henry III, which suggests he and perhaps his parents, still residents of Virginia, were visiting in South Carolina as early as 1774. They had grown children, Marianne and Henry III, living there. Marianne and husband, Frederick Burdette, were in Laurens County in 1775. There is recorded evidence that indicates Henry III was in South Carolina by 1775-1776 and in 1780. He most likely lived and worked with relatives or leased or purchased farm land through a private transaction. He and sister Marianne as well apparently lived close to the current location of Bramlett United Methodist Church before later obtaining land through state grants. Henry II/Jr.’s brother William and family lived quite a distance and southeast from the church in 1774, according to an historical map included below which shows the distance between the church and William’s 1773 land  grant. William and family were identified in the Burdette Diary as members rather than founders of the church. John’s obituary indicates Margaret and family joined the Methodist faith in Virginia before they moved to South Carolina.

   Margaret Bramlett permanently settled in Laurens County later, in 1790. She bought her 50-acre South Carolina farm next to her son Nathan’s farm in Laurens County on May 10, 1791, from Ezekiel Griffith for 20 pounds:

“This indenture made the Tenth day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand seven hundred & ninety one, and in the Sixteenth year of American Independency, Between Ezekiel Griffeth of Laurens county in the state of South Carolina on the one part, and Margaret Bramlett of the county & State aforesaid of the other part. Witnesseth that the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for & in consideration of the sum of Twenty pounds to him in hand well; Truly paid by the sd. Margaret Bramlett the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged Have Bargained, granted, sold, aliened Embossed & confirmed, and by these presents doth Grant, Bargain & Sell, alien emboss [Ribaned/Ribboned] & confirm unto the said Margaret Bramlett her defeasible Estate of Inheritance in fee simple of & in all & singular the tract of land & every part & heirs & assigns forever part of a Tract of land Situate & Lying on Beaverdam Creek water of Enoree River, to begin on the north side of sd. creek on a Red Oak on a stoney nole, Thence to the corner in Nathan Bramlett’s field, Thence along the sd. Nathan Bramlett’s to the corner, Thence to the creek & up the creek to the mouth of the spring branch & up the branch to the head, Thence to the Begining to contain Fifty acres more or less, & hath such shape, form & marks as are represented by a plat thereof to the Original grant annexed, which was granted to the said Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs & assigns forever on the Twenty fourth day of January, one Thousand seven hundred & seventy by the … William Bull Then Governor and Recorded in … office in Book EEE page 68 and also the Reversion and Reversions, Remainder & Remainders, Rents, … & Profits thereof & all the Estate, Right, Title, Interest Claim & demand whatsoever of him the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs or assigns to have and to hold the sd. Tract of fifty acres of land more or less with every appurtenance thereunto belonging to the only proper use & behoof of her the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs or assigns forever &tc the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for him his heirs & assigns doth covenant with the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns that he the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth now is & untill the execution of these presents shall stand seized in his right of a good sure perfect, absolute in parcel hereof without any manner of condition…” (DB-D:5-6)

Margaret sold her farm on Zak’s/Zek’s/Zeak’s (or Beaverdam) Creek, waters of Enoree River, to her son Nathan Bramlett for $100 on April 16, 1809. (The creek may have been known locally as Zek’s after/for the former landowner, Ezekiel Griffith.) The deed indicates the land was originally granted to Ezekiel Griffith on Jan. 20, 1770, and conveyed to Margaret Bramlett on May 10, 1791. Margaret’s grandson John Burditt and Jesse Gray witnessed the 1809 deed (DB-J:73). No other later record of Margaret has yet been found.

   Margaret and Henry II/Jr.’s children are Marianne, Benjamin, Jalilah, Henry III, Reuben, John, Nathan,  and perhaps William, Sarah and Nancy.

Important Works Cited For Margaret Bramlett

Asbury, Rev. Francis. The Journal of the Rev. Francis Asbury, bishop of the Methodist Episcopal church. New York: The Methodist Episcopal Church, N. Bangs and T. Mason, 1821. p. 40. 1801 references    to Widow (Margaret) Bramblet, Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church, and reference to (Margaret’s son) John Bramblet, regarding Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church: https://archive.org/stream/00612616.874.emory.edu/00612616874#page/n41/mode/2up.

–. The Journal. The Methodist Episcopal Church. p. 86. 1802 references to Nathan Bramblet, Bramlett Church — “Bramblet’s Chapel”:https://archive.org/stream/00612616.874.emory.edu/006 12616_874#page/n87/mode/2up.

Chapter 5:

Generation 5

Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette

(Children: John, Henry, Margaret, Mary Ann, Reuben, Elizabeth, William, Ailsey, Jesse)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

Frederick Burdette served as a Soldier during the American  Revolution

South Carolina State Seal and Motto: While I Breathe, I Hope

Marianne Bramlett, most likely first or second child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born Sept. 15, 1752, in a portion of Prince William Co., Va., that later became Fauquier County. She died at age 81 years, 5 months, 21 days, on March 8, 1834, in Laurens Co., S. C. Family tradition shared in the past by family historian William Ralph Burdette and others holds that Marianne rests at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church Cemetery near Gray Court in Laurens County. Her grave has not yet been located; however, there are graves marked with field stones in the old section of the cemetery near the graves of Marianne’s brother Nathan Bramlett and his wife, Elizabeth Gray, which still have inscribed tombstones. Marianne and husband, Frederick Burdette, and Marianne and Nathan’s mother, Margaret, may occupy those unmarked graves. A will and probate records have not been found for Marianne. She and Frederick were living in Laurens County with or near some of her Bramlett relatives by 1775, and they settled and remained there all of their lives on a land grant near the Enoree after the Revolution.

Direct descendants Martha Anne (Curry) Duke and Franklin Donald Burdette provide most of the following about Marianne’s marriage to Frederick, his war service, Bible records and children.

The Marriage of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette

   Marianne married Frederick Burdette circa 1775, probably in Fauquier County where she and her parents were living. However, it is possible they married in South Carolina.Their first child, Henry, was born there in 1776. A deed recorded in Laurens County in 1790 indicates Frederick was in South Carolina when it was written in 1775. “Fredrick” was born Oct. 15, 1753, according to the Burdette Bibles. The names of Frederick’s parents are not yet known. Descendant William Ralph Burdette believed Frederick was born in Amsterdam, Holland, of French parents who came from Normandy, France. (William Ralph is son of Ella Towns Black and David Wilcut Burdette Jr. and grandson of David Wilcut and Zelena McPherson Burdette.) Ralph indicates in an unpublished written history that Frederick’s parents may have been Huguenots, French Protestants, who fled France to Holland to escape religious and ethnic persecution and later settled in Colonial America. There are early records of some Burdettes who lived in Amsterdam during the 1730s; 1750s; however, no definite evidence has yet been found to document the Huguenot connection. DNA evidence has not yet yielded enough connections to discern definite names of Frederick’s parents.

Will, Death, Estate of Frederick Burdette

   Frederick Burdette died at age 87 years, 3 months, 25 days, on Feb. 10, 1841, in Laurens County and most likely was buried there beside Marianne, by tradition in the old section of the cemetery at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court. Burial records or tombstones with legible inscriptions have not been located for them, but there are some fieldstone markers in the graveyard very near Nathan Bramlett’s inscribed tombstone which may be the final resting places of Frederick, Marianne and her mother, Margaret. Frederick wrote his Last Will and Testament on Nov. 30, 1826, in Laurens County, leaving his land to three grown children–William, Molly, Ailsey–and eventually to son William if the two daughters married or died, and if William predeceased them, after their deaths the estate would be divided among his other children or their heirs. Sons John and William, named as administrators, presented the will in court on March 1, 1841, and it was proved there by William on March 16, 1841 (Box 83, pkg. 2).

State of South Carolina} Laurens District}

“In the name of God, amen, I Frederick Burditt of the State and District aforesaid being of sound and disposing mind and memory, but weak in body, and calling to mind the uncertainty of life, and being desirous to dispose of such worldly Estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with, do make and ordain this my last Will in manner following, that is to say:I give to my son William Burdit, and my two daughters now living with me, Molly and Ailsey Burditt, the plantation and tract of land whereon I now live, together with the Horses, Cows, Hogs and stock of every kind, Household and Kitchen furniture, plantation Tools, Waggon & Reins [geirs?] and Blacksmiths Tools, to them for their material benefit and support so long as they all live together but should either or both of my daughters above named marry or be disposed to seperate and leave the place, then and in that case it is my will that she or they take such part of my personal property as shall be her or their equal distributive share, and that the tract of land remain my son William[’s] in fee simple forever after his two sisters, Molly and Ailsey have married, died or other wise left him, provided, however, that my son William Burditt should die before his two sisters Molly and Ailsey, having no law full issue, then the said tract of land to remain the property of the daughters during their natural life time and at their death to be sold and the monies arising therefrom to be equally divided among the whole of my children or their lawful representatives share and share alike. I give to my grand daughterAilsey Gray a certain Red cow and calf which she now claims, Eight head of sheep, and the bed and furniture which she has always claimed. And lastly, I do constitute and appoint my son William Burditt and Robert Hand Senr. Executors of this my last Will and testament by me heretofore made. In testamony whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal this thirtieth day of November 1826. Frederick (his x mark) Burditt Seal Signed, sealed, published and declared as and for the last will and testament of the above named Frederick Burditt in presence of us Thos. Wright Arch. Young John Harriss.

State of South Carolina} Laurens District} Personally appeared before me Archibald Young, John Harriss & Thomas Wright who being sworn as the law directs made oath they saw Frederick Burditt Execute the within instrument as his last Will and that they in the presence of Each other and in the presence of the testator subscribed as witnesses to the same sworn to before me the 16th day of March, One Thousand Eight Hundred and forty one.W. D. Watts O.L.D. [Ordinary of Laurens District] Archd. Young John Harriss Ths. Wright”

“South Carolina} Laurens District} To W. D. Watts Ordinary of said District. The Petition of William Burditt showeth that Frederick Burditt late of said District recently died having first Executed his last will in which he names your Petitioner as one of his Executors, he therefore prays that you would grant him a citation to have the said will proven in solemn form and your Petitioner will pray &tc. This 1 March 1841. William (his x mark) Burditt

“South Carolina} Laurens District} Whereas William Burdett has made suit to me to have the will of Frederick Burdett proven in solemn form. Then and there fore to Cite and admonish all and singular the Kindred and Creditors of the late Frederick Burdett said to be and appear before me Archibald Young on the sixteenth day of March Inst. to show cause if any they can why the said will should not be proven and letters Testamentary granted to William Burdett who is named as one of the Executors to said will. Given under my hand & seal this the 1st March 1841 W. D. Watts O.L.D. State of South Carolina,} Laurens District.} Warrant of Appraisement By W. D. Watts Ordinary of said district. These are to authorize and empower you, or any three or four of you, whose names are here under written, to repair to all such parts and places within this State, as you shall be directed unto by William Burditt Excr. of the goods and chattels, rights and credits of Frederick Burditt deceased, wheresoever any of the said goods and chattels are or do remain within the said parts and places, and which shall be shown unto you by the said William Burditt and there view and appraise all and every the said goods and chattels, being first duly sworn on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, to make a true and perfect inventory and appraisement thereof, and to cause the same to be returned under your hands, or any three or four of you, unto the said William Burditt on or before the 16th day of May next.Witness W. D. Watts Esquire, Ordinary of the said district, the 16th day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty one and in the Sixty fifth year of American Independence. To Messrs. Benjamin Martin Jesse Gray James B. Higgins ; David Higgins”

“Memorandum — That on the fifth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty one personally appeared before me Thomas Wright, one of the Magistrates assigned to keep the peace in Sd. District, Jesse Gray, James B. Higgins and David Higgins being three of the appraisers appointed to appraise the goods and chattels of Frederick Burditt late of Laurens District deceased, who being duly sworn, made oath that they would make a just and true appraisement of all and singular, the goods and chattels of the said Frederick Burditt deceased, and that they would return the same, certified under their hands, unto the said William Burditt on or before the of 16th of May next. Sworn the day and year above written, before me, Thos. Wright, M. for L. D.”

The appraisement, which lists the following items and their value, was provided to William Burditt by Jesse Gray, James B. Higgins and David Higgins. 

“Stock of hogs — cattle and sheep $55.50 Waggon & gear and 1 lot of waggon … 11.00 1 lot of Carpenters tools — grindstone &tc 5.00 1 lot of plantation tools — drawing chains & log chains 14.25 1 cutting knife & box — oats — Riddle &tc 3.00 1 stack of fodder & 1 lot of corn 24.00 1 gray Mare 60.00 1 lot of baskets & old irons 2.00 Bacon – Lard and barrels 32.00 Cupboard & furniture 1 lot of books & 2 tables 18.00 9 sitting chairs – 1 box and lot of bed clothing 23.00 2 beds – bedsteads &tc furniture 20.00 Shoe makers tools – shot gun & pouch 1 saddle & bridle 9.00 1 trunk & 1 can & bottles 3.00 1 lot of sundries (up stairs) 9.25 Castings – tin ware – pewter – knives forks &tc 28.12 1 Loom & apparatus 5.00 Kitchen dresser & cupboard 2.00 Jugs – jars – sieve – gun powder – shots &tc 6.00 1 half bushel measure – boxes – barrels – wheat & salt 7.00 4 sitting chairs & candlestick 2.60 1 lot of blacksmith tools – jointers – chisels & gouges 14.00 one note due the 25 of December next for one tract of land 236 acres 40.00 Total $708”

After William, Ailsey and Mary Ann “Molly” died, Frederick’s estate, administered by son John Burdett, was sold in 1873 and the proceeds were distributed among the surviving heirs of Frederick’s other deceased children who could be identified and located: Henry, John, Margaret and Reuben Burdett. Some heirs at law, including Nathan B. Burditt, Eliza Ann Curry, Frederick Burditt and others not named–contested the administration of John Burdett of his father’s estate on Jan. 28, 1873, in Laurens County, but lost the lawsuit. A notice naming the three contesting heirs and “others,” advising them John would settle the estate by court order, was published on Feb. 1873. The distribution of the estate, amounting to $1,744.24, was settled March 21, 1873. Part of the settlement was recorded March 22 in Laurens. There were two sales for Frederick’s personal estate. The first sale on July 11, 1876, generated $320.64. The second sale on Oct. 10, 1876, generated $1,555.81. Purchasers listed include Wesley Burdett, who bought 1 lot of clothing & Bible and other items; John Burdett, a spinning wheel and other items; Elizabeth Burton, “2 smoothing irons” and a bed and furniture and other items; Peter Waddle, chairs and axes; Ivory Curry, smith tools, dried fruit, two trunks, chairs, two looking glasses, clothing, other items; and Jesse Burditt, “1 Bibell” and clothing. Frederick’s son William entered the will for probate in Laurens Co., S.C., Court on March 1, 1841. The court issued a warrant of appraisement on estate of Frederick Burditt April 5, 1841, in Laurens. 

“Decree Whereas the names of many of the parties interested in this Estate are unknown to the Court — It is Ordered Decreed that the said Estate be divided as follows. One Share to the Children and representative of Henry Burdett decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of John Burditt decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of Margaret Gray decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of Reuben Burdett decd. according to their respective rights. March 21st 1873. Given under my hand and Seal of Office C. Lark Judge of Probate Court L. C.”

The settlement documents indicate four shares of Frederick’s estate, each amounting to $436.46, were to be paid out by John Burdett. The names of the recipient heirs, “unknown by the court,” are not documented in the estate records. The documents indicate Frederick’s coffin, made by J. M. Riddle, cost $6.00. Property taxes for Frederick’s land amounted to $9.75. The estate paid an attorney, B. W. Ball, a total of $50.00. Probate fees to Laurens County amounted to $12 in 1873. A number of other payments were made to individuals for debts and services rendered.

Marianne and Frederick in South Carolina

   Frederick was living in Ninety-Six (Laurens) District in 1775, according to the aforementioned deed written and recorded there. Since Frederick and Marianne’s first child was born there in 1776, she probably was living with him there in 1775 as well. Her brother Henry Bramlett III was in the same area in 1776-1780: later Georgia census records indicate he had a child, daughter Margaret, born in South Carolina in 1776, and his stated residence in the 1780 Bramlett land resurvey recorded in Virginia is “Laurens Dist., S. C.” Marianne’s Aunt Elizabeth and Uncle William Bramblett and family, who moved to South Carolina by 1773 when their royal land grant from Gov. William Bull and King George III was surveyed, also lived nearby. Revolutionary War pension records indicate Marianne’s brother Reuben Bramlett, one of the three first cousins with that given name born in the same generation in Fauquier County, was stationed for three months in northwest South Carolina on the Indian Line as a soldier during the war in 1780 or 1781; however 1787, the birth year of Reuben’s second son Henry, is the first definite date of Reuben’s residency in South Carolina. Later census records indicate at least two of Reuben’s children were born in South Carolina: Henry in 1787 and Nathan in 1799. (He later moved into Christian Co., Ky., circa 1801 and then settled in 1818 in a portion of Gallatin Co., Ill., that later became Saline County in 1847.) Marianne’s brother John went to Laurens County from Fauquier County circa 1785. Marianne’s brother Nathan may have gone to South Carolina at the same time, but was definitely in Laurens County by 1789 when bought land there. Laurens County census records indicate Marianne also may have had at least two or three other sisters who moved in South Carolina with their mother, Margaret, by 1790. Marianne’s mother, Margaret, bought land adjacent to Nathan’s farm in 1791.

   Frederick’s name first appears in existing Laurens County records in that December 1775 deed: “Fredk. Burdett” and “Wm. Bramlet”  (Marianne’s uncle) witnessed the deed on Dec. 10-11, 1775, when their neighbor William Vaughn, a “planter of Craven Co, Prev, of S.C.,” and his wife, Barbara Vaughn, sold two hundred acres of land on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River in Laurens District to John Stone (DB-C:159). The land was part of a 400-acre grant to William Vaughn on Jan. 16, 1772. The Vaughns owned land adjacent to Marianne’s Uncle William Bramblett’s 1773 William Bull land grant property. (The “William Bramlet” who witnessed the 1775 deed is the owner of the 1773 loyal and grant and Frederick’s uncle by marriage, the brother of Marianne’s father, Henry Jr.) Frederick Burdett and William Bramlet may have been signing as witnesses for John Stone. Stone’s land also adjoined the property that Margaret Bramlett, Henry Jr.’s widow, bought in Laurens County in 1791. Stones also were early members of Bramlett Methodist Church. William Thompson also witnessed the 1775 deed, probably for the Vaughns. The deed was recorded April 27, 1790, in Laurens County. To legally witness a deed in 1775, Frederick had to have been at least age 21, thus born in/before 1754, which is consistent with his documented birth year: 1753. “Fredk. Burdett” also witnessed a deed in Laurens County on Nov. 28, 1789, when Richard Fowler and wife, Debby, sold Nathan Bramlett his 225 acres of land “where sd N. B. now lives” on “Zeack’s” Branch (Beaverdam Creek) of Enoree River for “45 pounds proclamation money” (DB-C:131). The land was originally granted to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789. Other witnesses: William Stone and Reuben Bramlett (most likely the brother-in-law of Frederick and brother of Nathan Bramlett and Marianne, who went on to Kentucky and settled in Illinois, since Reuben Jr., son of Reuben Sr., did not move to the area until 1794). The deed was recorded March 16, 1790.

Frederick’s Revolutionary War Service

   Frederick served as a soldier during the Revolutionary War. Pay records (copied below) indicate he fought at the Battle of King’s Mountain on Oct. 7, 1780, and at Cowpens on Jan. 17, 1781. “Frederick Burdit” is included as a Revolutionary War soldier in loose papers found in the South Carolina State House in Columbia, S.C., according to “The Revolutionary Rolls,” published by the Secretary of State in The State newspaperon Sunday, Oct. 9, 1904. Frederick’s military service is documented in pay records in South Carolina Archives: Stub entry #390, issued June 16, 1785, indicates South Carolina paid “Three Pounds One Shilling and Five Pence Sterlg,” amounting to “Twenty-one Pounds Ten Shillings” Current Money to “Mr. Frederick Burdit” for “Militia duty before the reduction of Charlestown” (Accounts Audited, p. 912, frames 329-330). Charleston fell on May 12, 1780. The payment was based on Col. Anderson’s return. Stub Entry #39017 in 1785 indicates the militia also paid Frederick three pounds, one shilling sterling (twenty pounds current money) in 1785 “for services at the Battle of King’s Mountain” on Oct. 7, 1780, and for service at Cowpens on Jan. 17, 1781.


Loose papers also indicate one “William Burdet” (possibly Frederick’s brother) served “101 days militia duty…on horseback” in Capt. John Wilson’s Company during Sept. 11, 1779, to June 16, 1780 (The State 1904). Transcripts and copied images of the actual pay stub records, microfilmed by South Carolina Dept. of Archives and History, follows:

State So Carolina Dr. [Deliver/delivered] to William Burdet for 101 days Toward duty from four differ[en]t Pay Bills of Capt. [John] Willson performd alternately from Sept. 11th 1779 untill June 16th 1780 vizt on horseback *38 days — L38* [plus] 42 do — 42 [plus] 4 do — 4 [plus] 17 do — 17 [Total] 101 days Stlg 14.8.6 3/4 *This 38 Days to Capt. [Hugh] Wardlaw’s Pay Bill.” The transcript of the second page: “[No.] 607 – 31 Decr 1784 Mr. William Burdet his accot. of 101 Days Militia Duty as Private on Horseback on four Bills Pay…[rolls?] of Capt. H. Wardlaw’s performd alternately from Sept. Eleventh to June 16, 1780…101 days…Duty 280. 6 3/4 Fourteen Pounds, Eight shillings & Six Pence three shillings Sterling – Exd. T. W. J. McAgee (SCAR Microcopy 8 Roll 16 Record 911). [Figures written and calculated on the page:] 280.6 3/4 (minus) 20.09.11 1/4 (minus) 12 (equals) 239.

Researchers calculate the birth year of William Burdet as circa 1755, which would make him a contemporary of Frederick, who was born in 1753. Although they lived in the same general area of South Carolina, present-day Edgefield and Laurens in Ninety-Six District, and  shared a surname, it is not known if the two men knew of or were related to each other. This William Burdett married Patience Delacey Hart and later received three land grants in present-day Edgefield County.

   As a resident, Frederick was eligible to acquire a state land grant to purchase property in Laurens County in 1786. After the war was over, South Carolina granted free land to officers but for a small fee granted vacant land to volunteer veterans who had served in lower ranks. The latter, who paid for their land, aided the state once again by helping South Carolina acquire funds to pay down the war debt. The majority of the post-Revolutionary War state grants were purchased, and some veterans used pay for their military services to buy their state land grants. Staff at South Carolina Department of Archives & History determined  that  Frederick’s land was not granted because he was a soldier in the Revolution, but sold  to him because he was a resident of the state.

Frederick and Marianne’s land, located on this map slightly south and east of where Marianne’s mother, Margaret “Peggy” Bramlett, and brother Nathan Bramlett lived and where Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church was and still is located. Marianne’s sister or cousin Sarah Bramlett and husband, Nicholas Ware Garrett, and her aunt and uncle Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett had also settled in the area, the latter in 1773. Nicholas Garrett’s land also is designated on the map. He is son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett and brother of William Garrett who married Nancy Bramlett, possibly another sister or cousin of Marianne. Henry Bramlett III, brother of Marianne, may be the Henry Bramlett who obtained a post-war land grant in 1792 southwest of the other Bramlett properties in Laurens County and lived there before he relocated his family to Elbert Co., Ga.

Frederick and Marianne Burdette lived near Bramlett Church, shown in top left grid, and close to land owned by her brother Nathan Bramlett and mother, Margaret Bramlett. Frederick’s land, granted Dec. 4, 1786, is farther right, above Beaverdam Creek, south of Enoree River, north of William and Elizabeth Bramblett’s 1773 property.

Frederick’s Post-Revolutionary War Land Grant

“State of South-Carolina, To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting: Know Ye, That for and in Consideration of Four Pounds ten Shillings & 2 Pe[nce] Sterling Money, paid by Frederick Burdit into the Treasury for the use of this State, We have granted, and by these Presents do grant unto the said Frederick Burdit Heirs and Assigns, a Plantation or Tract of Land, containing One hundred and ninety three Acres Situate in the District of ninety six, on a Branch of Enoree River having such Shape, Form and Marks, as are represented by a Plat hereunto annexed, together with all Woods, Trees, Waters, Watercourses, Profits, Commodities, Appurtenances, and Heriditaments whatsoever thereunto belonging, To have and to hold the said Tract of One hundred and ninety three Acres of Land, and all and singular other the Premises hereby granted unto the said Frederick Burdit his Heirs and Assigns, for ever, in free and common Soccage. Given under the Great Seal of the State. Witness, his Excellency William Moultrie Esquire, Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the said State, at Charleston, this fourth Day of December Anno Domini, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty six and in the Eleventh Year of the Independence of the United States of America. William L. M. S. Moultrie And hath thereunto a Plat thereof annexed, representing the same, certified by F. Bremar Surveyor-General. 27th March 1786.” (Vol. 13, p. 95)

Property owned by “Frederick Burdett” is mentioned as a landmark on a plat recorded for James Higgins in Laurens Co., S. C., in 1788. Higgins received a land grant for 79 acres on Beaverdam Creek, Enoree River, Ninety-Six Dist., S. C., which was surveyed by James Wofford on Sept. 24, 1788 (SCDAH S213190:23:240:2). Frederick’s 1786 land grant property is mentioned as a landmark in two deeds recorded in 1800 in Laurens County. One deed dated Dec. 17, 1800, when Isaac Lindsay sold 50 acres of land on the Pan Trough Branch of Enoree River to Moses Biter, indicates “Fetherick Burdett” and others owned adjacent land (DB-G:129). The land was also bounded by property owned by Edward Lindsay, James Higgins and Thompson Farley; and the deed indicates it was part of an original grant to Steen, J. (John) Lindsay, Brown and Cannon. William Higgins and Edward Lindsay witnessed the deed, which was recorded Dec. 18, 1800. Frederick and Marianne’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed dated Dec. 18, 1800, when Edward Lindsay and wife, Catey, sold 46 acres of land on the south side of Enoree River to Ezekiel Lindsay (DB-G:515). The land, part of a tract conveyed by John Lindsay to Edward, Isaac and Ezekiel Lindsay, was bounded by property owned by “Fredk. Burdet” and Ephraim Moore and Thompson Farley. Ephraim Moore, Elizabeth Moore and Isaac Lindsay witnessed the deed, which was recorded Nov. 29, 1802 (DB-G:515). “Fredk. Burdett” witnessed a deed in Laurens County on April 23, 1801, when Nathan and Elizabeth Gray Bramlett sold John Burdett 100 acres of land for 25 pounds (DB-O:199). The deed was not recorded until April 6, 1844, after Nathan and Elizabeth had died. The land, located on the south side of the Enoree River, was part of an original grant by Gov. Charles Pinckney to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789. In 1801 it was bounded by property owned by Elias Stone, (Amos?) Critchfield and Margaret Bramlett (Marianne’s mother), “along stony ridge.” Samuel Ansley and Zachariah Gray also witnessed the 1801 Bramlett-Burdett deed.

   Frederick was a trustee at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church near Young’s Store northeast of Gray Court, S.C, in 1807. He may have joined the church and served as a trustee much earlier, from 1780. “Fredk. Burdett” was one of three trustee recipients mentioned in a deed written June 2, 1807, when Nathan Bramlett and George Sims granted the trustees and the church “for the sum of five dollars” two acres of land “near Enoree River on Zaks Creek for the purpose of securing a Meeting House thereon, standing and to remainfor the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church…” (DB-H:235). (“Zak’s” or Zeak’s, Ezekiel’s, Creek is part of, known as Beaverdam Creek.) The other trustees listed are Joel Fowler and Raughley Stone. Frederick Burdett signed (made his mark on) the deed as recipient; and his son John Burditt and Benjamin Tradewell, a neighbor or possibly relative, witnessed the deed. Frederick’s son John Burditt also signed the deed and agreed to deliver it to his father when it was recorded July 6, 1807, by John Garlington, Register’s Office, of Laurens District.

Frederick and Marianne in Census Data

   Frederick may or may not be the “Frederick Burt,” Free white male of 16 years and upward, who is listed in the First U.S. Census for Ninety-Six (Laurens) Dist., S.C., in 1790. He headed a family that includes four free white females (wife, Marianne, and three daughters Margaret, born 1781; Mary Ann “Molly,” born 1784; and Elizabeth, born 1786) and three free white males under age 16 years (three sons John, born 1776; Henry, born 1778; and Reuben, born 1787). Other children were born after 1790. “Frederick Burdict,” 45 and over, born before 1755, is listed in the 1800 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over, born before 1755 (wife, Marianne); two females 16-26, born 1774-84 (daughters Margaret and Mary Ann “Molly”); a male 16-26, born 1774-84 (nephew? son-in-law?); a female 10-16, born 1784-90 (daughter Elizabeth); a male 10-16, born 1784-90 (son William); a female under 10, born 1790-1800 (daughter Alcey/Ailsey); and one male under 10, born 1790-1800 (son Jesse). Sons John, Henry and Reuben Burdett, married and were living away from home, are listed as heads of their own families in 1800. “Fredrick Burdit,” 45 and over, born in/before 1765, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over (wife, Marianne), and four children: a male 16-26, born 1784-94 (son Jesse or William), and three females 16-26, born 1784-94 (daughters Mary Ann “Molly,” Elizabeth, Alcey/Ailsey) (NARA Film M252:61:88). Frederick is not listed as head of his family in 1820. (Frederick Burtz in 1820 is a different person.) “Fred Burdett,” 70-80, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 70-80 (wife, Marianne) and three grown children: a male 40-50 (son William), a female 30-40 (daughter Mary Ann “Molly”) and a female 15-20 (daughter Alcey/Ailsey) (NARA Film M19:169:275). “Frederick Burdett,” 80-90, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Laurens County as head of a family that includes two females 40-50 (daughters Mary Ann “Molly” and Alcey/Ailsey) and a male 40-50 (son William) (NARA Film M704:513:15).

   An excerpt in South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research indicates “Frederick Burditt” and sons John and Henry as well as several others, including Frederick’s brother-in-law Nathan Bramlett, foreman, and (Frederick’s son-in-law?) Hezekiah Gray, were called to a Laurens District Coroner’s Inquisition on Feb. 6, 1815, to “view the body of Daniel Bragg found dead and drowned in Enoree River” and find out “when where how and after what manner the s’d D. Brag[g] came to his death.” The report, filed two days later in Laurens District Court by Coroner William Irby, indicates Bragg, “in striving to save a negroe man he got drowned” (SCMAR 197). The same panel members were asked to “View the body of a negro man drowned on the plantation of Daniel Bragg” on the same day and report the manner of death. The report, filed two days later in Laurens District, indicated “Negroe George the property of Daniel Brag[g] came to his death…in crossing Enoree River” Feb. 5, 1815, when he “got wash’d off his horse and got drowned” (SCMAR 24-4:198).

Family Bibles

   Inscriptions for Frederick and Marianne and their children were transcribed Feb. 19, 1950, by the late Helen A. (Gossett) Burdette, wife of the late Melvin Louis Burdette Sr., from a small Burdette Bible owned by the late Thomas Oscar Burdette. The inscriptions came from an older Bible. The small Burdette Bible was then, in 1950, in possession of Toy Donald Burdette. Helen shared her 1950 transcript with Franklin Donald Burdette,who contributes the information to this history.

Fredrick Burdett b. Oct. 15 – 1753

Ag. 87 yrs. 3. mons. d. Feb. 10 – 1841

Maryan Burdett b. Sept. 15 – 1752

Ag. 81 yrs. 5 mons. 21 days d. March 8 – 1834

John Burdett b. Feb. 4 – 1776

83 yrs. 1 m. 6 days d. Mar. 11, 1859

Henry Burdett b. Sept. 5 – 1778

74 yrs. 9 m. 8 days d. May 29, 1853

Margret Burdett b. Dec. 3 – 1781

Mary Burdett Rhodes b. May 22 – 1784

83 yrs. 6 m. 23 days d. Nov. 13 – 1867

Reuben Burdett b. Nov. 26 – 1787

75 yrs. 1 m. 12 days d. Jan. 6 – 1862

Elizabeth Burdett Hand b. Sept. 1 – 1786

84 yrs. 8 m. 11 days d. May 12 – 1871

William Burdett b. Jan. 1[8?] – 1790

70 yrs. 16 days d. Feb 3 – 1860

Alcy Burdett b. March 18, 1793

78 yrs. 2 m. 10 days d. May 28, 1871

Jesse Burdett b. Oct. 18 – 1795

(no death date)

Following inscriptions from another larger existing Burdette Bible 

Memoranda

Frederick Burdett was born Oct. 15th 1753 and died Feb. 10th 1841.

Marian Burdett was born Sep. 15th 1752 and died March 8th 1834.

John Burdett was born Feb. 4th 1776 and died March 11th 1859.

Henery Burdett was born Sep. 5th 1778 and died May 29th 1853.

Margaret Burdett was born Dec. 3d 1781.

May (Mary Ann) Burdett was born May 22d 1784 and died Nov 13th 1867.

Reubin Burdett was born Nov. 26th 1787 and died Jan. 18th 1862.

Elizabeth Burdett was born Sep. 1st 1786 and died May 17th 1871.

William Burdett was born Jan. 18th 1790 and died Feb. 3d 1860.

Alcy Burdett was born March 18th 1793 and died May 28th 1871.

Jessee Burdett was born Oct. 18th 1795. (No death date)

Children of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette

   Some of Frederick and Marianne’s nine children may have been named after her parents and siblings and other relatives: John after Marianne’s brother, Henry after Marianne’s father, Henry Bramlett Jr.,    and her brother Henry Bramlett III, and grandfather Henry Bramlett Sr.; Margaret after Marianne’s mother, Margaret “Peggy” (unknown); and Frederick Reuben in part perhaps after Marianne’s brother Reuben Bramlett who settled in Gallatin Co., Ill., in 1818. Jesse and Ailsey are given names in the allied Gray family and Jesse is a name used by the family of Marianne’s brother Henry Bramlett III. Mary Ann “Molly” was named after Marianne herself. Two other children–Elizabeth and William–may be named after Marianne’s paternal aunt and uncle or her great-grandfather William Bramlett I/Sr., or after Frederick’s family members.

A later map of the area where Marianne and Frederick’s 193-acre tract is located in Ninety-Six, Laurens Dist., S. C., shows Bramlett Church with neighbors,

including Mrs. A. \\. Burdette, Mrs. E. A. Burdette and Rev. Burdettte.

Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette’s tombstone in Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis

 

euben W. Burditt.jpg`

Private Reuben W. Burditt, Company E, 4th Battalion, South Carolina Reserves, Confederate States of America, died Oct. 1, 1864, of disease at Charleston, S.C. A direct descendant of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette of Laurens County, he rests in the Confederate Section of historic Magnolia Cemetery at Charleston. Photo by Deborah G. Dennis

Hiram Peterson Burdette, born Dec. 9, 1854, and wife, M. E., born June 19, 1854, buried  in Bramlett Cemetery, Gray Court,  S C.

Chapter 4:

Generation 5

Benjamin Bramlett

(By Family Tradition,  Son of Margaret and Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr.)Benjamin “died on a British prison ship during the American  Revolution”

Benjamin Bramlett, most likely first or second child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., and reportedly their eldest son, according to family tradition, may have been born circa 1751 in a portion of Prince William Co., Va., that later became Fauquier County. No evidence has been officially shared about his birth or death; however, Benjamin reportedly did exist and died in 1780 on a British prison ship while serving as a soldier or as a civilian patriot during the American Revolution. Family traditions held by some descendants of Henry Bramlett III identify Benjamin as the son of Henry II/Jr. and say his death was the cause or reason for Henry II/Jr.’s suicide in 1779 or 1780. Whether or not Benjamin  married is unknown. No documentation of this sad tradition has been officially shared, but Benjamin is included in this history in memoriam with a hope that, no longer imprisoned by the enemy’s chains nor tortured by the tragedy and fragility of life, his spirit and the anguished soul of his father both rest in eternal peace. Pray for them.

Chapter 4:

Generation 5

Henry Bramlett III and Elizabeth Moss

 

Son of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr.

Native of Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To TyrantsHenry Bramlett III served as an American soldier from South Carolina in 1775-1780 during the  Revolution and drew land as a veteran in the Georgia State Land Lottery after moving with wife and family to Elbert County circa  1801. They began acquiring land and farming as they had in South Carolina and before in Fauquier Co., Va.

 

Henry Bramlett III, child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born circa 1755 in Prince William (now Fauquier) Co., Va. He died around 1828, most likely in Elbert Co., Ga., where he and his family were then living. His burial place is unknown. He married Elizabeth Moss before 1775 in Virginia or South Carolina. She was born circa 1755-1760, perhaps in South Carolina. She died circa 1850 in Elbert or Forsyth Co., Ga. Henry was living by 1775 in Laurens Co., S.C., where he served as a soldier during the American Revolution. Details of his unit and service have not been located.

Roster of Revolutionary War Soldiers in Georgia indicates Henry Bramlett III was a war veteran living in Elbert County, Georgia, in 1827 (279). The source of the information is the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery records.

 

HENRY III REV SOLDIER

Recorded deeds indicate Henry III returned to Virginia to claim his father’s plantation in 1780, after Henry Jr. had died, and then returned to South Carolina. Henry III sold the plantation property in 1784 to James Dobie/Dobey.

Henry Bramlett III’s 1780 plat map of his father’s Bramlett Plantation on Elk Marsh Run where he and siblings grew up:

This survey of Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr.’s former plantation is documented in Virginia Land Office Proprietory Records, VLO entry 117 Box 1. Is was “Land being Bounded as followeth Viz Beginning at A a white oak corner to Jonas Williams thence along the said Williams’s Line S 31 (degrees) E 60 Poles to B two Hicories thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two small hicories, thence 35 1/2 W 216 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & sundry saplings, thence S 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G two small hicorys in the said Williams’s Line, thence along the same to the Beginning Containing 231 Acres.”https://bramblettefamilyinamerica.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/cfdad-henry2biii2bplat2bmap.jpg?w=960
Henry Bramblett Advertisement, Land Office, Northern Neck of Virginia, Lord Proprietor’s Office. To Mr. John Moffett–Whereas Henry Bramblett of South Carolina hath set forth to this Office that there is a certain tract of land on the Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County containing by estimation Two hundred and fifty Acres and formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett Father of Henry aforesaid & which said Henry (the Father) died seized thereof in Fee simple but dying a Suicide the said Tract Escheated to the Lord of the Fee. And the Rules of the Office having been complied with as to issuing and affixing at the Court House at Fauquier County an Advertisement at three several Courts & no person offering to shew Cause why the said Land should not be granted as Escheat to the said Henry Bramblett And the said Henry Bramblett desiring a Warrant to resurvey the same in order to obtain an Escheat Deed being ready to pay the Composition & Office Fees, These are therefore to impower you to resurvey the said Land for the Said Henry Bramblett A Plat of which Resurvey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 5th Day of February next. Given under my Hand & the Office Seal the 5th Day of August 1780. B. Martin”

By virtue of a warrant from the Proprietor’s office to me directed, I have surveyed for Henry Bramblett, [III] of South Carolina, a tract of Land on Elk Marsh Run, in Fauquier County, formerly the property of A Henry Bramblett [II/Jr.] father to the aforesaid Henry [III], [Henry II/Jr.] who dying a suicide the said Land became Escheatable: the said Land being Bounded as followeth Viz Beginning at A a white oak corner to Jonas Williams thence along the said Williams’s Line S 31 (degrees) E 60 Poles to B two Hicories thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two small hicories, thence 35 1/2 W 216 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & sundry saplings, thence S 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G two small hicorys in the said Williams’s Line, thence along the same to the Beginning Containing 231 Acres. … J. Moffett 20th Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett } Chain Carriers 

 

Henry III and his brothers John and Nathan and mother, Margaret, co-founded Bramlett Episcopal Methodist Church near Gray Court, S.C., in 1780 or 1781. Henry and Elizabeth’s daughter  Margaret, named after her paternal, grandmother, joined Bramlett Church before she moved to Georgia with her parents and siblings circa  1801.

Henry III and Eizabeth’s other children include

 

 

Chapter 4:

Generation 5

Reuben Bramlett

1757–1844

Son of Margaret Unknown and Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr.

Native of Virginia

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

Reuben and wife and their family “Broke the Prairie” in 1814-1818 when they plowed fertile, virgin  ground to “put in new crops,” including corn, wheat, and tobacco, on their respective farms  in present-day Saline County, then pure, pristine earth with Tallgrass and Wild Flowers, a haven for Wildlife in the Illinois Territory. When threatened, Bramletts and Browns took refuge in nearby Brown Block House, constructed by Elizabeth Brown Bramlett’s Brown family after they relocated from Kentucky.

   This Part of Our Comprehensive History is Compiled with affection, devotion and appreciation for the patriarch of the Illinois Bramblette Tree Branch, Reuben Bramlett, a Revolutionary War Veteran and pensioner who served three tours of duty for his country and for Gen. George Washington  in the Virginia Line and Continental Army, and who with wife and children helped populate the newly minted State of Illinois in 1818. Our matriarch is Elizabeth Brown, whose mother, Mary Coleman Brown, and Brown siblings also were among Early Illinois Territory and State settlers who also “Broke the Prairie” there circa 1805-1812 and later.

(Son of Margaret and Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr.)Reuben served three tours as a Private during the American  Revolution

Reuben Marker

Reuben and Elizabeth’s companion military headstone at Wolf Creek Cemetery, installed by Deborah and the late Gary M. Dennis. Reuben served three tours in the Virginia Militia & Virginia Line from Fauquier County during the Revolution.

1818 Map Gallatin:White

Reuben and Elizabeth Brown Bramlett’s Seven Children

Benjamin, Henry, John, Nathan, Coleman Brown, Margaret, Elizabeth

Elizabeth and Reuben’s seven children are named in a request for his final pension payment in 1844, which was recorded by the Gallatin (later Saline) County Court. Their first child, Benjamin, was born in Virginia in 1785, according to a published historical account in Gallatin/Saline County. They moved to Laurens Co., S.C., before their son Henry was born there in 1787, son John was born there in 1797 and son Nathan was born there in 1799. Reuben and Elizabeth then moved the family to Kentucky circa 1800 1801. They began farming there in Christian Co., Ky., in 1801.

  Bible records indicate their youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born in Caldwell Co., Ky., which was adjacent to Christian County, in 1802. Census data indicate two daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth, were born in Kentucky as well, between 1804-1806. The entire family moved in 1816-1818 across the Kentucky State Line into southern Illinois where they established Bramlet Settlement, a rural community of individual family farms located southeast of Raleigh and southwest of Eldorado in Gallatin, later Saline, County, that eventually included an elementary school, family graveyard, and Baptist church. Some Bramlet and Brown family members were living in the area in 1814 at Brown Blockhouse, located in present day west Eldorado on land also occupied from about 1814-1816 until today by Brown Graveyard, now called Wolf Creek Cemetery. Some Bramlet and Brown family members also lived in nearby Harrisburg, Ill., and other close communities after 1818 and up to the present day. Elizabeth Brown Bramlett’s siblings settled on the land just west of present-day Eldorado and built the blockhouse there for protection from hostile Indians and wild animals. Wolf Creek Cemetery was established inside the fortification as Brown Family Graveyard. The blockhouse location today is inside the cemetery grounds on the elevated land just past the cemetery drive and flagpole near the final resting places of Reuben Bramlett and wife, Elizabeth, and daughter Margaret.

 

 

Chapter 4: William Bramblett of Laurens Co., S.C.

 

Chapter 4: Reuben Bramblett I/Senior of Bourbon Co., Ky.

Reuben Bramblett Sr., child of Henry Bramlett Sr. and unknown mother, was born circa 1734 in Prince William  (now Fauquier) Co., Va. He  wrote his will on Dec. 10, 1806, and it was proved in court in Bourbon Co., Ky., and recorded in January 1807 in Will Book C, pages 198-200. Following is a transcript as written:

“In the name of God, Amen. I Reuben Bramblett Senr. of Bourbon County and State of Kentucky, being very sick and weak in body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be given unto God calling to mind the mortallity of any body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die do make and ordain this my last will and Testament that is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul to the hands of Almighty God that gave it and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in a decent Christian burial at the discretion of my executors hoping at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God. And as touching such worldy estate where with it has pleased God to bless me in this life, I give devise and dispose of the same in the manner and form following. First I give and bequeath to my well beloved wife Peggy Bramblett my negroe woman named Dicey and my negroe boy named Manuel during her natural life and at her death both they and their increase to decend to John Grinstead my sun in law [husband of Ann] & Hugh Bramblett my sun in an equal proportion. Also I give & bequeath to my well beloved wife Peggy Bramblett one hundred acres of land including the place whereon I now live with all the house hold furniture, farming utentials, horses, cattle, & stock of every kind that is in my pocession or claimed by me at this time during her natural life, and at her death the land on which I now live as aforesaid is by this my last will and testament to decend to my sun Hugh Bramblett & the ballance of the property that is to say the horses, cattle, and stock of every kind together with household furniture and farming utentials is to be sold and equally divided amongst my three children in South Carolina (viz) Reuben Bramblett jr., Milly Robertson and Polly Robertson in equal proportion. I also give and bequeath to my sun in law John Grinstead my sun William Bramblett and my sun Lewis Bramblett one hundred acres of land each out the land I claim from the heirs of Martin Pickett deceased if so much should be obtained by virtue of said claim and if not it is my will and desire that my four children to whom I have given the land aforesaid [Hugh, Ann, William, Lewis] shall have an equal proportion of what may be obtained wheather it be land, money or otherwise. I also will and bequeath to my sun Henry Bramblett two negroes to wit one Boy named Daniel and a girl named Sally. I also will and bequeath to my sun William Bramblett one negroe girl named Polly. I also will and bequeath to my sun Lewis Bramblett one negroe girl named Winney. I also ordain, constitute and appoint John Grinstead, Henry Bramblett & Hugh Bramblett executors of this my last will and testament. It is also my will that all debts due to me shall be collected by my executors and as far as necessary applied to the discharge of my just debts and whatever ballance then may be remaining it is my will that my beloved wife Peggy Bramblett shall have to use at her discretion. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this tenth day of December in the year of our Lord one Thousand and eight hundred and six. Reuben Bramblett. Signed, Seald, and acknowledged in presence of us Will Mitchell, Edward Riley, Reuben Bramblett Jr.”

“Reuben Bramblett Jr.” who witnessed the will is a son of Reuben Sr. Reuben Sr.’s son Reuben Jr. was living in South Carolina at the time, but descendants say there is evidence that suggests he visited his father in Kentucky when Reuben Sr. decided to write his will in 1806. Edward Riley may be the son or other relative of Jalilah Bramlett and John Riley who married in Fauquier County in 1771 and moved to Mercer Co., Ky. She is believed to be daughter of Henry Jr. or Henry Sr. In addition, Reuben Sr.’s son “Henry Bramlett” signed as a bondsman for (witnessed) the Feb. 29, 1793, marriage of “John Riley” and “Mildred Gouch” (Gough/Goff) in Fauquier County (MB-1:385). Mildred is sister of Henry’s wife, Gladys Linny “Gladas” “Glady” Gough, daughter of Verlinda “Linny” and Francis T. “Frank” Gough. “John Rylah” witnessed Gladah and Henry’s marriage bond. (Will Mitchell probably is related to Daniel Mitchell who later married Reuben Sr.’s granddaughter Leanne Bramblett in 1814. Will Mitchell may also be related to John P. Mitchell who later married Reuben Sr.’s granddaughter Elizabeth Bramblett in 1814. John P. and Elizabeth [Bramblett] Mitchell had a son named William Mitchell who was born circa 1823.)

“Bourbon County January Court 1807.
“The Last Will and Testament of Reuben Bramblett, deceased, was produced in open Court and proved by the oaths of William Mitchell, Edward Riley & Reuben Bramblett jr. witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of John Grinstead and Hugh Bramblett, two of the executors named in said Will who made oath thereto and together with William Mitchell and Edward Riley their securities entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of $2,500 conditioned as the law directs. Certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form. Liberty being reserved for the other executor named in said will to join in the probate thereof when he shall think fit. Teste Will Garrard, C.B.C.” (WB-C:198-200).

Reuben Sr.’s personal estate was inventoried and appraised by John M. Hutchason, James Mitchell (husband of one of Reuben Sr.’s granddaughters) and Robert Hughes on April 20, 1807:
“Agreeable to an order of County Court of Bourbon Co we John M. Hutchason James Mitchell Malchi Couchman & Thos Pattan or any three of us directed appointing us to appraise the personal Estate of Reuben Bramblet decd., we John M. Hutchason James Mitchell & Robt Hughes [Malchi Couchman crossed out] being first duly sworn proceeded to do the same in the manner following viz”:
one Negroe woman Namd Dicy $283.34
one Negroe Boy Namd Manuel $266.68
one do [ditto Negroe] do [Boy] Namd Danl $200.00
one do [Negroe] girl Namd Polly $200.00
one do [Negroe] do [girl] Namd Winney $125.00
one do [Negroe] do [girl] Namd Sally $83.34
Total $1158.36.
one Sorrel Horse $37.50
one Bay mare $1.00
one Bay horse $40.00
one Bay horse colt $25.00
one Bay mare colt $30.00
Total $133.50
Also: 12 head of sheep $12.00; 23 head of hogs $18.00; One black cow $9.00; One red do. $7.50; One heifer $6.00; One stear $6.00, One do. $5.00; One heifer $3.00, bull $3.00, One steer $2.50; One fan (alias Dutch fan) $15.00; Sundry farming tools $1.00; Broad ax $1.00, One bell & collar $1.00; One Do. $0.25, One do. & collar $1.25; One pair trace chains $2.50; One log chain $2.50; One steel & cutting knife $2.25; One croscut saw $2.50, One frow $0.75; One drawing knife & handsaw $0.50; 2 Iron wedges $1.50, Two falling axes $2.50; 4 Reap hooks $3, Two grubbing hoes $2; 1 Trace chain $0.75, 3 hilling hoes $1.75; One pair steel yards $2.00; 1 whiskey barrel $1.25, 3 shovel plows $5.00; 1 pothooks & chain $3.00; 1 Oven led $1.00, 1 pot $2.50; 1 Pot & hooks $0.75, 1 skillet $1.00; 1 Tub & 2 buckets $1.30; 1 Big wheel $2.00, Two flax wheels $2.00; 4 hogsheads $3.00, 2 meal tubs $1.00; 1 grindstone $0.75, One tub $0.75; 1 Churn $0.50, One coarse hackle $0.75; 1 Jointer $1.50, 2 scythes $1.75; 1 pair sheep shears $0.25, 5 chains $1.25; 1 Bed & Bedstead etc $10.00; 1 Bed & furniture $7.50; Sundry pewter $10.00; Old cupboard furniture $1.34; 1 Old chest $1.00, One man’s saddle $7.00” (WB-C:253).
The appraisement of Reuben Sr.’s estate includes a reference to land claimed from the heirs of Martin Pickett.
Margaret “Peggy” survived Reuben Sr. and lived on their home place in Bourbon County until he died in late 1806 or very early 1807 and she died sometime after the 1810 census, probably in 1812 or 1813. “Widow Bramlet” is included on the 1807 Bourbon County Tax List but with no land amount given. She headed her household in 1810: “Peggy Bramblett,” white female 45 and over, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Bourbon Co., Ky., living alone, the owner of five slaves (NARA Film M252:5:79). The slaves are most likely some who were mentioned in Reuben Sr.’s will: Dicey, Manuel, Daniel, Sally, Winney and Polly). Margaret’s son Hugh began paying taxes on one hundred acres of land, most likely his parents’ homeplace, in 1813, which indicates his mother may have died in 1812 or 1813.

 

Reuben Sr. and Peggy’s children are Ann (married John Grinstead), Hugh, Reuben Jr., Milly (married Manoah Robertson), Polly (Mary Martha?) (married James Odell Robertson), William Sr., Lewis, and Henry Bramblett.

Ann, Daughter of Margaret and Reuben Sr.

ANN BRAMBLETT, first child of Margaret “Peggy” (Darnall?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born circa 1754-55 in a portion of Prince William Co., Va., that became Fauquier County in 1759. She may have died in or before 1830 in Bourbon Co., Ky., since she is not enumerated in the census with her husband and family that year. Her burial place is unknown.
   Ann married John Grinstead circa 1780 or earlier in Virginia. John was born circa 1755-1758, perhaps in Henrico or Prince William Co., Va., the son of Elizabeth “Betty” Helm? and James Grinstead. He grew up and lived as a young adult in Prince William County. He died in his 90s on Feb. 7, 1851, in Montgomery Co., Ky., and was buried there. His will, written Feb. 20, 1847, was proved there in June 1851 (WB-E:143). John and Ann’s son Lewis Grinstead served as administrator of his estate. In 1807 John Grinstead served as co-executor of his father-in-law Reuben Bramblett Sr.’s estate in Bourbon Co., Ky. Reuben Sr. wrote in his 1806 will, “I also ordain, constitute and appoint John Grinstead, Henry Bramblett & Hugh Bramblett executors of this my last will and testament.” John also is named as Ann’s legal representative in the will. She inherited slaves. “…First I give and bequeath to my well beloved wife Peggy Bramblett my negroe woman named Dicey and my negroe boy named Manuel during her natural life and at her death both they and their increase to descend to John Grinstead my sun in law & Hugh Bramblett my sun in an equal proportion…..” Ann also inherited land: “I also give and bequeath to my sun in law John Grinstead my sun William Bramblett and my sun Lewis Bramblett one hundred acres of land each out the land I claim from the heirs of Martin Pickett deceased if so much should be obtained by virtue of said claim and if not it is my will and desire that my four children to whom I have given the land aforesaid [Hugh, Ann Grinstead, William, Lewis] shall have an equal proportion of what may be obtained wheather it be land, money or otherwise.” John and Ann (Bramblett) Grinstead and her siblings requested a deed for the five hundred acres on Sept. 10, 1813.

John Grinstead served more than two years in three terms as a soldier in the Virginia Continental Line during the Revolutionary War. His pension application, R.4338, was rejected, lacking material documentation, even though several witnesses testified that they knew from tradition that he was a veteran. His discharge papers had been lost. His son Lewis Grinstead, age 53, later in 1852 applied again for the pension for John’s surviving children. However, Lewis also was unable to provide documentation and the claim was again rejected. Lewis testified that his father resided in early life in Prince William Co., Va., where he entered the service as a private in an infantry company in the Virginia Continental Line and served for one year and six or more months before receiving an honorable discharge, which document was later lost. Lewis indicated his father also served two additional terms of service and that he served a total of two years and seven months. Lewis said his father told of serving “through Cold, Hunger and almost Nakedness most of the time without shoes and with bleeding feet half starved and on hard marches all in defence of our country and to obtain our Independence and was paid in Continental money which was of no value.” He also states “his Father John Grinstead removed from Virginia and came to Kentucky in the year 1796and settled in Bourbon County where he lived for about thirty years. He then removed a short distance to and in the county of Montgomery where he lived until the day of his death.” John died on the 7th day of February in the year 1851 at the advanced age of 99 years, according to his bible record. Lewis “further states that soon after the passage of the Act of Congress granting pensions to the old revolutionary soldiers my Father John Grinstead began to urge his claim and hunt for living evidence of his services but was unable to obtain any such proof which he considered under the act necessary under the law granting pensions.” He never found the evidence and did not press his claim due to old age and disease and confinement during the last eight years of his life. Lewis indicated he administered his father’s estate. He names his siblings as Milly Gamble, Susannah Bowles, Nancy Barker and Reubin Grinstead. “He further states that two of his sisters now reside in a distant part of the State of Indiana And that his Brother Reubin Grinstead is not of sound mind he is entirely simple and is a charge to me and my family as it appears he ever will be.” John’s wife, Ann, apparently died before Lewis made his application since she is not mentioned in his deposition. John was a planter in Prince William/Fauquier Co., Va., and in Bourbon Co., Ky. He and Ann moved to Kentucky in 1796. John lived there in Bourbon County for about thirty years before moving to Montgomery Co., Ky. “John Grinsted,” over 45, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Bourbon Co., Ky., as head of a family that includes a female over 45 (wife, Ann) and five others: two males 16-26, born 1784-94 (Reuben, Lewis); one female 16-26, born 1784-94 (Milly?); one male 10-16, born 1794-1800 (son); and one female 10-16, born 1794-1800 (Nancy) (NARA Film M252:5:90). Three slaves also are enumerated.

Hugh Bramblett, child of Margaret  (Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co.,  Va. He died in 1818 in Bourbon Co., Ky., and presumbly was buried there. He was a Revolutionary War Veteran who served one tour of duty from Fauquier Co., Va. He married . She applied for a widow’s pension based on her first husband’s military service.

fa6b4-hugh252bbramblet252bsignature

Reuben Bramblett Jr., child of Margaret  (Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born circa  1758 in Fauquier Co.,  Va. He moved with sisters Milly and Polly to Laurens Co., S.C., in 1794. He died there around 1840. He was a Revolutionary War Veteran who served as a wagoneer from Virginia. He applied for a pension based on his military service, but it was rejected. His burial place is unknown but believed  to be a family graveyard on some of his property which was mentioned in one of his deeds.

 

Milly Bramblett, child of Margaret  (Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co.,  Va. She married Manoah Robertson  in 1785 in Fauquier County. She may have died in Laurens Co., S.C., after 1804. She is named as an heir in her father’s will.

Mary (Martha?) (“Polly” Bramblett, child of Margaret (Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co.,  Va. She married James Odell Robertson and may have died in Laurens Co., S.C., after 1804. She is named as an heir in her father’s will.

William Bramblett, child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Kentucky. William farmed in Fauquier County near his father before moving to Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1794. He married Nancy Ann Laurence on Dec. 26, 1793.  in Virginia. Some of their children are named in the 1864 Bourbon County will of their son Peter Bramblett: James, Malinda, Ambrose and Elizabeth Bramblett.

Peter Bramblett and Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall

   Peter Bramblett, child of Nancy Ann Laurence and William Bramblett, was born circa 1799-1800 in Bourbon Co., Ky. Peter died there in or shortly before Sept. 3, 1866, and was first buried in the private family graveyard on his thousand-acre plantation near Cane Ridge. He married Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall circa 1822 in Bourbon County. She was born April 4, 1780, in Shenandoah Valley, Va. She died Oct. 13, 1871, at home near Cane Ridge and was buried there beside Peter. Peter and Mary may have been exhumed and reinterred at Paris Cemetery in now unmarked graves when the remains of their only child, William Peter Bramblett, was moved to his final resting place beside the Confederate Memorial Monument in the Confederate Section there in 1905. One local historian indicated Peter’s wife, Mary “Polly” Hutzell Hall Bramblett, was buried beside William Peter; however, Paris Cemetery had no record of her or her husband Peter’s reburial there when queried several years ago. Mary gave birth to William Peter at about age 43. She had another son, John Hall, with her first husband, Robert D. Hall, a native of Yorkshire, England.

Peter Bramblett’s Last Will and Testament:

   Peter’s will, written July 19, 1864, in Bourbon Co., Ky., includes legacies of eight slaves given to relatives, about $6,000 in cash, personal and household property, and 600 acres of land, freedom and support for three slaves, to ten heirs: his wife, Polly (Mary Hutsell Hall); his stepson and executor John Hall; Peter’s siblings/heirs–James, Malinda, Ambrose’s descendants and Elizabeth; and his son William Peter’s 400 acres to his granddaughter “Mollie P. Bramblett”–the only child of his only child, William Peter Bramblett, who had died in 1863. Peter also arranged lifetime support for two invalid slaves: “my two invalid servants Horace & Clarissa” and their freedom, plus freedom and $100 for a slave named Jefferson.

“I, Peter Bramblett of the County of Bourbon State of Kentucky do make this my last Will and Testament. I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] &  Henry & two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land & slaves shall return to my estate. I divise to my  brother James Bramblett the tract of one hundred seventy six and a half acres of land which I purchased of Geo. W. Hall situate in Bourbon County to him his heirs and assigns forever. After the payment of my debts and one thousand Dollars to my Executor herein after named for his service in settling up my Estate, I divise all the rest and residue of my Estate consisting of about six hundred acres of land more or less whereon I now reside all my Household & kitchen furniture, slaves, stock, crops, money, notes, debts, claims, demands & chosis in action [legal/law suits] to my wife Polly Bramblett for and during her life with the privilege & power to divise five thousand dollars thereof in cash to whomsoever she may think proper and after her death all said Estate, hereby divised to her shall be sold by my executor herein after named who is vested with full power to convey the same to the purchaser or purchasers and the proceeds thereof after deducting the five thousand Dollars mentioned herein I divise to be equally divided between my brothers and sisters or their descendants to wit: To Malinda Young one equal share To Ambrose Bramblett’s descendants one equal share To Elizabeth Miles [Mitchel? document smudged] one equal share. I constitute my stepson John Hall Executor of this my last will and Testament & divise to him the one thousand dollars aforesaid for his service & settling up my estate. The divise made to my Grand daughter Mollie P. and to my brother James in the 1st and 2nd Sect. or clause of my will is all that I intend they shall have or receive from my estate & Out of the Estate divised to my wife my Executor shall also retain in his hands after my death a sufficient sum of money to support comfortably my two invalid servants Horace & Clarissa during their lives. It is my will that whenever my servant Jefferson elects to accept his freedom agreeably to the laws of Kentucky he shall have it after my wife’s death & one hundred dollars in cash. Witness my hand this 19th day of July 1864. Peter Bramblett. Att[est] R. J. Davis R. J. Brown”

Peter’s last will was probated in Bourbon County on Sept. 3, 1866, and recorded on pages 198-199 in Will/Estate Book 2845:

State of Kentucky Bourbon County Court September Term September 3d 1866 This last Will and Testament of Peter Bramblett decd was produced and proved in Open Court by the call of R. T. Davis, R. J. Brown subscribing witnesses thereto and the probate thereof being duly stamped is ordered to record. Witness Jas. M. Hughes Clerk of said court the date above. J. M. Hughes, Clk.

   Peter owned nineteen slaves in Dist. 1, Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1850: a black female 55, a black female 48, a black female 40, a mulatto male 34, a mulatto female, 27, a black male, 26; a mulatto male, 26; a black female, 23; a mulatto female, 14; a black male, 28; a mulatto female, 10; a black male, 10; a mulatto male, 8; a black male, 6; a black female, 6; a mulatto female, 6; a black male, 4; a mulatto female, 21; and a mulatto female, 1. 
   Peter’s granddaughter and an heir, “Pollie M. Bramblett,” who is also known as Maude Mary “Mollie” Bramblett, lived with her mother, Margaret Ann Payne Bramblett, in Marion Co., Mo., in 1860 and until Margaret died there in 1921 in Palmyra. Margaret and Maude lived near William Peter’s paternal aunt Malinda Bramblett Young and her family, who had moved to Marion County from Bourbon Co., Ky., before 1840. Maude lived in Palmyra until she died at St. Francis Hospital, Hannibal, Marion Co.,  Mo. She, her mother, and her grandmother Minerva H. Mahan Payne, all died in Marion Co., Mo. They  all rest at Greenwood Cemetery, once  known as old city or Palmyra Cemetery. Minerva was born Oct. 24, 1806, and died at  age  80  on Oct. 10, 1877. Peter and Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall Bramblett are parents of one only child: William Peter Bramblett.

William Peter Bramblett, only child of Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall and Peter Bramblett, was born Oct. 21, 1823, in Bourbon Co., Ky. He fell in battle, twice wounded near Murfreesboro, Tenn., while serving as a Confederate officer and later died Jan. 23, 1863, at a private Payne residence, possibly the home of his  wife’s relatives, in Nashville, Tenn.

William+Peter+Bramblett+grave+markerCapt. Bramblett’s military tombstone in Paris Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis

The Union physician who treated Capt. Bramblett’s wounds also documented his later death in Nashville in an article he wrote and published in the Confederate Veteran. William Peter’s body was taken to his father’s thousand-acre plantation and buried in the family graveyard near Cane Ridge, Ky. His remains were later exhumed and reinterred in the Confederate section of Paris, Ky., Cemetery in 1905. William Peter’s mother, Mary, who was born 1780 in Shenandoah Valley, Va., and died in 1871 near Cane Ridge, and his father, Peter, who died in 1866, no doubt attended their only child’s first burial in 1863. William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne, and their only child, Maude Mary “Pollie M.” “Mollie” Bramblett, who were both born in Bourbon County, are not mentioned in his death notices. They were living in Missouri by 1860, perhaps to escape the dangers of impending war. It is not known if they returned to Kentucky to attend his funeral at Cane Ridge; however, one historical report indicates a “throng” was there while “only a remnant of a once proud and gallant Company” were at his first burial. Other soldiers in his unit were killed at Murphreesboro. Many people also attended his second burial in Paris Cemetery in 1905.

Marriage of William Peter Bramblett and Margaret Ann Payne

Bramblett to Payne: This certifies that William P. Bramblett of Bourbon County and Miss Margaret Ann Payne of Marion County were united in marriage Jany. 28, 1854, by the undersigned a regular ordained minister of the Baptist Church, Jas. S. Green Recorder Filed 1st of February 1854 Thos. E. Thompson (Marion Co., Mo., MB:158)

Wm. Peter Bramblett Marriage

William Peter and Margaret, both natives of Bourbon Co., Ky.,  returned there, where their daughter was born. He is listed in the 1860 Slave Schedule as an owner of several slaves in District 1 of Bourbon County.  Margaret and Maude then moved to and settled in Marion Co., Mo., before the war began.

William Peter’s slaves enumerated in 1860

William Peter Bramblett 1850

William Peter’s wife, Margaret, and daughter, Maude Mary, inherited his Kentucky estate and continued to live in Missouri until their deaths. After William Peter died in 1863, his father administered his estate, transferring his land and slaves to Maude Mary, whom he identified in his 1864 Bourbon Co., Ky., will as “Mollie P. Bramblett”:

“I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] &  Henry &  two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land & slaves shall return to my estate.

William Peter Bramblett’s Wife and Daughter

William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne, daughter of Minerva Hawkins Mahan and William Thomas Payne, was born circa 1828 near Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky., and died Aug. 4, 1921, in Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. Their daughter Maude Mary “Polly “Mollie” Bramblett/Bramlette, also died near Palmyra, at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Hannibal, Marion Co., Mo., on March 8, 1939. Her Missouri Death Certificate names her parents and indicates she died of chronic nephritis and malnutrition. Maude and her mother, Margaret, and grandmother Minerva Hawkins Mahan all rest at Greenwood Cemetery in Palmyra.

Maude M. Bramlette Death Cert

Census Data

Margaret M. Bramlett, 40, keeping house, $3,000 real estate, $200 personal estate, widow, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with her daughter, Mary (Maude), 15, no occupation, $40,000 real estate and $500 personal estate, who had attended school within the year, and Margaret’s mother, Minerva K. (H.?) Payne, 61, widowed, without occupation (NARA Film M593:791:665A). All were born in Kentucky. Also listed with them: Millie Cauberton (illegible), 12, born in Missouri, black, domestic servant. (Note the real and personal estate amounts for Mary Maude “Mollie” “Polly” Bramblett, indicating she inherited her father’s estate. Mgt. Bramblette, 50, at home, widowed, and daughter, Maude, 25, at home, divorced, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo., living with Margaret’s mother, Mrs. Minerva Payne, 74, born in Kentucky to a mother born in Ireland, father born in Virginia, keeps house, head of the family (NARA Film T9:702:346B). Maude may have married a man named Wilson between 1870 and 1880 and later divorced. She is referred to as Maude Wilson at one time by one source. She did not have children who survived. Margaret Bramlett, 75, born in January 1825 in Kentucky to parents born there, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with one daughter, “Maud M. (Mary P. ‘Pollie M.’ ‘Mollie’) Bramlett,” 45, born in October 1854 in Kentucky to parents born there, servant in the home (NARA Film T623:874:42B). Margret Bramblette, 81, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramblette,” 54, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, both widowed, both retired with incomes, are listed in the 1910 U. S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T624:798:43A). Margaret Bramlette, 91, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramlette,” 60, single, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T625:934:38A).

Captain Bramblett’s Fall at Stone’s River

Captain Bramblett with two of his lieutenants, myself one of them, crawled through the weeds a distance of several hundred yards to a prominent part of observation from which through his field glass and even the naked eye we could see the enemy’s concentrated forces near and above the lower ford on the opposite side of the river, his artillery being thrown forward and nearest to the river. His artillery appeared to be close together and covering quite a space of ground; we could not tell how many guns, but there was quite a number. The infantry was seemingly in large force and extended farther down toward the ford.

Captain Bramblett was a man of no mean order of military genius and information, and after looking at, and studying the situation in silence for some minutes, he said to us boys, that he believed “Rosecrans was setting a trap for Bragg.” Continuing, he said, “If he means to attack us on this side, why does he not reinforce this side? Why concentrate so much artillery on the bluff yonder? He must be expecting us to attack that force yonder, pointing to Beatty’s position on the hill North of us, and if we do, he will use that artillery on us as we move to the attack.” At another time during the afternoon I heard him while discussing the situation with other officers of the regiment use substantially the same argument. I accompanied Captain Bramblett to General Breckinridge’s headquarters and heard him make substantially in detail a report containing the facts above recited….General Breckinridge, to thoroughly and unmistakably understand the situation and satisfy himself, in company with one or two of his staff examined the situation as best he could and I presume reached the same conclusion, and when he (Breckinridge) repaired to Bragg’s headquarters and…suggested the presumptive plan of the enemy, Bragg said: “Sir, my information is different. I have given the order to attack the enemy in your front and expect it to be obeyed.” What was General Breckinridge to do but attempt to carry out his orders, though in carrying out this unwise and ill-conceived order it should cost in one hour and ten minutes 1,700 of as brave and chivalrous soldiers as the world ever saw. What a terrible blunder, what a bloody and useless sacrifice!…We rallied some distance to the right of where we started and found that many, very many, of our noblest, truest and best had fallen. Some of them were left on the field, among whom was my military preceptor, advisor and dear friend, Captain Bramblett, who fell into the hands of the enemy and who died a few days after in Nashville. I shall never forget our parting, a moment or two before he received his wound–never forget the last quick glance and the circumstances that called it forth. He was a splendid soldier and his loss grieved me very much…. –Lieutenant Lott D. Young, “Reminiscences of a Soldier of the Orphan Brigade,” Paris, Kentucky

The Union physician who treated William Peter’s wounds after he was captured and taken to a prison hospital, Dr. F. G. Hickman, of Vandalia, Ill., also indicated in an 1894 article William Peter died at a private Payne residence in Nashville. His wife’s maiden name  also is Payne, so she may be a relative.

Captain Bramblett’s Death in Nashville

Soon after the battle of Stone’s River…I was placed in charge of a prison hospital at Nashville. The hospital was on Cherry Street, South Nashville. The hospital was for the sick and wounded Confederates and the sick of the Union Army who were under arrest for the violation of military discipline. The position I occupied as surgeon of the hospital gave me the opportunity of making many acquaintances, especially among ladies who thronged the hospital daily to see and inquire about relatives and friends. I well remember some who took an active part in administering to the wants of their sick and wounded friends. [Among them was a Miss Payne who cared for Captain Bramblett as he died.] …At the battle of Stone’s River, on Friday night about midnight there was a wounded Confederate officer brought to the field operating tent in which I was engaged as assistant surgeon, and he was laid just outside the tent. After many hours, Dr. Walton, of Kentucky, who was in charge, said to us: “We will not do any more work to-night.” Just then we heard an exclamation from this officer, and I insisted that he be brought in and his wounds dressed. This was done, and he asked me if his wounds were fatal. I told him that the chances were greatly against him. He was shot through the chest and through the leg. He was carried to a shed near by and laid on some unbaled cotton. I gave him some water and brandy. The night was very cold; I got an order for a pair of blankets and placed them over him and told him that I would see him in the morning, but I failed, as he was sent to Nashville very early. He was Capt. Peter Bramblett, Second [actually Fourth] Kentucky Infantry. Ten days later I saw his death announced in a Nashville paper. Mrs. Payne who was a frequent visitor at the hospital, wanted to have a friend of hers paroled and taken to her home, and related to me that she had cared for several Confederate soldiers, one of whom was Capt. Bramblett, who had died at her house. She said that when he was about to die she concluded to remove the coarse blankets and replace them with neater ones; that he caught her hand and said: “No, do not remove those blankets, for they saved my life at Stone’s River. They were placed over me that cold night by the hand of the enemy, but a brother. You may come across him sometime; and if you should, tell him I died under the blankets he placed over me that night.” She sent them to his parents in Paris, Ky. –“Reminiscences of a Federal Surgeon,” Confederate Veteran, 1894.

 

“…The only son of an indulgent father, who owned one thousand acres of Blue Grass land, with money, stock and slaves, he gave up all for what he conceived to be the right….” –Capt. Hugh Henry

Capt. Hugh Henry, Kentucky Orphan Brigade, Capt. William Peter Bramblett’s friend and neighbor in life and successor in battle, later of Louisville, Ky., memorialized him in the Bourbon News:

Capt. William Peter Bramblette

Bourbon County through her press, has boasted of and blazoned the deeds of her brave soldiers performed upon the field of Mars upon either side during the late war. But while she has been almost universally generous in her recollections and praise, there remains one, strange to record, whose memory seems entirely shrouded in oblivion; one too who had as much to jeopardize from a worldly standpoint as any, and I dare assert that none bore themselves more gallantly or died more bravely than the subject of this sketch. Born in Bourbon county, elected first Lieutenant in Capt. W. E. Simms’ Company in the Mexican War and distinguished there for his military bearing and efficiency, it was an easy matter for him to enlist a Company to follow him when the tocsin of war sounded, and he announced his intention of casting his lot with the Confederate army. The only son of an indulgent father, who owned one thousand acres of Blue Grass land, with money, stock and slaves, he gave up all for what he conceived to be the right, and in the stormy period, at Shiloh, Vicksburg and Murfreesboro, (at which latter place he was mortally wounded and died at Nashville). No man was more conspicuously brave, more devoted to the cause, or more solicitous for the comfort and welfare of his men than he. He fell on the bloody field of Murfreesboro in the fearful and ever memorable charge of the gallant Breckinridge, and the few remaining members of his Company vividly remember his bearing on that occasion, as with sword in hand he led them through the hail of shot and shell which rained upon them from the Federal batteries. He was brought back and buried at the old homestead and although the weather was intensely cold and bayonets overshadowed the land, there was an immense throng present. Laid away in his oblivious surroundings, with none to kindly remember or appreciate him save the remnant of a once proud and gallant Company, yet should Bourbon county, at any time in the future conclude to note other names upon the monument she has erected to the memory of her fallen braves, she cannot in justice to herself and history write a name higher upon her school of fame and honor than that of Capt. Wm. P. Bramblette. [Signed] H. [Hugh Henry]

 

 

William Peter monument

 

 

Hugh Henry’s description of the battle as “the fearful and ever memorable charge of the gallant Breckinridge” is a veiled reference to the general’s attempt to persuade General Braxton Bragg to delay the fight or change tactics based on military intelligence he and Capt. Bramblett provided after assessing the field. Hugh Henry believed Bragg’s decision to refute the intelligence and continue with his fateful, unsuccessful engagement plan resulted in some 1,700 unnecessary Confederate deaths during the battle. Hugh Henry, who helped carry Capt. Bramblett from the battlefield that day after he was twice wounded, is identified in the article below as one of the pallbearers at Capt. Bramblett’s 1905 reinterment in Paris, Ky., as is Lieutenant Lot D. Young, who describes Capt. Bramblett’s fall at the Battle of Stone’s River in another news article.

The undated memorial by Capt. Hugh Henry above and other news items below are courtesy of Geoff Walden, Orphan Brigade Historian, the latter appearing in print in August 1905 when William Peter and reportedly perhaps his parents were exhumed from the family graveyard near Cane Ridge and reinterred in the Confederate Section of Paris, Ky., Cemetery.

 

Capt. William P. Bramblett Paris, Ky., Aug. 8, 1905. Tuesday. Remains Reinterred. The remains of Capt. Wm. P. Bramlette, of the Kentucky Orphan Brigade who fell in the battle of Murfreesboro, will be taken from the old farm lot on Cane Ridge and reinterred in the Confederate lot on the 24th inst., at 3:00 P M. Veterans and friends of the lost cause are invited to be present.    — The Bourbon News
BRAMBLETT, Captain William P., Confederate killed at Murfreesboro and buried near Cane Ridge, will be exhumed and re-interred August 24, at the Confederate lot in the Paris Cemetery. Col. A. T. Forsythe, being master of ceremonies, orderly Sergeant William E. Knox, called the roll of the living and the dead, when Capt. James R. Rogers feelingly pronounced the eulogy. He reviewed the military record of Capt. Bramblett and paid an eloquent tribute to his memory. Rev. Dr. E. H. Rutherford pronounced the benediction. Capt. Bramblett was born and reared in Bourbon County, Ky., near the historic grounds of old Cane Ridge Church. He was a young man of great prominence, endowed with fine personal appearance, possessed of a large farm and many slaves. He enlisted in the Mexican War and served as Lieut. in Capt. Simms’ Co. from 1847 to 1848. In 1861 he enlisted in Col. Roger Hanson’s Regt, Gen. John C. Breckinridge’s brigade. At the battle of Murfreesboro, where 45,000 Confederates were engaged and during the terrific charge made by Breckenridge in which 2,000 were killed and wounded, Peter Bramblett was one of the number wounded, and while being borne tenderly from the field by Capt. Henry and other comrades, he was again wounded, this time yielding up his precious life as one of the bravest and knightliest of soldiers and truest and tenderest of gentlemen. Pall Bearers: Capt. Hugh Henry of Louisville, William E. Knox of Wilmore; Lieut. L. D. Young of Carlisle; Dr. C. J. Clark of Paris; James McDonald, of Kansas City; Capt. James R. Rogers of Cane Ridge. About 800 old soldiers and friends were present. — August 2, 1905, The Bourbon News

William Peter Bramblett was also celebrated by his only child. Maude Mary “Polly M.” “Molly” Bramlette identifies herself as his daughter in her membership application for the Missouri Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which she joined to honor her father’s war service.

 

 

William Bramblett, child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Kentucky. William farmed in Fauquier County near his father before moving to Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1794. He married Nancy Ann Laurence in Virginia. Some of their children are named in the 1864 will of their son Peter Bramblett: James, Malinda, Ambrose and Elizabeth Bramblett.

Peter Bramblett and Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall

Peter Bramblett, child of Nancy Ann Laurence and William Bramblett, was born circa 1799-1800 in Bourbon Co., Ky. Peter died there in or shortly before Sept. 3, 1866, and was buried in the private family graveyard on his thousand-acre plantation near Cane Ridge. He married Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall circa 1822 in Bourbon County. She was born April 4, 1780, in Shenandoah Valley, Va. She died Oct. 13, 1871, at home near Cane Ridge and was buried there beside Peter. Peter and Mary may have been exhumed and reinterred at Paris Cemetery in now unmarked graves when the remains of their only child, William Peter Bramblett, was moved to his final resting place beside the Confederate Memorial Monument in the Confederate Section there in 1905. One local historian indicated Peter’s wife, Mary “Polly” Hutzell Hall Bramblett, was buried beside her son; however, Paris Cemetery had no record of her or her husband Peter’s burial there when queried several years ago. Mary gave birth to William Peter at about age 43. She had another son, John Hall, with her first husband, Robert D. Hall, a native of Yorkshire, England.

Peter Bramblett’s Last Will and Testament:

Peter’s will, written July 19, 1864, in Bourbon Co., Ky., includes legacies of nine slaves, about $6,000 in cash, personal and household property, and 600 acres of land to eight heirs: his wife, Polly (Mary Hutsell Hall); his stepson and executor John Hall; Peter’s siblings/heirs–James, Malinda, Ambrose’s descendants and Elizabeth; and his son’s 400 acres to his granddaughter “Mollie P. Bramblett”–the only child of his only child, William Peter Bramblett, who had died in 1863. He also arranged lifetime support for two invalid slaves and their freedom plus $100 for a slave named Jefferson.

I, Peter Bramblett of the County of Bourbon State of Kentucky do make this my last Will and Testament. I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] & Henry, two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children, which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land & slaves shall return to my estate. I divise to my brother James Bramblett the tract of one hundred seventy six and a half acres of land which I purchased of Geo. W. Hall situate in Bourbon County to him his heirs and assigns forever. After the payment of my debts and one thousand Dollars to my Executor herein after named for his service in settling up my Estate, I divise all the rest and residue of my Estate consisting of about six hundred acres of land more or less whereon I now reside all my Household & kitchen furniture, slaves, stock, crops, money, notes, debts, claims, demands & chosis in action [legal/law suits] to my wife Polly Bramblett for and during her life with the privilege & power to divise five thousand dollars thereof in cash to whomsoever she may think proper and after her death all said Estate, hereby divised to her shall be sold by my executor herein after named who is vested with full power to convey the same to the purchaser or purchasers and the proceeds thereof after deducting the five thousand Dollars mentioned herein I divise to be equally divided between my brothers and sisters or their descendants to wit: To Malinda Young one equal share To Ambrose Bramblett’s descendants one equal share To Elizabeth Miles [? document iss smudged] one equal share. I constitute my stepson John Hall Executor of this my last will and Testament & divise to him the one thousand dollars aforesaid for his service & settling up my estate. The divise made to my Grand daughter Mollie P. and to my brother James in the 1st and 2nd Sect. or clause of my will is all that I intend they shall have or receive from my estate & Out of the Estate divised to my wife my Executor shall also retain in his hands after my death a sufficient sum of money to support comfortably my two invalid servants Horace & Clarissa during their lives. It is my will that whenever my servant Jefferson elects to accept his freedom agreeably to the laws of Kentucky he shall have it after my wife’s death & one hundred dollars in cash. Witness my hand this 19th day of July 1864. Peter Bramblett. Att[est] R. J. Davis R. J. Brown

Peter’s last will was probated in Bourbon County on Sept. 3, 1866, and recorded on pages 198-199 in Will/Estate Book 2845:

“State of Kentucky Bourbon County Court September Term September 3d 1866 This last Will and Testament of Peter Bramblett decd was produced and proved in Open Court by the call of R. T. Davis & R. J. Brown subscribing witnesses thereto and the probate thereof being duly stamped is ordered to record. Witness Jas. M. Hughes Clerk of said court the date above. J. M. Hughes, Clk.”

Peter owned nineteen slaves in Dist. 1, Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1850: a black female 55, a black female 48, a black female 40, a mulatto male 34, a mulatto female, 27, a black male, 26; a mulatto male, 26; a black female, 23; a mulatto female, 14; a black male, 28; a mulatto female, 10; a black male, 10; a mulatto male, 8; a black male, 6; a black female, 6; a mulatto female, 6; a black male, 4; a mulatto female, 21; and a mulatto female, 1.

   Peter’s granddaughter and an heir, “Pollie M. Bramblett,” who is also known as Maude Mary “Mollie”  “Pollie” Bramblett, lived with her mother, Margaret Ann Payne Bramblett, in Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo., in 1860 and until Margaret died there in 1921. Margaret and Maude lived near William Peter’s aunt Malinda Bramblett Young and her family, who had moved to Marion County from Bourbon Co., Ky., before 1840. Maude lived in Palmyra until she died in St. Mary Hospital at Hannibal, Mo.
   Peter and Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall Bramblett are parents of one only child: William Peter Bramblett.

kybramblettscan

The Romantic Epitome of the Dashing Southern Gentleman Planter and Military Officer: Confederate Captain William Peter Bramblett, 1823-1863, only child of Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall and Peter Bramblett of Bourbon Co., Ky. Gone too soon: twice wounded on the battlefield at Stone’s River and died a Prisoner of War at Nashville. Photo restoration by Deborah G. Dennis, original photo courtesy Geoff Walden, Orphan Brigade Kinfolk Association Historian.



   William Peter Bramblett, only child of Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall and Peter Bramblett, was born Oct. 21, 1823, in Bourbon Co., Ky. He fell in battle near Murfreesboro, Tenn., while serving as a Confederate officer during the Civil War/War Between the States. He later died from his wounds on Jan. 23, 1863, at a private Payne residence in Nashville, Tenn. He was first buried in a small family graveyard on his father’s plantation near Cane Ridge in Bourbon County. His body was later disinterred and moved to a more accessible location in the Confederate Section of Paris, Ky. Cemetery.

Capt. Bramblett’s military tombstone, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis

William+Peter+Bramblett+grave+marker

William’s military grave marker at Paris Cemetery. He died in 1863 from wounds suffered during the Battle of Stone River. He is described by a soldier in his company: Capt. Bramblett was born and reared in Bourbon County, Ky., near the historic grounds of old Cane Ridge Church. He was a young man of great prominence, endowed with fine personal appearance, possessed of a large farm and many slaves.”

  The Union physician who treated Capt. Bramblett’s wounds documented his later death in Nashville in an article published in the Confederate Veteran. His body was taken to his father’s thousand-acre plantation and buried in the family graveyard near Cane Ridge, Ky. To honor him and his military service at a more accessible location near other soldiers, his remains were later exhumed and reinterred in the Confederate section of Paris, Ky., Cemetery in 1905. William Peter’s mother, Mary, who was born 1780 in Shenandoah Valley, Va., and died in 1871 near Cane Ridge, and his father, Peter, who died in 1866, no doubt attended their only child’s burial in  1863. William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne, and their only child, Maude Mary “Pollie M.” “Mollie” Bramblett, who were both born in Bourbon County, are not mentioned in his death notices. They were living in Missouri by 1860, perhaps to escape the dangers of the impending war. It is not known if they returned to Kentucky to attend his funeral at Cane Ridge; however, one historical report indicates only a remnant of his company attended his burial.

Bramblett to Payne: This certifies that William P. Bramblett of Bourbon County and Miss Margaret Ann Payne of Marion County

William Bramblett, child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Kentucky. William farmed in Fauquier County near his father before moving to Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1794. He married Nancy Ann Laurence in Virginia. Some of their children are named in the 1864 will of their son Peter Bramblett: James, Malinda, Ambrose and Elizabeth Bramblett.

Peter Bramblett and Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall
   Peter Bramblett, child of Nancy Ann Laurence and William Bramblett, was born circa 1799-1800 in Bourbon Co., Ky. Peter died there in or shortly before Sept. 3, 1866, and was buried in the private family graveyard on his thousand-acre plantation near Cane Ridge. He married Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall circa 1822 in Bourbon County. She was born April 4, 1780, in Shenandoah Valley, Va. She died Oct. 13, 1871, at home near Cane Ridge and was buried there beside Peter. Peter and Mary may have been exhumed and reinterred at Paris Cemetery in now unmarked graves when the remains of their only child, William Peter Bramblett, was moved to his final resting place beside the Confederate Memorial Monument in the Confederate Section there in 1905. One local historian indicated Peter’s wife, Mary “Polly” Hutzell Hall Bramblett, was buried beside her son; however, Paris Cemetery had no record of her or her husband Peter’s burial there when queried several years ago. Mary gave birth to William Peter at about age 43. She had another son, John Hall, with her first husband, Robert D. Hall, a native of Yorkshire, England.

   Peter’s will, written July 19, 1864, in Bourbon Co., Ky., includes legacies of nine slaves, about $6,000 in cash, personal and household property, and 600 acres of land to eight heirs: his wife, Polly (Mary Hutsell Hall); his stepson and executor John Hall; Peter’s siblings/heirs–James, Malinda, Ambrose’s descendants and Elizabeth; and his son’s 400 acres to his granddaughter “Mollie P. Bramblett”–the only child of his only child, William Peter Bramblett, who had died in 1863. He also arranged lifetime support for two invalid slaves and their freedom plus $100 for a slave named Jefferson.
I, Peter Bramblett of the County of Bourbon State of Kentucky do make this my last Will and Testament. I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] &  Henry & two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land & slaves shall return to my estate. I divise to my brother James Bramblett the tract of one hundred seventy six and a half acres of land which I purchased of Geo. W. Hall situate in Bourbon County to him his heirs and assigns forever. After the payment of my debts and one thousand Dollars to my Executor herein after named for his service in settling up my Estate, I divise all the rest and residue of my Estate consisting of about six hundred acres of land more or less whereon I now reside all my Household & kitchen furniture, slaves, stock, crops, money, notes, debts, claims, demands & chosis in action [legal/law suits] to my wife Polly Bramblett for and during her life with the privilege & power to divise five thousand dollars thereof in cash to whomsoever she may think proper and after her death all said Estate, hereby divised to her shall be sold by my executor herein after named who is vested with full power to convey the same to the purchaser or purchasers and the proceeds thereof after deducting the five thousand Dollars mentioned herein I divise to be equally divided between my brothers and sisters or their descendants to wit: To Malinda Young one equal share To Ambrose Bramblett’s descendants one equal share To Elizabeth Miles [? document smudged] one equal share. I constitute my stepson John Hall Executor of this my last will and Testament & divise to him the one thousand dollars aforesaid for his service & settling up my estate. The divise made to my Grand daughter Mollie P. and to my brother James in the 1st and 2nd Sect. or clause of my will is all that I intend they shall have or receive from my estate & Out of the Estate divised to my wife my Executor shall also retain in his hands after my death a sufficient sum of money to support comfortably my two invalid servants Horace & Clarissa during their lives. It is my will that whenever my servant Jefferson elects to accept his freedom agreeably to the laws of Kentucky he shall have it after my wife’s death & one hundred dollars in cash. Witness my hand this 19th day of July 1864. Peter Bramblett. Att[est] R. J. Davis R. J. Brown

Peter’s last will was probated in Bourbon County on Sept. 3, 1866, and recorded on pages 198-199 in Will/Estate Book 2845:

State of Kentucky Bourbon County Court September Term September 3d 1866 This last Will and Testament of Peter Bramblett decd was produced and proved in Open Court by the call of R. T. Davis, R. J. Brown subscribing witnesses thereto and the probate thereof being duly stamped is ordered to record. Witness Jas. M. Hughes Clerk of said court the date above. J. M. Hughes, Clk.
Peter owned nineteen slaves in Dist. 1, Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1850: a black female 55, a black female 48, a black female 40, a mulatto male 34, a mulatto female, 27, a black male, 26; a mulatto male, 26; a black female, 23; a mulatto female, 14; a black male, 28; a mulatto female, 10; a black male, 10; a mulatto male, 8; a black male, 6; a black female, 6; a mulatto female, 6; a black male, 4; a mulatto female, 21; and a mulatto female, 1. 
   Peter’s granddaughter and an heir, “Pollie M. Bramblett,” who is also known as Maude Mary “Mollie” Bramblett, lived with her mother, Margaret Ann Payne Bramblett, in Marion Co., Mo., in 1860 and until Margaret died there in 1921 in Palmyra. Margaret and Maude lived near William Peter’s aunt Malinda Bramblett Young and her family, who had moved to Marion County from Bourbon Co., Ky., before 1840. Maude lived in Palmyra until she died.

   Peter and Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall Bramblett are parents of one only child: William Peter Bramblett.



   William Peter Bramblett, only child of Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall and Peter Bramblett, was born Oct. 21, 1823, in Bourbon Co., Ky. He fell in battle near Murfreesboro, Tenn., while serving as a Confederate officer and later died Jan. 23, 1863, at a private Payne residence in Nashville, Tenn.

Capt. Bramblett’s military tombstone in Paris Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis

The Union physician who treated Capt. Bramblett’s wounds documented his later death in Nashville in an article he wrote and published in the Confederate Veteran. His body was taken to his father’s thousand-acre plantation and buried in the family graveyard near Cane Ridge, Ky. His remains were later exhumed and reinterred in the Confederate section of Paris, Ky., Cemetery in 1905. William Peter’s mother, Mary, who was born 1780 in Shenandoah Valley, Va., and died in 1871 near Cane Ridge, and his father, Peter, who died in 1866, no doubt attended their only child’s burial. William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne, and their only child, Maude Mary “Pollie M.” “Mollie” Bramblett, are not mentioned in his death notices. They were living in Missouri by 1860, perhaps to escape the dangers of the impending war. It is not known if they returned to Kentucky to attend his funeral at Cane Ridge; however, one historical report indicates only a remnant of his company attended his burial.

 

Bramblett to Payne: This certifies that William P. Bramblett of Bourbon County and Miss Margaret Ann Payne of Marion County were united in marriage Jany. 28, 1854, by the undersigned a regular ordained minister of the Baptist Church, Jas. S. Green Recorder Filed 1st of February 1854 Thos. E. Thompson (Marion Co., Mo., MB:158)

William Peter’s wife, Margaret, and daughter, Maude Mary, inherited his Kentucky estate and continued to live in Missouri until their deaths. After William Peter died, his father administered his estate, transferring his land and slaves to Maude Mary, whom he identified in his 1864 Bourbon Co., Ky., will as “Mollie P. Bramblett”: “I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] & Henry & two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land & slaves shall return to my estate.

 

William Peter Bramblett’s Wife and Daughter
William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne, daughter of Minerva Hawkins Mahan and William Thomas Payne, was born circa 1828 near Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky., and died Aug. 4, 1921, in Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. Their daughter Maude Mary Bramblett/Bramlette, also died in or near Palmyra, Mo., after 1921. Margaret M. Bramlett, 40, keeping house, $3,000 real estate, $200 personal estate, widow, is listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with her daughter, Mary (Maude), 15, no occupation, $40,000 real estate and $500 personal estate, who had attended school within the year, and Margaret’s mother, Minerva K. (H.?) Payne, 61, widowed, without occupation (NARA Film M593:791:665A). All were born in Kentucky. Also listed with them: Millie Cauberton (illegible), 12, born in Missouri, black, domestic servant. (Note the real and personal estate amounts for Mary Maude “Mollie” “Polly” Bramblett, indicating she inherited her father’s estate and part of her grandfather’s estate. Mgt. Bramblette, 50, at home, widowed, and daughter, Maude, 25, at home, divorced, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo., living with Margaret’s mother, Mrs. Minerva Payne, 74, born in Kentucky to a mother born in Ireland, father born in Virginia, keeps house, head of the family (NARA Film T9:702:346B). Maude may have married a man named Wilson between 1870 and 1880 and later divorced. She is referred to as Maude Wilson at one time by one source. Margaret Bramlett, 75, born in January 1825 in Kentucky to parents born there, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with one daughter, “Maud M. (Mary P. ‘Pollie M.’ ‘Mollie’) Bramlett,” 45, born in October 1854 in Kentucky to parents born there, servant in the home (NARA Film T623:874:42B). Margret Bramblette, 81, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramblette,” 54, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, both widowed, both retired with incomes, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T624:798:43A). Margaret Bramlette, 91, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramlette,” 60, single, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T625:934:38A).

 

Captain Bramblett’s Fall at Stone’s River

…Captain Bramblett with two of his lieutenants, myself one of them, crawled through the weeds a distance of several hundred yards to a prominent part of observation from which through his field glass and even the naked eye we could see the enemy’s concentrated forces near and above the lower ford on the opposite side of the river, his artillery being thrown forward and nearest to the river. His artillery appeared to be close together and covering quite a space of ground; we could not tell how many guns, but there was quite a number. The infantry was seemingly in large force and extended farther down toward the ford.

Captain Bramblett was a man of no mean order of military genius and information, and after looking at, and studying the situation in silence for some minutes, he said to us boys, that he believed “Rosecrans was setting a trap for Bragg.” Continuing, he said, “If he means to attack us on this side, why does he not reinforce this side? Why concentrate so much artillery on the bluff yonder? He must be expecting us to attack that force yonder, pointing to Beatty’s position on the hill North of us, and if we do, he will use that artillery on us as we move to the attack.” At another time during the afternoon I heard him while discussing the situation with other officers of the regiment use substantially the same argument. I accompanied Captain Bramblett to General Breckinridge’s headquarters and heard him make substantially in detail a report containing the facts above recited….General Breckinridge, to thoroughly and unmistakably understand the situation and satisfy himself, in company with one or two of his staff examined the situation as best he could and I presume reached the same conclusion, and when he (Breckinridge) repaired to Bragg’s headquarters and…suggested the presumptive plan of the enemy, Bragg said: “Sir, my information is different. I have given the order to attack the enemy in your front and expect it to be obeyed.” What was General Breckinridge to do but attempt to carry out his orders, though in carrying out this unwise and ill-conceived order it should cost in one hour and ten minutes 1,700 of as brave and chivalrous soldiers as the world ever saw. What a terrible blunder, what a bloody and useless sacrifice!…We rallied some distance to the right of where we started and found that many, very many, of our noblest, truest and best had fallen. Some of them were left on the field, among whom was my military preceptor, advisor and dear friend, Captain Bramblett, who fell into the hands of the enemy and who died a few days after in Nashville. I shall never forget our parting, a moment or two before he received his wound–never forget the last quick glance and the circumstances that called it forth. He was a splendid soldier and his loss grieved me very much…. –Lieutenant Lott D. Young, “Reminiscences of a Soldier of the Orphan Brigade,” Paris, Kentucky

The Union physician who treated William Peter’s wounds after he was captured and taken to a prison hospital, Dr. F. G. Hickman, of Vandalia, Ill., also indicated in an 1894 Conederate Veteran article William Peter died at a private residence in Nashville:

Captain Bramblett’s Death in Nashville

Soon after the battle of Stone’s River…I was placed in charge of a prison hospital at Nashville. The hospital was on Cherry Street, South Nashville. The hospital was for the sick and wounded Confederates and the sick of the Union Army who were under arrest for the violation of military discipline. The position I occupied as surgeon of the hospital gave me the opportunity of making many acquaintances, especially among ladies who thronged the hospital daily to see and inquire about relatives and friends. I well remember some who took an active part in administering to the wants of their sick and wounded friends. [Among them was a Miss Payne who cared for Captain Bramblett as he died.] …At the battle of Stone’s River, on Friday night about midnight there was a wounded Confederate officer brought to the field operating tent in which I was engaged as assistant surgeon, and he was laid just outside the tent. After many hours, Dr. Walton, of Kentucky, who was in charge, said to us: “We will not do any more work to-night.” Just then we heard an exclamation from this officer, and I insisted that he be brought in and his wounds dressed. This was done, and he asked me if his wounds were fatal. I told him that the chances were greatly against him. He was shot through the chest and through the leg. He was carried to a shed near by and laid on some unbaled cotton. I gave him some water and brandy. The night was very cold; I got an order for a pair of blankets and placed them over him and told him that I would see him in the morning, but I failed, as he was sent to Nashville very early. He was Capt. Peter Bramblett, Second [actually Fourth] Kentucky Infantry. Ten days later I saw his death announced in a Nashville paper. Mrs. Payne who was a frequent visitor at the hospital, wanted to have a friend of hers paroled and taken to her home, and related to me that she had cared for several Confederate soldiers, one of whom was Capt. Bramblett, who had died at her house. She said that when he was about to die she concluded to remove the coarse blankets and replace them with neater ones; that he caught her hand and said: “No, do not remove those blankets, for they saved my life at Stone’s River. They were placed over me that cold night by the hand of the enemy, but a brother. You may come across him sometime; and if you should, tell him I died under the blankets he placed over me that night.” She sent them to his parents in Paris, Ky. –“Reminiscences of a Federal Surgeon,” Confederate Veteran, 1894.
“…The only son of an indulgent father, who owned one thousand acres of Blue Grass land, with money, stock and slaves, he gave up all for what he conceived to be the right….” –Capt. Hugh Henry
Capt. Hugh Henry, Kentucky Orphan Brigade, Capt. William Peter Bramblett’s friend and neighbor in life and successor in battle, later of Louisville, Ky., memorialized him in the Bourbon News:

Capt. William Peter Bramblette
Bourbon County through her press, has boasted of and blazoned the deeds of her brave soldiers performed upon the field of Mars upon either side during the late war. But while she has been almost universally generous in her recollections and praise, there remains one, strange to record, whose memory seems entirely shrouded in oblivion; one too who had as much to jeopardize from a worldly standpoint as any, and I dare assert that none bore themselves more gallantly or died more bravely than the subject of this sketch. Born in Bourbon county, elected first Lieutenant in Capt. W. E. Simms’ Company in the Mexican War and distinguished there for his military bearing and efficiency, it was an easy matter for him to enlist a Company to follow him when the tocsin of war sounded, and he announced his intention of casting his lot with the Confederate army. The only son of an indulgent father, who owned one thousand acres of Blue Grass land, with money, stock and slaves, he gave up all for what he conceived to be the right, and in the stormy period, at Shiloh, Vicksburg and Murfreesboro, (at which latter place he was mortally wounded and died at Nashville). No man was more conspicuously brave, more devoted to the cause, or more solicitous for the comfort and welfare of his men than he. He fell on the bloody field of Murfreesboro in the fearful and ever memorable charge of the gallant Breckinridge, and the few remaining members of his Company vividly remember his bearing on that occasion, as with sword in hand he led them through the hail of shot and shell which rained upon them from the Federal batteries. He was brought back and buried at the old homestead and although the weather was intensely cold and bayonets overshadowed the land, there was an immense throng present. Laid away in his oblivious surroundings, with none to kindly remember or appreciate him save the remnant of a once proud and gallant Company, yet should Bourbon county, at any time in the future conclude to note other names upon the monument she has erected to the memory of her fallen braves, she cannot in justice to herself and history write a name higher upon her school of fame and honor than that of Capt. Wm. P. Bramblette. [Signed] H. [Hugh Henry]
Hugh Henry’s description of the battle as “the fearful and ever memorable charge of the gallant Breckinridge” is a veiled reference to the general’s attempt to persuade General Braxton Bragg to delay the fight or change tactics based on military intelligence he and Capt. Bramblett provided after assessing the field. Hugh Henry believed Bragg’s decision to refute the intelligence and continue with his fateful, unsuccessful engagement plan resulted in some 1,700 unnecessary Confederate deaths during the battle. Hugh Henry, who helped carry Capt. Bramblett from the battlefield that day after he was twice wounded, is identified in the article below as one of the pallbearers at Capt. Bramblett’s 1905 reinterment in Paris, Ky., as is Lieutenant Lot D. Young, who describes Capt. Bramblett’s fall at the Battle of Stone’s River in another news article above.
The undated memorial by Capt. Hugh Henry above and other news items below are courtesy of Geoff Walden, Orphan Brigade Historian, the latter appearing in print in August 1905 when William Peter and reportedly perhaps his parents were exhumed from the family graveyard near Cane Ridge and reinterred in the Confederate Section of Paris, Ky., Cemetery.

 

William Peter Bramblett memorialized on the honor wall of Confederate Monument, Paris, Ky., Cemetery (fifth from top, left column)

Capt. William P. Bramblett Paris, Ky., Aug. 8, 1905. Tuesday. Remains Reinterred. The remains of Capt. Wm. P. Bramlette, of the Kentucky Orphan Brigade who fell in the battle of Murfreesboro, will be taken from the old farm lot on Cane Ridge and reinterred in the Confederate lot on the 24th inst., at 3:00 P M. Veterans and friends of the lost cause are invited to be present.    — The Bourbon News
BRAMBLETT, Captain William P., Confederate killed at Murfreesboro and buried near Cane Ridge, will be exhumed and re-interred August 24, at the Confederate lot in the Paris Cemetery. Col. A. T. Forsythe, being master of ceremonies, orderly Sergeant William E. Knox, called the roll of the living and the dead, when Capt. James R. Rogers feelingly pronounced the eulogy. He reviewed the military record of Capt. Bramblett and paid an eloquent tribute to his memory. Rev. Dr. E. H. Rutherford pronounced the benediction. Capt. Bramblett was born and reared in Bourbon County, Ky., near the historic grounds of old Cane Ridge Church. He was a young man of great prominence, endowed with fine personal appearance, possessed of a large farm and many slaves. He enlisted in the Mexican War and served as Lieut. in Capt. Simms’ Co. from 1847 to 1848. In 1861 he enlisted in Col. Roger Hanson’s Regt, Gen. John C. Breckinridge’s brigade. At the battle of Murfreesboro, where 45,000 Confederates were engaged and during the terrific charge made by Breckenridge in which 2,000 were killed and wounded, Peter Bramblett was one of the number wounded, and while being borne tenderly from the field by Capt. Henry and other comrades, he was again wounded, this time yielding up his precious life as one of the bravest and knightliest of soldiers and truest and tenderest of gentlemen. Pall Bearers: Capt. Hugh Henry of Louisville, William E. Knox of Wilmore; Lieut. L. D. Young of Carlisle; Dr. C. J. Clark of Paris; James McDonald, of Kansas City; Capt. James R. Rogers of Cane Ridge. About 800 old soldiers and friends were present. — August 2, 1905, The Bourbon News

William Peter Bramblett was also celebrated by his only child. Maude Mary “Polly M.” “Molly” Bramlette identifies herself as his daughter in her membership application for the Missouri Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which she joined to honor her father’s war service.

William Peter Bramblett also ismemorialized on the honor wall of Confederate Monument, Paris, Ky., Cemetery (fifth from top, left column)

William Peter Bramblett 1850

William Bramblett and Nancy ann Laurence

William Bramblett, child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown (Darnall? Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Kentucky. William farmed in Fauquier County near his father before moving to Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1794. He married Nancy Ann Laurence in Virginia. Some of their children are named in the 1864 will of their son Peter Bramblett: James, Malinda, Ambrose and Elizabeth Bramblett.

Peter Bramblett and Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall

Peter Bramblett, child of Nancy Ann Laurence and William Bramblett, was born circa 1799-1800 in Bourbon Co., Ky. Peter died there in or shortly before Sept. 3, 1866, and was buried in the private family graveyard on his thousand-acre plantation near Cane Ridge. He married Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall circa 1822 in Bourbon County. She was born April 4, 1780, in Shenandoah Valley, Va. She died Oct. 13, 1871, at home near Cane Ridge and was buried there beside Peter and their son, William. Peter and Mary may have been exhumed and reinterred at Paris Cemetery in now unmarked graves when the body and grave of their only child, William Peter Bramblett, was moved to his final resting place beside the Confederate Memorial Monument in the Confederate Section there in 1905. One local historian in Paris, Ky., indicated Peter’s wife, Mary “Polly” Hutzell Hall Bramblett, was buried beside her son; however, Paris Cemetery had no record of her or her husband Peter’s burial there when queried several years ago. They may have been moved from the family graveyard to Paris when their son’s grave was relocated. Mary gave birth to William Peter at about age 43. She had another son, John Hall, with her first husband, Robert D. Hall, a native of Yorkshire, England.

Peter Bramblett’s Last Will and Testament:
Peter’s will, written July 19, 1864, in Bourbon Co., Ky., includes legacies of nine slaves, about $6,000 in cash, personal and household property, and 600 acres of land to eight heirs: his wife, Polly (Mary Hutsell Hall); his stepson and executor John Hall; Peter’s siblings/heirs–James, Malinda, Ambrose’s descendants and Elizabeth; and his son’s 400 acres to his granddaughter “Mollie P. Bramblett”– the only child of his only child, William Peter Bramblett, who had died in 1863. He also arranged lifetime support for two invalid slaves and their freedom plus $100 for a slave named Jefferson.

I, Peter Bramblett of the County of Bourbon State of Kentucky do make this my last Will and Testament. I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] & Henry & two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land and slaves shall return to my estate. I divise to my brother James Bramblett the tract of one hundred seventy six and a half acres of land which I purchased of Geo. W. Hall situate in Bourbon County to him his heirs and assigns forever. After the payment of my debts and one thousand Dollars to my Executor herein after named for his service in settling up my Estate, I divise all the rest and residue of my Estate consisting of about six hundred acres of land more or less whereon I now reside all my Household & kitchen furniture, slaves, stock, crops, money, notes, debts, claims, demands & chosis in action [legal/law suits] to my wife Polly Bramblett for and during her life with the privilege & power to divise five thousand dollars thereof in cash to whomsoever she may think proper and after her death all said Estate, hereby divised to her shall be sold by my executor herein after named who is vested with full power to convey the same to the purchaser or purchasers and the proceeds thereof after deducting the five thousand Dollars mentioned herein I divise to be equally divided between my brothers and sisters or their descendants to wit: To Malinda Young one equal share To Ambrose Bramblett’s descendants one equal share To Elizabeth Miles [? document smudged] one equal share. I constitute my stepson John Hall Executor of this my last will and Testament & divise to him the one thousand dollars aforesaid for his service & settling up my estate. The divise made to my Grand daughter Mollie P. and to my brother James in the 1st and 2nd Sect. or clause of my will is all that I intend they shall have or receive from my estate & Out of the Estate divised to my wife my Executor shall also retain in his hands after my death a sufficient sum of money to support comfortably my two invalid servants Horace & Clarissa during their lives. It is my will that whenever my servant Jefferson elects to accept his freedom agreeably to the laws of Kentucky he shall have it after my wife’s death & one hundred dollars in cash. Witness my hand this 19th day of July 1864. Peter Bramblett. Att[est] R. J. Davis R. J. Brown

Peter’s last will was probated in Bourbon County on Sept. 3, 1866, and recorded on pages 198-199 in Will/Estate Book 2845:

State of Kentucky Bourbon County Court September Term September 3d 1866 This last Will and Testament of Peter Bramblett decd was produced and proved in Open Court by the call of R. T. Davis & R. J. Brown subscribing witnesses thereto and the probate thereof being duly stamped is ordered to record. Witness Jas. M. Hughes Clerk of said court the date above. J. M. Hughes, Clk.

Peter owned nineteen slaves in Dist. 1, Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1850: a black female 55, a black female 48, a black female 40, a mulatto male 34, a mulatto female, 27, a black male, 26; a mulatto male, 26; a black female, 23; a mulatto female, 14; a black male, 28; a mulatto female, 10; a black male, 10; a mulatto male, 8; a black male, 6; a black female, 6; a mulatto female, 6; a black male, 4; a mulatto female, 21; and a mulatto female, 1.
Peter’s granddaughter and an heir, “Pollie M. Bramblett,” who is also known as Maude Mary “Mollie” Bramblett, lived with her mother, Margaret Ann Payne Bramblett, in Marion Co., Mo., in 1860 and until Margaret died there in 1921 in Palmyra. Margaret and Maude lived near William Peter’s aunt Malinda Bramblett Young and her family, who had moved to Marion County from Bourbon Co., Ky., before 1840. Maude lived in Palmyra until she died.
   Peter and Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall Bramblett are parents of one only child: William Peter Bramblett.



   William Peter Bramblett, only child of Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall and Peter Bramblett, was born Oct. 21, 1823, in Bourbon Co., Ky. He was morttally wounded and fell in battle near Murfreesboro, Tenn., while serving as a Confederate officer during the Civil War/War Between the States. He later died Jan. 23, 1863, at a private Payne residence in Nashville, Tenn. Residents of the Payne home may have been related to William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne Bramblett.kybramblettscan

The Romantic Epitome of the Dashing Southern Gentleman Planter and Military Officer: Confederate Captain William Peter Bramblett, 1823-1863, only child of Mary “Polly” Hutsell Hall and Peter Bramblett of Bourbon Co., Ky. Gone too soon: twice wounded on the battlefield at Stone’s River and died a Prisoner of War at Nashville. Photo restoration by Deborah G. Dennis, original photo courtesy Geoff Walden, Orphan Brigade Kinfolk Association Historian.

Capt. Bramblett’s military tombstone in Paris Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis
The Union physician who treated Capt. Bramblett’s wounds documented his later death in Nashville in an article in the Confederate Veteran. His body were taken to his father’s thousand-acre plantation and buried in the family graveyard near Cane Ridge, Ky. His remains were later exhumed and reinterred in the Confederate section of Paris, Ky., Cemetery in 1905. William Peter’s mother, Mary, who was born 1780 in Shenandoah Valley, Va., and died in 1871 near Cane Ridge, and his father, Peter, who died in 1866, no doubt attended their only child’s burial. William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne, and their only child, Maude Mary “Pollie M.” “Mollie” Bramblett, are not mentioned in his death notices. They were living in Missouri by 1860, perhaps to escape the dangers of the impending war. It is not known if they returned to Kentucky to attend his funeral at Cane Ridge; however, one historical report indicates only a remnant of his company attended his burial.

Bramblett to Payne: This certifies that William P. Bramblett of Bourbon County and Miss Margaret Ann Payne of Marion County were united in marriage Jany. 28, 1854, by the undersigned a regular ordained minister of the Baptist Church, Jas. S. Green Recorder Filed 1st of February 1854 Thos. E. Thompson (Marion Co., Mo., MB:158).”

William Peter’s wife, Margaret, and daughter, Maude Mary “Molie Polly,” inherited his Kentucky estate and continued to live in Missouri until their deaths. After William Peter died, his father administered his estate, transferring his land and slaves to Maude Mary, whom he identified in his 1864 Bourbon Co., Ky., will as “Mollie P. Bramblett”: “I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] & Henry & two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land & slaves shall return to my estate.”  She did not have children and  she survived her mother.

William Peter Bramblett’s Wife and Daughter

William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne, daughter of Minerva Hawkins Mahan and William Thomas Payne, was born circa 1828 near Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky., and died Aug. 4, 1921, in Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. Her daughter Maude Mary Bramblett/Bramlette, also died in or near Palmyra, Mo., after 1921. Margaret M. Bramlett, 40, keeping house, $3,000 real estate, $200 personal estate, widow, is listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with her daughter, Mary (Maude), 15, no occupation, $40,000 real estate and $500 personal estate, who had attended school within the year, and Margaret’s mother, Minerva K. (H.?) Payne, 61, widowed, without occupation (NARA Film M593:791:665A). All were born in Kentucky. Also listed with them: Millie Cauberton (illegible), 12, born in Missouri, black, domestic servant. (Note the real and personal estate amounts for Mary Maude “Mollie” “Polly” Bramblett, indicating she inherited her father’s estate and part of her grandfather’s estate. Mgt. Bramblette, 50, at home, widowed, and daughter, Maude, 25, at home, divorced, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo., living with Margaret’s mother, Mrs. Minerva Payne, 74, born in Kentucky to a mother born in Ireland, father born in Virginia, keeps house, head of the family (NARA Film T9:702:346B). Maude may have married a man named Wilson between 1870 and 1880 and later divorced. She is referred to as Maude Wilson at one time by one source. Margaret Bramlett, 75, born in January 1825 in Kentucky to parents born there, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with one daughter, “Maud M. (Mary P. ‘Pollie M.’ ‘Mollie’) Bramlett,” 45, born in October 1854 in Kentucky to parents born there, servant in the home (NARA Film T623:874:42B). Margret Bramblette, 81, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramblette,” 54, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, both widowed, both retired with incomes, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T624:798:43A). Margaret Bramlette, 91, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramlette,” 60, single, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1920 U. S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T625:934:38A).

Captain Bramblett’s Fall at Stone’s River

“…Captain Bramblett with two of his lieutenants, myself one of them, crawled through the weeds a distance of several hundred yards to a prominent part of observation from which through his field glass and even the naked eye we could see the enemy’s concentrated forces near and above the lower ford on the opposite side of the river, his artillery being thrown forward and nearest to the river. His artillery appeared to be close together and covering quite a space of ground; we could not tell how many guns, but there was quite a number. The infantry was seemingly in large force and extended farther down toward the ford.

Captain Bramblett was a man of no mean order of military genius and information, and after looking at, and studying the situation in silence for some minutes, he said to us boys, that he believed “Rosecrans was setting a trap for Bragg.” Continuing, he said, “If he means to attack us on this side, why does he not reinforce this side? Why concentrate so much artillery on the bluff yonder? He must be expecting us to attack that force yonder, pointing to Beatty’s position on the hill North of us, and if we do, he will use that artillery on us as we move to the attack.” At another time during the afternoon I heard him while discussing the situation with other officers of the regiment use substantially the same argument. I accompanied Captain Bramblett to General Breckinridge’s headquarters and heard him make substantially in detail a report containing the facts above recited….General Breckinridge, to thoroughly and unmistakably understand the situation and satisfy himself, in company with one or two of his staff examined the situation as best he could and I presume reached the same conclusion, and when he (Breckinridge) repaired to Bragg’s headquarters and…suggested the presumptive plan of the enemy, Bragg said: “Sir, my information is different. I have given the order to attack the enemy in your front and expect it to be obeyed.” What was General Breckinridge to do but attempt to carry out his orders, though in carrying out this unwise and ill-conceived order it should cost in one hour and ten minutes 1,700 of as brave and chivalrous soldiers as the world ever saw. What a terrible blunder, what a bloody and useless sacrifice!…We rallied some distance to the right of where we started and found that many, very many, of our noblest, truest and best had fallen. Some of them were left on the field, among whom was my military preceptor, advisor and dear friend, Captain Bramblett, who fell into the hands of the enemy and who died a few days after in Nashville. I shall never forget our parting, a moment or two before he received his wound–never forget the last quick glance and the circumstances that called it forth. He was a splendid soldier and his loss grieved me very much…. –Lieutenant Lott D. Young, “Reminiscences of a Soldier of the Orphan Brigade,” Paris, Kentucky

The Union physician who treated William Peter’s wounds after he was captured and taken to a prison hospital, Dr. F. G. Hickman, of Vandalia, Ill., also indicated in an 1894 article William Peter died at a private residence in Nashville.

  William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann, and daughter, Maude Mary “Mollie Polly,” inherited his Kentucky estate and continued to live in Missouri until their deaths. After William Peter died, his father administered his estate, transferring his land and slaves to Maude Mary, whom he identified in his 1864 Bourbon Co., Ky., will as “Mollie P. Bramblett”: “I divise to my Grand daughter Mollie P. Bramblett the farm and tract of land in same county whereon her father Wm. P. Bramblett dec’d formerly resided, Containing about four hundred acres more or less also two negro men [Jerry or Jimy] & Henry & two negro women Lucy & Rhoda & Rhoda’s four children which said land and slaves shall be held by her as her exclusive property during her life and, at her death to descend to her children (if she should have any) then living or to the descendants of such of her children as may be dead, and if she leaves no such issue, then said land & slaves shall return to my estate.” Note: Maude may have been married briefly, but she did not have issue.

William Peter Bramblett’s Wife and Daughter

William Peter’s wife, Margaret Ann Payne, daughter of Minerva Hawkins Mahan and William Thomas Payne, was born circa 1828 near Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky., and died Aug. 4, 1921, in Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. She rests at Cemetery. Their daughter Maude Mary Bramblett/Bramlette, was born Oct. 6, 1856, in Bourbon Co., Ky. Her Missouri Death Certificate indicates she died of chronic kidney disease and malnutrition on March 8, 1939, at Elizabeth Hospital, Hannibal, Marion Co., Mo.,

Maude M. Bramlette Death Cert

 

Margaret M. Bramlett, 40, keeping house, $3,000 real estate, $200 personal estate, widow, is listed in the 1870 U. S. Census for Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with her daughter, Mary (Maude), 15, no occupation, $40,000 real estate and $500 personal estate, who had attended school within the year, and Margaret’s mother, Minerva K. (H.?) Payne, 61, widowed, without occupation (NARA Film M593:791:665A). All were born in Kentucky. Also listed with them: Millie Cauberton (illegible), 12, born in Missouri, black, domestic servant. (Note the real and personal estate amounts for Mary Maude “Mollie” “Polly” Bramblett, indicating she inherited her father’s estate and part of her grandfather’s estate. Mgt. Bramblette, 50, at home, widowed, and daughter, Maude, 25, at home, divorced, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U. S. Census for Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo., living with Margaret’s mother, Mrs. Minerva Payne, 74, born in Kentucky to a mother born in Ireland, father born in Virginia, keeps house, head of the family (NARA Film T9:702:346B). Maude may have married a man named Wilson between 1870 and 1880 and later divorced. She is referred to as Maude Wilson at one time by one source. Margaret Bramlett, 75, born in January 1825 in Kentucky to parents born there, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo., with one daughter, “Maud M. (Mary P. ‘Pollie M.’ ‘Mollie’) Bramlett,” 45, born in October 1854 in Kentucky to parents born there, servant in the home (NARA Film T623:874:42B). Margret Bramblette, 81, owner of a mortgage-free home, mother of one living child, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramblette,” 54, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, both widowed, both retired with incomes, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T624:798:43A). Margaret Bramlette, 91, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free home, and grown daughter, “Maud M. Bramlette,” 60, single, both born in Kentucky to parents born there, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Palmyra, Liberty Township, Marion Co., Mo. (NARA Film T625:934:38A).

Captain Bramblett’s Fall at Stone’s River

“…Captain Bramblett with two of his lieutenants, myself one of them, crawled through the weeds a distance of several hundred yards to a prominent part of observation from which through his field glass and even the naked eye we could see the enemy’s concentrated forces near and above the lower ford on the opposite side of the river, his artillery being thrown forward and nearest to the river. His artillery appeared to be close together and covering quite a space of ground; we could not tell how many guns, but there was quite a number. The infantry was seemingly in large force and extended farther down toward the ford.

Captain Bramblett was a man of no mean order of military genius and information, and after looking at, and studying the situation in silence for some minutes, he said to us boys, that he believed “Rosecrans was setting a trap for Bragg.” Continuing, he said, “If he means to attack us on this side, why does he not reinforce this side? Why concentrate so much artillery on the bluff yonder? He must be expecting us to attack that force yonder, pointing to Beatty’s position on the hill North of us, and if we do, he will use that artillery on us as we move to the attack.” At another time during the afternoon I heard him while discussing the situation with other officers of the regiment use substantially the same argument. I accompanied Captain Bramblett to General Breckinridge’s headquarters and heard him make substantially in detail a report containing the facts above recited….General Breckinridge, to thoroughly and unmistakably understand the situation and satisfy himself, in company with one or two of his staff examined the situation as best he could and I presume reached the same conclusion, and when he (Breckinridge) repaired to Bragg’s headquarters and…suggested the presumptive plan of the enemy, Bragg said: “Sir, my information is different. I have given the order to attack the enemy in your front and expect it to be obeyed.” What was General Breckinridge to do but attempt to carry out his orders, though in carrying out this unwise and ill-conceived order it should cost in one hour and ten minutes 1,700 of as brave and chivalrous soldiers as the world ever saw. What a terrible blunder, what a bloody and useless sacrifice!…We rallied some distance to the right of where we started and found that many, very many, of our noblest, truest and best had fallen. Some of them were left on the field, among whom was my military preceptor, advisor and dear friend, Captain Bramblett, who fell into the hands of the enemy and who died a few days after in Nashville. I shall never forget our parting, a moment or two before he received his wound–never forget the last quick glance and the circumstances that called it forth. He was a splendid soldier and his loss grieved me very much…. –Lieutenant Lott D. Young, “Reminiscences of a Soldier of the Orphan Brigade,” Paris, Kentucky

The Union physician who treated William Peter’s wounds after he was captured and taken to a prison hospital, Dr. F. G. Hickman, of Vandalia, Ill., also verified in the 1894 article William Peter died at a private residence in Nashville.

 

Malinda Bramblett, child of William and Nancy Laurence Bramblett, lived in Bourbon Co., Ky. She died sometime after 1864 in Marion Co., Mo. She is identified as “Malinda Young” in her brother Peter’s 1864 will. Malinda and family moved to Missouri before 1840.

Ambrose Bramblett, child of William and Nancy Laurence Bramblett, lived in Bourbon Co., Ky. Family tradition holds that he died after being shot during a duel before 1864. His brother Peter Bramblett  designated Ambrose as deceased and mentioned Ambrose’s descendants as heirs in his 1864 will.

Elizabeth Bramblett, child of William and Nancy Laurence Bramblett, lived in Bourbon Co., Ky. She died sometime after 1864. She is identified as “Elizabeth Miles” or “Mitchell” in her brother Peter’s 1864 will. (Will is smudged and part of Elizabeth’s surname is missing.)

 

James Bramblett, child of Nancy Ann Laurence and William Bramblett, was born in Bourbon Co., Ky.  He is named as a brother of Peter Bramblett in Peter’s  Last Will and Testament. lived in Bourbon Co., Ky. He died sometime after 1864.

Malinda Bramblett, child of Nancy Ann Laurence and William Bramblett, was born in Bourbon Co., Ky.  She is named as a sister of Peter Bramblett in Peter’s Last Will and Testament.

Ambrose Bramblett, child of Nancy Ann Laurence and William Bramblett, was born in Bourbon Co., Ky. He died in a duel. He married and had children. He is named as a brother of Peter Bramblett in Peter’s  Last Will and Testament.

Elizabeth Bramblett, child of Nancy Ann Laurence and William Bramblett, was born in Bourbon Co., Ky. She is named as a sister of Peter Bramblett in Peter’s Last Will and Testament.

 

Lewis Bramblett, child of Margaret  (Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co.,  Va.

 

Henry Bramblett, child of Margaret  (Darnell?) and Reuben Bramblett Sr., was born in Fauquier Co.,  Va.

 

 

Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett, child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1732 in Colonial Virginia. She died in Bedford Co., Va. Her burial place is unknown. She first married Capt. James C. Callaway, most likely in  Lunenburg  Co., Va. He was born in Virginia, the son of Catherine Browning? and Joseph Callaway II/Jr. James served as a soldier during the French  and Indian Wars. He died in Bedford County. He and Sarah had several children, including James Jr., Flanders, Susannah and John Callaway.

John Callaway, child of Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett and James C. Callaway, was born in Bedford Co., Va. He is listed below as a soldier  in Captain John Holder’s Company stationed near/at Fort Boonesborough, Ky., in June 1779 during the American Revolution.

JOHN CALLAWAY

 

Chapter 4:
Generation 3
REV. WILLIAM BRAMBLETT JR. and ANNA BALLARD
(Children: James, William III, Mary, Reuben, Mildred, Lydia, Lucy, Matilda, Elkanah)

Rev. William Bramblett Jr., child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1719 in Colonial Virginia. William Jr. was a member of the Virginia Militia ordered into service in 1758 during the French and Indian War. Hening’s Statutes indicates he was paid 5 pounds, 19 shillings in September 1758 for his service (Hening 209).  He was a planter who established Cedar Hill Plantation in 1760-61 in Bedford Co., Va., a surveyor and a registered Baptist Minister in Bedford County. His name appears Sept. 22, 1777, on a list of ministers of the gospel authorized by the court to perform marriages and preach. He was reportedly one of the first white ministers to preach in Kentucky. He died before Aug. 23, 1779, in present day Knox Co., Ky., and was buried there near Flat Lick, Ky., in an unknown grave location marked with one or more large boulders. He was accidentally shot and killed or purposely killed by traveling companion Aquilla White during a real or perceived Indian attack while a hunting excursion from camp. The group had stopped to eat and rest near Cumberland Gap on the journey back to Virginia. Rev. William Jr. went on the trip with Daniel Boone and Company, including his maternal uncle Capt. Richard Callaway, to deliver supplies to forts and claim land. Boone established Boonesborough and later owned a cabin nearby.

Boone:Flanders Callaway

Painting depicting Daniel Boone leading soldiers and settlers through Cumberland Gap on Wilderness Road toward Fort Boonesborough, Ky. Two red ovals show the site of William Bramblett Jr.’s Station on Licking Creek/River, East of Bonesborough and South of Blue Licks. Several sites on the map had salt mines or licks where wild animals and settlers gathered to consume and mine the salt, which was an important ingredient used to season and preserve meat and food. Historical records indicate Rev. Willliam Bramblett’s Station included a valuable salt mine known as Bramblett’s Lick.

Wilderness Road

 

Boone's cabin

BOONE'S CABIN 2

Rev. William had just established Bramblett’s Station, 400 acres with a cabin, perhaps similar to Capt. Daniel Boone’s log cabin pictured above, cleared and tilled land, planted a new crop in Fayette (now Bourbon) Co., Ky., He was on his way home with a large company of others when he died near Cumberland Gap. The Land Court in Kentucky issued a certificate referring to Bramblett’s Station “on a branch of Stoner’s Fork, a branch of Licking.” However, another man claimed the property the day before William’s surrogates filed a claim for the land and got possession of it. The first term of the Land Court was held Oct. 13, 1779, shortly after Rev. William Jr.’s death. His Nenney descendants who lived near the Gap in Tennessee were convinced he was killed on purpose so the shooter could claim and steal his Kentucky land. An eyewitness described the incident as an accident.

   Rev. William Jr. wrote his will Feb. 26, 1779, in Bedford Co., Va., before he left on the ill-fated trip into the Kentucky  Wilderness (WB-1:351). It names his wife, Anna, and son James and mentions education for “my other children” as heirs. It was probated Aug. 23, 1779. An inventory/appraisement dated Oct. 25, 1779, includes “one negro fellow.” Friends and relatives William Callaway and William Buford were named in the will and served as executors. Anna inherited the estate to use until she married again or died, and James inherited a young horse named Ranter. William’s estate was inventoried by Augustine Leftwich, D. Beard and George Dooley in Bedford County in October 1779:

Bramblett’s Inventory} “In Obedience to an Order of Bedford Court to us directed have appraised the Estate of Wm. Bramblett Decd as follows Viz One Negro Fellow £1, 200.00, 1 Young Bay Horse £250, 1 Brown Mare £200, 1 Black do. £160, 1 Gray Horse £200, 1 Bay Mare Colt £100, 1 do. £80, 1 Bay Horse £150, 1 Large Do. £250, 17 Head of Sheep £130, 13 Head of Cattle £350, 3 head of do. £130, 1 Bell & Collar £3, 4 Bedsteads Beds & furniture £400, 1 Rifle Gun £80, 1 old Smothe do £10, 3 Chests £30, 2 Tables £6, 1 Great Wheel & 3 Small Do £32.10, 1 Box of Shew Tools £5, Sundries of Carpenter’s Tools £30, Sundries of Tools £12, 5 Sickles £4, 1 Barr Shear & Lumber £25, 3 Pare old Cards £10, 2 Old Sithes & hangings £8, 1 Crosscut saw £30, a Man’s Saddle £30, a Woman’s Do. £15, 1 pare Steelyards £12, 4 Sides of Lether £40, 13 deer Skins £70, 1 Elk Skin & 2 Pieces Taned Lether 15£, 1 Old Hackle 25, 5 axes & a Tomahawk £30, 3 Hoes Lg. 2 Small plows & hangings £15, 1 Pare Iron Wedges £5, 1 Matlock £7, Old pewter £25, 2 Cream pots £5, 2 pots & a duch Oven £20, a parcel Lumber £20, 1 Loom £15, Sundries of Geers £10, Sundries of Slays £12, 16 Head of Hogs £160, 6 head do. 7.10, 1 Truck Wagon £10, a Cutting Box £10, 4 Bells & Collars £13, a quantity of Books £21, 1 hive Bees £8; 1 Box Iron & heaters £3, 1 Candlestick 18, a Small Trunk 40, 2 Razors & Brass £5, 1 Tin Coffeepot 20.”
   A memo at the bottom of the document indicates “We the appraisors do hereby certify that we appraised the Estate of William Bramblett at Twenty prices more than it would have been sold for Ye Year 1774. Augustine Leftwich, D. Beard and George Dooley.” They returned the inventory and appraisement to the court to be recorded by J. Steptoe, Clerk, on Oct. 25, 1779 (WB-1:357).

Chapter 6:

Generation 3

JAMES BRAMLETT and WINEFRED UNKNOWN BRAMLETT PAGE

(Children: Lucy? Bramlett)

James Bramlett served as a Soldier during the Freench & Indian War

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

James Bramlett, child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and First Wife Unknown, may have been born in or before 1723 in Colonial Virginia, most likely in Essex County. One official recorded document exists for James in 1744 in Caroline Co., Va., which allows us to calculate his estimated birth year: “James Bramlitt” may have been at least age 21 when he legally witnessed a deed from Edward Scrimshaw to Ephraim Simons in Caroline Co., Va., Court on June 8, 1744 (OB-1740-1746:281). John Carter and Richard Vawter also witnessed the document. If James were  age 14 when he signed the record, he would have been born circa 1730. James fought as a soldier in the Bedford County Militia during the French and Indian War and was paid for that service  in 1758, the year he died. He may have been suffering from injuries or illness incurred during his military service; he does state in his will he was “very sick & weak.” He may be buried in lost Bramblett Graveyard on the former Cedar Hill Plantation in Bedford. James wrote his will on July 14, 1758, in Bedford Co., Va. (DB-1:179). 

“July the fourteenth one thousand seven Hundred & 58 In the Name of God Amen I James Bramlett of the Parish of Russell and County of Bedford being very sick & weak, but of Perfect senses and Understanding do make this my last will and Testament in the manner & form as follows first and Principally I commit my soul to God that gave it in sure Hopes of of a free Pardon for my sins and my Body I Commit to the Earth from Whence it was taken to be decently Buried at the Discretion of my Executor hereafter Mentioned & also my worldly estate I give & Dispose of it in the manner as followeth. Item I give and Bequeath to my sister Nancy Bramlet one Prime Heffer Marked with a crop & over Heel/Keel in each Ear. Item I give & Bequeath to my Loving wife Winefred Bramlet all & singular my whole Estate after Lawfull Debts are paid. Lastly I Constitute and Appoint my Loving wife Winefred Bramlet Whole & sole Executor of this my Last Will & Testatment In Witness Whereof I have set my Hand & seale the Day and Date first above Written. Sign’d, Seal’d & Delivered} James Bramlett in the Presents of us Wm Callaway, Francis Callaway & John Adams”


The will was recorded by Benjamin Howard, Bedford County Clerk, on Nov. 27, 1858 (DB-1:187-188).

“At a Court held for Bedford County Nov. 27th 1758 This will was Proved the the oaths of William Callaway, Francis Callaway & John Adams, Witnesses thereto & sworn to Winifred Bramlitt the Executrix therein Named and Ordered to be Recorded and on the Motion of the said Executrix who entered into & acknowledged a Bond with William Callaway & Francis Callaway her Securities in the Penalty of one Hundred Pounds according to Law. Certificate was granted her for Obtaining a Probate thereof in due form. Teste Benjamin Howard, C.B.C.” (WB-1:187)

An inventory and appraisement of James’s estate is dated Dec. 29, 1758 (WB-1:197-198). His wife, Winefred, and sister Nancy (Ann?) are named as his only heirs. Francis Callaway, Isaac Woodward and Charles Brat/Briot made “An Inventory of the Estate of Mr. James Bramlett Deceas’d” which was “appraised December 29th 1758.” The itemized list of furniture and household items, appraised at 69 pounds 3 shillings 7 pence, was returned to the court and recorded Jan. 22, 1759, in Bedford County:

“1 Mear & Coalt, 1 Young Mear, 1 Old Horse, 1 Young do, 1 Cow & Calf, 2 do, 1 Heifer & the Yearlings, 10 Hoggs, one Bed & furniture, 1 do, 1 do, 1 large Leather Trunk, 1 Small do, 1 Chest, 1 Table & Chairs, 1 Looking Glass, 1 Sifter, 1 Bible & Prayer Book, 1 Pare of Money Scales & Pocket Book, 1 Silver Bockel & Paire of Harnes, 2 hides of Tand Leather, 2 Raw Hides, 1 Bocks Iron & Heters & fire Tongs, 1 Candlestick & Snuffers, 1 Gunn, 4 Bottles, 1 Teapot & Pech Bowl & Coffee Pott &tc, 2 Vials, 1 Wheel & four Paires of Cards, 1 pare of sheres, 1 Dozn Knives & forks, 1 parcel of Earthen Ware, 2 potts & Skillet & Ladle & flesh fork, 6 Pewter Plates &Gold, 3 Dishes, 5 Bacons, 15 Spoons, 1 Candle Mould &tc, set of Carpenter’s toolts, a Parcel of Old Iron Ware, a Parcel of Woden ware, 7 Bells, 3 locks, 1 saddal Bridle, 1 slay & Harnes, small tubs…. (WB-1:197)

James may have farmed land on Tomahawk Creek adjacent to land owned by Francis Callaway and Capt. Lynche in Bedford County. Francis Callaway, a witness who provided security for James’s estate, transferred 150 acres on the creek to Winiford Page, most likely James Bramlett’s widow, and her (second?) husband, Robert Page, of Goochland Co., Va., for £15 in 1761 (DB-A-1:502-503). They later sold this land to James Bramlett’s brother Ambrose Bramlett on March 27, 1765 (DB-2:539). “Winiford Page” made her mark on the deed. When preparing to move to North Carolina, Ambrose sold the land a few years later to Andrew Thompson on May 24, 1768 (DB-3:149-50). Robert Page was one of the first justices appointed in Bedford County in 1754.

   No child was named in his will; however, James and Winefred may have had a child born after his death in 1758-1759: perhaps Lucy Bramlett. She may be the Lucy Bramblett who married Thomas Lumpkin in Bedford County in 1778. 

   Lucy Bramlett, perhaps child of James and Winefred Bramlett, may have been born circa 1758-1759 after her father died in Bedford Co., Va. Lucy Bramblett married Thomas Lumpkin in 1778 in Bedford County. He was born circa 1750-1759 and died after 1830, perhaps in Bedford County. Lucy may have died before 1798. Lucy and Thomas Lumpkin had a child named Sophia Lumpkin, born circa 1779-1782 and died pre-1817, who married Abraham Buford, son of Henry Buford and nephew of James Buford Sr. who married Elizabeth Bramblett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr.

   Sophia Lumpkin, child of Lucy Bramlett and Thomas Lumpkin, was born circa 1779-1782 and died pre-1817. She married Abraham Buford, son of Henry Buford and nephew of James Buford Sr. and Elizabeth Bramblett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr. Abraham was born Dec. 13, 1778. He died in 1845 in Bedford Co., Va. His will was probated Oct. 9, 1845.

Chapter 7:

Generation 3

NANCY ANN BRAMLETT and (THOMAS LUMPKIN?)

(Marriage/Children unknown)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

Nancy Ann Bramlett, child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and First Wife Unknown, was born before 1732 in Colonial Virginia. She died sometime after being named as an heir in her brother James Bramlett’s 1758 will. She may have been living with James and wife, Winefred, at the time because her mother had died and her stepmother, Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett, was deceased. Elizabeth is not mentioned in a deed of gift William I/Sr. wrote in 1759 to son-in-law Stephen White; so she died before that date. (If Elizabeth were still living at that time, William I/Sr. would have made arrangements for her as well.) Nancy Ann’s nephew William Bramblett III, son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., signed/witnessed as surety for a marriage of Ann Bramlett and Thomas Lumpkin on Oct. 25, 1798, in Bedford County. (William III later moved to South Carolina.) Earlier, Thomas Lumpkin had married Lucy Bramblett, probably daughter of James and Winefred and the niece of Anna and Rev. William Jr., on March 4, 1778. Robert Alexander, then county clerk, signed the marriage bond as surety/witness. (Alexander probably was not a relative; county clerks commonly signed marriage records if relatives or friends were not available to act as witnesses for brides and grooms of legal age. Lucy’s father, if he indeed was James Bramlett who died in 1758, was not available to witness her marriage bond.) (One theory suggests Lucy Bramlett, born circa 1758-1759, may be the only child of Winefred and James Bramblett, perhaps born after her father died in 1758 in Bedford County. No children are named in James’s will, so Lucy would not have had a sibling to witness her marriage bond, either. (Winefred second married Robert Page, and they most likely reared Lucy.) No other information is yet available about Nancy Ann. Thomas Lumpkin, born circa 1750-1759, died circa 1830, probably in Bedford County. Thomas Lumpkin, over 45, is listed in the 1820 U.S. Census for Bedford Co., Va., as head of a family that includes a female 26-45, another female 26-45, a male 26-45, and three females under 10. Thomas Lumpkin, born circa 1740-1750, before 1775, died circa 1830, probably in Bedford County. Thomas Lumpkin, 80-90, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Bedford Co., Va., as head of a family that includes a female 40-50, and a male 30-40.

 

Chapter 8:

Generation 3

AMBROSE BRAMLETT and JANE “JEAN” “JANNY” WOODSON WHITE

(Children: Theodosia, Lydia, Jesse H., William, Stephen H., John, Lunsford M., Sarah, Mary Ann, Elizabeth)

Col. Ambrose Bramlett served as an officer during the French & Indian War & American Revolution

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

COL. AMBROSE BRAMLETT, child of Elizabeth Callaway and William Bramlett I/Sr., was born after 1732, perhaps in or by 1736, in Essex or Caroline Co., Va. He died in Wilkes Co., Ga., in late February/early March 1804. He wrote his will on Nov. 13, 1803, and it was proved March 5, 1804, in Wilkes County. He married Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson on Nov. 28, 1768, in Pittsylvania Co., Va. Janny was born circa 1745 in Cumberland or Henrico Co., Va., the daughter of Elizabeth Hughes and Sanburne Woodson. Adam Loving provided surety and John Burch and Charity Burch witnessed the marriage bond. Janny is stepdaughter of Charity Childress, second wife of Sanburne Woodson, and John Burch, second husband of Charity Childress. (The Burches married in 1756 in Cumberland Co., Va.) Janny died after 1818, most likely  in Days Bend, Autauga Co., Ala. Janny and Ambrose moved to Surry Co., N.C., and later settled in Wilkes Co., Ga. After Ambrose died, Janny married Jesse White circa 1809, probably Wilkes Co., Ga., and moved to Autauga Co., Ala. Jesse was probably born in the 1740s or 1750s. He died after 1809-1810 in Putnam Co., Ala., or after 1817 in Autauga Co., Ala. He may be buried there with Janny.

Ambrose Bramlette’s Will and Estate

Ambrose’s Life in Colonial Virginia

   William Waller Hening’s Statutes at Large, which notes September 1758 payments “To the Militia of the County of Bedford, and provisions furnished by sundry inhabitants of the said county” during the French & Indian War, indicates “Ambrose Bramlett, Serjeant” received £2, 17s, 4p; and “Ambrose Bramlett, Ensign” received £7, 18s. Also “Amhus Bramlett” received 8 shillings, perhaps for provisions given as a “sundry inhabitant” since no military rank is attached to his name. All three entries may be for the same Ambrose. The name “Amhus” is most likely merely a variant spelling or an abbreviated or quickly written form of Ambrose. No other record of an “Amhus” has surfaced. “William Bramlitt” (most likely Jr. and less likely William I/Sr. because of the latter’s advanced age, 60s in 1758) and “James Bromlet” (died in 1758) also received payments for military service in the Bedford Militia during the French & Indian War. Ambrose also served as a colonel in the North Carolina Militia during the American Revolution. His daughter Theodosia’s obituary indicates the family was held by Lord Cornwallis and troops who used their plantation as headquarters during the war.

   Ambrose and Janny’s children are Theodosia, Lydia, Jesse Hughes, William, Sarah (“Sally”), Lunsford Meredith, John, Elizabeth (“Eliza”), Stephen Hughes and Mary Ann Bramlette.

Photograph of newly freed, former slaves, unidentified and still on the plantation

SLAVES RECENTLY FREED
Theodosia Bramlette and Benjamin Netherland’s Mingo Tavern, Est. Nicholasville, Ky., 1793, from A History of Jessamine County
Mingo Tavern

Theodosia Bramlette, adopted child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlette, was born Aug. 10, 1766, in Salisbury, Rowan Co., N.C. Her obituary indicates she “lost her parents at an early age.” This information refers to Theodosia’s biological parents, names unknown. Theodosia was an adult, about age 52, when Janny died circa 1818 and about age  38 when Ambrose died circa 1803-1804, so they are not her biological parents whom she lost  at an early  age. Theodosia died Oct. 20, 1853, in Nicholasville, Jessamine Co., Ky., and was buried at lost Netherland Cemetery in the garden  at the family’s residence.

Tombstones of Benjamin Netherland and Theodosia Bramlette in Nicholasville, Ky.

Below: Old Jessamine County Jail, the site of Netherlands’ former Mingo Tavern



 Theodosia married Benjamin Netherland in early 1787 in Surry Co., N.. Benjamin was born Feb. 29, 1755, in Powhatan Co., Va., the son of Mary Ann Mosby and Capt. John Netherland. Benjamin died Oct. 10, 1838, in Jessamine County, and was buried with military honors in Netherland Cemetery, the garden graveyard of his residence. His grave and others in the cemetery were desecrated when the property was sold to a developer who cleared the residence and garden for construction of a new commercial building. Neighbors were able to save Theodosia’s tombstone, which was later installed in the yard of the old county jail, the site of the Netherlands’ former home and business at 200 South Main, Nicholasville, Ky. The Netherlands owned and operated Mingo Tavern and were in charge of the local post office at Nicholasville. They also bred and sold race horses and farmed.

 

Lieut. Benjamin Netherland served as an Officer during the American Revolution

   Both Theodosia and Benjamin experienced the American Revolution first hand. She was still at home, unmarried, with her family and he was serving as an American officer in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Kentucky. One of Benjamin’s descendants, Capt. John William Thompkins, summarized his military service for an SAR application:

At the outbreak of the revolutionary war Benjamin was in Cuba on a trading voyage, here he learned that Sir Peter Parker was to make an attack on Charleston, South Carolina. He then filled his boat with Cuban goods, ran the blockade, and helped to defend Fort Moultrie against the British assault. He accomp[an]ied General La Fayette on his journey from Charleston in 1777 so far as Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. He remained in Charlotte, North Carolina until 1781, took part in the battle of G[uil]ford Courthouse, and shortly after drifted into Kentucky. In Kentucky he took part in nearly all Indian battles from 1781 to 1784, was the hero of the battle of Blue Licks. He went with George Rogers Clark on one of his expeditions to punish the Indians, Lieutenant Netherland (at this date) was a member of company commanded by Captain Harbisham, of the regiment commanded by Colonel Harris of the Georgia Line, for two years from 1776.

After the war in 1793 one Benjamin Netherland served as a volunteer soldier with the rank of private in a company of mounted infantry militia in the First Battalion, Second Regiment, First Brigade, Third Division, state of Georgia, for 17 days in the service of the United States (NARA Film M905 Roll 7). His NARA Compiled Military Service Records indicate he was called into service May 30, 1793, and was discharged June 15, 1793.

   Benjamin applied for a pension based on his military service at age 74 on Feb. 7, 1829. Theodosia applied for and received a widow’s pension, W.8487, on June 19, 1845.

   Benjamin is featured in Bennett H. Young’s History of Jessamine County, Kentucky From Its Earliest Settlement to 1898:

“One of the most unique and extraordinary characters in the history of Jessamine county in its early days was Maj. Benjamin Netherland. He was born in Powhatan county, Virginia, in 1755. He went to Cuba as the agent of his father, to dispose of his tobacco crop. There learning that Sir Peter Parker was to make an attack on Charleston, he left his cargo and ran the blockade into Charleston and helped to defend Fort Moultrie against British assault. He accompanied LaFayette on his journey from Charleston in 1777 as far as Mecklenburg county, North Carolina, when the distinguished Frenchman was on his way to Philadelphia to tender his services to Washington in behalf of American liberty.
“He remained at Charlotte, North Carolina until 1781, took part in the battle of Guilford Courthouse, and shortly after this he drifted into Kentucky. In May, 1782, he was at Estill station, and was with the Kentucky troops in the Estill defeat. He took part in nearly all the Indian’ battles from 1781 to 1784. He went with George Rogers Clark on his expedition in 1782 to punish the Indians for the wrongs of Blue Licks.
“He was with General Harmar in his defeat, and with General Wayne in his victory at Fallen Timbers in 1794 and was instrumental in punishing the men who had perpetrated the slaughter at Blue Licks. After seven years’ absence in Kentucky, he returned to North Carolina in 1788 and married his boyish sweetheart, Miss Theodosia Bramlette, who was a daughter of the distinguished Revolutionary fighter Col. Bramlette. He had lived in Fayette and Madison counties prior to his coming to Jessamine.
“After his marriage he settled on a farm five miles east of Nicholasville, and in 1793 he removed to where Nicholasville now stands, and built a hotel and called it Mingo Tavern — this house he kept until his death in 1838. The house was torn down in 1864.
He was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Nicholasville, and was prominent in its early history, and his children were the first white people born within its limits. He was the real hero of the battle of Blue Licks. Robert Wickliffe, of Lexington, whose second wife was the only daughter of Col. Todd, who was in command at the battle at Blue Licks, in a political speech in 1848 in Nicholasville said that the majority of men who escaped at Blue Licks owed their preservation to Benjamin Netherland and that Netherland was a fearless man, fruitful in resources and of magnificent courage.
   “Major Netherland always retained his old-time dress. He wore a cut-a-way coat, short breeches with knee buckles, and low shoes with silk lacers and silver buckles. His pants were always fastened with red bands, and his long queue was tied with a red ribbon.
“From his entrance into Nicholasville early in 1791 for forty years he was prominent as a leader in all its affairs. He was postmaster for about twenty-three years and always dispensed the village hospitality with a lavish hand. Every man who had fought in the Revolutionary war or in the Indian wars either in Kentucky or in the Northwest, was his friend, and none ever went from his door hungry or uncared for.
  “Major Netherland’s experience in the battle of the Blue Licks, justified him in his subsequent love of horses. He bred a great many fine race horses in his day, and in a letter written by him to Gen. John McCalla, in 1830, now in my possession, he begs him to come to Nicholasville on the following Sunday to dine with him and promises to show him “the damndest best three colts in the world.

“Major Netherland died October 10, 1838, and was buried in his garden, which is now the lot on which the county jail is built. Mr. Jos. Wallace, a remote kinsman, has, with most commendable love and liberality and true spirit of kinship, erected a headstone over the grave of Major Netherland and that of his wife, who, in 1851, was laid beside her husband. At his death Major Netheriand was accorded a magnificent military funeral. The funeral sermon was preached by Bishop Kavanaugh, who was then the Presiding Elder of the district. Gen. Leslie Combs, Maj. D. B. Price, Gen. John McCalla and Robert Wickliffe were his pall-bearers, and all the leading military companies of the county turned out to do his memory honor. (Louisville: Courier-Journal, 1898, pp. 15-23)

John Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born circa 1787 in Kentucky.

Mary Ann Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born circa 1788 in Surry Co., N.C. She died in 1810 in Kentucky. She married Joel Moss Prewitt. Their child is Benjamin Mosby Prewitt.

 

   Powhatan Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born circa 1789 in Kentucky.

 

 Betsy Ann Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born circa 1790 in Jessamine Co., Ky. She married Robert Peace McMurty.

 

   Catherine Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born in Kentucky.

 

Shelby Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born in Kentucky.

 

Daughter Netherland, child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born in Kentucky. She married Isaac Bourne.

 

Benjamin Netherland Jr., child of Theodosia Bramlett and Benjamin Netherland Sr., was born in Kentucky.

 

   Lydia Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C.

 

   Jesse Hughes Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N.C.

 

   William Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C.

 

   Sarah “Sally” Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N.C., or Wilkes Co., Ga.

 

   Judge Lunsford Meredith Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N. C., or Wilkes Co., Ga. He died in 1867 in Pulaski, Giles Co., Tenn., and was buried there in Maplewood Cemetery. He left a Will that was probated Sept. 7, 1867. The will specifically provides for his children, who are all daughters, to bequeath assets “free from the control” of husbands in order “to secure them from want and poverty.” Heirs: wife, Mary; daughter Josephine Perkins and her children, Constantine and Bramlett Perkins; unmarried Daughters, including Anna B. Bramlett (defendant in the following court case); and  Lunsford’s sister Elizabeth Mitchell.

   Lunsford moved from Wilkes Co., Ga., to Tennessee in 1813. He first married Sarah Slater on June 29, 1815, in Williamson Co., Tenn. She was born Feb. 25, 1799. She died June 15, 1841, and was buried in Maplewood Cemetery. His children are Josephine, Frances P. (“Fannie”), Mary L., Anna Bland, Eliza Jane, and Adelaide W. Bramlett. Lunsford second married Mary Crockett on Sept. 14, 1848. She was born circa 1829 in North Carolina, the daughter of Frances Bland Dudley and Samuel Crockett. She died circa 1888. After Lunsford’s death, Mary married Charles Nathan Ordway.

 

Tennessee Wills and Probate Records, Giles County Wills, Inventories, Settlements, Vol. B-C, 1869-1917, pp. 180-183

January 1872 Term Giles County Court — Regarding Lunsford Meredith Bramlett’s Will

Charles N. Ordway & Others vs. Anna B. Bramlett &Others

The following four-page document is from a court case brought by Lunsford’s widow, Mary Crockett Bramlett Ordway and her second husband, Charles N. Ordway, seeking judgment against one of Lunsford’s children, Anna B. Bramlett, and others. The text of Lunsford’s 1867 will, which had been lost or destroyed, was entered into the record of the court proceedings, apparently in an effort to settle/distribute part of the estate to the designated heirs.

 

[Transcript of Lunsford M. Bramlett Will]

 

 

   Hon. Lunsford M. Bramlett was the presiding chancellor when the Chancery Court of Wilson Co., Tenn., convened for the first time on July 25, 1836, at the court house in Lebanon. The court had been created during that year.

 

   Lunsford is featured in Sketches of the Bench and Bar of Tennessee:

“Among the Tennesseans of former times who were once prominent, who performed valuable public service, and whose names are all but unknown to the present generation, is Lunsford M. Bramlett. He was, like many others whose names belong to our history, a native of North Carolina. He was born in Surry County, but exactly when, it is impossible to say. Conflicting accounts of the descent of his father are given, some saying that he was of English origin, and others that he was of Huguenot or Scotch-Irish stock. It is certain that his mother was of the Virginia family of Taylors, and was remotely akin to Zachary Taylor. The future Chancellor probably was born in the last decade of the last century. It appears that soon after his birth the family went to Wilkes County, Georgia, where he was reared. In 1813 he came to Tennessee, and on March 7, 1814, was admitted to the bar at Pulaski. He was a diligent and persevering student of the law, zealous on behalf of his clients and more than ordinarily prone to enter into their feelings. That he was a successful lawyer, and was esteemed by the public and by the profession, is proved by his elevation to the bench at a time when judicial office was carefully bestowed. He became Chancellor in 1836, and served until 1844, He died in 1854. After retiring from the bench he endured the hard fortune that waits on retired Judges, and was unable to regain his practice. In his life he was devoted to the law, and after his death the settlement of his estate seems to have occupied surviving members of the profession for some time. As Chancellor he was distinguished not for brilliancy or readiness of decision, bur for careful and conscientious investigation, and an earnest desire to be just. At the bar he was not an eloquent speaker, but a painstaking and zealous advocate, who by fair means made the best of every case. This is the record, not of a great man, but of an excellent and worthy one, a good lawyer, and a competent and upright Judge.” (201)

Works Cited For Lunsford Meredith Bramlett

Caldwell, Joshua William. “Lunsford M. Bramlett.” Sketches of the Bench and Bar of Tennessee. Knoxville, Tenn.: Ogden Brothers & Company, 1898.

Ordway, Charles N. and Anna B. Bramlett. “Lunsford M. Bramlett Court Case 1872.”Tennessee Wills and Probate Records, Giles County Wills, Inventories, Settlements. Vol. B-C, 1869-1917, pp. 180-183.

Eliza Jane Bramlett, child of Sarah Slater and Lunsford Meredith Bramlett, was born in Tennessee. She died May 26, 1852, in Memphis, Shelby Co., Tenn., and was buried in an area that later became an elaborate vault in the Chapel Hill section of Elmwood Cemetery, established by her husband and others in 1853. She married Davidson M. Leatherman circa 1846-1848. He was born Dec. 13, 1813, in Rowan Co., N. C., the son of M. Nancy Partee and Daniel Leatherman, and moved to Giles Co., Tenn., where he met and married Eliza. He died July 25, 1873, at Raleigh Springs, Shelby Co., Tenn., and was buried beside Eliza in Elmwood Cemetery. His obituary in the July 29, 1873, edition of Nashville Union and American indicates “…he married a daughter of Judge Bramlette of this state” who died a few years after the family moved to Memphis and that Davidson Leatherman buried her in a “then unoccupied spot which, under his direction and management was laid off and converted into a beautiful burial ground near this city known as Elmwood Cemetery.” He was a founder and first president of the cemetery. Davidson was a lawyer and Tennessee Attorney General for about four years and prominent citizen of Memphis. Davidson and Eliza’s known child is Lunsford Leatherman, born circa 1848 in Tennessee. He died sometime after 1879-1880.

Eliza Jane Bramlett and Davidson M. Leatherman Family Vault at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, courtesy Mary Pepin Moran

Above Left plaque: “Davidson M. Leatherman 1813-1873 A Founder of Elmwood Cemetery. Elected As Its First President Oct. 9, 1872. This Lot, Number One, Was The First To Be Purchased In The Chapel Hill Section.” Above Right: Eliza Jane Bramlett Leatherman’s marker is attached to the exterior, opposite side of the vault, shown below.

Eliza Jane Bramlett and Davidson M. Leatherman Vault, courtesy Mary Pepin Moran

 

  Adelaide W. Bramlett, child of Sarah Slater and Lunsford Meredith Bramlett, was born July 28, 1819, in Tennessee. She died Aug. 18, 1842, and was buried in Maplewood Cemetery. She married Andrew Franklin Goff on July 29, 1834, in Giles County. He was born in 1809 in Tennessee, the son of Izabella Miller McEwen and John Goff. He died Dec. 9, 1874, and was buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville. Adelaide’s tombstone inscription: “Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Adelaide W., Consort of A. E. Goff and Daughter of L. M. and Sarah S. Bramlett. Born 28th July 1891, and Departed This Life 18th August 1842.” Andrew was a major in the First Tennessee Mounted Militia during the Second Seminole War. He second married Rebecca Jane Erwin on July 1, 1843, in Davidson Co., Tenn.

 

   Josephine Bramlett, child of Sarah Slater and Lunsford Meredith Bramlett, was born June 7, 1826, in Pulaski, Giles Co., Tenn. She died Nov. 9, 1876, in Birmingham, Ala., and was buried in Elyton Cemetery. She married Constantine Hume Perkins Jr. He was born in 1823 in Alabama, the son of Eliza Mildred Field and Constantine Perkins Sr. Constantine Jr. died there circa 1868. Josephine and Constantine Jr.’s children are Bramlett, Constantine III., Eliza Jane, Virginia, Anne Elizabeth, Thomas W., and Josephine Bramlett Perkins.

 

Anna B. Bramlett, child of Lunsford Meredith Bramlett, was born in Tennessee. She died in Florida. She married a man named Bright.

 

   John Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N.C., or Wilkes Co., Ga.

 

   Elizabeth “Eliza” Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N.C., or Wilkes Co., Ga. She died after 1867. She married a man named Mitchell. She was named as an heir and lived with her brother Lunsford in Pulaski, Tenn., before his death in 1867.

 

   Stephen Hughes Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N.C.

 

   Mary Ann Bramlette, child of Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson and Ambrose Bramlett, was born in Surry Co., N.C., or Wilkes Co., Ga.

 

Chapter 9:

Generation 3

AGATHA AGGY BRAMLETT and STEPHEN WHITE

(Children: Ambrose, Sarah, William, James, Thomas, Stephen Jr., Susannah, Jesse, Tabia)

Stephen White and Sons served as Soldiers during the American Revolution

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

Kentucky Seal

Kentucky State Seal: “United We Stand Divided We Fall”

Heartfelt Thanks to Descendants Mary L. Mortimeyer and Frances H. Revesz for providing much of the following about Agatha and family.

Agatha “Aggy” Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Callaway and William Bramlett I/Sr., probably was born after 1732 in Caroline Co., Va. She died circa 1812-1820 in Adair Co., Ky., and was buried there in White Cemetery. Her tombstone was missing in 1981. She is variously named in different Virginia and Kentucky records as Agatha, Agness, Agge and Aggy. She married Stephen White circa 1752 in Caroline Co., Va. He was born in 1728, possibly in Caroline Co., Va., the son of Susannah Quarles and Thomas White Sr. His parents owned and operated an ordinary–a store or Inn known as White’s or Burk’s Shop, in Caroline County. Thomas White (father of Stephen) and “William Bramlit” (father of Agatha) and others served on a jury in Caroline Co., Va., on Nov. 8, 1733, when “John Taliaferro Gent., late Sheriff of this county,” sued Roger Quarles, Thomas Carr Jr., and Richard Maulden for “an action of debt” (OB-1732-1740:108). After Stephen’s father died, his mother applied to the county court for the ordinary license so she could operate the business. After their marriage Stephen and Agatha lived in Bedford Co., Va., perhaps moving there circa 1752 when the area was still Lunenburg. They definitely were living in Bedford County before 1759 when Agatha’s father, William Bramlett I/Sr., transferred some property to Stephen in a recorded deed of gift. Thirty years later, circa 1791, the Whites relocated to Fayette Co., Ky., and settled in what is now Adair Co., Ky. Stephen died there at the distinctive age of 102 on Oct. 30, 1830, at the home of his son Thomas White, and was buried there beside Agatha in White Cemetery.

Stephen White’s tombstone: “Born in Virginia & died Oct. 30th 1830, Aged 102 years.”

Rubbing of Stephen White’s tombstone shows the wheat/grain design in greater detail, courtesy Mortimeyer and Revesz

The owner of the White farm in 1860, Oscar Pile, donated the cemetery to the White family in a deed recorded in Adair Co., Ky.:

“Whereas there is Situated on my farm a Grave Yard & burying ground and whereas it is desired that said grave yard should be held & used only as a burying ground Now for good and valuable consideration I hereby donate & forever set apart said burying ground to be used alone for burying purposes and hereby donate the following parcel of land for that purpose (viz) Beginning at the north corner of said Grave Yard running thence South 110 feet Thence West 40 feet Thence N 110 feet Thence East 40 feet to the beginning. I hereby donate to said White family said Grave Yard for burying purposes & to all other persons to be used & occupied only as a burying ground. Witness my hand this 25th day of April 1860 – Oscar Pile.” (DB-R:411)

Mortimeyer and Revesz, authors in 1992 of White Families – John and Stephen of Virginia and Kentucky, who visited the cemetery in 1981, reported cattle roaming free through the pasture where the burial ground is located. Stephen’s tombstone was in good condition at that time, they write; but Agatha’s had disappeared and many others were broken (207). The residence was then known as the Estil Ballou farm.

Agatha and Stephen’s Life in Virginia

   Stephen “Might have been apprenticed to a blacksmith as a youth,” according to historian William S. Simpson Jr. in Virginia Baptist Ministers 1760-1790: A Biographical Survey (1999, Vol. III:141). When grown Stephen was a planter and slaveowner, surveyor and Separate Baptist lay minister. No evidence of ordination has been found yet.

Agatha and Stephen’s Life in Kentucky

   Agatha and Stephen relocated to Kentucky in 1790 after a daughter married in Virginia, or in 1791. They first lived in Fayette Co., Ky., and settled in what is now Adair Co., Ky.

End Notes For Agatha and Stephen

1 Thomas White Sr., father of Stephen, was born circa 1700-1710, the son of Elizabeth and Samuel White and grandson of Jane and Robert White, all of England. Thomas Sr. is named in several records in Caroline County during 1725-1740s. He died in or before 1750 when his wife, Susannah (Quarles) White, applied for the renewal of his ordinary’s license. She was licensed to operate White’s (Burk’s) Shop until at least 1759. Mortimeyer and Revesz list several possible siblings of Stephen in their 1992 history: Jane, Ursula, Ann, William, James, Thomas White Jr., who all were born between circa 1724 and 1738.

2 In past years, family tradition held that Stephen descends from or is related to Pilgrim William White, a laborer who came to America from England or Ireland on the Mayflower, landing at Plymouth Rock, Mass., in 1607, and his son William White Jr. Some believe Stephen may be related to John White, the first governor of Virginia. There appear to be separate White families in different areas of colonial America who may not be fully researched and may or may not be closely or distantly related to each other. One is the family of Henry White of Buckingham and Bedford counties in Virginia, whose descendant Jacob White married one of Elizabeth Bramlett Buford’s granddaughters, mentioned below. Also, Stephen may or may not be related to Aquilla White who was involved in the unfortunate shooting death of Agatha’s brother Rev. William Bramblett Jr. and perhaps one or two others in 1779 on the Kentucky Frontier. Aquilla, born circa 1745 in Maryland, reportedly descends from Elizabeth and John White and ancestors from England. After the shooting incident in Kentucky, Aquilla returned to his home in Pennsylvania for his family. They were in Fayette County in 1780-1781 and settled on nearly 3,000 acres in present-day Montgomery Co., Ky. Aquilla married Susannah Noland. He was a constable and planter who applied for his Revolutionary War pension in 1811. He died in 1823 at Red River, Montgomery Co., Ky.

 Agatha and Stephen’s children are Ambrose, Sarah, William, James, Thomas, Stephen Jr., Susannah, Jesse and Tabia White.

   Ambrose White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1753-1756 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Agatha’s brother Ambrose Bramlett. Ambrose White and his father, Stephen, and brothers served as soldiers during the American Revolutionary War. Ambrose died May 4, 1839, in Franklin Co., Ky. He first married a woman named Elizabeth in Bedford County. They had three children: Mary, Charlotte, Elizabeth White. He married Cynthia Green in 1822 in Franklin Co., Ky.

 

   Sarah White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1757-1758 in Bedford Co., Va. She is a namesake of Agatha’s sister Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett Callaway Brown. She died in 1814 in Adair Co., Ky. She first married John Field in Bedford Co., Va. John wrote his will on April 15, 1778, in Bedford County, naming wife, Sarah, and two children: Thomas and John. It was probated July 27, 1778. Sarah and her father, Stephen White, were named executors. James White and Edmund Fair witnessed the will (WB-1:305). John and Sarah’s children include Thomas, John, Mildred, Sarah, Ackeberry, Clementina Field. Sarah second married William Hurt. Their children include William W., Susannah, James, Alban, Susan Hurt.

 William White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1759-1760 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Agatha’s father William Bramlett I/Sr. and Stephen’s brother William White. He died in 1814 in Franklin Co., Ky. He first married a woman named Church. He second married Nancy Gale. He third married Ann Lewis. His children include Judy, John S., Mary C., Robert T./L., Permelia B., James G., Susan C., William, Catherine, Sophia Jane, Elizabeth Ann, Agatha L. M. White.

 

  James White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1761 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Agatha’s brother James Bramlett and Stephen’s brother James White. He died in 1828 in Bedford County. He married Lucy Terry there on March 6, 1783. Lucy, daughter of Thomas Terry, and James applied for their marriage bond on Feb. 13, 1783, in Bedford County. John Mead signed the  document as surety. Rev. Nathaniel Shrewsbury, father of Milley Shrewsbury, wife of James Bramlette Sr., performed their marriage ceremony. James and Lucy’s children include Jeremiah, Thomas F., Stephen, Mary, Crawford Enoch, Frances B. White.

 

Mary White, child of Lucy Terry and James White Sr., married William Lowry in 1821 in Bedford Co., Va. They applied for their marriage bond on Jan. 30, 1821. “Enock C. White” (Crawford E., brother of Mary) signed the document as surety.

 

 Crawford Enoch White, child of Lucy Terry and James White Sr., married Elizabeth W. Martin, daughter of George Martin, on Jan. 23, 1827, in Bedford Co., Va. They applied for their marriage bond on Jan. 22, 1827. Abner Martin signed as surety. Frederick Kabler performed their marriage ceremony.

Frances B. White, child of Lucy Terry and James White Sr., married Julius H. Hatcher, on Feb. 24, 1829, in Bedford Co., Va. She married Julius H. Hatcher there on Feb. 24, 1829. They applied for their marriage bond on Feb. 23, 1829. Crawford E. White, brother of Frances, signed as surety. William Harris performed their marriage ceremony.

 

   Thomas White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1762-1763 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Stephen’s father Thomas White Sr. He died in 1844 in Adair Co., Ky. He first married Jane Lusk on March 23, 1783, in Bedford County. They applied for their marriage bond on March 18, 1783. Araba Brown signed as surety. William Johnson performed their marriage ceremony. Thomas White’s second wife is Elizabeth, surname unknown. Thomas had at least nine children: Jabin, Javan, Thomas, Lucinda L., James B., Cynthia, Edmund F., Ambrose, Stephen White.

 

   Stephen  White Jr., child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1764-1765 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of his father, Stephen White Sr. He died in 1820 in Fayette Co., Ky. He first married Polly Rushton in 1785 in Bedford County. His second wife is Theodosia White. His children include Stephen III, James, Theodosia, John C., Ambrose, Rowland, Thomas C. White.

 

   Susannah White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1766-1768 in Bedford Co., Va. She died circa 1844 in Howard Co., Mo. She married James Callaway on July 13, 1784, in Bedford County. They applied for their marriage bond on July 12, 1784. Lance Woodward signed as surety. William Johnson performed their marriage ceremony. James and Susannah’s eleven children: Charles, Stephen, Agatha, John, Anna, Ambrose, Betsy, Sally, James, Flanders, Signea Callaway.

 

   Jesse White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1769-1770 in Bedford Co., Va. He died circa 1836 in Adair Co., Ky. He married Frances White. She also died in Adair County. His children include William, Mildred, Janetta, Sanford, Dudley, Harmon B. White.

 

   Tabia “Taby” White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1771-1773 in Bedford Co., Va. She died sometime after 1790 in Adair Co., Ky. She married Robert Rowland on Aug. 12, 1790, in Bedford County. Stephen White, father of “Taby,” gave consent on the marriage bond, dated Aug. 9, 1790. William Leftwich Jr. signed as surety. Rev. Nathaniel Shrewsbury performed their marriage ceremony. Robert Rowland is the son of Penelope Clark and Henry Rowland. (Henry left a will in Bedford County witnessed in 1773 by Joshua Early. Penelope is the daughter of Judith Adams and Micajah Clark of Abemarle Co.,Va.) Tabia and Robert moved to Adair Co., Ky., shortly after they married. Robert Rowland signed two bonds as security when his brother-in-law Jesse White executed and re-secured his bond as constable of Adair County on Feb. 1, 1808 (CB-B:57) and on Feb. 5, 1810 (CB-B:175).

White Family Members, courtesy Patti Imani

1 Thomas White Sr., father of Stephen, was born circa 1700-1710, the son of Elizabeth and Samuel White and grandson of Jane and Robert White, all of England. Thomas Sr. is named in several records in Caroline County during 1725-1740s. He died in or before 1750 when his wife applied for the renewal of his ordinary’s license. She was licensed to operate White’s (Burk’s) Shop until at least 1759. Mortimeyer and Revesz list several possible siblings of Stephen in their 1992 history: Jane, Ursula, Ann, William, James, Thomas White Jr., who all were born between circa 1724 and 1738.

2 In past years, family tradition held that Stephen descends from or is related to Pilgrim William White, a laborer who came to America from England or Ireland on the Mayflower, landing at Plymouth Rock, Mass., in 1607, and his son William White Jr. Some believe Stephen may be related to John White, the first governor of Virginia. There appear to be separate White families in different areas of colonial America who may not be fully researched and may or may not be closely or distantly related to each other. One is the family of Henry White of Buckingham and Bedford counties in Virginia, whose descendant Jacob White married one of Elizabeth Bramlett Buford’s granddaughters, mentioned below. Also, Stephen may or may not be related to Aquilla White who was involved in the unfortunate shooting death of Agatha’s brother Rev. William Bramblett Jr. and perhaps one or two others in 1779 on the Kentucky Frontier. Aquilla, born circa 1745 in Maryland, reportedly descends from Elizabeth and John White and ancestors from England. After the shooting incident in Kentucky, Aquilla returned to his home in Pennsylvania for his family. They were in Fayette County in 1780-1781 and settled on nearly 3,000 acres in present-day Montgomery Co., Ky. Aquilla married Susannah Noland. He was a constable and planter who applied for his Revolutionary War pension in 1811. He died in 1823 at Red River, Montgomery Co., Ky.

Agatha and Stephen’s children are Ambrose, Sarah, William, James, Thomas, Stephen Jr., Susannah, Jesse and Tabia White.

   Ambrose White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1753-1756 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Agatha’s brother Ambrose Bramlett. He served with his father, Stephen, and brothers as a soldier during the American Revolution.

Ambrose White

Ambrose died May 4, 1839, in Franklin Co., Ky. He first married a woman named Elizabeth in Bedford County. They had three children: Mary, Charlotte, Elizabeth White. He married Cynthia Green in 1822 in Franklin Co., Ky.

   Sarah White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1757-1758 in Bedford Co., Va. She is a namesake of Agatha’s sister Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett Callaway Brown. She died in 1814 in Adair Co., Ky. She first married John Field in Bedford Co., Va. John wrote his will on April 15, 1778, in Bedford County, naming wife, Sarah, and two children: Thomas and John. It was probated July 27, 1778. Sarah and her father, Stephen White, were named executors. James White and Edmund Fair witnessed the will (WB-1:305). John and Sarah’s children include Thomas, John, Mildred, Sarah, Ackeberry, Clementina Field. Sarah second married William Hurt. Their children include William W., Susannah, James, Alban, Susan Hurt.

   William White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1759-1760 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Agatha’s father William Bramlett I/Sr. and Stephen’s brother William White. He died in 1814 in Franklin Co., Ky. He first married a woman named Church. He second married Nancy Gale. He third married Ann Lewis. His children include Judy, John S., Mary C., Robert T./L., Permelia B., James G., Susan C., William, Catherine, Sophia Jane, Elizabeth Ann, Agatha L. M. White.

  James White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1761 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Agatha’s brother James Bramlett and Stephen’s brother James White. He died in 1828 in Bedford County. He married Lucy Terry there on March 6, 1783. Lucy, daughter of Thomas Terry, and James applied for their marriage bond on Feb. 13, 1783, in Bedford County. John Mead signed the  document as surety. Rev. Nathaniel Shrewsbury, father of Milley Shrewsbury, wife of James Bramlette Sr., performed their marriage ceremony. James and Lucy’s children include Jeremiah, Thomas F., Stephen, Mary, Crawford Enoch, Frances B. White.

Mary White, child of Lucy Terry and James White Sr., married William Lowry in 1821 in Bedford Co., Va. They applied for their marriage bond on Jan. 30, 1821. “Enock C. White” (Crawford E., brother of Mary) signed the document as surety.

 Crawford Enoch White, child of Lucy Terry and James White Sr., married Elizabeth W. Martin, daughter of George Martin, on Jan. 23, 1827, in Bedford Co., Va. They applied for their marriage bond on Jan. 22, 1827. Abner Martin signed as surety. Frederick Kabler performed their marriage ceremony.

Frances B. White, child of Lucy Terry and James White Sr., married Julius H. Hatcher, on Feb. 24, 1829, in Bedford Co., Va. She married Julius H. Hatcher there on Feb. 24, 1829. They applied for their marriage bond on Feb. 23, 1829. Crawford E. White, brother of Frances, signed as surety. William Harris performed their marriage ceremony.

   Thomas White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1762-1763 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of Stephen’s father Thomas White Sr. He died in 1844 in Adair Co., Ky. He first married Jane Lusk on March 23, 1783, in Bedford County. They applied for their marriage bond on March 18, 1783. Araba Brown signed as surety. William Johnson performed their marriage ceremony. Thomas White’s second wife is Elizabeth, surname unknown. Thomas had at least nine children: Jabin, Javan, Thomas, Lucinda L., James B., Cynthia, Edmund F., Ambrose, Stephen White.

   Stephen  White Jr., child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1764-1765 in Bedford Co., Va. He is a namesake of his father, Stephen White Sr. He died in 1820 in Fayette Co., Ky. He first married Polly Rushton in 1785 in Bedford County. His second wife is Theodosia White. His children include Stephen III, James, Theodosia, John C., Ambrose, Rowland, Thomas C. White.

   Susannah White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1766-1768 in Bedford Co., Va. She died circa 1844 in Howard Co., Mo. She married James Callaway on July 13, 1784, in Bedford County. They applied for their marriage bond on July 12, 1784. Lance Woodward signed as surety. William Johnson performed their marriage ceremony. James and Susannah’s eleven children: Charles, Stephen, Agatha, John, Anna, Ambrose, Betsy, Sally, James, Flanders, Signea Callaway.

   Jesse White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1769-1770 in Bedford Co., Va. He died circa 1836 in Adair Co., Ky. He married Frances White. She also died in Adair County. His children include William, Mildred, Janetta, Sanford, Dudley, Harmon B. White.

   Tabia “Taby” White, child of Agatha Bramlett and Stephen White, was born circa 1771-1773 in Bedford Co., Va. She died sometime after 1790 in Adair Co., Ky. a married Robert Rowland on Aug. 12, 1790, in Bedford County. Stephen White, father of “Taby,” gave consent on the marriage bond, dated Aug. 9, 1790. William Leftwich Jr. signed as surety. Rev. Nathaniel Shrewsbury performed their marriage ceremony. Robert Rowland is the son of Penelope Clark and Henry Rowland. (Henry left a will in Bedford County witnessed in 1773 by Joshua Early. Penelope is the daughter of Judith Adams and Micajah Clark of Albemarle Co.,Va.) Tabia and Robert moved to Adair Co., Ky., shortly after they married. Robert Rowland signed two bonds as security when his brother-in-law Jesse White executed and re-secured his bond as constable of Adair County on Feb. 1, 1808 (CB-B:57) and on Feb. 5, 1810 (CB-B:175).

Works Cited for Agatha “Aggy” Bramlett White

Imani, Patti. Photographs of Mary J. Waggener and Stephen White and son Frank White and wife, Nancy, and Susie and Jessie W. Martin. 30 September 2000. 2837 28th Ave.. NW, Olympia, WA 98502.

Mortimeyer, Mary L. and Frances H. Revesz. White Families – John and Stephen of Virginia and Kentucky. 1992. Permission to quote all material obtained from the late Mary Mortimeyer.

Chapter 10:

Generation 3

ELIZABETH BRAMLETT and JAMES BUFORD

(Children: John, William, James Jr., Simeon K., Abraham, Ambrose, Henry, Judith, Elizabeth, Frances)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

Capt. James Buford served as an Officer during the American Revolution

Elizabeth Bramlett, child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and Elizabeth Callaway, was born circa 1745 in Colonial Virginia. She died in 1798 in Scott Co., Ky. “Betty,” a spinster, gave her own consent when she married Capt. James Buford Sr., a bachelor, on July 14, 1761, in Bedford Co., Va. Her maternal uncle Francis Callaway signed the marriage bond as surety,  or witness. James, son of Judith Early and John Buford Sr., was born in 1740 in Bromfield Parish, Culpeper Co., Va. He died circa 1792-1799 in Scott Co., Ky. Both James and Elizabeth were early residents of Liberty, now Bedford, Bedford Co., Va. Elizabeth moved there with her family in 1752. James was living there by 1761. He helped lay out the town of Liberty and served as a presiding magistrate. He recorded a deed as a trustee of Bedford in 1786. James Sr. served as captain of a company in the Virginia State Militia. On March 22, 1777, “Captain James Buford was allowed pay, rations, &tc., for his company to the 15th instant, £997 1s. 9d.” James Sr. appointed his son James Jr. as his attorney for business in Virginia, and moved with the rest of his family to Kentucky, according to Mortimeyer and Revesz (331). They cite Mildred Buford Minter’s 1924 history Buford Family in America for names of the children. James Sr. and Elizabeth’s children, born in Bedford, Va., include John, William, James Jr., Simeon K., Abraham, Ambrose, Henry, Judith, Elizabeth, and Frances Buford.

 

   John Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born circa 1764 in Bedford Co., Va. He died in Kentucky. He married Frances Turpin Benton. John moved to Lincoln (later Garrard) Co., Ky.

   William Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born circa 1768 in Bedford Co., Va. He died circa 1794 in Kentucky, perhaps at Crab Orchard. He married Martha Hill Logwood, daughter of Ann Aiken and Thomas Logwood, on Oct. 11, 1783, in Bedford County. She was born circa 1766 in Virginia. She died in 1808 in Bedford, Va. After William Buford died, Martha second married Stephen Hubbard. They had five children: Nancy, Thomas, William, Edmund, Margaret Hubbard. William and Martha’s children are Matilda, Lucinda, Parthenia, Parmelia Buford.

   Matilda Buford, child of William and Martha Hill (Logwood) Buford, was born in 1793 in Bedford Co., Va., and died in 1876. She married Jacob Washington White in 1812 in Bedford County. Matilda’s guardian, grandfather Thomas Logwood, gave consent for the marriage. Jacob was born circa 1792, the son of Hannah Spiers and Capt. Jacob White, a Revolutionary War veteran. Jacob died in 1829. Matilda and Jacob’s children are Celine Catherine, William Allen, Adeline Martha, John Henry, Sarah Frances, Virginia Ann, Parmelia Elizabeth, Mary Starr and Hillary Alexander White. Matilda second married William Thaxton, born 1782 and died 1839.

   Celine Catherine White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born Oct. 18, 1813, in Bedford Co., Va. She died there circa 1853. She married Fountain Melvin Hawkins. He was born 1811 and died 1865. Their children are Matilda, Fannie Lewis, Harvey, Martha, John Henry, Mary Elizabeth, Edward C., Sallie, Spotswood B. Hawkins.

   William Allen White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.

   Adeline Martha White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.

   John Henry White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.

   Sarah Frances White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.

  Virginia Ann White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born July 20, 1820, in Bedford Co., Va. She died April 9, 1877, and was buried in Jeter Cemetery, Union, Bedford Co., Va. She married Fielding Harris Jeter circa 1836. He was born Dec. 29, 1810, and died May 2, 1894. He also rests in Jeter Cemetery. Their children include Jacob W., Finley W., Matilda F., Lucy E., Tilman Buford and Thomas Alexander Jeter.

   Thomas Alexander “Pomp” Jeter, child of Virginia Ann White and Fielding Harris Jeter, was born July 16, 1841, in Bedford Co., Va. He died May 16, 1885, and was buried in Beaver Dam Baptist Church Cemetery. He married Lauria Cornelia Mays on Oct. 16, 1872. She was born Feb. 2, 1851, the daughter of Malinda Wright and Joseph W. Mays. Lauria died in early 1876. Their children are Laura E. M. Jeter Davidson, born 1875 and died 1958, and Lula Eastman Jeter.

   Lula Eastman Jeter, child of Laura Cornelia Mays and Thomas Alexander “Pomp” Jeter, was born in 1873 near Chamblissburg in Bedford Co., Va. She died in 1954. She lived with her maternal grandparents after her mother died and then with her father for a year in Liberty, Va., until he died in 1885. Lula married in 1903 George Pleasant Parker, a hardware merchant. He was born in 1863, the son of Rebecca Louise Fitzhugh Walker and Robert William Parker. George died in 1939. He and Lula are both buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Bedford, Va. They had four children: Georgette, Laura Jeter, Virginia Hamilton and Josephine Mays Parker. Lula, a genealogist, historian and author, co-wrote with her White cousin Mary Denham Ackerly Our Kin: The Genealogies of Some of the Early Families Who Made History in the Founding and Development of Bedford County, Virginia, which was published by J. P. Bell, Lynchburg, Va., in 1930, and co-authored and published with Peter Viemeister Parker’s Bedford County, Virginia, History in Bedford, Va., in 1938. The latter was reprinted in 1954 by Bedford Democrat. Lula also contributed to a compilation naming Bedford County World War II veterans. She was an active member of Peaks of Otter Daughters of the American Revolution and a graduate of Belmont Seminary and Hollins Institute.

   Parmelia Elizabeth White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.

   Mary Starr White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.

   Hillary Alexander White, child of Matilda Buford and Jacob Washington White, was born in Bedford Co., Va.

   James Buford Jr., child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va.

   Simeon K. Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. He first married Mary Barr. He second married Ann Mary Sieher

   Abraham Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born April 13, 1772, in Bedford Co., Va. He died Oct. 3, 1840. He married Mary Moody. She was born 1777 and died 1853. Abraham moved to Bourbon Co., Ky., and Missouri.

   Ambrose Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va. He married Nancy Kirtley, daughter of Elizabeth and Francis Kirtley of Orange Co., Va. Ambrose moved to Kentucky and to Missouri in 1827.

   Henry Buford, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Col. James Buford Sr., was born in Bedford Co., Va.

 

   Dr. Christopher Columbus Graham, father of Mary E. Graham Adams Bramlette, and second father-in-law of Thomas Elliott Bramlette, was born Oct. 10, 1784, at Fort Worthington near Danville, Kentucky Territory, the son of Mary Worthington and James Graham, one of the legendary “long hunters” who explored the Kentucky Frontier in 1769-1774. The Grahams went into the territory near the Falls of Ohio in 1778 with Gen. George Rogers Clark, who is buried near Thomas in Cave Hill Cemetery. The next year they were among the founders of Louisville. Dr. Graham attended the wedding of Nancy Hanks and Thomas Lincoln on June 12, 1806. He was a veteran of the War of 1812, serving with Major Holmes when wounded and captured, then exchanged. He received his medical degree from Transylvania in 1819. He attempted to recover some of his escaped slaves in Canada in 1840-1841. He built a four-story brick hotel for 1,000 guests at Harrodsburg Springs in 1842-1843. The property and building, which cost $300,000, was sold to the government for $100,000 in 1852. He also served in the Mexican War in 1846. He was an author of scientific and natural history books and articles; an adventurer and renaissance man: a physician, businessman, silversmith, archeologist and early resident of Harrodsburg and Louisville, finally settling in Danville, Boyle Co., Ky. He died there at age 100 years and four months on Feb. 3, 1885, and was buried in Bellevue Cemetery. His first wife, Teresa Sutton, was born May 8, 1804, the daughter of Sarah “Sallie” Fulkerson and David Sutton. After Teresa died, Dr. Graham second married Columbia S. Buford in 1861.

Cousins and Co-authors of Our Kin: Lula Eastman Jeter Parker and Mary Denham Ackerly Field

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A descendant of Elizabeth Bramlett Buford: the late Lula Eastman Jeter Parker (1873-1954), left,  is a native and and past resident of Bedford Co., Va., She is well known as an historian, genealogist and author who was active in documenting local, state, regional, national and family history. She is co-author, with Mary Denham Ackerly Field, of Our Kin: The Genealogies of Some of the Early Families Who Made History in the Founding and Development of Bedford County, Virginia (Lynchburg, Va.: J. P. Bell, 1930) and co-author with Peter Viemeister of Parker’s History of Bedford County, Virginia (Bedford: Parker, Bedford: 1938; Bedford: Bedford Democrat, 1954).

   Lula also contributed to a compilation naming Bedford County World War II veterans and was involved in many civic projects in her lifetime. She was an active member of Peaks of Otter D.A.R., a graduate of Belmont Seminary and Hollins Institute. She married George Pleasant Parker, and both are buried at  Oakwood Cemetery, Bedford, Va. They are parents of four children. Lula directly descends from parents, Laurie Cornelia Mays and Thomas Alexander Jeter, who also had another daughter, Laura E. M. Jeter Davidson. Thomas Alexander Jeter (1841-1885) is son of Virginia Ann White (1820-1877) and Fielding Harris Jeter (1810-1894), and Laurie Cornelia Mays Jeter (1851-1876) is daughter of Malinda Wright and Joseph W. Mays. Virginia Ann White Jeter is daughter of Matilda Buford (1793-1876) and Jacob Washington White (1792-1829). Matilda Buford, daughter of Martha Hill Logwood Hubbard and William Buford, is listed as under guardianship of Thomas Logwood (grandfather) when she married Jacob Washington White in 1812 in Bedford County. She second married William Thaxton. William Buford (1760s-1794) of Crab Orchard, Ky., is son of Elizabeth Bramblett and Capt. James Buford and grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr. (See their history above.) Jacob Washington White descends from Capt. Jacob White, son of Henry White, the former of Buckingham and Bedford counties and a Revolutionary War veteran who married Hannah Spiers and Nancy Oglesby. (No information about how or if Capt. Jacob White is related to Stephen White, husband of Agatha Bramblett, and his father, Thomas White of Essex/Caroline Co., Va.)

   A White cousin of Lula Eastman Jeter Parker is the late Mary Denham Ackerly Field (1885-1970), a native and resident of Bedford Co., Va., also historian, genealogist, author, who is co-author with Lula ofOur KinMary Denham Ackerly Field, who married George Harris Field (1868-1937), is daughter of Mary Conna Blount White (1862-1968) and John Paul Glascow Ackerly Sr. (1850-1927). Mary Conna Blount White Ackerly is daughter of Mary Virginia White (1836-1916) and John Milton White (1831-1920). Mary Virginia White is daughter of Mary Ann Gwatkin (1810-1846) and Henry Milton White (1805-1867). Henry Milton White is son of Hannah Spiers (1700-1780) and Capt. Jacob White (1763-1832), Virginia Militia, Revolutionary War. John Milton White (1831-1920) is son of Caroline Poindexter (1809-1837) and Col. William Allen White (1804-1844) who also is son of Hannah Spiers and Capt. Jacob White.

   Capt. Jacob White, of Buckingham and Bedford counties. who married Hannah Spiers and Nancy Oglesby, reportedly is the son of Henry White. (As noted above, no information is yet available about how or if Henry White or Capt. Jacob White is related to Stephen White, husband of Agatha Bramblett, and his father, Thomas White of Essex/Caroline Co., Va.)

One of Elizabeth Bramlett and James Buford’s descendants or relatives may be John R. Buford, 72, born circa 1840, a Virginia military cadet, assigned to Hilliard’s Legion Artillery during the Civil War/War Between the States, who is pictured in a photo of “Confederate Ex-patriots in South America.” John is the second from right, back row. The image appears in Confederate Veteran, Vol. 21, p. 169. The photo was taken Aug. 20, 1912, at the home of Dr. Robert C. Norris, at Villa Americano, Estado de São Paulo, Brazil, South America. Between 10,000 and 20,000 ex-Confederates left America when the South lost the war in 1865, some taking their slaves, to live in Brazil where slavery was legal until 1888. The emperor at the time gave them incentives, including legal slavery, low land prices and low or no taxes, to emigrate. Most settled in and around São Paulo and Rio De Janeiro and present-day Santa Bárbara d’Oeste and Americana. Many who developed homesickness and/or disillusionment about the opportunities for economic success in Brazil eventually returned to the United States. Those who remained, designated as “Confederados,” at the end of their lives left descendants whose families today live and celebrate the Confederacy in many cities throughout Brazil.

Bramblette slaves enlisted in the Union Army in 1863-1865 to fight for freedom

AFTERWORD

Not Bramblette Slaves below but  representative of their African-American Culture

Owner’s painting of his slaves Making Music on “The Old Plantation” near Beaufort

Not Bramblette Slaves, per se, but  representative of them and their culture.

This famous watercolor of Gullah Slaves dancing and playing African-derived musical instruments, including shegureh scarf rattle, molo banjo precursor, and gudugudu gourd drum, is named “The Old Plantation,” most likely after Roseland Plantation, Beaufort, S.C., owned by John Rose, also the attributed painter in 1790. Original artwork is owned by Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, in Virginia.

 

   As Bramblette descendants and American citizens, we should understand from history and experience that some family members and others, especially minorities and immigrants, have not shared and still do not share equally the opportunities and prosperity available to everyone pursuing the American Dream. We live in an unjust society that does not yet protect minorities by ensuring equal opportunity in the workplace and equal salaries on their paychecks, that does not universally protect voting, reproductive, LBGTQ and civil rights. American ethnic and cultural discrimination began in the colonies, was imported, and has been perpetuated as a way to control and exploit others ever since. Before the Civil War, many people supported or ignored racism and the practice of slavery, which generally was considered to be socially acceptable. Some Bramblettes were large land and slave owners, including the ancestors of our relative Gov. Thomas Elliott Bramlette of Kentucky. He participated as a Union officer in 1861-1863 and, as a proponent of President Abraham Lincoln, he had a front seat at the national spectacle, so to speak, as a political leader in 1863-1867. In public speeches during and after the war, Thomas definitively described THE CAUSE of the Civil War as “a sectional dispute about SLAVERY” (his words; my emphases). The South seceded because it wanted the states’ right to and retain and expand slavery, and the North wanted to keep the Union intact while constraining and eventually eliminating slavery. After the war, which resulted in catastrophic death and destruction and did not completely solve the issue, some promoted Jim Crow laws and supported or joined Knights of the Ku Klux Klan (KKKK). Discovered references to such family activities and family slaves are included in this history, even those former slaves with biological connections to their owners, to embrace and include them — to open wide the door in the brick wall, lay out the welcome mat — and to facilitate the difficult task of African American researchers. One such astonishing family discovery involves the Civil Rights icon Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer who joined the struggle for voting and civil rights in the South during the 1960s. The experiences of her grandmother Liza Gober Bramlett as a Mississippi slave influenced Fannie’s courageous decision to work for equality against all odds and with dangerous, potentially fatal consequences. Beaten to near death merely for her desire to vote, she stood up over and over again after every subsequent attack and setback, risking everything for what she conceived to be the right. Her efforts with other freedom fighters continue to inspire contemporary proponents of national and universal civil and human rights. We live in a nation founded by European immigrants upon a revolutionary ideology: Freedom from tyranny. Our Continental Congress’ Declaration of Independence tells us that we all — “all men” — including minorities, are born with “Inalienable Rights” which include “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.” Yet the United States Constitution contains one particular paradoxical conundrum with no clear or easy solution: it hypocritically promoted freedom while protecting slavery. The free labor and trade system of the uncompensated enslaved made many white Americans rich; it built our plantations, towns, cities; and it distinctly defined our country and society as a divided nation from its inception. And, inexplicably, the peculiar institution’s racist effects still covertly and overtly negatively affect the social, economic, political and cultural aspects of America as we know it today. Only a few poignant examples of current events…

Shocking: Some high schools in the South today–in 2016–are still segregated according to skin color. Outrageous: It took a white supremacist’s attempt to start a race war with the cold blooded massacre of nine Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church members in June 2015 at Charleston, S.C., before the state government would reluctantly remove a specific, racially symbolic, Confederate Battle Flag from the statehouse in Columbia. That disrespected Virginia flag, not used in battle by South Carolina troops, the same banner adopted and hailed by the Emanuel A. M. E. Church murderer, had been directly insulting state residents at the capital for the past 54 years despite ongoing objections by constituents. Typical: Our successful first African-American President has been openly and relentlessly despised, verbally abused, personally, politically and professionally attacked, obstructed and targeted for failure on a daily basis during his entire tenure merely because some in a specific opposing political party do not like the color of his skin. The American people twice selected President Barack Hussein Obama with a majority of millions of votes, and he has turned the country around despite constant opposition. Crazy: Living History–A front runner/presumed GOP nominee in the current presidential campaign–who regularly makes public xenophobic, homophobic, misogynistic, sexist, racist remarks–equally opportunistic bloviations–uses bullying, name calling, hate mongering and vulgarity to incite unrest and violence, to attract a cult-like strain of voter-followers who unwittingly or purposefully still suffer from the lingering negative effects of patriarchy, inherited and adopted ignorance and white supremacy. The historical alternative is our best hope to avoid chaos, to keep our country on the right track toward a more perfect, free union.

Undeniable family, regional and national embarrassments, white supremacy, white nationalism and slavery are inextricably associated with prejudice, racism, discrimination and oppression. Unfortunately they are part of our history that can not and should not be denied or ignored and need to be neutralized, eliminated by current and future generations. Rallying at political events and promoting candidates on social media are not enough: Such activities help identify problematical issues, but actual change takes place in the voter booth and by society in the community by activists who reject institutional indifference and collective resistance to progress.

charlestonstrongimage1

#CharlestonStrong #AmericaStrong in memory of Nine Innocent Souls murdered AT MOTHER EMANUEL CHURCH, Charleston. S.C.,  by  a homegrown  white supremacist terrorist.

Proposed design of the Slave Museum planned for Charleston, S.C., on the harbor wharves where Slave Ships once arrived from Africa and docked for unloading and later slave auctions in the city.

Slave Museum

Slaves below carrying fresh produce for sale and working at the Cotton Warehouse, not far from the museum site, in Charleston, S.C.

Women SlavesWoman Slaves Cotton Warehouse

GATHERING OF RECENTLY FREED SOUTHERN SLAVES still on the plantation in 1865:

SLAVES RECENTLY FREED

 

The lovely painting below was used to promote false propaganda abroad about how slaves were treated on Southern Plantations in America: but they generally were not comforted and well fed, well cared for, and cherished as family members. They were considered to be subhuman, chatttels, livestock, bought and sold, traded, and given to others as property, unpaid servants, free laborers, legacies bequeathed to successive generations of same family owners.

America Use.jpg

 

“NOBODY’S FREE UNTIL EVERYBODY’S FREE.” — Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer, Granddaughter of Liza Gober Bramlett, a Former Slave owned by Gobers and Bramletts in Mississippi.

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Fannie Lou Hamer: Intelligent, Courageous & Proud, Generous

   Although iconic civil rights activist Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer may not be biologically related to the Bramlett family, her mother shared the surname, and her grandmother Liza Gober Bramlett, who may  or may not have been related, reportedly gave birth to many children fathered by her white Bramlett and Gober slave owners. Four of her twenty-three children were not fathered by white men. Fannie did not discuss details of her family relations in public, so not much is known about her mother and grandmother.

    Fannie was born Oct. 6, 1917, in Montgomery Co., Miss., the 20th child of Lou Ella Bramlett and James Lee “Jim” Townsend. Lou Ella Bramlett is the 23rd child of Liza Gober Bramlett, a former slave owned by Gobers and Bramletts in Mississippi.

Fannie grew up ill, disabled and perpetually hungry and exhausted from the mind- and soul- and body-numbing toil of child labor, the never-ending chores of a black sharecropper’s daughter in the unforgiving cotton fields of the Mississippi Delta. She grew up hearing stories told by her mother and grandmother about the indignities suffered by her slave ancestors who were forced to live and work to benefit their white owners. The experiences of her grandmother Liza, who, outrageously, through coerced integration, was forced to bear children of her white owners; and Fannie’s own forced sterilization, influenced her decision to join the struggle for voting rights in the South during the 1960s and to work for equality and freedom from racism and opression. Fannie carried on even after being illegally detained and beaten to near death in a Mississippi jail.

Fannie and fi. .jpg

The photo above was taken by the FBI after Fannie was beaten. She suffered from internal injuries that bothered her for  the rest of her life. Fannie joined the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and became well known in the Civil Rights Movement as a venerated speaker, singer and activist for change. Fannie married Perry “Pap” Hamer. They did not have biological children because she was sterilized without her consent when she had other scheduled surgery,  but they adopted Dorothy Jean, Virgie Ree, Lenora and Jacqueline from the Sunflower County area. She died there of cancer and complications on March 14, 1977. She rests at Freedom Farms Cooperative, which she founded and established in Ruleville, Miss. A larger-than-life bronze statue of Fannie is the centerpiece of the formal memorial that honors her there along the state’s Civil Rights Trail.

For more about  Townsend Hamer’s remarkable life: see Chana Kai Lee’s biography For Freedom’s Sake: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1999) and Chris Myers Asch’s biography The Senator and the Sharecropper: The Freedom Struggles of James O. Eastland and Fannie Lou Hamer (New York: The New Press, 2008). Both document the lack of social justice and the struggle for freedom and civil rights in the toxic racist atmosphere of 19th-century Mississippi. Fannie also discusses civil rights and growing up in the Delta during a 1972 recorded interview with transcript available only on location, Volume 31, at the Center for Oral History and Cultural Heritage, McCain Library, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Miss. Fannie’s autobiography, To Praise My Bridges, was published in Jackson, Miss., in 1967. Fannie Lou Hamer Cancer Foundation, Ruleville, Miss., works in her honor and memory to raise funds for better treatments and  a cure.

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African-American Civil War Soldiers Honored at the Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Fought for Freedom: combatted, sailed, scouted, guarded, picketed, constructed, cooked…

aa-memorial-use

 

 The End

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