BRAMBLETTE FAMILY IN AMERICA: Descendants of Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet and/or William Bramlett I/Sr. By Deborah G. Dennis

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The Bramblette family in America appears to have originated with William Bramlett I/Sr., born in/before 1694, most likely in Colonial Virginia, and perhaps with his father, Ambrose “Bamblet” or Bramblet, probably born in western Europe, who reportedly immigrated to America from Great Britain in 1690, according to a land patent recorded in New Kent Co., Va., which names him as a transport who came to help settle land there. Unfortunately, the names of Ambrose’s wife and William I/Sr.’s first wife are unknown. William I/Sr. second married Elizabeth Callaway, who is the mother of some of his younger children. With few Bibles, wills and probate records to fully document the early Bramblette generations, we find only thin trails and hints of trials of historical existence in military records and life struggles, tragedies and triumphs in a few Virgin- ia deeds, plat maps, tax records and other court documents. We piece together what we can and conclude, while the nuggets of information are interesting and valuable to us alone, the ancestors’ true legacies live on in the DNA of thousands of descendants with the name Bramblette, Bramblett, Bramblet, Bramlet, Bramlett, Bramlette and other variations and different allied surnames. Hopefully, DNA comparisons, while helpful in genealogy, will someday be replaced or enhanced by a better mechanism of linking our paper trails with matches and measuring the connections of relatives. Our familial multitude of thousands in the past and today populate the records of many areas of the country from the original Thirteen Atlantic Colonies to California and states between. Many of us honor the early ancestors with respect and gratitude after realizing how fortunate we are to have been born into such a courageous, adventurous, prosperous family with distinctive allied connections, let alone to have been born at all and survived in a dangerous world to adulthood. From fighting tyranny before and during the American Revolution to fighting World Wars to fighting evil enemies in the Cold War and Vietnam Conflict, to stopping Terrorists from attacking Western Civilization in general and America in particular today, our history has been and is often defined by war. Our current world seems even more dangerous with internal strife and struggles between opposite extremist political, social, religious ideologies and innocents trapped in or fleeing war-torn regions and terror attacks spreading in and beyond overseas borders. We must choose courage and encourage others, work for peace and avoid unnecessary wars at all costs. Love Wins.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1: AMBROSE BAMBLET/BRAMBLET I/SR.
& UNKNOWN WIFE
CHAPTER 2: WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR. & UNKNOWN WIFE & WIFE ELIZABETH CALLAWAY

CHAPTER 3: HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR. & UNKNOWN WIFE/WIVES
CHAPTER 4: HENRY BRAMLETT II/JR. & WIFE MARGARET “PEGGY” UNKNOWN
CHAPTER 5: MARIANNE BRAMLETT & FREDERICK BURDETTE
WORKS CITED IN PROCESS
DEDICATION

Chapter 1:
Generation 1
AMBROSE BAMBLET/BRAMBLET I/SR.
(Probable Immigrant Founder 1690)
(Probable Patriarch of All Bramblettes in America)
(Children: William I/Sr.? Others?)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Possible Direct Ancestor
AMBROSE “BAMBLET” (BRAMBLET) I/SR., parents unknown, was born before 1690 when he apparently immigrated to America. Assuming he was an adult at the time, he was born circa 1669-1672 or earlier. One immigration document recorded in Virginia Land Patents suggests Ambrose was transported from England in 1689 or 1690, apparently alone without wife or other close relatives, to help populate New Kent Co., Va. It is not known if he actually boarded the ship, survived the journey and arrived in America. His name, “Ambrose Bamblet,” which appears on a Virginia Land Office Patent, is the only evidence yet found of his existence. In the land patent record, the scribe may have just misspelled the name by omitting the letter “R” from the surname Bramblet, a common variant spelling. Ambrose reportedly was one of forty-five per- sons transported to America by John Lyddal, who received 648 acres of land in St. John’s Parish, New Kent Co., Va., for bringing in the new settlers. St. John’s Parish was created in 1680. The original handwritten patent, although difficult to decipher, does contain a description of the land and indicates it may have been part of more than 2,200 acres previously granted to Capt. Geo. Lydal and others.
“To all &tc. whereas & Now Know ye that … lying and being in New Kent County in St. John’s Parish … 1690 beginning on south side of Black Creek at mouth of the south branch about 35 two pole chains below the new mill adjacent to … &tc. now or late, of Mr. Napier &tc. … acres granted to Capt. Geo. Lydal … & deserted & granted to Mr. John Langston … March 1672/3 but never present & deserted & granted to sd. John Lyddal by order &tc. court 648 acres bering date of 17th of October 1689 by and for the importation of forty-five persons into the Collony, whose names…to have and to hold…the 21st of April anno dom 1690….Ambrose Bamblet….” (Virginia Land Patent Book 8, p. 45)

Names of “Bramlett“ heads of households living on Virginia Land and paying taxes on it “Ann, widow of Rev. William Jr. in Bedford County— and in Fauquier County — Margaret “Peggy, widow of Henry Jr., Reuben Sr., husband of Margaret Peggy Darnell and Reuben Jr.– son of Reuben Sr., in Counties, Virginia


The patent identifies 44 other immigrants with different surnames; no wife or children were transported with Ambrose. Without later records with the same names, we have no way of connecting the other persons to Ambrose. The other immigrants and Ambrose were most likely indentured servants who planned to work as farmers for a specific amount of years without pay in exchange for transportation to the new land. Ambrose apparently came to America to get land, become a farmer in Virginia. No record of the exact plot of land he planned to farm or actually farmed in St. John’s Parish has yet been found. No marriage record or other public or official or private record of him has been yet located in existing documents: New Kent is a burned county with few surviving early records.
No other details of Ambrose’s life are known. The cause of his death, his death date and place and burial place are unknown. The name of his wife, if he married, is unknown. The names of his children, if he had any, are undocumented. However, he is the only known candidate for the father of William Bramlett I/Sr., most likely born as an English citizen before 1694 in British – controlled Colonial Virginia, then ruled by Great Britain. Ambrose and William I/Sr. do have geographical proximity in common: New Kent County, created 1634, where Ambrose reportedly lived, is very close–only two narrow counties away–from Essex County, created 1692, where William I/Sr., lived in 1715-1716. No definitive record of immigration has been found for William. (One of William’s sons is named Ambrose Bramlett, perhaps a namesake of this paternal grandfather Ambrose “Bamblet.”) If Ambrose Bamblet had other children, in addition to William I/Sr., they are not yet known.

Digital Record of John Lyddal’s 1690 Virginia Land Office Patent, courtesy Library of Virginia Ambrose Bamblet is located at the bottom, left, last line.

Chapter 2:
Generation 2
WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR. and UNKNOWN FIRST WIFE and ELIZABETH CALLAWAY
(Patriarch of Essex, Caroline, Lunenburg, Bedford, King George, Prince William, Fauquier Families)
(Children: Henry Sr., William II/Jr., Sarah, James, Nancy, Ambrose, Agatha, Elizabeth)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants
Most Likely Direct Ancestor

WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR., perhaps child of Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet I/Sr., was born in 1694-1695, most likely in Colonial Virginia. He witnessed a deed in 1715-1716, which indicates he was at least age 21 and born in/by 1694-1695, and much later successfully petitioned the Bedford County Court for an exemption from levies at about age 60 on Nov. 25, 1755, which suggests he indeed was born in 1694-1695. With a tax exemption, he was no longer required to pay taxes or work on roads or participate as an active member of the county and state militias. Although William I/Sr. has long been identified as our “immigrant ancestor,” no clear evidence of immigration has been found for him: He most likely was born here, in this country, in Virginia, to Ambrose “Bamblet” or Bramblet who reportedly arrived here in 1690 to help populate land in New Kent Co., Va. The name of William I/Sr.’s mother and first wife are unknown. William I/Sr. died between 1759 and 1762 in Bedford Co., Va. He probably died shortly before Nov. 26, 1759, the recording date for a deed he wrote six months earlier on May 3 that year. His burial place is unknown. He may be buried in the lost family graveyard on Bramblett land that later became Cedar Hill Plantation in Bedford, Va., the plantation established by his son Rev. William Bramblett Jr. in 1760-1762. Or he may be buried in one of the church cemeteries nearby or in Callaway -Steptoe Cemetery. William Bramlett I/Sr. and his daughters and sons are all early settlers of Bedford Cit amd County since they already were living there in 1754 when the county was founded and created from Lunenburg. At some point, between 1747 and 1768, Bramblett Road was surveyed and cleared by William I/Sr. and/or some of his sons, perhaps including Rev. William Jr., to facilitate travel along or through an area now known as the former Cedar Hill Plantation in present day Bedford, Va. William Bramlett I/Sr., a surveyor living in Caroline County at least until late 1747 and living by 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg that became Bedford County in 1754, no doubt was involved in building his own road on his land or wherever he lived there. He did not retire until 1755, and Bramblett Road ran right past or through his son Rev. William Jr.’s Cedar Hill property: today it is known as West Main Street. The road existed on or before April 26, 1868, when son Rev. William Jr. was appointed surveyor for a road “from Bramblett’s [Road or house] to Augusta Road” (CB-3:424). Celebrated historian Lula Eastman Jeter Parker describes the thoroughfare but offers no date for its origin in Parker’s History of Bedford County, Virginia:
“Bramblett’s Road” is the first road of importance mentioned in Bedford County records. This was an east-to-west thoroughfare passing through New London, and what was later the town of Liberty, and on to the Botetourt County line. It was probably the same route as that followed by the Lynchburg and Salem Turnpike, built in the early 1830s, and practically the same, from Bedford to Roanoke, as State Highway 460 of today [1954]. (85)
Lula is a direct descendant of William Bramlett I/Sr. through his daughter Elizabeth Bramlett, an early settler of Bedford in 1754, who married Col. James Buford. Able-bodied landowners and non-exempt residents were asked/required to clear and construct roads for their and public use by county courts in colonial and early America. County orders to “view a road” (meaning to suggest a location and/or survey the site) are common in early records.
William’s Marriages
William I/Sr. married at least twice and had at least eight children. He probably married his first wife, unknown, circa 1710. She most likely is mother of Henry I/Sr., Rev. William Jr., Sarah, James and Nancy. William I/Sr. married his second wife, Elizabeth Callaway, circa 1732 in Essex or Caroline Co., Va. She most likely is mother of Ambrose, Agatha “Aggie” and Elizabeth “Bettie” Bramlett. Elizabeth Callaway, daughter of unknown mother and Joseph Callaway, was born circa 1710 in Virginia, according to the late Bobbie Callaway, former Callaway Association Historian. (Elizabeth cannot be mother of William I/Sr.’s probable eldest son Henry I/Sr. since Henry I/Sr. and his stepmother Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett share the same birth year–1710.) Elizabeth died before 1759, probably in Caroline, Lunenburg or Bedford County, since she is not mentioned in the deed of gift dated that year which William I/Sr. wrote to transfer property to his son-in-law Stephen White, husband of Agatha “Aggie” Bramblett. He would have made living arrangements for Elizabeth as well if she were still alive. William I/Sr. wrote a will in 1758 that names heirs and legacies; however, unfortunately, its location is unknown and it apparently was not recorded. A reference to William Bramlett Senr., as a payee owed a small amount of money from an estate, was recorded in Bedford County in 1762. The administrator or scribe did not refer to “the estate” of William Bramlett, who probably died in 1759, because William did not leave an estate. He bequeathed items to legatees in his missing will and transferred farm tools and land and livestock and other items to his son-in-law Stephen White in a deed of gift. A small debt was acknowledged in the 1762 estate record; who was paid is not known; whether or not William Bramlett I/Sr. was still alive or deceased in 1762 is not known. The scribe had local knowledge; he apparently did not feel the need to write “William Bramlett Senr. deceased” on the list of debts since all involved would have known if William were alive or dead and to whom to pay the debt.
William’s Life in Colonial Virginia
William I/Sr. is the oldest definite Bramblette found so far in existing records, not counting his possible father, Ambrose I/Sr. William I/Sr. first appears as an adult, at least age 21, as a witness on a Feb. 16-17, 1715-1716, deed recorded in Essex County (DB-11:62). “William Bramlit” signed the deed, which records the lease or sale of 53 acres of land in St. Mary’s Parish, Essex Co, Va., by Matthew Collins to John Morgan, both of Essex County. George Robinson and John Smith also witnessed the document, which was recorded March 20, 1715-1716. The land, adjacent to a corner of John Ellitt’s land and the south fork of Peumansend Creek swamp called the Beaverdam branch, was formerly granted/patented April 17, 1667, to Henry Peters who later died. The land was located in an area of St. Mary’s Parish that later became Caroline County. Essex County, created 1692, is near New Kent where Ambrose I/Sr. reportedly settled in 1690. Since William I/Sr. was required to be at least age 21, an adult, to legally witness the 1715-1716 record, the date of the signature allows us to calculate his birth year as in/before 1694-1695. Essex also is adjacent to King George County, created 1721, where planter Henry Bramlett I/Sr., believed to be son of William I/Sr., was living in 1735. The early found and documented Bramblettes in 1690-1715-1735–Ambrose I/Sr., William I/Sr., Henry I/Sr.–lived in relatively close geographical proximity to each other, within the same small region in three counties of eastern Colonial Virginia. William I/Sr. is mentioned in several Essex and Caroline County records, a few times as a witness to land transactions and a few times as the plaintiff and defendant in court cases. He and John Sanders witnessed a deed on Feb. 18-19, 1716, when Thomas Griffin leased or sold 100 acres of land in Essex County to George Robinson (DB-11:64). He also witnessed a deed on July 13-14, 1722, when Allin Frazier of Essex County sold land to William Blanton of the same county (DB-11:84). Thomas Smith, George Robinson and Joan Frazier also witnessed (made their marks on) the document. William I/Sr. also served on several Caroline County juries between 1733-1736. He most likely lived in a portion of Essex that became Caroline in 1728, a legal boundary change based on a legislative act of 1727. It is not known if William Bramlett I/Sr. owned land in Essex and/or Caroline County. Exactly which land he owned in Lunenburg/Bedford County is not known, but the items in his personal possession in 1759, including livestock and household goods, suggest he owned a home and land and his occupation was planter and farmer. He may have first owned the land his son Rev. William II/Jr. acquired or inherited from the mysterious missing will, with a majestic view of the Peaks of Otter, perhaps part of more than 700 acres of land used to establish Cedar Hill Plantation circa 1760-1761.
An important court record: William I/Sr. and the Callaway family:
Ann Callaway, sister of Thomas Callaway, petitioned the Caroline County Court to choose “Wm. Bramblitt” as her guardian on Oct. 12, 1732. (Ann would have been at least age 12 and under age 18, thus born between 1715-1720, in order to legally choose a guardian in Virginia in 1732.) Thomas Callaway was summoned to answer the petition (OB-1732-1740:43). Both Thomas and Ann are children of Joseph Callaway II of Essex County, who reportedly died of a fever in 1732, according to family tradition. Josephs other children include Elizabeth Callaway, born in 1710, second wife of William I/Sr., and Richard Callaway, a resident of Essex/Caroline County who moved to Lunenburg County by 1752. “Rich. Callaway” is included in the Tithe List that year living near William Bramlett I/Sr. and with the latter’s son “Amb. [Ambrose] Bramlet” as a tithable, a white male over 16, in Richard’s Callaway house. Richard paid three tithes. Thomas Mosely created the tithe list for John Phelps. (Richard Callaway and brother William Callaway were among the first justices appointed in Bedford County in 1754. Their brother also is Col. James C. Callaway Sr. who married Sarah Bramblett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr. Col. Richard Callaway later moved with Col. Daniel Boone to Fort Boonesborough, Ky., where he served as a soldier and an officer on the Western Frontier during the American Revolution. But Daniel survived; and Richard was killed and scalped by Indians near the fort at his ferry in 1779.) “Wm. Bramlet Jr.” is listed as a tithable with his father, William Bramlet I/Sr., on John Phelps’ list of residents whose names were collected by Matthew Talbot for Lunenburg County in 1752. William and Richard also may be on other tithe lists for earlier and later years. (This Ambrose later married Jean “Jane” “Janny” Woodson and moved to North Carolina and Georgia; he is not the elder Ambrose Bamblet, possible immigrant, who would have been at least 80-85 in 1755 if still alive, and exempt, thus not of tithable age.) Ann Callaway is believed to be the youngest sister of Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett, the reason Ann selected her brother-in-law William Bramlett I/Sr. as her guardian. There is no other documentation yet found for the implied marriage of Elizabeth and William I/Sr., but he and sons are named with Callaways in several other Virginia records as well. William I/Sr. and Elizabeth, if she were still living, resided in Caroline County until at least 1747 before moving south to Lunenburg County. On Nov. 13, 1747, when “The Court proceed to lay the County levy” and paid William Bramlett 300 pounds of tobacco, perhaps for surveying. The court had appointed William Bramlett surveyor “in the room of” (to replace) John Ralls on April 10, 1741. William I/Sr. moved his family by 1752 to a portion of Lunenburg Co., Va., that became Bedford County in 1754. He was considered an early settler of Bedford County since he was living in the area when land boundaries changed to create Bedford. He was still living in Bedford a few years later when the county court on Nov. 25, 1755, gave him the above mentioned tax exemption due to his age: 60 years or older.
“Wm. Bromlet Senr.”–either William I/Sr. in 1762 or his son Rev. William Bramblett Jr. in 1766 — is referenced as a creditor who was due 5 shillings in the Bedford Co., Va., estate of William Boyd, dated between 1762 and Sept. 23, 1766 (WB-1:21-24). By the latter date, Rev. William Bramblett Jr. may have been the senior William “Bromlet” in Bedford. The scribe/clerk would not have referenced William Bromlet Senr.’s estate because there was no estate: William Bramlett I/Sr. had deeded his property to son-in-law Stephen White in 1759 and bequeathed other legacies to heirs named in his mysterious, lost 1758 will, which was not recorded. The deed of gift to his son-in-law was not a probate record and does not name the heirs of those legacies or the items bequeathed in the 1758 will. “William Bramblet Sr.” signed the bill of sale for livestock and other property to son-in-law Stephen White on May 3, 1759, and it was recorded as a deed of gift in Bedford County in 1759:
Bramlet to White Bill of Sale: Know All Men by these Presents that I William Bramlet Senr. of the County of Bedford & Parish of Russel, do Bargain, Contract & Deliver unto Stephen White for a Valuable Consideration, that is to say for my maintainanse in a Decent and Wholesom manner with Clothing agreeable to my age, diet, washing & Lodging in a good & Wholesom & becoming Manner During Life, all & singular my Stock of Cattle & Hoggs & Horses, Household goods & all other appertenance to me Belonging of what Nature or Kind soever after the Legacies men- tioned in my Will bearing date 6th of February 1758 are paid as I give this Bill of Sail only to Stringthen the Right & … Impower the said Stephen White in his Part and do warrant the same from myself and from any Person or Persons Whatsoever given under my Hand this third day of May 1759 William Bramlett” (DB-A-1:238.)

John Robinson and William and Anester Young or Going witnessed the document, which was recorded Nov. 26, 1759, in Bedford Co., Va. Mortimeyer and Revesz read the Young surname as “Gowing” and note the Gowing family name has evolved to Gowan, that some of William and Anester’s descendants may have moved to Bedford Co., Tenn. (201).

William I/Sr.’s children are listed in an unpublished manuscript titled “Bramblett” written by Bedford County historian and Bramblette-Buford descendant Lula Eastman Jeter Parker in Bedford County on Sept. 28, 1933. Parker and the late Mrs. Mary A.. Bell Buford (second wife of Rowland Dabney “R. D.” Buford), who was then in 1933 deceased, “both searched the records of Bedford County, Va., for data of the Bramblett family, and often talked over our findings.” Parker deposited her brief history with the Bedford County clerk. She writes,
We concluded that William Bramblett, Sr., settled in Brunswick County in the early 1700’s, perhaps in territory that was cut off into Lunenburg in 1748, and into Bedford in 1754; and that, since we found no other Bramblett who could have been his contemporary, he must have been the progenitor of the family in Virginia, and that he was the father of all of the older Brambletts in this section. He died after November 26, 1759, when he made a Bill of Sale to Stephen White, and perhaps before 1761, when his daughter, Elizabeth, (my ancestress) married James Buford, for she signed her own marriage bond.
William I/Sr.’s 1759 deed was written in May and recorded Nov. 26, so he may have died before or on the later date. These family sleuths focused mainly on their beloved Bedford records for Bramblettes and did not check other Virginia counties, which would have introduced them to a whole new world of family activities in Essex, Caroline, King George, Prince William and Fauquier. They would have discovered in Caroline County Court records William Bramlett I/Sr.’s residence was not Lunenburg County when it still was Brunswick County–before May 1, 1746; recorded documents at that time prove he was living in Essex and then Caroline County until at least November 1747. However, he did live in 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg, formerly Brunswick, that became Bedford in 1754. Historians in the 1930s did not have the easy access to the large amount of information that genealogical researchers enjoy today, but Parker and Mrs. (Mary A. Bell) Buford did have easy access to Bedford records because Mrs. Buford was the wife of the county clerk. Rowland Dabney “R. D.” Buford, 1827-1921, served 32 years in that capacity. (Mary A. Bell Buford was born in 1838 and died in 1930. She and Rowland are buried in Longwood Cemetery.)
Parker lists the following children for William Bramlett I/Sr. in her brief history:
1) William Bramblett Jr., who married Anna Ballard and died in 1779; 2) Ambrose, who lived in North Carolina in 1779; 3) James who married a woman named Winifred and died in 1758; 4) Elizabeth who married James Buford in 1761; and 5) Nancy, mentioned in her brother James Bramlett’s will. [Parker also lists as possible children of William I/Sr.:] 6) Lucy who married Thomas Lumpkin on March 4, 1778; 7) Molly who married Stephen Dooley on July 24, 1781; and 8) Aggy, wife of Stephen White.
However, Lucy and Molly were born and married much later, between seventeen and twenty years, respectively, than Elizabeth Bramlett Buford. Molly (Bramlett) Dooley is a grandchild of William Bramlett I–the daughter of Rev. William II/Jr. and Anna, according to their estate records. Lucy (Bramlett) Lumpkin also is probably a grandchild of William Bramlett I: She may be the only child of James Bramlett who died in Bedford County in 1758 and his wife, Winefred. She is not the daughter of Ambrose Bramlett: He names all of his children in his 1804 will. Nor is she the daughter of Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. and Anna: Their daughter Lucy married Patrick Nenney in 1796 in Bedford County and moved to Tennessee. No daughters have yet surfaced for Henry I/Sr. of Prince William/Fauquier.
Other children of William Bramlett I/Sr. not mentioned by Parker are Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett who first married James Callaway Sr., son of Joseph Callaway, and then second married Leonard “Linus” “Lynah” “Liner” “Leo” Brown, and Henry Bramlett Sr., a planter living in King George County, Va., in 1735 when he bought land in a portion of Prince William County that later became Fauquier County, whose wife is unknown. (King George County in 1735 was adjacent to a portion of Essex County that later became Caroline County where William Bramlett I lived from 1715-1716 to 1747.)
(Note: Lula Eastman Jeter Parker’s 1930s history books, although out of print, are still in high demand and treasured today. She and her White cousin Mary Denham Ackerly co-authored a wonderful book, Our Kin, which includes Boones, Callaways, Bufords, Whites and other allied relatives.)
Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages of America: A Collection of Genealogical Studies, Completely Documented and Appropriately Illustrated, Bearing Upon Notable Early American Lines and Their Collateral Connections (New York: American Historical Company, 1939) contains the following information about the sons of William Bramlett I/Sr. in a section entry titled “Bramlette”:
William, Ambross and Amhus Bramlette or Bramlett were early bearers of the name in Bedford County, Virginia. It is possible that they were brothers….In the militia rosters contained in Hening’s “Statutes at Large” is found a Bedford County list of September, 1758, in which appear the names of Ambrose Bramlett, sergeant; Amhus Bramlett, and William Bramlett. [Note: Their brother James, died 1758, also is listed in the Hening record as a paid soldier.]A William Bramlett was “one of the oldest settlers in Bedford County, and a sergeant in the Colonial Army.” He was father of Elizabeth, who married, July 4, 1761, in Bedford County, James Buford, son of John and Judith Beauford, of Culpeper County, Virginia. After carefully considering the land transactions…between Ann Bramlette (widow), her sons, James and Reuben Bramlette, and James Buford, it seems highly probable that William Bramlette, the sergeant, was also the father of William Bramlette [husband of Anna]….” (209-210)
Actually, the cited Hening’s Statutes does not designate William I/Sr. or II/Jr. as sergeant, and since William I/Sr. was age 60 in 1755, it seems unlikely he would have served as a sergeant in the military at age 63 in 1758; but perhaps a record may surface indicating he served as a sergeant during an earlier time or that his son William II/Jr. served with that rank. In either case, William I/Sr.. was an early settler of Bedford, as were his children, when it was created in 1754, and he was the father of William II/Jr., James who died 1758, Ambrose, Elizabeth and others. “Amhus” cited by Hening most likely is a misspelling of Ambrose (Ambus/Ambos/Ambros); no other reference to “Amhus” has yet been found. Hening also refers to a “Francis” Bramlett, who is a complete mystery.
Since Bible and probate records have not surfaced for some of the early generations, especially for William Bramlett I/Sr., extensive research in official Virginia and South Carolina records has been used to reconstruct William Bramlett I/Sr.’s family: Henry Bramlett Sr., Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr., Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett Callaway Brown, James Bramlett, Nancy (Ann?), Ambrose Bramlett, Elizabeth Bramlett Buford and Agatha “Aggie” Bramlett White.
End Noten addition, in the interest of reducing confusion, note the Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages biography quoted above in a footnote incorrectly identifies Reuben, brother of James and son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr., as Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky.: but the two Reubens had different fathers and lived in different areas in Virginia, i.e., Bedford and Fauquier, and definitely are not one and the same. The biography quotes an abstract from Reuben Sr.’s will: “Reuben; his will, dated December 10, 1806, and proved in January, 1807, in Bourbon County, Kentucky (WB-C-198), mentions wife Peggy; son-in-law, John Grinstead; son Hugh; three children in South Carolina, Reuben, Jr., Milly Robertson and Polly Robertson; son William; son Lewis; land I claim from heirs of Martin Pickett, deceased; son Henry. Executors, John Grinstead, Henry and Hugh Bramblett. Witnesses, Will Mitchell, Edward Riley, Reubin Bramblett, Jr.” (209-10). The following portion of the footnote, citing marriages from two different Reubens as the marriages of one Reuben, is incorrect: “Reuben Bramlette married (first) December 10, 1789, Sally Ashton [Abston]; probably (second) Margaret (‘Peggy’).” Reuben, son of Anna Ballard and William Bramlett Jr., returned to Bedford Co., Va., from Fayette Co., Ky., and married Sally Abston; they remained in Virginia, appearing in Bedford census records in 1810-1820 and court records there in 1830. The other Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky., is the son of Henry Bramlett I/Sr. of Prince William (later Fauquier) Co.,Va., and grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr.; Reuben Sr. never lived in Bedford County and never married Sally Abston. Reuben Bramblett Sr. married a woman named Margaret “Peggy,” surname unknown, perhaps Darnall but not proven, and went to Bourbon Co., Ky., from Fauquier County in 1794-95 after trading his Virginia land to Martin Pickett, as documented in Fauquier County deeds and the 1796 tax list for Bourbon Co., Ky. (DB-12:145; DB-12:324). A completely different man, not Reuben Sr. of Bourbon, the Reuben who married Sally Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, may have first applied for a marriage license to wed Lucy Abston, also a daughter of Jesse Abston and sister of Sally Abston, whom Reuben married in 1790. (Jesse Abston signed as surety.) Or Bedford County may have made a mistake, wrote Lucy instead of Sally, when they entered the following record: “Dec. __, 1790, Reuben Bramblett and Lucy Abston Married by Joseph Drury.” If Reuben and Lucy did marry, their marriage was later annulled: Lucy Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, later married Joel Callaway in Bedford County on Dec. 27, 1793. Alderson Weeks performed their marriage ceremony. Lucy and Joel applied for their marriage license on Dec. 24, 1793. Thomas Pullen signed as surety, and Lucy is named as the daughter of Jesse Abston. So, Reuben Sr. of Bourbon County is not the son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr.; however, as a son of Henry Bramlett I/Sr., Reuben Sr. is considered a grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr., as is Reuben, son of Rev. William II/Jr., who married Sally Abston in Bedford County. (No son named Reuben has yet been found for William Bramlett I/Sr.)

Chapter 3:
Generation 3
HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR. and UNKNOWN
(Known Children: Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr., William Bramblett, Reuben Bramblett Sr.)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Thus Ever To Tyrants

Definite Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis
HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR., believed to be child of Unknown First Wife and William Bramlett I/Sr., was born in or before 1710, most likely in Colonial Virginia. No documentary evidence has been found to connect Henry I/Sr. and William I/Sr. as father and son; however, they lived near each other and William I/Sr. is the only known documented Bramblette in America who was old enough to have been Henry I/Sr.’s father. Henry I/Sr. probably died intestate between 1752 and 1758, in Prince William (later Fauquier) Co., Va., after he was replaced as constable there in 1752 and before his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture and began paying taxes on it for 1758 in 1759. (Land and tax records show Henry I/Sr. is the father of Henry II/Jr. Two other adult males living nearby in Prince William/Fauquier are considered sons of Henry I/Sr. as well, based on geographical proximity and a process of elimination for other possibilities. No will, probate or Bible records have surfaced for Henry I/Sr. His exact death date and place, cause of death and burial place is unknown. The name of his wife, unfortunately, is unknown.
Henry Bramlett Sr.’s Life in Virginia
Henry I/Sr. was a planter living in Brunswick Parish in King George Co., Va., in 1735 when he purchased half of a contiguous tract of 500 acres of land–250 acres more or less–in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., from a man named John Ambrose. The recorded “lease” or first deed of their transaction indicates “John Ambrose of Brunswick Parish King George, planter” sold 250 acres on Elk Marsh Run adjacent to Jonas William’s line to “Henry Bramblet of same, planter” for twenty-five pounds sterling. John Ambrose owned about 500 acres of land in Prince William County, which he may have inherited or purchased or received though a gift or grant. John Ambrose then acknowledged the sale to “Henry Bramblet” in a “release” or second deed for the land, which was recorded in Prince William Co., Va., Court on Sept. 17, 1735 (DB-B:480-482). The transaction was witnessed by George Harrison, John James and Hugh West. (In Virginia in the early 1700s, one deed, known as a bargain and sale–and/or two deeds–a lease and release–could be prepared and recorded to transfer a full title when land or other property was sold or traded.) Available land at that point was scarce in Virginia and generally sold or transferred in the family when possible, so it is conceivable to logically consider a familial relationship by blood or marriage between Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and/or William Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose and/or a first wife. (His spouse in 1747, Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington, was about twenty-five years younger than John and may have been a second wife.) John Ambrose was born in Rappahannock Co., Va., circa 1684, according to a 1747 deposition stating his age as 63, (making him a contemporary of William Bramlett I/Sr.) and died at about age 72 in 1756. Elizabeth Ambrose states her age as 36 in her 1747 deposition, which means she was born circa 1711-1712 (DB-L:12-13). They were deposed witnesses in a case regarding a land title dispute between neighbors. Planter Henry I/Sr. and planter and church warden John Ambrose both moved their families from King George County and farmed adjoining tracts of land on Elk Marsh Run, Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, beginning in 1735.
John Ambrose and John Champe, relationship unknown, both Church Wardens of the Parish of Brunswick, King George Co., Va., bought 200 acres of land there for 100 pounds sterling money of Great Britain from Hugh French, Gentleman, of Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., Va., on May 31, and June 1, 1733 (DB-1729-1735:260-262/DB-1A:260-262). Deeds of lease and release with receipt of money were recorded June 1, 1733. Hugh French’s wife on May 4, 1733, appointed a representative for her dower release: “Know all men I Mary French, wife of Hugh French appoint Thomas Turner my lawfull Attorney” in the “sale of 200 acres conveyed by my husband to John Champe & John Ambris [sic] Church Wardens for a Glebe for the said Parish of Brunswick” in order to “relinquish my right of dower.” The power of attorney was recorded June 1, 1733. Mary Browne Triplett French, daughter of Original and Jane (Brooks) Browne, and wife of first husband, Francis Triplett, died after the above record and before Oct. 5, 1736, when Hugh French wrote his will in Stafford County and named children but no wife (WB-M:247).
“Henry Brimlett” is included on a 1738 Rent Roll for Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., which indicates he was at least age 21 and thus born in or before 1717. He paid five shillings on 250 acres of land for one year from Michaelmass 1738 to Michaellmass 1739. (Source: “Rent Roll from Michaelmass 1738 to Michaelmass 1739.” Prince William County, Virginia, manuscripts in the Huntington Library, 1 microfilm reel [366 frames]; RELIC Microfilm 975.527 Pri. page 2.) This land is the property Henry bought from John Ambrose in 1735.
Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose’s residences are mentioned as landmarks in several recorded deeds, and Henry I/Sr. witnessed a few documents in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., during various years up to 1750-51. They lived near Tinpot Run and Elk Marsh Run and Licking Run and Welches Rolling Road. Henry Bramlett I/Sr.’s property is mentioned as a landmark on a deed written March 16, 1744, when James Genn bought some land for his neighbor Catesby Cock/e of Fairfax County. The land, situated on Elk Marsh Run and Tinpot Run and Welches Rolling Road, was adjacent to property already owned by Catesby Cock/e and adjacent to property then owned by Henry Bramblet, Jonas Williams, Morgan Darnall, Nathaniel Dodd, John Bush and someone named Garner, Gardner or Gardiner. James Genn surveyed the property. Daniel Marr, Nathaniel Dodd and William Cairn witnessed the deed, which was recorded in Prince William County on Aug. 30, 1745 (DB-1745/46). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on Aug. 21-22, 1746, when James Genn of Prince William County sold to John Higgins some property in Hamilton Parish on the branches of Elk Marsh and Tinpot runs. The property “bounded…along the land of Morgan Darnall to a Hickory and one red and 1 box Oak corner of said Darnall & Jonas Williams then with Williams line N. E. to a black Oak & Hickory in the said line Corner of Henry Bramblets land thence with Bramblets line N.W. to a large marked Hickory another of Bramblets corners thence No. W. to a box Oak by Welches Roling Road Corner of said Bramblet thence with another of his lines No. E. to a Spanish Oak on the side of a stony Ridge thence N. Wt. to a large live Oak in a Pond…” (DB-1745/46:173-77; GB-F:244). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on March 11, 1745, when Augustine Jennings, planter of Prince William, bought property next to him from Honer and planter Jonas T. Williams: a “parcel of land containing One hundred and eight acres being in the Parish of Hamilton and County of Prince William adjoyning to a tract of land one part whereof in possession of John Ambros the other part whereof in possession of Henry Bramlet….” The acreage was granted to Jonas Williams on March 6, 1718, and was currently in possession of Augustine Jennings as a result of a one-year indenture. The cost was 3,000 pounds of lawfull Tobacco Current money of Virginia. Jno. Crump and John Bohanan witnessed the deed on March 24, 1745 (DB-1745/56:36-40). Henry Bramlett later witnessed Augustine Jennings’s will on Dec. 13, 1776, in Hamilton Parish, Fauquier County, and it was probated there Aug. 24, 1778 (WB-1:348). (Peter Barker and Lucretia Russell also witnessed the document. Heirs include wife Hannah, daughter Betty, daughter Hannah, daughter Sally, daughter Jemima Hudnall, daughter Nancy Weathers, son William, son Benjamin, son Baylor, son George, son Berryman, son Lewis, son Augustin Jennings. One Jennings daughter, Fanny, married circa 1767 Thomas Obannon, son of Samuel Obannon, nephew of Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington. One of Thomas Obannon’s sons is named John Ambrose Obannon.) Henry I/Sr.’s property is again mentioned as a landmark in a deed written March 30, 1748, when William Kernes bought some Prince William County land nearby. The land, situated on Licking Run, adjoined property then owned by someone named Page, Major Catesby Cocke, Thomas Stone, Henry Bramblet and John Ambrose who farmed adjoining tracts of land, and Colonel Carter. The deed was recorded April 2, 1748, in Prince William County (DB-1745/56:42). Henry I/Sr. also is listed on the 1751 Prince William Co., Va., tithable list, which records taxes for certain tithables and particular items of personal property. Henry I/Sr. witnessed a deed on Feb. 5, 1750/51, which records a transaction between John Darnall and Morgan Darnall regarding the dividing line of property left to them by the Darnall’s deceased father, Morgan Darnall Sr., in Hamilton Parish of Prince William County. The bond later was recorded Feb. 28, 1760 (DB-1759/78:59-60).

One recorded reference to Henry I/Sr. in Prince William County Court documents indicates that, in addition to being a planter, he also was the constable there in 1752 when he was replaced. No reason was given. An entry in Prince William County Court Minute Book on Nov. 27, 1752, indicates Thomas Gardner was appointed constable “in the Room of Henry Bramlet.” Gardner was ordered that day to “go before some Justice of the peace and be sworn accordingly” there (MB-1:77). Although no reason is given in the court record, the act of replacement suggests Henry I/Sr. may have been seriously ill or already dead. At about age 42-50, he probably was not ready to retire due to old age. No other existing court, land or tax records have been found that refer to him as being alive or dead in Prince William or Fauquier County or any other place in Virginia after 1752. It appears his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture by 1758. Tax records indicate Henry I/Sr.’s other two sons–William and Reuben Sr.–had their own separate land in 1759. Henry I/Sr.’s three sons also owned their own land in Fauquier Co., Va., in 1770, according to the Rent Roll, which lists Henry Bramlett (Jr.) with 250 acres. father’s former land, Reuben Bramlett with 150 acres and William Bramlett with 123 acres. Henry II/Jr. apparently did not farm the plantation while living next to John Ambrose since the latter died circa 1756. The latter’s wife, Elizabeth Obannon, married again to John Etherington (a.k.a. Edrington) circa 1762, and he also died before October 1769, before Nov. 29, 1776, when she wrote her will as Elizabeth Etherington in Fauquier County (WB-1:323). Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr. witnessed her will, which was probated March 23, 1778. (Elizabeth’s heirs include Catherine Nelson, Betty Allen, Catherine Duncan, Benjamin Russell, nephew Thomas Obannon son of her brother Samuel and wife, Stelle Obannon, Capt.. John Wright. Elias Edmonds Sr. and Jeremiah Darnall were named executors; other witnesses: Berryman Jennings, James Wright.) Elizabeth Obannon was born circa 1716-1720, the daughter of Bryant Boru Obannon, as he named himself in his will, reportedly an immigrant from Ireland, and, according to family tradition, first wife, Zena Sarah Isham. (Daughter Elizabeth Ambrose is named as an heir of 60 pounds current money and horses in Bryant Boru Obannon’s 1760 will [WB-1:41].) Henry I/Sr. and unknown wife/wives had three known sons: Henry II/Jr., William and Reuben Sr. If he had daughters, unfortunately, their names are not yet known.

Chapter 3:
Generation 3
Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr. and Margaret “Peggy” Unknown
(Children: Marianne, Benjamin, Jalilah, Henry III, Reuben, perhaps William, John, Nathan, perhaps Sarah, Nancy)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

Definite Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis
Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr., child of Unknown and Henry Bramlett I/Sr., was born circa 1730 in Colonial Virginia. Since Henry II/Jr. had possession of his father’s former plantation in Fauquier County and Henry Sr. died intestate under the laws of primogeniture, Henry II/Jr. can be considered the eldest son and heir to his father’s property. He died in 1779 or 1780, definitely before Aug. 5, 1780, most likely in Virginia. His burial place is unknown. Recorded deeds indicate Henry Jr. died a suicide but do not indicate where or why. No documentation has been offered or independently discovered, but family tradition holds that Henry II/Jr. became distraught and inconsolable and took his own life after the death of his eldest son, Benjamin, who reportedly perished as a soldier or patriot while being held on a British prison ship during the American Revolution.
Henry II/Jr. married Margaret Unknown circa 1750, probably in Virginia. Her birth date and place and parents are unknown. She died sometime after she sold her Laurens Co., S.C., farm to her son Nathan in 1809. Her burial place is unknown, but she may rest near Gray Court, S.C., in the old cemetery section of Bramlett United Methodist Church, which she co-founded, next to the graves of her son Nathan and his wife, Elizabeth Gray, whose graves are still marked with inscribed tombstones and footstones: N. B. and E. B. There are three field or native stones without inscriptions next to Elizabeth and Nathan’s graves.
Henry II/Jr. was a planter who inherited his father’s 250-acre Bramlett Plantation through primogeniture between 1752 and 1758. Henry II/Jr. and his brother Reuben Sr. witnessed a deed for Morgan Darnall, perhaps one of Reuben Sr.’s in-laws, in 1760 in Fauquier County (MB-1:92). Henry “Harry Bramblett” II/Jr. witnessed neighbor Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington’s will, which was proved in court in 1778 (MB-5:307). Henry II/Jr.’s relationship to her is not given in the document, but family or close friends traditionally witnessed important documents such as wills and deeds. The will identifies her as the widow of John Etherington deceased and names a nephew with the surname Obannon as one of her heirs. Elizabeth may not have had children who survived since none were named as heirs in the will.
After Henry II/Jr. died by Aug. 5, 1780, and his son Henry III inherited the Bramlett Plantation, the land was resurveyed as a tract of 231 acres. Henry II/Jr.’s widow, Margaret “Peggy” Bramblett/Bramlett paid taxes on the property in the county from 1782 to 1784. When the land was sold by Henry Bramlett (III) of “96 District, S.C.” to James and Ann Dobie/Dobey in 1784, the deed indicated the widow, Margaret Bramlett, was occupying the plantation (DB-9:144). Margaret then moved to live on a different tract of land there–50 acres–until 1790 when she left the state. She lived in the land tax district of B. Edward Humston, Fauquier County Tax Commissioner. Margaret Bramlett paid her taxes–125 pounds or 18 shillings 9 pence after deducting quitrents–on 250 acres, her former husband’s plantation, in 1783. On the smaller property after she moved, she was assessed to pay 17 pounds 18 shillings 4 pence in taxes on the 50-acre tract in 1790–but only paid 5 shillings 4 pence after deducting quitrents. She last paid taxes in the same amount on the second property in 1791 for the year 1790. When the Dobies later sold the Bramlett Plantation and additional property, amounting to 244 acres, in 1794 to Benjamin Dodd, the deed described it as once belonging to “Henry Bramblet, a suicide” (DB-12:60).
Margaret Unknown Bramlett, Wife of Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr.
Resident of Virginia, Patriot of the Revolution, Methodist Family Leader, Resident of South Carolina

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

Patriot: Margaret gave provisions to Washington’’s Army during the American Revolution
Not much is known about Margaret, but she is highly regarded today as a Patriot of the Revolution and an individual with deep religious convictions. Margaret, named as “Peggy Bramlett” and “Margaret Bramlett,” is documented as a Revolutionary War Patriot in Fauquier County “Publick Claims” with certificates she filed after the war for providing supplies–beef and brandy–to the forces led by Gen. George Washington and the Continental Army. “Peggy Bramlett” first presented a certificate and applied for compensation for the listed provisions
At a court held for Fauquier County 24 March 1782 and continued by several adjournments till 3 May following. The court pursuant to the act of Assembly entitled “an act for adjusting claims for property impressed or taken for public services” [by the military] examined the…claims and valued each article in specie viz Beef at the rate of 3p [pence] per pound…. Peggy Bramlett 225 (1).
In addition, the claims lists indicate “Margt. Bramlett” also presented on Nov. 25, 1785, a certificate granted by Col. William Edmonds for compensation by the county for earlier providing 3 1/2 gallons of brandy to the American troops (13). Cheers to the officers and soldiers who benefitted from the provision. Two or three of Margaret’s sons served as soldiers during the Revolution: possibly Benjamin, and definitely Henry III who settled in Elbert Co., Ga., and Reuben, who settled in Gallatin Co., Ill., some years after the war. The latter two and Margaret qualify descendants for membership in Daughters and Sons of the American Revolution. Several of Reuben’s and Marianne’s descendants have joined the organizations.
Shortly before or just after husband Henry Jr. died, Margaret and her children joined the Methodist Church in Virginia and in 1780 or 1781 founded their own meeting house or religious group which became Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court, Laurens Co., S.C. Margaret’s great-grandson Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette, an ordained minister who preached at Bramlett after the 1861-1865 war, documented the history of the church. He wrote in a Diary reproduced here that Margaret and her sons Henry III, Nathan and John were the co-founders of Bramlett Methodist Church in 1780 or 1781. Bishop Francis Asbury indicated in his Journal that Margaret had a meeting house near the present-day location of Bramlett Church in Laurens County. She relocated from Virginia in 1790, but at least two of her grown adult children were living in Laurens County in or before 1775. Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church is the mother church of John Bramlett’s meeting house, Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church, founded circa 1799-1801 in Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C.
Margaret and Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church

Diary of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, Cover Date 1875, preserved, copyright, courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke of Denton, Tex.
One of the most important records yet found for Henry Bramlett II/Jr. and Margaret’s family is the Diary kept by their great-grandson Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette. The Burditt Diary was located in family papers in South Carolina and preserved and shared, Thank God, by Martha Anne Curry Duke of Texas. The Burditt Diary not only documents the early founding years of Bramlett Church and the names of the co-founders and surnames of members, but also provides documentation for the connection between Henry III, John and Nathan as biological brothers and sons of Margaret. (Other records definitely connect the brothers with their father, mother and siblings, including Marianne and Reuben of Illinois.) Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt is the son of Frederick Reuben Burdett and second wife, Sarah Elizabeth Rhodes. Born in 1833, he died in 1892 and rests in the old section of Bramlett Church Cemetery with a tombstone that identifies him as Rev. F. H. Burdette. He was a resident of Laurens County, a member of the church and acted as a lay minister before being officially ordained in 1866 after he returned to the community from serving as a soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He apparently wrote or dispatched a verbal question via a messenger to his Great-Uncle John Bramlett in Greenville County before John died there in 1855 and got a reply that John “sent” to answer a question posed about the origins of the church. Copies of the Diary pages and a transcript follow:
First Qurt. [Quarterly] Conference in 1783 John Bramlett sent. from the best information the church had been organized three years before Preachers who they were is unknown only as we remember hearing old people speak such as Bingham, Travice, Tarply, Hillyard Judge, Stafford, Asbury and others. The members consisted of three or four families viz WilM. Bramlett, Dacus, Robertson and perhaps Stone. John, Nathan, or Henry Bramletts were the founders with their Mother in the year 1780 or 81 but the best information say[s] in 80 by what minister is unknown. Some suppose Asbury others Travice while others Hillyard Judge, but the last name lived some where from 1800 to 1820.

Copies of original pages from the Diary of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, preserved Thank God, and contributed by Great-Granddaughter Martha Anne Curry Duke

The given name of the Bramlett Mother Founder is not written on the page, but other South Carolina and Virginia official tax lists with recorded land deeds name her in connection with her husband and children as Margaret, widow of Henry Bramlett II/Jr. The diary entries are not dated, but the cover of Pierce’s Memorandum and Account Book indicates it was “Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1875, by R. V. Pierce, M. D., in the office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.” Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt inscribed the information about the church history in or after 1875 and before he his death in 1892, but the information came from John before he died in 1855. The Memorandum and Account Book is “A Present from the People’s Medical Servant, R. V. Pierce, M. D.” of Buffalo, N. Y., “designed for Farmers, Mechanics and All People who appreciate the value of keeping a memorandum of business transactions, daily events, and other items of importance, or future references.”
Portrait of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, owner of the Diary that documents the founding history–the date and names of the founders–of Bramlett Episcopal Methodist Church as well as the close biological connection of Marianne’s brothers Henry III, John and Nathan Bramlett, courtesy Great-Granddaughter Martha Anne Curry Duke of Texas

Bramlett United Methodist Church was co-founded in 1780 or 1781, according to Father John Bramlett, by John, his mother, Margaret Bramlett, and one or two of her other sons, Nathan and/or Henry (III). The church still holds services on the same property deeded by Nathan Bramlett and George Sims and sold to the trustees for $5 in 1807.
Margaret was recognized as leader of Bramlett Church in Laurens County in November 1801 by Methodist Episcopal Bishop Francis Asbury in his Journal: “Wednesday [November] 21. We rode sixteen miles to the widow Bramblet’s meeting-house.” This was a church building or her home on her property or Nathan’s land near the current church. Two days earlier the Bishop visited Margaret’s son John Bramlett at Bethel Church in Greenville County: “Monday [November] 20. At John Bramblet’s, Greensville. After meeting, we rode to …Reedy River” (p. 40). This may have been the visit during which the Bishop formally organized Bethel Church. In his 1802 Journal, the Bishop recognized Margaret’s son Nathan Bramlett as leader of Bramlett Church, which he once called “Bramblet’s Chapel”: “Wednesday 22….Next day I went to Nathan Bramblet’s….Sunday 27. At Bramblet’s chapel I spoke on Acts ii. 37-39.”
Nathan, born in 1766, and John, born in 1764, were not old enough to found a church in 1780 or 1781, the date provided by John; however, it is known from Nathan’s tombstone inscription and John’s obituary that they both joined the Methodist Church when they were young men, John specifically about that time–1780–when he was age 16, so they were very early/charter members of Bramlett Church. Henry III was born earlier, was the eldest son in 1780 since he inherited through primogeniture his father’s former Virginia plantation. Henry III was born circa 1755, before his brother Reuben, who was born March 15, 1757. He would have been an adult and old enough to organize and found a church with his mother, Margaret, in 1780; and recorded Virginia deeds indicate Henry III was living in Laurens County at exactly that time. Henry III was in South Carolina earlier, in 1775-1776 when his son Reuben and daughter Margaret were born there and while he served as a soldier during the Revolution. Henry III and possibly other members of his close family may have traveled to Laurens County with his Uncle William Bramblett and family, who were early members of Bramlett Church and settled on his land grant there in 1774.
That year, 1774, appears as a possible organizational or founding date for Bramlett Church in “A History of Bramlett,” co-written by member Ruth Wallace Cheshire and pastor Rev. George B. Wilson for The 1962 Church Journal. They quote a respected, long-time member as the source of some interesting details about the church’s early organization. “C. R. Wallace (1856-1916), a venerable and diligent servant of God, has bequeathed the following information:”
About 1774, or two years before the Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson, just thirty years after the first Methodist Conference was held in the old Foundry Church in London, England, a few people living in this community who were strong adherents of the Methodist faith, met in the home of a family who lived a few hundred yards west of where the house (the present church building), and held religious services. The services were conducted at regular intervals for two or three years. As interest in these meetings increased the need for more room was felt, and they decided to change the place of meeting. A log house was built. This log house was located one-fourth of one mile and a little south of east from this point. There the services were continued for several years. For four years after these meetings began, there was no organized society here. It was not until 1779 that this church was organized. In the little graveyard just across the road from this house is the sleeping dust of him whose name it bears.
The man referenced as the church namesake, of course, is Nathan Bramlett, whose inscribed tombstone still memorializes him in the old section of the cemetery, and who sold land to the trustees in 1807 “for the purpose of Secureing a Meeting house, thereon Standing and to Remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church.” This part of the recorded deed indicates a church building was already in existence on the site, which means the church was founded before the 1807 date of the document. The namesake family referenced, of course, is the family of Henry Bramlett Jr. and Margaret, especially Henry III, which suggests he and perhaps his parents, still residents of Virginia, were in South Carolina as early as 1774. They had grown children, Marianne and Henry III, living there. Marianne and husband, Frederick Burdette, were in Laurens County in 1775. There is evidence that indicates Henry III was in South Carolina by 1775-1776 and in 1780. He most likely lived and worked with relatives or leased or purchased land through a private transaction. He and sister Marianne as well apparently lived very close to the current location of Bramlett United Methodist Church before later obtaining land through war grants. Henry II/Jr.’s brother William and family lived quite a distance and southeast from the church on land surveyed in 1773. More recent artifacts from Bramlett Church include outdoor signage.

Margaret Bramlett permanently settled in Laurens County later, in 1790. She bought her 50-acre South Carolina farm next to her son Nathan’s farm in Laurens County on May 10, 1791, from Ezekiel Griffith for 20 pounds:
This indenture made the Tenth day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand seven hundred & ninety one, and in the Sixteenth year of American Independency, Between Ezekiel Griffeth of Laurens county in the state of South Carolina on the one part, and Margaret Bramlett of the county & State aforesaid of the other part. Witnesseth that the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for & in consideration of the sum of Twenty pounds to him in hand well & Truly paid by the sd. Margaret Bramlett the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged Have Bargained, granted, sold, aliened Embossed & confirmed, and by these presents doth Grant, Bargain & Sell, alien emboss [Riban?] & confirm unto the said Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns forever part of a Tract of land Situate & Lying on Beaverdam Creek water of Enoree River, to begin on the north side of sd. creek on a Red Oak on a stoney nole, Thence to the corner in Nathan Bramlett’s field, Thence along the sd. Nathan Bramlett’s to the corner, Thence to the creek & up the creek to the mouth of the spring branch & up the branch to the head, Thence to the Begining to contain Fifty acres more or less, & hath such shape, form & marks as are represented by a plat thereof to the Original grant annexed, which was granted to the said Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs & assigns forever on the Twenty fourth day of January, one Thousand seven hundred & seventy by the … William Bull Then Governor and Recorded in … office in Book EEE page 68 and also the Reversion and Reversions, Remainder & Remainders, Rents, … & Profits thereof & all the Estate, Right, Title, Interest Claim & demand whatsoever of him the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs or assigns to have and to hold the sd. Tract of fifty acres of land more or less with every appurtenance thereunto belonging to the only proper use & behoof of her the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs or assigns forever &tc. the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for him his heirs & assigns doth covenant with the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns that he the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth now is & untill the execution of these presents shall stand seized in his right of a good sure perfect, absolute indefeasible Estate of Inheritance in fee simple of & in all & singular the tract of land & every part & parcel hereof without any manner of condition… (DB-D:5-6)
Margaret sold her farm on Zak’s (Zek’s/Zeak’s or Ezekiel’s) Creek, part of Beaverdam Creek, waters of Enoree River, to her son Nathan Bramlett for $100 on April 16, 1809. (That part of the creek may have been known locally as Zek’s after the former landowner, Ezekiel Griffith.) The deed indicates the land was originally granted to Ezekiel Griffith on Jan. 20, 1770, and conveyed to Margaret Bramlett on May 10, 1791. Margaret’s grandson John Burditt and Jesse Gray witnessed the 1809 deed (DB-J:73). No other later record of Margaret has yet been found.

Margaret and Henry II/Jr.’s children are Marianne, Benjamin, Jalilah, Henry III, Reuben, perhaps William, John, Nathan and perhaps Sarah and Nancy.

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette
(Children: John, Henry, Margaret, Mary Ann, Reuben, Elizabeth, William, Ailsey, Jesse)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

Frederick Burdette served as a Soldier during the American Revolution
Marianne Bramlett, most likely first or second child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born Sept. 15, 1752, in a portion of Prince William Co., Va., that later became Fauquier County. She died at age 81 years, 5 months, 21 days, on March 8, 1834, in Laurens Co., S.C. Family tradition shared in the past by family historian William Ralph Burdette and others holds that Marianne rests at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church Cemetery near Gray Court in Laurens County. Her grave has not yet been located; however, there are graves marked with field stones in the old section of the cemetery near the graves of Marianne’s brother Nathan Bramlett and his wife, Elizabeth Gray, which still have inscribed tombstones. Marianne and husband, Frederick Burdette, and Marianne and Nathan’s mother, Margaret, may occupy those unmarked graves. A will and probate records have not been found for Marianne. She and Frederick were living in Laurens County with or near some of her Bramlett relatives by 1775, and they settled and remained there all of their lives on a land grant near the Enoree after the Revolution.
Direct descendants Martha Anne (Curry) Duke and Franklin Donald Burdette provide most of the following about Marianne’s marriage to Frederick, his war service, Bible records and children.
The Marriage of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette
Marianne married Frederick Burdette circa 1775, probably in Fauquier County where she and her parents were living. However, it is possible they married in South Carolina. Their first child, Henry, was born there in 1776. A deed recorded in Laurens County in 1790 indicates Frederick was in South Carolina when it was written in 1775. “Fredrick” was born Oct. 15, 1753, according to the Burdette Bibles. The names of Frederick’s parents are not yet known. Descendant William Ralph Burdette believed Frederick was born in Amsterdam, Holland, of French parents who came from Normandy, France. (William Ralph is son of Ella Towns Black and David Wilcut Jr. and grandson of David Wilcut and Zelena McPherson Burdett.) Ralph indicates in an unpublished written history that Frederick’s parents may have been Huguenots, French Protestants, who fled France to Holland to escape religious and ethnic persecution and later settled in Colonial America. There are early records of some Burdettes who lived in Amsterdam during the 1730s; 1750s; however, no definite evidence has yet been found to document the Huguenot connection. DNA evidence has not yet yielded enough connections to discern definite names of Frederick’s parents.
Will, Death, Estate of Frederick Burdette
Frederick Burdette died at age 87 years, 3 months, 25 days, on Feb. 10, 1841, in Laurens County and most likely was buried there beside Marianne, by tradition in the old section of the cemetery at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court. Burial records or tombstones with legible inscriptions have not been located for them, but there are some fieldstone markers in the graveyard very near Nathan Bramlett’s inscribed tombstone which may be the final resting places of Frederick, Marianne and her mother, Margaret. Frederick wrote his Last Will and Testament on Nov. 30, 1826, in Laurens County, leaving his land to three grown children–William, Molly, Ailsey–and eventually to son William if the two daughters married or died, and if William predeceased them, after their deaths the estate would be divided among his other children or their heirs. Sons John and William, named as administrators, presented the will in court on March 1, 1841, and it was proved there by William on March 16, 1841 (Box 83, pkg. 2).
State of South Carolina} Laurens District}
In the name of God, amen, I Frederick Burditt of the State and District aforesaid being of sound and disposing mind and memory, but weak in body, and calling to mind the uncertainty of life, and being desirous to dispose of such worldly Estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with, do make and ordain this my last Will in manner following, that is to say: I give to my son William Burdit, and my two daughters now living with me, Molly and Ailsey Burditt, the plantation and tract of land whereon I now live, together with the Horses, Cows, Hogs and stock of every kind, Household and Kitchen furniture, plantation Tools, Waggon & Reins [geirs?] and Blacksmiths Tools, to them for their material benefit and support so long as they all live together but should either or both of my daughters above named marry or be disposed to seperate and leave the place, then and in that case it is my will that she or they take such part of my personal property as shall be her or their equal distributive share, and that the tract of land remain my son William[’s] in fee simple forever after his two sisters, Molly and Ailsey have married, died or other wise left him, provided, however, that my son William Burditt should die before his two sisters Molly and Ailsey, having no law full issue, then the said tract of land to remain the property of the daughters during their natural life time and at their death to be sold and the monies arising therefrom to be equally divided among the whole of my children or their lawful representatives share and share alike. I give to my grand daughter Ailsey Gray a certain Red cow and calf which she now claims, Eight head of sheep, and the bed and furniture which she has always claimed. And lastly, I do constitute and appoint my son William Burditt and Robert Hand Senr. Executors of this my last Will and testament by me heretofore made. In testamony whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal this thirtieth day of November 1826. Frederick (his x mark) Burditt Seal Signed, sealed, published and declared as and for the last will and testament of the above named Frederick Burditt in presence of us Thos. Wright Arch. Young John Harriss.
State of South Carolina} Laurens District} Personally appeared before me Archibald Young, John Harriss & Thomas Wright who being sworn as the law directs made oath they saw Frederick Burditt Execute the within instrument as his last Will and that they in the presence of Each other and in the presence of the testator subscribed as witnesses to the same sworn to before me the 16th day of March, One Thousand Eight Hundred and forty one.W. D. Watts O.L.D. [Ordinary of Laurens District] Archd. Young John Harriss Ths. Wright
South Carolina} Laurens District} To W. D. Watts Ordinary of said District. The Petition of William Burditt showeth that Frederick Burditt late of said District recently died having first Executed his last will in which he names your Petitioner as one of his Executors, he therefore prays that you would grant him a citation to have the said will proven in solemn form and your Petitioner will pray &tc. This 1 March 1841. William (his x mark) Burditt
South Carolina} Laurens District} Whereas William Burdett has made suit to me to have the will of Frederick Burdett proven in solemn form. Then and there fore to Cite and admonish all and singular the Kindred and Creditors of the late Frederick Burdett said to be and appear before me Archibald Young on the sixteenth day of March Inst. to show cause if any they can why the said will should not be proven and letters Testamentary granted to William Burdett who is named as one of the Executors to said will. Given under my hand & seal this the 1st March 1841 W. D. Watts O.L.D. State of South Carolina,} Laurens District.} Warrant of Appraisement By W. D. Watts Ordinary of said district. These are to authorize and empower you, or any three or four of you, whose names are here under written, to repair to all such parts and places within this State, as you shall be directed unto by William Burditt Excr. of the goods and chattels, rights and credits of Frederick Burditt deceased, wheresoever any of the said goods and chattels are or do remain within the said parts and places, and which shall be shown unto you by the said William Burditt and there view and appraise all and every the said goods and chattels, being first duly sworn on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, to make a true and perfect inventory and appraisement thereof, and to cause the same to be returned under your hands, or any three or four of you, unto the said William Burditt on or before the 16th day of May next.Witness W. D. Watts Esquire, Ordinary of the said district, the 16th day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty one and in the Sixty fifth year of American Independence. To Messrs. Benjamin Martin Jesse Gray James B. Higgins & David Higgins
Memorandum — That on the fifth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty one personally appeared before me Thomas Wright, one of the Magistrates assigned to keep the peace in Sd. District, Jesse Gray, James B. Higgins and David Higgins being three of the appraisers appointed to appraise the goods and chattels of Frederick Burditt late of Laurens District deceased, who being duly sworn, made oath that they would make a just and true appraisement of all and singular, the goods and chattels of the said Frederick Burditt deceased, and that they would return the same, certified under their hands, unto the said William Burditt on or before the of 16th of May next. Sworn the day and year above written, before me, Thos. Wright, M. for L. D.
The appraisement, which lists the following items and their value, was provided to William Burditt by Jesse Gray, James B. Higgins and David Higgins.
Stock of hogs — cattle and sheep $55.50 Waggon & gear and 1 lot of waggon … 11.00 1 lot of Carpenters tools — grindstone &tc. 5.00 1 lot of plantation tools — drawing chains & log chains 14.25 1 cutting knife & box — oats — Riddle &tc. 3.00 1 stack of fodder & 1 lot of corn 24.00 1 gray Mare 60.00 1 lot of baskets & old irons 2.00 Bacon – Lard and barrels 32.00 Cupboard & furniture 1 lot of books & 2 tables 18.00 9 sitting chairs – 1 box and lot of bed clothing 23.00 2 beds – bedsteads & furniture 20.00 Shoe makers tools – shot gun & pouch 1 saddle & bridle 9.00 1 trunk & 1 can & bottles 3.00 1 lot of sundries (up stairs) 9.25 Castings – tin ware – pewter – knives forks &tc. 28.12 1 Loom & apparatus 5.00 Kitchen dresser & cupboard 2.00 Jugs – jars – sieve – gun powder – shots &tc. 6.00 1 half bushel measure – boxes – barrels – wheat & salt 7.00 4 sitting chairs & candlestick 2.60 1 lot of blacksmith tools – jointers – chisels & gouges 14.00 one note due the 25 of December next for one tract of land 236 acres 40.00 Total $708
After William, Ailsey and Mary Ann “Molly” died, Frederick’s estate, administered by son John Burdett, was sold in 1873 and the proceeds were distributed among the surviving heirs of Frederick’s other deceased children who could be identified and located: Henry, John, Margaret and Reuben Burdett. Some heirs at law, including Nathan B. Burditt, Eliza Ann Curry, Frederick Burditt and others not named–contested the administration of John Burdett of his father’s estate on Jan. 28, 1873, in Laurens County, but lost the lawsuit. A notice naming the three contesting heirs and “others,” advising them John would settle the estate by court order, was published on Feb. 1873. The distribution of the estate, amounting to $1,744.24, was settled March 21, 1873. Part of the settlement was recorded March 22 in Laurens. There were two sales for Frederick’s personal estate. The first sale on July 11, 1876, generated $320.64. The second sale on Oct. 10, 1876, generated $1,555.81. Purchasers listed include Wesley Burdett, who bought 1 lot of clothing & Bible and other items; John Burdett, a spinning wheel and other items; Elizabeth Burton, “2 smoothing irons” and a bed and furniture and other items; Peter Waddle, chairs and axes; Ivory Curry, smith tools, dried fruit, two trunks, chairs, two looking glasses, clothing, other items; and Jesse Burditt, “1 Bibell” and clothing. Frederick’s son William entered the will for probate in Laurens Co., S.C., Court on March 1, 1841. The court issued a warrant of appraisement on estate of Frederick Burditt April 5, 1841, in Laurens.
Decree Whereas the names of many of the parties interested in this Estate are unknown to the Court – It is Ordered Decreed that the said Estate be divided as follows. One Share to the Children and representative of Henry Burdett decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of John Burditt decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of Margaret Gray decd. according to their respective rights: One Share to the Children and representatives of Reuben Burdett decd. according to their respective rights. March 21st 1873. Given under my hand and Seal of Office C. Lark Judge of Probate Court L. C.
The settlement documents indicate four shares of Frederick’s estate, each amounting to $436.46, were to be paid out by John Burdett. The names of the recipient heirs, “unknown by the court,” are not documented in the specific estate record. The documents indicate Frederick’s coffin, made by J. M. Riddle, cost $6.00. Property taxes for Frederick’s land amounted to $9.75. The estate paid an attorney, B. W. Ball, a total of $50.00. Probate fees to Laurens County amounted to $12 in 1873. A number of other payments were made to individuals for debts and services rendered.
Marianne and Frederick in South Carolina
Frederick was living in Ninety-Six (Laurens) District in 1775, according to the aforementioned deed written and recorded there. Since Frederick and Marianne’s first child was born there in 1776, she probably was living with him there in 1775 as well. Her brother Henry Bramlett III was in the same area in 1776-1780: later Georgia census records indicate he had a child, daughter Margaret, born in South Carolina in 1776, and his stated residence in the 1780 Bramlett land resurvey recorded in Virginia is “Laurens Dist., S.C.” Marianne’s Aunt Elizabeth and Uncle William Bramblett and family, who moved to South Carolina by 1773 when their royal land grant from Gov. William Bull and King George III was surveyed, also lived nearby. Revolutionary War pension records indicate Marianne’s brother Reuben Bramlett, one of the three first cousins with that given name born in the same generation in Fauquier County, was stationed for three months in South Carolina on the Indian Line as a soldier during the war in 1780 or 1781; however 1787, the birth year of Reuben’s second son Henry, is the first definite date of his residency in South Carolina. Later census records indicate at least two of Reuben’s children were born in South Carolina: Henry in 1787 and Nathan in 1799. (He later moved into Christian Co., Ky., circa 1801 and then settled in 1818 in a portion of Gallatin Co., Ill., that later became Saline County in 1847.) Marianne’s brother John went to Laurens County from Fauquier County circa 1785. Marianne’s brother Nathan may have gone to South Carolina at the same time, but was definitely in Laurens County by 1789 when bought land there. Laurens County census records indicate Marianne also may have had at least two or three other sisters who moved in South Carolina with their mother, Margaret, by 1790. Marianne’s mother, Margaret, bought land adjacent to Nathan’s farm in 1791.
Frederick’s name first appears in existing Laurens County records in that December 1775 deed: “Fredk. Burdett” and “Wm. Bramlet” (Marianne’s uncle) witnessed the deed on Dec. 10-11, 1775, when their neighbor William Vaughn, a “planter of Craven Co, Prev, of S.C.,” and his wife, Barbara Vaughn, sold two hundred acres of land on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River in Laurens District to John Stone (DB-C:159). The land was part of a 400-acre grant to William Vaughn on Jan. 16, 1772. The Vaughns owned land adjacent to Marianne’s Uncle William Bramblett’s 1773 William Bull land grant property. (The “William Bramlet” who witnessed the 1775 deed is the owner of the 1773 loyal and grant and Frederick’s uncle by marriage, the brother of Marianne’s father, Henry Jr.) Frederick Burdett and William Bramlet may have been signing as witnesses for John Stone. Stone’s land also adjoined the property that Margaret Bramlett, Henry Jr.’s widow, bought in Laurens County in 1791. Stones also were early members of Bramlett Methodist Church. William Thompson also witnessed the 1775 deed, probably for the Vaughns. The deed was recorded April 27, 1790, in Laurens County. To legally witness a deed in 1775, Frederick had to have been at least age 21, thus born in/before 1754, which is consistent with his documented birth year: 1753. “Fredk. Burdett” also witnessed a deed in Laurens County on Nov. 28, 1789, when Richard Fowler and wife, Debby, sold Nathan Bramlett his 225 acres of land “where sd N. B. now lives” on “Zeack’s” Branch (Beaverdam Creek) of Enoree River for “45 pounds proclamation money” (DB-C:131). The land was originally granted to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789. Other witnesses: William Stone and Reuben Bramlett (most likely the brother-in-law of Frederick and brother of Nathan Bramlett and Marianne, who went on to Kentucky and settled in Illinois, since Reuben Jr., son of Reuben Sr., did not move to the area until 1794). The deed was recorded March 16, 1790.
Frederick’s Revolutionary War Service
Frederick served as a soldier on horseback during the Revolutionary War. Pay records indicate he fought at the Battle of King’s Mountain on Oct. 7, 1780, and at Cowpens on Jan. 17, 1781. “Frederick Burdit” is included as a Revolutionary War soldier in loose papers found in the South Carolina State House in Columbia, S.C., according to “The Revolutionary Rolls,” published by the Secretary of State in The State newspaper on Sunday, Oct. 9, 1904. Frederick’s military service is documented in pay records in South Carolina Archives: Stub entry #390, issued June 16, 1785, indicates South Carolina paid “Three Pounds One Shilling and Five Pence Sterlg,” amounting to “Twenty-one Pounds Ten Shillings” Current Money to “Mr. Frederick Burdit” for “Militia duty before the reduction of Charlestown” (Accounts Audited, p. 912, frames 329-330). Charleston fell on May 12, 1780. The payment was based on Col. Anderson’s return. Stub Entry #39017 in 1785 indicates the militia also paid Frederick three pounds, one shilling sterling (twenty pounds current money) in 1785 “for services at the Battle of King’s Mountain” on Oct. 7, 1780, and for service at Cowpens on Jan. 17, 1781.

Loose papers also indicate one “William Burdet” (possibly Frederick’s brother) served “101 days militia duty…on horseback” in Capt. John Wilson’s Company during Sept. 11, 1779, to June 16, 1780 (The State 1904). Transcripts and copied images of the actual pay stub records, microfilmed by South Carolina Dept. of Archives and History, follow:
State So Carolina Dr. [Deliver/delivered] to William Burdet for 101 days Toward duty from four differ[en]t Pay Bills of Capt. [John] Willson performd alternately from Sept. 11th 1779 untill June 16th 1780 vizt on horseback 38 days — L38 [plus] 42 do — 42 [plus] 4 do — 4 [plus] 17 do — 17 [Total] 101 days Stlg 14.8.6 3/4 *This 38 Days to Capt. [Hugh] Wardlaw’s Pay Bill.” The transcript of the second page: “[No.] 607 – 31 Decr 1784 Mr. William Burdet his accot. of 101 Days Militia Duty as Private on Horseback on four Bills Pay…[rolls?] of Capt. H. Wardlaw’s performd alternately from Sept. Eleventh to June 16, 1780…101 days…Duty 280. 6 3/4 Fourteen Pounds, Eight shillings & Six Pence three shillings Sterling – Exd. T. W. J. McAgee (SCAR Microcopy 8 Roll 16 Record 911). [Figures written and calculated on the page:] 280.6 3/4 (minus) 20.09.11 1/4 (minus) 12 (equals) 239.
Researchers calculate the birth year of William as circa 1755, which would make him a contemporary of Frederick, who was born in 1753. Although they lived in the same general area of South Carolina, present-day Edgefield and Laurens in Ninety-Six District, it is not known if the two men knew of or were related to each other. This William Burdett married Patience Delacey Hart and later received three land grants in present-day Edgefield County.
By serving as a soldier in the war, Frederick was eligible to acquire a state land grant in Laurens County in 1786. After the war was over, South Carolina granted free land to officers but for a small fee granted vacant land to volunteer veterans who had served in lower ranks. The latter, who paid for their land, aided the state once again, beyond their military service, by helping South Carolina acquire funds to pay down the war debt. The majority of the post-Revolutionary War state grants were purchased, and some veterans used the pay they received for their military services to buy their state land grants.

Frederick and Marianne’s land, located on this map slightly south and east of where Marianne’s mother, Margaret “Peggy” Bramlett, and brother Nathan Bramlett lived and where Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church was and still is located. Marianne’s sister or cousin Sarah Bramlett and husband, Nicholas Ware Garrett, and her aunt and uncle Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett had also settled in the area, the latter in 1773. Nicholas Garrett’s land also is designated on the map. He is son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett and brother of William Garrett who married Nancy Bramlett, possibly another sister or cousin of Marianne. Henry Bramlett III, brother of Marianne, may have obtained a post-war land grant in 1792 southwest of the other Bramlett properties in Laurens County and lived there before he relocated his family to Elbert Co., Ga.

Frederick and Marianne Burdette lived near Bramlett Church, shown in top left grid, and close to land owned by her brother Nathan Bramlett and mother, Margaret Bramlett. Frederick’s land, granted Dec. 4, 1786, is farther right, above Beaverdam Creek, south of Enoree River, north of William and Elizabeth Bramblett’s 1773 property.
Frederick’s Revolutionary War Land Grant
State of South-Carolina, To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting: Know Ye, That for and in Consideration of Four Pounds ten Shillings & 2 Pe[nce] Sterling Money, paid by Frederick Burdit into the Treasury for the use of this State, We have granted, and by these Presents do grant unto the said Frederick Burdit Heirs and Assigns, a Plantation or Tract of Land, containing One hundred and ninety three Acres Situate in the District of ninety six, on a Branch of Enoree River having such Shape, Form and Marks, as are represented by a Plat hereunto annexed, together with all Woods, Trees, Waters, Watercourses, Profits, Commodities, Appurtenances, and Heriditaments whatsoever thereunto belonging, To have and to hold the said Tract of One hundred and ninety three Acres of Land, and all and singular other the Premises hereby granted unto the said Frederick Burdit his Heirs and Assigns, for ever, in free and common Soccage. Given under the Great Seal of the State. Witness, his Excellency William Moultrie Esquire, Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the said State, at Charleston, this fourth Day of December Anno Domini, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty six and in the Eleventh Year of the Independence of the United States of America. William L. M. S. Moultrie And hath thereunto a Plat thereof annexed, representing the same, certified by F. Bremar Surveyor-General. 27th March 1786. (Vol. 13, p. 95)
Property owned by “Frederick Burdett” is mentioned as a landmark on a plat recorded for James Higgins in Laurens Co., S.C., in 1788. Higgins received a land grant for 79 acres on Beaverdam Creek, Enoree River, Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., which was surveyed by James Wofford on Sept. 24, 1788 (SCDAH S213190:23:240:2). Frederick’s 1786 land grant property is mentioned as a landmark in two deeds recorded in 1800 in Laurens County. One deed dated Dec. 17, 1800, when Isaac Lindsay sold 50 acres of land on the Pan Trough Branch of Enoree River to Moses Biter, indicates “Fetherick Burdett” and others owned adjacent land (DB-G:129). The land was also bounded by property owned by Edward Lindsay, James Higgins and Thompson Farley; and the deed indicates it was part of an original grant to Steen, J. (John) Lindsay, Brown and Cannon. William Higgins and Edward Lindsay witnessed the deed, which was recorded Dec. 18, 1800. Frederick and Marianne’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed dated Dec. 18, 1800, when Edward Lindsay and wife, Catey, sold 46 acres of land on the south side of Enoree River to Ezekiel Lindsay (DB-G:515). The land, part of a tract conveyed by John Lindsay to Edward, Isaac and Ezekiel Lindsay, was bounded by property owned by “Fredk. Burdet” and Ephraim Moore and Thompson Farley. Ephraim Moore, Elizabeth Moore and Isaac Lindsay witnessed the deed, which was recorded Nov. 29, 1802 (DB-G:515). “Fredk. Burdett” witnessed a deed in Laurens County on April 23, 1801, when Nathan and Elizabeth Gray Bramlett sold John Burdett 100 acres of land for 25 pounds (DB-O:199). The deed was not recorded until April 6, 1844, after Nathan and Elizabeth had died. The land, located on the south side of the Enoree River, was part of an original grant by Gov. Charles Pinckney to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789. In 1801 it was bounded by property owned by Elias Stone, (Amos?) Critchfield and Margaret Bramlett (Marianne’s mother), “along stony ridge.” Samuel Ansley and Zachariah Gray also witnessed the 1801 Bramlett-Burdett deed.
Frederick was a trustee at Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church near Young’s Store northeast of Gray Court, S.C., in 1807. “Fredk. Burdett” was one of three trustee recipients mentioned in a deed written June 2, 1807, when Nathan Bramlett and George Sims granted the trustees and the church “for the sum of five dollars” two acres of land “near Enoree River on Zaks Creek for the purpose of securing a Meeting House thereon, standing and to remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church…” (DB-H:235). (“Zak’s” or Zeak’s, Ezekiel’s, Creek is part of, known as Beaverdam Creek.) The other trustees listed are Joel Fowler and Raughley Stone. Frederick Burdett signed (made his mark on) the deed as recipient; and his son John Burditt and Benjamin Tradewell, a neighbor or possibly relative, witnessed the deed. Frederick’s son John Burditt also signed the deed and agreed to deliver it to his father when it was recorded July 6, 1807, by John Garlington, Register’s Office, of Laurens District.
Frederick and Marianne in Census Data
Frederick may or may not be the “Frederick Burt,” Free white male of 16 years and upward, who is listed in the First U.S. Census for Ninety-Six (Laurens) Dist., S.C., in 1790. He headed a family that includes four free white females (wife, Marianne, and three daughters Margaret, born 1781; Mary Ann “Molly,” born 1784; and Elizabeth, born 1786) and three free whie males under age 16 years (three sons John, born 1776; Henry, born 1778; and Reuben, born 1787). Other children were born after 1790. “Frederick Burdict,” 45 and over, born before 1755, is listed in the 1800 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over, born before 1755 (wife, Marianne); two females 16-26, born 1774-84 (daughters Margaret and Mary Ann “Molly”); a male 16-26, born 1774-84 (nephew? son-in-law?); a female 10-16, born 1784-90 (daughter Elizabeth); a male 10-16, born 1784-90 (son William); a female under 10, born 1790-1800 (daughter Alcey/Ailsey); and one male under 10, born 1790-1800 (son Jesse). Sons John, Henry and Reuben Burdett, married and were living away from home, are listed as heads of their own families in 1800. “Fredrick Burdit,” 45 and over, born in/before 1765, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over (wife, Marianne), and four children: a male 16-26, born 1784-94 (son Jesse or William), and three females 16-26, born 1784-94 (daughters Mary Ann “Molly,” Elizabeth, Alcey/Ailsey) (NARA Film M252:61:88). Frederick is not listed as head of his family in 1820. (Frederick Burtz in 1820 is a different person.) “Fred Burdett,” 70-80, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 70-80 (wife, Marianne) and three grown children: a male 40-50 (son William), a female 30-40 (daughter Mary Ann “Molly”) and a female 15-20 (daughter Alcey/Ailsey) (NARA Film M19:169:275). “Frederick Burdett,” 80-90, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Laurens County as head of a family that includes two females 40-50 (daughters Mary Ann “Molly” and Alcey/Ailsey) and a male 40-50 (son William) (NARA Film M704:513:15).
An excerpt in South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research indicates “Frederick Burditt” and sons John and Henry as well as several others, including Frederick’s brother-in-law Nathan Bramlett, foreman, and (Frederick’s son-in-law?) Hezekiah Gray, were called to a Laurens District Coroner’s Inquisition on Feb. 6, 1815, to “view the body of Daniel Bragg found dead and drowned in Enoree River” and find out “when where how and after what manner the s’d D. Brag[g] came to his death.” The report, filed two days later in Laurens District Court by Coroner William Irby, indicates Bragg, “in striving to save a negroe man he got drowned” (SCMAR 197). The same panel members were asked to “View the body of a negro man drowned on the plantation of Daniel Bragg” on the same day and report the manner of death. The report, filed two days later in Laurens District, indicated “Negroe George the property of Daniel Brag[g] came to his death…in crossing Enoree River” Feb. 5, 1815, when he “got wash’d off his horse and got drowned” (SCMAR 24-4:198).
Illustration from Jesse Bramlett Burdett’s Family Bible

Family Bibles
Inscriptions for Frederick and Marianne and their children were transcribed Feb. 19, 1950, by the late Helen A. (Gossett) Burdette, wife of the late Melvin Louis Burdette Sr., from a small Burdette Bible owned by the late Thomas Oscar Burdette. The inscriptions came from an older Bible. The small Burdette Bible was then, in 1950, in possession of Toy Donald Burdette. Helen shared her 1950 transcript with Franklin Donald Burdette, who, with Melvin Louis Burdette Jr., contributes the information to this history.
Fredrick Burdett b. Oct. 15 – 1753
Ag. 87 yrs. 3. mons. d. Feb. 10 – 1841
Maryan Burdett b. Sept. 15 – 1752
Ag. 81 yrs. 5 mons. 21 days d. March 8 – 1834
John Burdett b. Feb. 4 – 1776
83 yrs. 1 m. 6 days d. Mar. 11, 1859
Henry Burdett b. Sept. 5 – 1778
74 yrs. 9 m. 8 days d. May 29, 1853
Margret Burdett b. Dec. 3 – 1781
Mary Burdett Rhodes b. May 22 – 1784
83 yrs. 6 m. 23 days d. Nov. 13 – 1867
Reuben Burdett b. Nov. 26 – 1787
75 yrs. 1 m. 12 days d. Jan. 6 – 1862
Elizabeth Burdett Hand b. Sept. 1 – 1786
84 yrs. 8 m. 11 days d. May 12 – 1871
William Burdett b. Jan. 1[8?] – 1790
70 yrs. 16 days d. Feb 3 – 1860
Alcy Burdett b. March 18, 1793
78 yrs. 2 m. 10 days d. May 28, 1871
Jesse Burdett b. Oct. 18 – 1795
(no death date)

Bible cover and pages courtesy Melvin Louis Burdette Jr.
Following inscriptions are from the larger existing Burdette Bible, originally owned by Jesse and Agness Burdett, given to Thomas O. and Victoria Burdette, passed down to Toy D. and Maggie Burdette, then to Melvin Louis Sr. and Helen Burdette, then to Melvin Louis Burdette Jr., and to his son. The Bible is preserved in a sealed air-tight container and fire-proof safe.
MEMORANDA
Frederick Burdett was born Oct. 15th 1753 and died Feb. 10th 1841.
Marian Burdett was born Sep. 15th 1752 and died March 8th 1834.
John Burdett was born Feb. 4th 1776 and died March 11th 1859.
Henery Burdett was born Sep. 5th 1778 and died May 29th 1853.
Margaret Burdett was born Dec. 3d 1781.
May (Mary Ann) Burdett was born May 22d 1784 and died Nov. 13th 1867.
Reubin Burdett was born Nov. 26th 1787 and died Jan. 18th 1862.
Elizabeth Burdett was born Sep. 1st 1786 and died May 17th 1871.
William Burdett was born Jan. 18th 1790 and died Feb. 3d 1860.
Alcy Burdett was born March 18th 1793 and died May 28th 1871.
Jessee Burdett was born Oct. 18th 1795. (No death date)

Bible pages courtesy Melvin Louis Burdett Jr. See transcripts below in Jesse Burdett’s history.

Children of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette
Some of Frederick and Marianne’s nine children may have been named after her parents and siblings and other relatives: John after Marianne’s brother, Henry after Marianne’s father, Henry Bramlett Jr., and her brother Henry Bramlett III and grandfather Henry Sr.; Margaret after Marianne’s mother, Margaret “Peggy” (unknown); and Frederick Reuben in part perhaps after Marianne’s brother Reuben Bramlett who settled in Gallatin Co., Ill. Jesse and Ailsey are given names in the allied Gray family and Jesse is a name used by the family of Marianne’s brother Henry Bramlett III. Mary Ann “Molly” was named after Marianne herself. Two other children–Elizabeth and William–may be named after Marianne’s paternal aunt and uncle or her great-grandfather William Bramlett I/Sr., or after Frederick’s family members.

A Complete Map Sketch of Laurens County S. C. By Kyzer & Hellams, dated 1883, shows the area where Marianne and Frederick’s 193-acre tract is located and shows Bramlett Church with neighbors, including Mrs. A. Burdette, Mrs. E. A. Burdette and Rev. Burdette
Mystery Burdette House: Photo owned by Carrie Purchase Burdette Curry but not labeled. Her granddaughter Martha believes since it was saved with other family photos, the depicted modest home must have been owned by one of Carrie’s ancestors, perhaps her father, Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, farmer and Methodist Minister during hard economic times after the War Between the States.

Old Burdette house, owner and date unknown, most likely in Laurens Co., S.C., courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke

Possible Burdette Connection
Frederick Burdette may be related to John Burditt, exact origins unknown, named in the record below, who came to America from Middlesex, England, in 1728. More research is needed.

The above record indicates John Burditt, in debtor’s prison for the “horrible crime” of failure to pay a coal bill, was transported to Virginia or Maryland in America from Middlesex, England, in 1728.

John, Henry, Margaret, Mary Ann, Frederick Reuben, Elizabeth, William, Ailsey and Jesse
John Burdett, son of Marianne and Frederick
John Burdett, first child of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette, was born Feb. 4, 1776, in Laurens Dist., S.C. He died there at age 83 years, 1 month, 6 days, on March 11, 1859, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. John married his first wife, name unknown, before 1800. She died between 1810 and 1820. They had two children: Frances P. “Fanny” and Alexandera “Ailsey” Burdett. “John Burdict,” white male 16-26, born 1774-84, is listed in the 1800 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with a female 26-45, unknown first wife, and two females under 10 (Frances P. “Fanny” and Alexandera “Ailsey”) (NARA Film M32:50:15). “Jno. Burdit,” white male 26-45, born 1765-84, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 26-45 (first wife, unknown) and two children: two females under 10, born 1800-10 (Frances P. “Fanny” and Alexandera “Ailsey”) (NARA Film M252:61:87). John second married Frances B. “Franny” Rhodes in Laurens County before 1829. She was born Jan./June 24, 1796, in Enoree, Spartanburg Co., S.C., the daughter of Mary “Molly” Asbury and Benjamin Rhodes. (Some of Frances B.’s siblings are John Barker Rhodes who married John Burdett’s sister Mary Ann “Molly” Burdett and Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” Rhodes who married John Burdett’s brother Frederick Reuben Burdette.) Frances died Oct. 13, 1862, in Laurens County. She probably is buried beside John in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. Their graves are not marked. Frances and John’s children are Joseph T. and John Fletcher Burditt/Burdett.
John Burdett witnessed a legal document in Laurens County in 1797 about eight months after he turned 21: John Burdett and Isaac Gray witnessed a deed on Oct. 10, 1797, when William Parker sold some land in Laurens County to Wiley Talley. The land, located on Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River, bounded property owned by Robert Allison, an original grant to Thomas Allison by Gov. William Bull on Feb. 2, 1773. The deed was recorded Dec. 22, 1810 (DB-J:184).
“John Burditt” of Laurens District bought 100 acres of land for 25 pounds from his Uncle Nathan and Aunt Elizabeth (Gray) Bramlett on April 23, 1801. The deed indicates the property was a tract of land originally granted to Richard Fowler on June 1, 1789, by Gov. Charles Pinckney and sold by Fowler to Nathan Bramlett (brother of Marianne Bramlett Burdette) in November that year. The land was situated on the south side of Enoree River in Laurens District
beginning at a Red Oak, comes of Limus Knitch field, comes and running with his line to another Red Oak, comes of Elias Stone in Crutchfield’s line, the north side of a branch, then as with the Stones line of the survey in which this is a part thereof, then as with said original line and comes then up the…branch to the fork of the branch therein, a straight line from the…fork to a Red Oak comes in Margaret Bramlett’s line, then, with the said Bramletts there…with on a stones ridge and the ridge being dividing line between the….Robertsons and John Burditt to the beginning.
John’s father, Frederick Burditt, and Zachariah Gray and Lonil Ansley witnessed the deed, and Nathan and Elizabeth Bramlett also signed it.
John Burdett and Benjamin Treadwell or Tradewell witnessed a deed written June 2, 1807, when Nathan Bramlett and George Sims conveyed two acres of land on “Zaks” Creek near Enoree River to “Fredk Burdett” and Joel Fowler and Raughley Stone, trustees of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church, for $5 “for the purpose of securing a Meeting House thereon, standing and to remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church…” (DB-H:235). The deed was recorded July 6, 1807, in Laurens County. The land was transferred to ensure the continuity of the church and the church meeting house, which had been previously constructed. The deed indicates the church was founded before 1807. Other historical accounts included in this history list the founding/organization date as 1779-1780-1781.
John Burdett also witnessed a deed on April 16, 1809, when his Grandmother Margaret Bramlett sold her 50-acre farm on Beaverdam Creek to her son Nathan Bramlett (DB-J:73). Jesse Gray also witnessed the deed, which was recorded the day it was written: April 16, 1809. The deed indicates the land was originally granted to Ezekial Griffith in 1770 and conveyed to Margaret Bramlett in 1791. The farm was adjacent to Nathan’s property.
John Burdett’s property is mentioned as a landmark in a Laurens County deed dated Dec. 24, 1810, when Samuel Vaughn sold 75 acres of land adjacent to property owned by “John Burdet” to Archibald Young (DB-J:200). The 1810 deed indicates the land, “where S. V. [Samuel Vaughn] now lives,” was originally granted to John Roberson (Robertson) and later conveyed “to Reuben Brown to Wm. Brown to S. V.” [Samuel Vaughn]. J. Benson and Thomas McCrary witnessed the deed, which was recorded March 5, 1811. Samuel Vaughn may be a relative of William and Barbara Vaughn, who had an original royal land grant dated Jan. 16, 1772, for four hundred acres of land situated in a portion of the royal county of Craven in the Province of South Carolina, which is present-day Laurens County. William Vaughn’s 1772 land grant was adjacent to William Bramblett’s royal 1773 land grant of 300 acres. “Wm. Bramlet” and John Burdett’s father, “Fredk. Burdett” and “Wm. Thompson” witnessed a deed for Vaughn on Dec. 10, 1775, when “Wm. Vaughn planter of Craven County province of South Carolina” and his wife, Barbara, sold some of his 1772 land grant property to John Stone (DB-C:159). William Vaughn had another tract of land containing two hundred acres which was located on the north side of Warrior Creek, granted on July 26, 1774 (DB-F:376; DB-G:180). Vaughn conveyed part of it to Samuel Allison who later conveyed 70 acres to Stephen Mullings, a son-in-law of Edward and Anna West (Owsley) Garrett. Stephen Mullings and wife, Dorcas, of Warrior Creek, Laurens County, then sold half of the tract, 35 acres, to Reuben Kelley on Feb. 21, 1801 (DB-G:180). Nicholas Garrett (husband of Sarah Bramlett) and George Hews (Hughes) witnessed the deed. Stephen Mullings of Warrior Creek later sold 30 acres to George Hughes for 30 pounds sterling on Sept. 15, 1798 (DB-F:376). The land bounded property owned by John Garrett. Nicholas Garrett (husband of Sarah Bramlett) and John Garrett (son of Edward and Ann West Owsley Garrett) witnessed the 1798 deed.
John Burdett owned land and farmed in Laurens County in 1821. Adjacent properties owned by “John Burdet,” “Reuben Burdit,” Mrs. Brag, Joel Fowler and Daniel McKey are mentioned on a plat map for 125.5 acres on Enoree River, Laurens Co., S.C., surveyed for Zachariah Gray by William Cowen on June 27, 1821 (SCDAH S213192:46:525:1).
“John Burdett,” 60-70, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 40-50 (second wife, Frances B. Rhodes), another female 40-50 (daughter Frances P.), a male 10-15 (son Joseph T.) and a male 5-10 (son John Fletcher) (NARA Film M704:513:49).
“John Burditt” was ordered to appear in court in Laurens County in 1842 to participate in a lawsuit he and some of his siblings filed to contest the 1839 will of their Uncle Nathan Bramlett who left his entire estate to the Methodist Church. This lawsuit, which names the Burdett children as Nathan’s “legal heirs,” documents the biological relationship between Marianne (Bramlett) Burdette and her brother Nathan Bramlett as siblings. Both are children of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr.
“John Burdith,” 72, farmer, $2,000 real estate, and wife, Frances, 50, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with three adult children: Fanny (Frances P.), 45; Joseph (T.), 20, farmer; John F. (Fletcher), 18, farmer (NARA Film M432:855:259A). Also listed: Elizabeth Wells, 20. All were born in South Carolina. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate John Burditt/Burdett, married, was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1842-1850. He was a class leader in 1844-1850. After he died, his wife headed the family: Fs. (Frances) Burdett, 64, female, farmer, $1,200 real estate and $200 personal estate, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Youngs Store P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes “F. [Frances] P. Burdett,” 60, female (adult stepdaughter) (NARA Film M653:1222:329B). Both were born in South Carolina. Bramlett Church records indicate “Frances Burditt” paid a subscription fee for her slave Mary Burditt to attend Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1862. Class Books indicate Frances Burdett was a member of the church in 1842-1862. A note in the 1861 Class Book indicates “Frances Burditt deceased (this life the 13th of October 1862).” Frances and John owned at least one slave: Mary Burditt/Burdett.

Mary Burditt: Former Slave, Bramlett Church Member
Former slave Mary Burditt/Burdett was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church from 1862 or earlier until her death. Church records indicate white member “Frances Burditt” paid a subscription fee for her slave Mary Burditt to attend Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1862. Ruth Wallace Cheshire and Rev. George Wilson mention Mary as an example of former slaves who attended white churches and mention those who left to form their own houses of worship in “A History of Bramlett” published in Bramlett’s 1962 Church Journal:
In the year 1879, Bramlett reported 68 white members and one colored member, Mary Burditt. When the slaves were freed some chose to remain as servants with their former masters. Mary Burditt was one of the many who decided to remain with their good white masters to work for them. Some few were permitted to remain as members of white churches. Mary Burditt was a member of Bramlett until her death in September 1893. (4)
Following the Civil War/War Between the States, many former slaves and free African-Americans left or were expelled from white houses of worship to organize black churches. Cheshire and Rev. Wilson describe the period and the exodus in their history:
The days following the Civil War (1860-1864) [sic] when the South lay prostrate, and was ruled by Carpet Baggers from the North, Poor White Trash of the South, and Negroes drunk with new found freedom, were difficult days for the people. The church must have been a source of strength and a place of refuge. In their Savior they found the patience to endure until the tide had changed and order was restored. In those days following the civil strife the Negroes organized their own churches for Negroes only. Prior to this time they had worshipped with their masters and had no churches of their own. (3)
Mary Burditt may be buried in the Slave Cemetery at Bramlett Church. She no doubt worshipped in the balcony with other slaves during services in the old log church buildings that preceded the frame and then brick house of worship that followed as the membership grew and the economy recovered from the civil devastation and failed reconstruction after the war.
Children of John and First Wife Burdett
Frances P. “Fanny” Burdett, child of John Burdett and his first wife, was born circa 1800 in Laurens Co., S.C. She died in 1865 or 1866. Church class books indicate Frances P. Burditt/Burdett, single, was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1842-1864. The 1866 record indicates F. P. Burditt paid $1.00 and was “decd.” She probably did not marry.
Alexandera “Ailsey” Burdett, child of John Burdett and his first wife, was born circa 1800-10 in Laurens Co., S.C.
Children of John and Frances B. Rhodes Burdett

Joseph T. Burdett, child of John and Frances B. (Rhodes) Burdett, was born Sept. 10, 1829, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died May 9, 1865, in Confederate Hospital, Camden, S.C., while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Capt. E. M. Cooper’s Company E, Fourth (James Henderson Williams’s) Battalion, State Troops, South Carolina Senior Reserves, Laurens Dist., S.C., on April 16, 1864, and served until his death. An obituary for soldier “Bro. Joseph T. Burditt” was published June 1, 1866, about a year after his death, in the Southern Christian Advocate:
Bro. Joseph T. Burditt was born Sept. 10, 1829, joined the Methodist Church, April 24, 1842, embraced religion at a prayer meeting held at his father’s house, 8 September, 1848 was married January 16, 1851, and immediately reared a family altar, on which was laid regularly the morning and evening sacrifice….[He? was? selected? a? class?] leader in 1855 [1856?], serving faithfully until called into the army—He died suddenly in Confederate hospital, Camden, S.C., May 9, 1865. In nearly every letter home, Bro. Burditt would enjoin his companion, to raise the children in the fear of God. This injunction is being carried out faithfully and he being dead, yet speaketh. Few were more cheerful givers than he–though not blessed bountifully with earth’s stores. His home was the home of weary preachers, who ever found a hearty welcome and willing hands to administer to their wants. He is missed at Bramlett’s. We doubt not, his spirit has changed its chrysalis state for immortal pleasure. Lead, O Father, the widow and children to the same fountain of happiness. (Vol. 29, No. 22, p. 7, col. 2)
Class books saved by Rev. Frederick Reuben Burdette and preserved by his great-granddaughter Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate “Joseph T. Burditt,” single, joined Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church on April 24, 1842, and was a member until he died in 1865. He married Arrinda Putnam on Jan. 16, 1851, in Laurens County. Rev. Tolaver Robertson, Baptist Minister, performed their marriage ceremony. Arrinda was born circa 1829-30 in South Carolina. She died sometime after 1880. Church records indicate “Arinda Burdett” was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1861-1876. She paid a subscription fee for her slaves’ attendance at Bramlett Church in 1862.
“Joseph T. Burditt,” “R. T. [Reuben Thomas] Burditt” and “W. S. Burdett” as well as several other citizens residing near Mountain Shoals and Pool Town, Laurens Co., S.C., signed a petition on Nov. 17, 1859, against opening a road from Mountain Shoals through Pool Town to Craigs Cross Roads in Laurens Co., S.C. (SCDAH S165015:77). Others listed include William Gray, John M. Gray, R. L. Gray, R. J. Higgins, Hollen M. Garrett. “Jos. T. Burdett,” 30, farmer, and wife, A. (Arinda), 29, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Youngs Store P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: M. E. (Martha Elizabeth), 5, and H. P.] (Hilliard Pierce), 3/12 (NARA Film M653:1222:329B-330A). All were born in South Carolina. “Arinda Burdett,” 40, keeping house, $350 real estate and $200 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Laurens P.O., Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: Martha, 15, attending school, and H. Pierce, 10, farm laborer (NARA Film M593:1501:278A). All were born in South Carolina. “Arrinda Burdett,” 48, widowed, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: Martha, 25, and Pierce, 20 (NARA Film T9:1233:293B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Arrinda and Joseph’s children are Martha Elizabeth “Mattie” “Eliza” and Hilliard Pierce Burdett.
Martha Elizabeth “Mattie” “Eliza” Burdett, first child of Joseph T. and Arrinda (Putnam) Burdett, was born circa 1855 in Laurens Co., S.C. Church records indicate “Mattie E. Burdett” was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1866-1876. A news item in the Aug. 23, 1884, edition of the Atlanta Constitution indicates Martha Eliza Burdett had recently filed a paternity lawsuit against William H. Pool after bearing his child. The article is titled “An Unfortunate Pool” and subtitled “A Carolina Young Man Finds Himself in The Meshes”:
Laurens, S.C., August 22-[Special]–Papers have been filed in the office of the clerk of the court in this county in the case of Martha Eliza Burdett against William H. Pool. In this correspondence some time ago I mentioned the fact that such a suit would be brought. It is alleged that the plaintiff, a comely young woman, was courted, deceived and seduced by the defendant, William H. Pool, a prominent grocery merchant of this place. Pool paid devoted attentions to the young woman, and it was currently thought she intended marrying him. She alleges that he made a most positive promise of marriage, and under the influence of that hope she, in an unguarded moment, was tempted beyond the power of resistance. Lately she has given birth to a child, which she claims is the product of the illicit amour. Pool denies this. He is a very popular young man, who has hitherto borne a good reputation. He will resist the suit to the last. The woman, through her attorneys, Messrs. Watts and Ball, of this town, brings suit for ten thousand dollars damages. The defendant is rich and should the case go against him would he be able to pay that amount. Some persons look upon the whole piece of business as blackmail, whilst many others–among them our best people–regard the suit as proper and deem the accused guilty. The case will abound in lively points when it comes to trial and many racy disclosures may be expected. The woman and her lawyers will not accept any compromise; they will push the case to an end. This is the only case of the sort ever known in this country.
William H. Pool may be the son of Mary Frances and George B. Pool of Laurens County. W. H. Pool, 2, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Scuffletown, Laurens Co., S.C., with parents, Geo., 21, and Fs. (Frances), 22 (NARA Film M653:1222:333). William H. Pool, 12, at school, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Scuffletown, Laurens Co., S.C., living with parents George B., 31, farmer, $600 real estate, $500 personal estate, and Mary F., 32, keeping house, and siblings Thomas P., 10, and Mary L., 3 (NARA Film M593:1501:162B). All were born in South Carolina. No other information has yet been found about the case, William H. Pool, the Child, or the courageous Martha Elizabeth Burdett. Perhaps this history reference will help a descendant find his or her family connection and produce a happy ending to the story.
Hilliard Pierce “Hillas” Burdett, second child of Joseph T. and Arrinda (Putnam) Burdett, was born circa 1860 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died of apoplexy and arteriosclerosis on Aug. 19, 1908, at Roper’s Hospital, Charleston, S.C. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate “Pierce Burditt” was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1875. “Hillas P. [Pierce] Burdett,” 39, born in May 1861 in South Carolina to parents born there, renter, assistant postmaster, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Laurens Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living in a household headed by Scott W. Knight, 50, June 1849, merchant, grocer (NARA Film T623:1533:256B). His 1908 death certificate indicates he was single and had not worked for a year or more.
John Fletcher Burdett, child of John and Frances B. (Rhodes) Burdett, was born circa 1832 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Sept. 19, 1864, and was buried in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery near Gray Court, S.C. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate “John F. Burditt,” single, joined Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church on April 24, 1842. Church records indicate John also was a member in 1844-1864. He married Elizabeth A. (Ann) “Betsy” Wells on June 17, 1852, in Laurens County. Rev. Tolaver Robertson performed their marriage ceremony. Elizabeth was born circa 1827 in South Carolina. She died sometime after 1900. Class Books indicate Elizabeth A. Wells joined Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church on Nov. 14, 1847. She and her children are listed as members in other church records as well. Elizabeth Wells, single, was a member in 1850. “John F. Burdett,” 28, farmer, and wife, E. A., 33, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Youngs Store P.O., Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: E. F. (Emily), 6, female, and John A. W. (Allen Wells), 11/12 (NARA Film M653:1222:329B). All were born in South Carolina. “Elizabeth A. Burdett,” 43, keeping house, $500 real estate and $200 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U.S. CensuDs for Laurens P.O., Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: Emily F., 16, at home, and John A. W., 10, attending school (NARA Film M593:1501:278A). All were born in South Carolina. “Betsy Burdett,” 52, keeps house, widowed, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with one grown child: John, 20 (NARA Film T9:1233:293B). Both were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Elizabeth Burdett,” 73, born in March 1827, widowed, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with her son, “John Burdett,” 40, born in September 1859, farmer, mortgage-free farm owner, married 20 years, and wife, Susan, 43, born in February 1857, mother of six children, three living, and their three children: William, 10, September 1889, farm laborer; Emma, 7, April 1893; and Jesse, 1, March 1899, daughter (NARA Film T623:1534:360A-B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Elizabeth and John’s children are Emily Frances and John Allen Wells Burdett.
Emily Frances Burdett, child of John Fletcher and Elizabeth Ann (Wells) Burdett, was born circa 1854-55 in Laurens Co., S.C. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate she was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1871-1876. She may have married, died or lived elsewhere in 1880: She is not listed with her mother in the census that year.

John Allen Wells Burdette, child of John Fletcher and Elizabeth Ann (Wells) Burdett, was born Sept. 12, 1859, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there April 16, 1916, and was buried in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery, Gray Court, S.C. His grave is marked with an inscribed tombstone which identifies him as “Jno. A. W. Burdette,” born Sept. 12, 1859, died April 16, 1916. He shares a marker with wife, Susan C., born Feb. 22, 1857, died April 8, 1913. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate “Johny Burditt” was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1875. He married Susan Caroline Abercromby or Abercrombie on Dec. 8, 1881. She was born Feb. 22, 1857, in South Carolina, the daughter of Jane and Jesse Abercromby. Susan died April 8, 1913, and was buried in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery. She and John share a tombstone. Her obituary, published in the July 17, 1913, Southern Christian Advocate, identifies her as Susan Burdette, wife of John:
BURDETTE.– Bramlette church in the Enoree circuit has lost one of her most faithful and devout members in the death of Mrs. Susan Burdette, who passed away April 8, 1913, having been born February 22, 1857, aged 56 years. She was a member of the Church at first at old Dial’s in Laurens county, which she joined in early childhood. After she transferred her name to Bramlette the place she loved so well. Her marriage was to Mr. Jno. Burdette, who is left, with one son and two daughters to mourn her departure. A good wife, a dear mother, a loving friend has gone to her reward. The large crowd that came to her burial showed in what high esteem she was held. The timely remarks made by Brother C. R. Wallace in regard to her life was a gem of kindly remembrance of this good woman whom he knew so well. May we all emulate the virtues, and follow the pathway of this sainted one?. W. B. Justus. (Vol. 77, No. 5, p. 15, col. 1)
“John Burdett,” 40, born in September 1859, farmer, mortgage-free farm owner, married 20 years, and wife, Susan, 43, born in February 1857, mother of six children, three living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: William, 10, September 1889, farm laborer; Emma, 7, April 1893; and Jesse, 1, March 1899, daughter (NARA Film T623:1534:360A-B). Also listed is John’s mother: “Elizabeth Burdett,” 73, born in March 1827, widowed. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “John A. Burdette,” 50, farmer, general farm, farm owner, married 29 years, and wife, Susan, 52, mother of six children, three living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: William, 20, farmer, rents farm; Emmie May (Emma), 13; and Jessie, 11, daughter (NARA Film T624:1464:287B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. John and Susan’s children include Mary A., John M., Alda J., William Wells (“Willie”), Emma Mae and Jessie Pauline Burdette.
Henry Burdett, son of Marianne and Frederick
Descendants Billy Brown of Texas and Wayne C. Barrett of Arkansas share some of the following.
Henry Burdett, second child of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette, was born Sept. 5, 1778, in Laurens Dist., S.C. He died at age 74 years, 8 months, 24 days, on May 29, 1853, in Washington Co., Tex., and was buried in Bethlehem Cemetery near Klump, Washington Co., Tex. His tombstone is inscribed “Henry Burdett Father of Adison Burdett Aged about 65 Years.” The cemetery was established by Erwin Brown in the 1850s. The first known burial is Susan J. Burdett, daughter of Henry, who died at age 39 in 1852. Henry married Nancy Clark circa 1800 in Laurens Dist., S.C. She was born circa 1784 in North Carolina, the daughter of Priscilla Doyle Tucker and Thomas Clark of Amelia Co., Va., who also lived in North Carolina and Spartanburg and Laurens Co., S.C., and Newton Co., Ga. Nancy died at about age 72 in or after 1860 in Brenham, Washington Co., Tex., and was buried in Bethlehem Cemetery. She and Henry share an inscribed tombstone. Henry was a farmer and blacksmith. He was a member of the Baptist Church and the Democratic Party. He and Nancy lived in Laurens County until moving to Mechanicsville, Jasper Co., Ga., circa 1820 and then to Texas in 1847.

Henry and Nancy’s companion tombstone in Bethlehem Cemetery, Klump, Washington Co., Tex.

“Nancy Burdett Aged About 72 Years” courtesy Jason Owens
Henry and Nancy’s Life in South Carolina
“Henry Burdett” witnessed a deed on Sept. 22, 1800, when John and Alcey Robertson sold 70 acres on a branch of Enoree River to Reuben Bramlett (DB-H:22). Nathan Bramlett also witnessed the deed. The land bounded property owned by John Robertson Junr., the Big Survey, Amos Serchfield and the said John Robertson. The deed was recorded March 23, 1804. (Nathan Bramlett is a maternal uncle of Henry Burdett, the brother of his mother, Marianne. Reuben Bramlett is most likely the Reuben who is the brother of Nathan and son of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr. Reuben moved to Christian Co., Ky., by 1802; so he may have still been in South Carolina in 1800. However, another Reuben, Reuben Bramblett Jr., son of Margaret “Peggy” and Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky., also was living in Laurens County at that time, so he could be the Reuben who is mentioned in the 1800 Robertson-Bramlett deed. These Bramletts all lived in the same general area in Laurens County and were closely related. Reuben Jr. had arrived in South Carolina in 1794, according to his Revolutionary War pension application; so he was there and could have purchased the land in 1800. In addition, he was closely related to the Robertsons–two of his sisters who also moved to South Carolina from Fauquier Co., Va.–Milley and Martha Mary “Molly” “Polly”–both married Robertsons.) “Henry Burditt” also witnessed a deed on Feb. 1, 1804, when Ezekiel Lindsey sold 150 acres to “Nathan Bramblett.” The land, on Enoree River, was part of an original grant to James Steen on Aug. 19, 1760, by Gov. William Bull. It was conveyed to John Lindsay and then by him to Edward, Isaac and Ezekiel Lindsay. Then Edward and Isaac Lindsay conveyed their parts to Ezekiel Lindsay. “Henry Burditt” and Hezekiah Gray witnessed the deed, which was recorded Feb. 12, 1805 (DB-H:71). “Henry Burdett” bought 100 acres of land for $300 from Joel and Sarah Fowler on Nov. 12, 1811. The deed, recorded Dec. 22, 1820, indicates the land, originally granted to John Fowler, was located on Durbin Creek next to property owned by Henry’s brother-in-law Hezekiah Gray and bounded by other property owned by Mary Fowler, Daniel Bragg and Joseph Downey. George Sims and Mary Patterson witnessed the document (DB-K:309). Henry’s farm is mentioned as a landmark in a deed written in Laurens County on Jan. 2, 1814, when Joseph Downey sold land to William Bowen and Pleasant Shadox. The Downey land bounded property originally laid out to John Fowler “(now in poss. of Henry Burdett).” William Rhodes and Hiram McKinney witnessed the document, which was recorded July 28, 1815 (DB-K:102). “Henry Burditt” and father, Frederick, and brother John as well as several others, including Frederick’s brother-in-law Nathan Bramlett, foreman, and Frederick’s son-in-law Hezekiah Gray, were called to a Laurens District Coroner’s Inquisition at a local plantation on Feb. 6, 1815, to view the bodies of two men who had drowned in Enoree River the previous day and find out how they died. “Henry Burdit,” 26-45, born 1765-84, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 16-26, born 1784-94 (wife, Nancy Clark) and four children: one male under 10, born 1800-10 (William) and three females under 10, born 1800-10 (Mahala, Matilda, Elvira) (NARA Film M252:61:87). “Henry Burdett,” 26-45, born 1775-94, is listed in the 1820 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 26-45, born 1775-94 (wife, Nancy), and eight children: a female 16-26, born 1794-1804 (Matilda); male 16-18, born 1802-04 (William); two females 10-16, born 1804-10 (Mahalah, Elvira); two females under 10, born 1810-20 (Clarissa, Martha); and two males under 10, born 1810-20 (Presley, Addison) (NARA Film M33:121:22). One person was employed in agriculture.
Henry and Nancy’s Life in Georgia and Texas
Henry and wife, Nancy, and her parents moved to Jasper Co., Ga., circa 1820-21. They settled in Mechanicsville, Ga., where Henry was a blacksmith. They moved to Washington Co., Tex., in the fall of 1847. “Henry Berdet,” 72, born North (South) Carolina, and wife, Nancy (Clark), 65, born Georgia (South Carolina), are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., with three grown children born South Carolina (Elizabeth, 27; Susan, 35; and M. [Martha], 31) and three grandchildren, sons of deceased daughter Clarissa, all born Georgia (Hunter Watts, 12; Thomas Watts, 11; Burrell Watts, 6) (NARA Film M432:294B-295A). After Henry died, a son headed the family in 1860: Nancy Burditt 72, born South Carolina, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Brenham P.O., Washington Co., Tex., living with her son “Adison Burditt,” 39, born South Carolina, farmer, $3,000 real estate, $3,000 personal estate, head of the family, and his wife, Susan (Unknown), 28, born Georgia, (NARA Film M653:1307:209A). Also listed are Nancy’s grandsons T. (Thomas) Watts, 21, and Burwell Watts, 14, both born Georgia, sons of Clarissa Burdett Watts.
Nancy and Henry’s children, all born in Laurens Co., S.C., are Matilda, William, Mahalah (“Mahaly”), Elvira Elizabeth, Clarissa, Presley P., Susan Jane Clark, Martha E., Addison and Elizabeth Burdett.

Tombstone of Matilda Burdett above, and tombstone of Adam Ervin Brown Jr. below

Matilda Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born Jan. 12, 1801, in Edgefield Co., S.C. She died March 7/12, 1871, and was buried in Brown Family Cemetery, Kosse, Tex. She married Adam Ervin Brown Jr. on Sept. 26, 1826, in Jasper Co., Ga. He was born in 1801 in South Carolina, the son of Sarah Bradford and Adam Ervin Brown Sr. Ervin Jr. died in 1875 in Limestone Co., Tex., and was buried in Brown Family Cemetery. His grave marker indicates he was a member of the Masonic Lodge. A historical marker at Brown Family Cemetery links the origin of the graveyard to Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr.

BROWN FAMILY CEMETERY
THE BROWN FAMILY CEMETERY TRACES ITS ORIGIN TO THE SETTLEMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA NATIVE ERVIN BROWN (1801-1875) AND HIS WIFE MATILDA (1807-1871) IN WASHINGTON COUNTY, TEXAS, IN 1846. ERVIN AND MATILDA MOVED THEIR FAMILY TO A 1600-ACRE FARM IN LIMESTONE COUNTY NEAR THE COMMUNITY OF EUTAW IN 1857. ERVIN WAS A CHARTER MEMBER OF THE EUTAW MASONIC LODGE IN 1859. ERVIN AND MATILDA ARE BOTH BURIED IN THIS CEMETERY. THEIR SON, THOMAS JEFFERSON (T. J.), SERVED AS A CONFEDERATE CAPTAIN IN THE CIVIL WAR AND LATER AS CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF TEXAS FROM 1911 TO 1915.
THE EARLIEST DOCUMENTED BURIAL HERE WAS THAT OF MARY ANN BROWN, WHO DIED ON APRIL 25, 1865. SHE WAS THE WIFE OF ERVIN’S SON JAMES PETTY (J. P.) BROWN, A CAPTAIN IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY DURING THE CIVIL WAR. J. P. WAS ELECTED TO THE TEXAS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN 1879. J. P. AND MARY’S SON GIBSON A. BROWN BECAME A PROMINENT FIGURE IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA. IN 1896 HE SUCCESSFULLY ARGUED FOR LEGISLATION TO PROTECT PROPERTY OWNERS AFFECTED BY THE U.S. SUPREME COURT DECISION MAKING THE SOUTH FORK OF THE RED RIVER THE OFFICIAL BOUNDARY BETWEEN THE TWO STATES. NEITHER T. J. BROWN NOR GIBSON BROWN ARE BURIED HERE. HOWEVER, THE CEMETERY REMAINS IN USE BY BROWN DESCENDANTS.
Ervin Jr. and Matilda moved from Georgia to Washington Co., Tex., in 1846. “Matilda Brown,” 49, and husband, Irvin, 49, farmer, $5,000 real estate, head of the family, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., with eight children, all except the two youngest born in Georgia: Thomas (Jefferson), 17; Martha, 14; Eliza, 12; Elvira, 10; Emily, 8; Matilda, 5; Irvin, 3, born Texas; Ann J., 2, born Texas (NARA Film M432:916:293A). Also listed: Mary Brown, 44, born Georgia. Matilda and Ervin Jr. and family moved to a 1,600-acre ranch near Eutaw, Tex., in 1857. They lived there in Limestone County in 1860. “Matilda Brown,” 54, and husband, Ervin, 58, farmer, $3,000 real estate, $1,200 personal estate, head of the family, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., with six children: Elvira, 18; Emily, 17; Matilda, 14; E. A. (Ervin Adam), 12, male; Ann J., 10; and C. H., 8, female (NARA Film M653:1300:323B). The first three children listed were born in Georgia and the others in Texas. “Matilda Brown,” 68, keeping house, and husband, Irvin, 68, planter, head of the family, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Dist. 48, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., with three grown children: Elvira, 30, born Georgia; Matilda A., 25, Georgia; Anna J., 25, Texas (NARA Film M593:1596:174A). Also listed: Martha A. Suitan? 32, born in Georgia, keeping house, and Wm. W., 10, born Texas. Matilda and Ervin’s known children are Caroline Harrington, James Petty, Elizabeth Francis (“Eliza”), William Henry, Thomas Jefferson, Martha Ann, Elvira, Emily (“Emma”), Matilda, Ervin Fleming A., Ann Jordon and Clarissa Florence Brown.
Caroline Harrington Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born Oct. 13, 1827, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died sometime after 1860. She married Henry Bland and moved to Texas. He was born circa 1826 in Tennessee. He died sometime after 1860. “C. H. Bland,” 22, born Tennessee (Georgia) and husband, Henry, 24, born Tennessee, farmer, $300 real estate, head of the family, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., with three daughters: M. F., 5, born Louisiana; L./S. J., 4, Louisiana; and J. H., 2, Virginia (NARA Film M432:916:292A). “Caroline Bland,” 32, and husband, H., 34, farm laborer, $300 personal estate, both born Georgia, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., with eight children, the six youngest born Texas: M. F., 15, born Georgia; S. J., 13, born Louisiana; Jane, 9; Louisa, 8; Amine, 7; Adeline, 7; Martha, 4; Matilda, 1 (NARA Film M653:1300:322B). Some of their children later lived in Texas and the Indian Territory. Caroline is mentioned in Genealogies of the Clark, Parks, Brockman and Dean, Davis and Goss Families, printed for Henry William Clark of Montgomery, Ala., by Harrisburg Publishing Co., Harrisburg, Pa., in 1905. Caroline and Henry’s known children are daughters M. F., S. J., J. H., Jane, Louisa, Amine, Adeline, Martha and Matilda Bland.

Capt. James Petty Brown, “Born March 5, 1829 Died July 23, 1897,” is buried in Brown Family Cemetery with a large inscribed tombstone ornamented with the Masonic emblem. Two of his three wives and some children also are buried there. His third wife, Cresidius C. McKinley Springfield Brown, is buried in nearby Kosse Cemetery.
James Petty Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born March 5, 1829, in Jasper Co., Ga. He died July 24, 1897, at home near Kosse, Tex., and was buried there in Brown Family Cemetery. His obituary in the July 29, 1897, edition of the Groesbeck Journal, is headlined “Capt. James P. Brown dies July 24, 1897. A Veteran Dead”:
Capt. James P. Brown passed away at home near Kosse
Kosse, Tx. July 24, 1897. Dead at his residence near here, yesterday, Capt. James P. Brown, age 66 years. Capt. James P. Brown was born in Georgia and moved to Texas before the war and settled in Washington County. In 1858 he moved to this county, and in 1861 he went into the Confederate Army as 3rd lieutenant, Company K, 12th Texas Cavalry, Parson’s Brigade. After one year’s service he was elected Captain of his company and served as such until the close of the war. He represented his county one term in the state legislature and was for the past 4 years collector for the county. He was a brother of Honorable T. J. Brown, one of the judges of the supreme court and of Judge E. F. Brown, of Sherman and the father of District Judge C. A. Brown of Vernon. He was a member of the Masonic Order and held the position of master of this lodge at the time of his death. He was a member of the Baptist church and a true christian, gentleman. He leaves a wife and several grown children. His relatives were nearly all with him.

NARA compiled military service records for James, which are incomplete, indicate he enlisted and mustered in Oct. 28, 1861, at Camp Hebert, Hempstead, Austin Co., Tex., as a second lieutenant in Capt. Anson F. Moss’s Company, “Eutaw Blues” Fourth Regiment. This unit was later re-designated Company K, Twelfth Regiment, Texas Cavalry, and was also known as Parson’s Regiment, Mounted Volunteers, and as Fourth Texas Dragoons. James was elected captain of the company May 25, 1862, after seven month’s service, and apparently served in the unit until the end of the war. He is mentioned in several records as captain commanding his company until the last reference on file Dec. 1, 1863. His unit disbanded May 23, 1865, but was included in the surrender on June 2, 1865 (NARA Film M323 Roll 71).
James moved from Jasper Co., Ga., to Washington Co., Tex., circa 1846. James first married Mary Ann Bryant there on Dec. 1, 1847. She was born June 30, 1830, in Georgia. She died April 26, 1865, in Limestone Co., Tex., and was the first person buried in Brown Family Cemetery. A memorial sign at the cemetery indicates her grave is the earliest documented burial. “James Brown,” 21, and wife, Mary A. (Bryant), 20, both born in Georgia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., with one child, James (Gibson A.), 1, born in Texas, and one other: Elizabeth Brown, 60, born in South Carolina (NARA Film M432:916:293). They lived near James Brown’s parents and siblings. They moved to Limestone Co., Tex., by 1860. “Jas. P. Brown,” 31, farmer, $1,500 real estate, $7,500 personal estate, and wife, M. A. (Mary Ann Bryant), 27, both born in Georgia, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., with three children born in Texas: (James) Gibson (A.), 11; John (T.), 6; and Ervin, 3 (NARA Film M653:1300:323B).
James second married Caroline Albina “Carrie” McKinley Clark between 1865-1868. She was born May 29, 1840, at Zebulon, Pike Co., Ga., the daughter of Nancy Wallace and Charles Carson McKinley. (Nancy Wallace was born Nov. 23, 1800, at Rocky River, Cabarrus Co., N.C. She died in 1879 at Eutaw, Limestone Co., Tex. She and Charles married circa 1822 at Rocky River. Charles was born Oct. 12, 1798, in Caburrus Co., N.C., the son of Jennet McNeeley and Charles David McKinley, a Revolutionary War veteran. Charles Carson McKinley died Nov. 13, 1860, in Falls Co., Tex.) Caroline Albina “Carrie” McKinley Clark Brown died April 10, 1868, near Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., and was buried in Brown Cemetery. She first married circa 1858 Thomas Henry Clark, born circa 1835, who apparently died, perhaps during the Civil War era. James Petty Brown’s second wife, Caroline Clark, 20, born Georgia, and her first husband, Jas. T. (Thomas) Clark, 25, born Mississippi, farmer, $700 personal estate, and two children (H., 2; Oliva, 5/12) living next to Caroline’s parents, C. C. (Charles Carson) McKinley, 62, and Nancy, 59, both born North Carolina, and brother Wesley, 23, born Georgia, 1860 Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., census (NARA Film M653:1300:320A).

James third married Caroline’s sister, Crecidius (Crecidus or Cresida or Cassida) C. McKinley Springfield, circa 1873. She was born Aug. 30, 1831, in Pike Co., Ga., the daughter of Nancy Wallace and Charles Carson McKinley. She died April 1, 1913, in Limestone Co., Tex., and was buried at Kosse Cemetery. She first married James Madison Springfield on May 27, 1855, in Limestone County. He was born April 12 or Dec. 4, 1812, in Travelers Rest, Greenville Co., S.C., and died Nov. 14, 1870, in Limestone County. (He first married Susan Gentry, daughter of Emaline Payne and Samuel Gentry.) Crecidius lived in Falls Co., Tex., in 1870 before marrying circa 1873 James Petty Brown, who lived in Limestone Co., Tex., in 1870. C. C. (Crecidius Cassida McKinley) Springfield, 28, born Georgia, and (first) husband J. M., 47, born South Carolina, farmer, $6,000 real estate, $3,205 personal estate, head of the family, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Alto Springs P.O., Falls Co., Tex., with three children born Texas: N. E., 10; J. (James) A., 2; Emma Springfield, 3/12, and two others: N. J. Read, 22, born Virginia, farm laborer, and M. Donly, 55, born South Carolina, teacher (NARA Film M653:1293:163B). “Precida” (Cresida) Springfield, 38, born in Georgia, (widowed) keeping house $10,000 real estate, $750 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Marlin P.O., Falls Co., Tex., with five children born Texas: James, 13; Emma, 11; (Aaron) Lee, 7; Josie, 3; Susan Springfield, 16 or 6/12? (NARA Film M593:1584:22A). “Jas. P. Brown,” 41, born Georgia, planter, $1,432 real estate, $990 personal estate, widowed, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Dist. 48, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., with seven children born Texas: (James) Gibson A., 21; Jno. T., 15; Irvin, 12; Wm. H., 10; Mary A., 8; Chas. W., 4; Caroline A., 2, and five others (Caroline’s children Thos. H. Clark, 12, and Olivia Clark, 10; [son- or brother-in-law? of James] Zachariah N. Morrell, 67, born South Carolina, Baptist Preacher, and his daughter Mary E. Morrell, 12, born Texas; and L__? Brunis? 55, born Ireland, blacksmith) (NARA Film M593:1596:174A-B). “Jas. P. Brown,” 51, born in Georgia to a mother born South Carolina and father born North Carolina, farmer, and (third) wife, C. C. (Cresidius or Cresidus or Cresida, Cassida McKinley), 48, keeping house, born in Georgia to parents born there, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., with three grown and minor children born in Texas: Ervin, 22; assistant farming; Charlie, 13, at school; C. (Caroline) A., 11, daughter, at school (NARA Film T9:1317:331A). Also listed: F. H. Clark, 22, stepson, assistant farming (son of Caroline Albina McKinley and Thomas James Clark); A. L. (Aaron Lee) Springfield, 16, stepson, at school; and Eula Springfield, 12, stepdaughter, at school (latter two children of Crecidius C. McKinley and James Madison Springfield). All were born in Texas. Widow Cassida A. Brown, 69, born in August 1831 in Georgia to parents born North Carolina, farmer, own farm, mother of ten children, two living, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Limestone Co., Tex., with one grown daughter, Emma Parrott, 40, born March 1860 in Texas to a mother born Georgia, father South Carolina, widowed, mother of seven children, six living, and five Parrott grandchildren born Texas to a mother born Texas, father born Tennessee: Ellis, 17, January 1882, farm laborer; Grover C., 15, September 1884, farm laborer; Eula L., 12, November 1887; Wallace B., 10, July 1889, farm laborer; and George N., 9, May 1891 (NARA Film T623:1655:242A-B). Widow Crecidus Brown, 78, born Georgia to parents born North Carolina, mother of ten children, two living, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Limestone Co., Tex., living with daughter Emma (Springfield) Parrott, 50, widowed, mother of seven children, six living, and her two sons born Texas: Grover, 25, and George, 19, both farmers (NARA Film T624:1574:107A).
James and Mary Ann’s children include James Gibson A., John T., Ervin, William Henry and Mary A. Brown. James and Caroline’s children include Charles W. (“Charlie”) and Caroline A. Brown. James and Crecidius C.’s children include Nancy Matilda and Lillie Adeline Brown.

Capt. James Petty Brown and third wife, Cresidus C. McKinley Springfield, and family.
James Gibson A. Brown, son of James Petty and Mary Ann (Bryant) Brown, courtesy Billy Royce Brown Jr.

James Gibson A. Brown, child of James Petty and Mary Ann (Bryant) Brown, was born circa 1849 in Eutaw, Limestone Co., Tex. He died Oct. 25, 1915, in Oklahoma City, Okla. He lived in Sherman, Grayson Co., Tex., in 1880 and in Clarendon, Donley Co., Tex., in 1882. He was elected county judge and in 1889 appointed judge of the Forty-Sixth Judicial District, serving until 1903. He lived in Wilbarger, Tex., in 1900. Gibson was a prominent Texas legislator before moving into Oklahoma. He had the distinction of presiding over the last court in Greer Co., Tex., and the first state court in Greer Co., Okla. He was elected as an Associate Justice of the Oklahoma Supreme Court and served until his death in 1915. A memorial sign at Brown Family Cemetery indicates Gibson “became a prominent figure” in Texas and Oklahoma. “In 1896 he successfully argued for legislation to protect property owners affected by the U.S. Supreme Court Decision making the south fork of the Red River the official boundary between the two states.” He married a woman named Adela H. “Ada” circa 1876. She was born in 1856. Their children include Floyd R., Peyton, Leon H. and Genevieve A. Brown.

John T. Brown, child of James Petty and Mary Ann (Bryant) Brown, was born Feb. 19, 1855, in Limestone Co., Tex. He died Nov. 16, 1930, in Winters, Runnels Co., Tex., and was buried there in North View Cemetery. He first married a woman named Sallie. She was born circa 1855 in Texas. She died between 1920 and 1930. “John Brown,” 25, born Texas to parents born Georgia, farming, and wife, Sallie, 25, born Tennessee to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., with two children: Robt., 3, and Lilly, 2 (NARA Film T9:1317:333A). Also listed: John’s brother W. H. Brown, 21, born Georgia to parents born Georgia, asst. farming. “John T. Brown,” 45, born in February 1855 in Texas to parents born Georgia, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, married 27 years, and wife, Sally E., 45, born in September 1854 in Tennessee to a mother born Alabama, father Tennessee, mother of five children, four living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Runnels Co., Tex., with three grown and minor children born Texas: Lillie J., 21, born January 1879; Willie L., 8, June 1891; and Jos. T., 5, January 1895 (NARA Film T623:1667:27). Also listed is Robert’s widow, Mary J., 23, born in December 1876, and her daughter, Lillie W., 7/12, November 1899, both born Texas. John and Sallie’s children are James Thomas, Robert, Lilly J., Willie L. and John T. Brown. John second married a woman named Ida between 1920 and 1930.

Ervin F. Brown, child of James Petty and Mary Ann (Bryant) Brown, was born June 11, 1858, in Washington Co., Tex. He died Feb. 8, 1939, in Winters, Runnels Co., Tex., and was buried in North View Cemetery. He was a prominent attorney and lived at Winter, Runnels Co., Tex., around 1905. He married Martha Emma Adams. She was born June 7, 1865, in Alabama, the daughter of Mary Ann Hawkins and John Q. Adams. She died May 29, 1944, in Winters, Tex., and was buried in North View Cemetery. Their children are Clar Mary Ann and Infant Son Brown.
William Henry Brown, courtesy descendant Billy Royce Brown Jr.

William Henry Brown, child of James Petty and Mary Ann (Bryant) Brown, was born Nov. 21, 1859, Limestone Co., Tex. He died Jan. 11, 1951, in Runnels Co., Tex. He and his wife rest in North View Cemetery, Winters, Tex. William married Justine A. “Justina” Brown. She was born circa 1862 in Georgia. She died in 1904. “W. H. Brown,” 21, born Texas to parents born Georgia, asst. farming, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., living with his brother John Brown, 25, and family (NARA Film T9:1317:333A). William and his family lived in Runnels County. “Will H. Brown,” 40, born November 1849 in Texas to parents born Georgia, owner of a mortgage-free farm, married 19 years, and wife, Justine A., 37, born September 1862 in Georgia to parents born there, mother of 12 children, ten living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Runnels Co., Tex., with ten children born Texas: James P., 18, November 1881; Lelia E., 14, October 1885; Clarence A., 13, May 1887; Viola V., 11, February 1889; Carl O., 8, December 1891; Irene, 5, November 1894; Eula, 3, May 1897; Will F., 1, June 1898; and Charlie, 3/12, and Carrie, 3/12, twins, both born February 1900 (NARA Film T623:1667:28A). W. H. Brown, 49, born Texas to parents born Georgia, farmer, home farm, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Runnels Co., Tex., with six children born Texas: Irene, 15; (William Franklin) Frank, 12, farm laborer, home farm; Eula, 11 (13); Dan, 8; Marshall 5; Carrie, 7; Carl, 18 (NARA Film T624:1586:171B). “Wm. H. Brown,” 65, born in Texas to parents born Georgia, farm owner, widowed, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Winters, Runnels Co., Tex., with two grown and minor children born Texas: Carrie, 19, and Marshall, 15 (NARA Film T625:1841:241). Also in the household: Sue Springfield, 66, born South Carolina, and four others born Texas: her son Hulet D., 40, born Texas, widowed, store bookkeeper; her brother-in-law George W. Springfield, 65, widowed; and her two grandchildren: Mary Sue, 7, and Eula May, 6.

William Henry Brown, son of James Petty and Mary Ann (Bryant) Brown, in later years
William Henry and Justina Brown rest in North View Cemetery, Winters, Tex.

William and Justina’s children include James Petty, Lelia E., Clarence A., Viola V., Carl O., Irene, Eula, William Franklin (“Will” “Frank”), Leon Marshall, Charlie, Carrie and Daniel Horace Brown.
Mary A. Brown, child of James Petty and Mary Ann (Bryant) Brown, was born circa 1862 in Texas.
Charles W. “Charlie” Brown, child of James Petty and Caroline Albina (McKinley Clark) Brown, was born circa 1866 in Texas. He married Armada A. She was born circa 1863. She died circa 1900 in Limestone Co., Tex., and was buried in Kosse Cemetery.
Jemima Brown, child of James Petty and Caroline Albina (McKinley) Brown, was born in Texas. She married a man named Bratton and lived at or near Kosse, Tex., in 1905.
Caroline A. “Carrie” Brown, child of James Petty and Caroline Albina (McKinley Clark) Brown, was born circa 1868 in Texas. She married a man named Reese and lived in Hill Co., Tex.
Nancy Matilda “Tillie” Brown, child of James Petty and Crecidius C. “Cassida” (McKinley Clark) Brown, was born April 14, 1874, in Texas. She died May 5, 1875, in infancy and was buried in Brown Family Cemetery with marker inscribed with her full birth and death dates and the epitaph “Mama’s Tillie Sleeps Sweetly Here.”
Lillie Adeline Brown, child of James Petty and Crecidius C. “Cassida” (McKinley Clark) Brown, was born March 18, 1875, in Limestone Co., Tex. She died there March 19, 1875, and was buried in Brown Family Cemetery.
Elizabeth Francis “Eliza” Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born Sept. 30, 1830, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died in 1917 near Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., and was buried in Eutaw Cemetery. She married Harrison F. Bryant in 1847. He was born July 7, 1810, in Georgia. He died Feb. 22, 1895, in Texas and was buried in Eutaw Cemetery. “Frances Bryant,” 18, and husband, Harris, 35, farmer, head of the family, both born Georgia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., with one child: James, 1 (NARA Film M432:916:286B). Also: E. Brown, 52, female, born North Carolina. “Frances E. Bryant,” 39, keeping house, and husband, Harrison, 57, planter, $1,200 real estate, $800 personal estate, both born Georgia, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Eutaw P.O., Dist. 48 West Texas, Limestone Co., Tex., with five children born Texas: Jas. R., 20; Adesin W., 18; Irvin, 13; Jefferson M., 8; and Edward, 4 (NARA Film M593:1596:171A). “E. F. Bryant,” 50, born Georgia to parents born North Carolina, and husband, H., 70, born Georgia to parents born Virginia, farmer, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., with two grown and minor children born Texas: Jeff, 18, farmer, and Edward, 14, asst. farmer (NARA T9:1317:317A). “Elizabeth F. Bryant,” 69, born in September 1830 in Georgia to parents born South Carolina, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Precinct 8, Limestone Co., Tex., living with her son Edd, 34, and wife, Ellen, 29, and their three children (NARA Film T623:1655:327). “Francis Bryant,” 79, born Georgia, widowed, mother, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Limestone Co., Tex., living with her son Jeff M., 48, and wife, Georgia, 47, and their family (NARA Film T624:1574:100A). Frances and Harrison’s children include James Reuben, Addison Watson, Mary, Ervin F., Stenny, Martha (“Mattie”), Jefferson Monroe and Edward Reagan Bryant.
James Reuben Bryant, child of Elizabeth Francis Brown and Harrison F. Bryant, was born circa 1850 in Washington Co., Tex. He died circa 1915 in Limestone Co., Tex. He married Laura Virginia Polk circa 1871. She was born circa 1849 in Limestone County. She died there Dec. 13, 1922. “Jas. Bryant,” 30, and wife, L. V., 30, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., with four children born Texas: Mary, 7; Tom, 5; May, 3; and Lizzie, 1 (NARA Film T9:1317:317). Their children include Mary (“Mollie”), Tom P., May, Elizabeth F. (“Lizzie”), Ada L., Laura Crockett, Nora Estelle and James Ward Bryant.
Addison Watson Bryant, child of Elizabeth Francis Brown and Harrison F. Bryant, was born March 29, 1852, in Washington Co., Tex. He died Dec. 28, 1929, in Limestone Co., Tex. He married Emma Rachel Crockett Polk. She was born Feb. 2, 1852, in Washington Co., Tex. She died circa 1942. Their children include Lillie E., Claud, Guy and Floyd C. Bryant.
Mary Bryant, child of Elizabeth Francis Brown and Harrison F. Bryant, was born circa 1855 in Texas. She lived with her parents and siblings in 1860 in Limestone Co., Tex. She married a man named Tribble.
Ervin F. Bryant, child of Elizabeth Francis Brown and Harrison F. Bryant, was born Feb. 9, 1857, in Limestone Co., Tex. He died there April 16, 1925, and was buried in Eutaw Cemetery, Kosse, Tex. He lived with his parents and siblings in 1860-1870 in Limestone Co., Tex. He married a woman named Fannie circa 1876. She was born circa 1861 in Georgia. She died circa 1946 and was buried in Eutaw Cemetery. “Ervin F. Bryant,” 53, born Texas, bank cashier, married 34 years, and wife, Fannie, 52, born in Georgia to parents born there, mother of seven children, four living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Limestone Co., Tex., with three children born Texas: Maurice, 17; Blake, 15; and Rowan, 13 (NARA Film T624:1574:105B). Also listed: Mary S. Johnson, 40, born Texas to parents born there, widowed, cook. Some of Ervin and Fannie’s children are Maurice D., Blake and Rowan Bryant.
Martha “Mattie” Bryant, child of Elizabeth Frances Brown and Harrison Bryant, was born circa 1859 in Texas. She lived with her parents and siblings in 1860 in Limestone Co., Tex.
Stenny Bryant, child of Elizabeth Francis Brown and Harrison F. Bryant, was born circa 1860.
Jefferson Monroe Bryant, child of Elizabeth Francis Brown and Harrison F. Bryant, was born March 17, 1862, in Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex. He died there July 5, 1935. He married Georgia Anna Lewis. She was born circa 1863. She died circa 1948. Their children include Mary Alice, George Harrison, Roy L. and Glenn Bryant.
Edward Reagan Bryant, child of Elizabeth Francis Brown and Harrison F. Bryant, was born circa 1866 in Limestone Co., Tex. He died Nov. 9, 1940, in Haskell Co., Tex., and was buried in Rule Cemetery there. He married Mary Ella Kindred. She was born Nov. 5, 1870, the daughter of Lizabeth Morris and Jack Kindred, in Carroll Co., Miss. She died Oct. 26, 1963, in Eastland Co., Tex., and was buried in Rule Cemetery. Their children include Clyde Reagan, Ernest R., Jewell Edna, Fay A., Claud Harrison and Gladis Francis Bryant.
Mary Ann Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born Sept. 22, 1832, in Georgia. She died circa 1867 in Texas.
William Henry Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born Aug. 26, 1834, in Georgia. He died Oct. 31, 1835.

Cast zinc tombstone of Thomas Jefferson Brown and his wife, Louise T. Estes Brown, in West Hill Cemetery, Sherman, Tex. The marker indicates Thomas and Louise married Aug. 7, 1859. Their daughter Lulie M. Brown Grizzard and her son Ervin L. Grizzard are buried beside them and share their marker. A grandson of Louise and Thomas, Leicester Brown Chapman, born Oct. 9, 1887, and died March 5, 1888, also is buried in the family plot.

Detail from cast zinc tombstone of Thomas Jefferson Brown and wife, Louise T. Estes, West Hill Cemetery.

Justice Thomas Jefferson Brown and two grandchildren, 1900s.

Thomas Jefferson Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born July 24, 1836, in Jasper Co., Ga. He died from complications of stomach cancer May 26, 1915, at home in Greenville, Hunt Co., Tex., and was buried beside his wife, who preceded him in death, at West Hill Cemetery, Sherman, Grayson Co., Tex., with an impressive tall monument. His obituary appears in Texas newspapers and in the May 28, 1915, edition of the New York Times:
“Chief Justice Brown Dead. Texas Jurist Succumbs at His Home in His 80th Year.”
Greenville, Texas, May 27. — Thomas Jefferson Brown, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Texas, died at his home here yesterday. He was a native of Georgia and was 79 years old. Justice Brown was born in Jasper County, Ga. He was graduated from Baylor University at Independence, Texas, from which he received the degree of L.L.B. in 1858. During the time he was at college he read law and received his license to practice the year before graduation. Justice Brown immediately began the practice of law, and shortly after removed to McKinney, Texas, where he remained until 1872. In 1859 he was admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court and in 1872 removed to Sherman, Texas, where he practiced until 1892. While in Sherman he entered politics and was elected to the Legislature in 1888 and 1890. Justice Brown was a member of the board that framed the Railway Commission law, and was the author of the greater part of that document. He was elected a Judge of the District Court in 1892, serving for a year, and then was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, becoming Chief Justice in 1911.
Thomas married Louise T. Estes on Aug. 7, 1859, in McKinney, Collin Co., Tex. She was born Oct. 11, 1836 in Kentucky, the daughter of Marietta Hornsby and Elisha Washington Estes. Louise died Jan. 11, 1907, in Gastonia, Tex., and was buried in West Hill Cemetery, Sherman, Tex. She shares their ornate tombstone. Her burial notice was published the day after her death:
Sherman, Tex., Jan. 12—Burial of Mrs. Louisa T. Brown, wife of Hon. T. J. Brown, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, took place at West Hill Cemetery this afternoon. The body, accompanied by the husband, daughters and other relatives and friends, reached the city from Austin this afternoon, and was taken to the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Chapman, where the services were conducted.
Thomas moved from Georgia to Washington Co., Tex., with his parents in 1846. “Thomas Brown,” 17, born Georgia, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., with his parents, Matilda Brown, 49, and Irvin, 49, farmer, $5,000 real estate, head of the family, both born South Carolina, and one other adult (Mary Brown, 44, born Georgia) and siblings (NARA Film M432:916:293B). Thomas earned his law degree in 1858 from Baylor University, Independence, Tex. He read the law in 1856 and passed the bar exam in 1857. He established his first law office in McKinney, Collin Co., Tex. “Thomas J. Brown,” 23, born Georgia, attorney, $300 real estate, and wife, Louisa, 20, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Precinct 1, McKinney P.O., Collin Co., Tex., with one child: Ervin L., 9/12, born Texas, (died before 1870) and five others, Louise’s “Estis” family, all born Kentucky (Louisa’s mother, M. H. [Marietta Hornsby] Estis, 50, and Louise’s siblings: Erma, 21; Thos, 19; Benjamin F., 17; and Mary, 15 (NARA Film M653:1291:26A).

Thomas served as a Confederate officer during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted in Company E, Capt. Robert H. Taylor’s Regiment, Texas Mounted Rifles, later Texas Cavalry, at age 26 on Dec. 26, 1861, at McKinney, Tex. (His unit was also known as First Indian Regiment, Texas Cavalry; Merrick’s Regiment, Texas Dismounted Cavalry, or Merrick’s Battalion, Texas Infantry; James G. Stevens’ Regiment, Texas Cavalry; and Robert D. Stone’s Battalion, Texas Cavalry.) Thomas was mustered in and appointed second lieutenant at Fort Washita on Jan. 10, 1862. His NARA Compiled Military Service Records indicate he was born in Georgia, and he was 5 feet 9 inches tall with dark hair, blue eyes and fair complexion. His occupation is listed as lawyer. He was elected first lieutenant March 4 that year and was later promoted to the rank of captain. He served another year until he resigned with disability on March 5, 1863.
Camp Kiamishi…March 5th 1863 To the Hon. Secretary of War. Having been in bad health for some time past with no prospect of recovering my health while I remain in Camps, I therefore tender you this my resignation as an officer in CSA. Respectfully Thos. J. Brown Captain Co. E Col. J. G. Stevens’ Regt. Texas Cavalry.
The surgeon’s certificate states that Thomas suffered from a stomach ailment for five years and from rheumatism for several years. He survived the war and returned home to his family and law practice.
“Thomas Brown,” 34, born Georgia, lawyer, $5,000 real estate, $2,000 personal estate, and wife, Louisa, 33, born Kentucky, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Precinct 1, McKinney P.O., Collin Co., Tex., with four children born Texas: Mary, 9; Lulu, 7; Emma, 6; Annie, 4, and three others (Louisa’s mother, Marietta Estes, 64, Kentucky, at home; Julia Holmes, 33, Tennessee, black, cook; Netta Royal, 10, Texas, black, nurse) (NARA Film M593:1579:366A). Thomas moved his law practice to Sherman, Grayson Co,. Tex., in 1872. “Thomas J. Brown,” 44, born in Georgia to parents born South Carolina, lawyer, and wife, Louiza T., 43, born Kentucky to a mother born Kentucky, father born Virginia, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Sherman, Grayson Co., Tex., with five grown and minor children born Texas: Mary E., 18; Lulie M., 16; Emma K., 15; Annie K., 13; Lillie, 9, and one other (Julie Holmes, 40, Arkansas, black, servant) (NARA Film T9:1306:40).
Thomas was elected to serve in the Texas House of Representatives, Twenty-first and Twenty-second legislatures, during 1888-1892, and during a special session March 14-April 12, 1892. He was appointed District Judge of Grayson and Collin counties, Tex., in 1892. He was appointed Associate Justice of the Texas Supreme Court, at Austin, Tex., in 1893, and was appointed Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court in 1911. He was a member of the Democratic Party. “Thos. J. Brown,” 63, born July 1836 in Georgia to a mother born Georgia, father born Virginia, Supreme Court Judge, owner of a mortgage-free home, married 42 years, and wife, Louisa T., 63, born October 1863 Kentucky to a mother born Kentucky, father born Georgia, mother of seven children, four living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Sherman, Dist. 88, Grayson Co., Tex., with one grown child: Annie K. Brown, 33, born Texas, and one other: Brown (M.) Grizzard, 18, born April 1882 Texas to a mother born Texas, father Tennessee, grandson (son of Lulie M. Brown and Dr. Luther A. Grizzard) (NARA Film T623:1639:12B). “Thos. Brown,” 73, born in Georgia to parents born there, Texas Supreme Court Judge, widowed, father-in-law, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Ward 3, Precinct 3, Austin, Travis Co., Tex., living with daughter Annie B. Myrick, 43, born Texas to a mother born Kentucky, father Georgia, second marriage, married nine years, and husband, John, 62, born North Carolina to parents born there, second marriage, Deputy Clerk, Supreme Court, head of the family, and their children born Texas: Frances L., 8; Thos., 6; Julia S., 24, and one other (Cassie Givens, 50, born Missouri, widowed) (NARA Film T624:1595:73A). Thomas and Louise’s children are Ervin L., Mary Etta, Lulu M. (“Lulie”), Emily K. (“Emma”), Annie K., Lillie and Daughter/Son Brown.
Ervin L. Brown, child of Thomas Jefferson and Louisa T. (Estes) Brown, was born April 8, 1860, in Collin Co., Tex. He died Nov. 24, 1867, and was buried in his parents’ family plot in West Hill Cemetery, Sherman, Tex. His plaque on the large zinc marker is inscribed “Ervin L., Son of T. J. & L. T. Brown Born Apr. 8, 1860, Died Nov. 24, 1867.”
Mary Etta “Marietta” Brown, child of Thomas Jefferson and Louisa T. (Estes) Brown, was born June 17, 1861, in McKinney, Tex. She died at age 86 years, 1 month, 4 days, on July 21, 1947, at Wilson N. Jones Hospital, Sherman, Tex., and was buried there in West Hill Cemetery. Her Texas Death Certificate 29592 names her parents and indicates she was a widow who died of cerebral hemmorhage and cardiac insufficiency with complications of hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and senility. She married Charles Eugene Craycroft in 1889. He was born April 23, 1857, in Kentucky, the son of Mary Frances Hunter and Clark Robert Craycroft. He died Dec. 31, 1927, in Sherman, Tex.

Lulie M. Brown Grizzard, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Louise T. Estes Brown, is buried beside them in West Hill Cemetery and shares their cast zinc tombstone. Her inscription on the large tombstone reads “Lulie M., Wife of Dr. L. A. Grizzard, Daughter of T. J. & L. T. Brown Born Sept. 13, 1863 Died June 30, 1888.” A separate foot stone with her name also was placed on the plot.

Lulu M. “Lulie” Brown, child of Thomas Jefferson and Louisa T. (Estes) Brown, was born Sept. 13, 1863, in McKinney, Tex. She died June 30, 1886, at Abilene, Tex., and was taken back to Sherman and buried in West Hill Cemetery. Her obituary appears in the June 30, 1886, edition of the Sherman Register:
The sad intelligence of the death of Mrs. L. M. Grizzard, nee Lulu Brown, at Abilene (Taylor Co.), reached this city this morning, and has cast a gloom over her many friends in this city. It was here that the deceased passed her girlhood days, and it was here where she became the wife of he who has always been a kind and loving husband. Her father and mother, Capt. T. J. Brown and wife, were with her at the last moment, and she passed away in the presence of those who loved her best, although no one knew her but to respect and admire. Her remains will be brought to this city tomorrow and on the following day will be laid away in the quiet city of the dead. The Register offers its sympathies to the bereaved parents and relatives in this, their hour of sorrow.
Lulie married Dr. Luther A. Grizzard in 1881. He was born March 30, 1850, in Tennessee, the son of Sarah J. Kirkpatrick and Alfred Perry Grizzard. He died July 27, 1910, in Fort Worth, Tarrant Co., Tex., and was buried in Abilene. Their child is Brown M. Grizzard, born April 29, 1882, in Texas and died April 28, 1956, in Grayson Co., Tex. Brown married Gladys Dean Robertson. Luther second married Mattie Mackey in 1891 and had four children (Hallie Mackey, Lois, Elizabeth and James Henry Grizzard.) He served as the Texas and Pacific surgeon at Abilene, Taylor Co., Tex., and was a prominent physician in the area.

Emily Katherine “Emma” Brown, child of Thomas Jefferson and Louisa T. (Estes) Brown, was born April 6, 1865, in McKinney, Collin Co., Tex. She died June 21, 1960, and was buried in West Hill Cemetery, Sherman, Grayson Co., Tex. She married Leicester Charles Chapman Sr. on Oct. 27, 1885, in Sherman. He was born Jan. 8, 1858. He died March 5, 1916, and was buried in West Hill Cemetery. “Emma C. Chapman,” 35, born April 1865 in Texas to a mother born Kentucky, father Georgia, and husband, Leicester, 42, born in January 1858 in North Carolina to a mother born Ireland, father England, dry goods merchant, owner of a mortgage free home, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Sherman, Grayson Co., Tex., with two children: Mary L., 10, October 1889, and Leicester C., 5, born June 1894 (NARA Film T623:1639:82A).“Emma K. Chapman,” 45, born in Texas to a mother born Kentucky, father Georgia, and husband, Leicester, 52, born in North Carolina to a mother born Ireland, father England, concrete contractor, owner of a mortgage free home, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Sherman, Grayson Co., Tex., with three children born Texas: Mary L., 20; Leicester C., 16; and Katherine, 8 (NARA Film T624:1556:94A). Leicester and Emma’s children are Mary L.; Leicester Brown, who died young in 1888; Leicester Charles Jr.; and Katherine Chapman.
Annie K. Brown, child of Thomas Jefferson and Louisa T. (Estes) Brown, was born Sept. 4, 1866, in McKinney, Collin Co., Tex. She died June 4, 1947, in Muenster, Cooke Co., Tex. She married John Southall Myrick circa 1901. John was born Oct. 13/15, 1848, in Murfreesboro, Hertford Co., N.C., the son of Julia Southall and Thomas Newsom Myrick. John died July 16, 1913, in Austin, Travis Co., Tex., and was buried at Oakwood Cemetery. John entered Virginia Military Institute on Sept. 5, 1867, and was graduated July 4, 1871. He was an assistant professor at the Texas Military Institute, a banker and city treasurer in Austin, Tex., before he became a Texas Supreme Court Clerk. He had been previously married Josephine Johnson, daughter of B. T. Johnson, who was born in 1854 and died in 1893. She and John and had two daughters, Margaret Raymond Myrick and Julia S. (Southall?) Myrick. “Annie B. Myrick,” 43, born Texas to a mother born Kentucky, father Georgia, second marriage, married nine years, and husband, John, 62, born North Carolina to parents born there, second marriage, Deputy Clerk, Supreme Court, head of the family, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Ward 3, Austin, Travis Co., Tex., with two minor children and a grown daughter born Texas: Frances L., 8; Thos., 6; and Julia S., 24 (NARA Film T624:1595:73A). Also listed: Annie’s father, Thos. Brown, 73, born Georgia to parents born there, Texas Supreme Court Judge, widowed, and Cassie Givens, 50, born Missouri, widowed. Annie and John’s children are Frances L. and Thomas Myrick.
John Southall Myrick, Class of 1871, Virginia Military Institute

Lillie Brown, child of Thomas Jefferson and Louisa T. (Estes) Brown, was born July 29, 1870 in Texas. She died Feb. 7, 1926, and was buried in West Hill Cemetery, Sherman, Grayson Co., Tex. She married a man named Blocker.
Daughter/Son Brown, child of Thomas Jefferson and Louisa T. (Estes) Brown, was born and died before 1900 in Texas. Census data indicate Louisa was the mother of seven children, four living, in 1900.
Martha Ann Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born March 28, 1838, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died May 17, 1919, and was buried in Ebenezer Baptist Church Cemetery, Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex. She attended Baylor University, Independence, Tex. “Martha Brown,” 14, born Texas, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., with parents, Matilda, 49, and Irvin, 49, and siblings (NARA Film M432:916:293A). She married by 1860 and lived with her parents in 1870. She married Henry C. Guyton on July 1, 1858. He was born June 16, 1833. He died May 13, 1861. He was a farmer. “M. A. Guyton,” 22, born Georgia, and husband, H. C., 27, born Alabama, farmer, $100 real estate, $1,800 personal estate, head of the family, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Steele Creek P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., with one child: W. W., 2/12, born Texas (NARA Film M653:1300:326A). Henry and Martha’s children are William Whitaker Guyton, born May 9, 1860, and died March 24, 1878, and Henry Guyton, born Sept. 15, 1861, and died Sept. 15, 1862. Martha second married Moses Sanford P. Lowery on Nov. 15, 1870. He was born Dec. 19, 1830, the son of John Wesley Lowery. He died Jan. 6, 1916, and was buried at Ebenezer Baptist Church Cemetery, Kosse, Tex. He was a farmer. He and Martha were members of Missionary Baptist Church. They lived at Kosse, Tex., in 1900. “M. A. Lowery,” 52, born in March 1838 in Georgia to parents born North (South) Carolina, mother of five children, three living, married 29 years, and husband, M. S. P., 70, born in December 1830 in Georgia to parents born there, farmer, owner of a mortgage free farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., with one grown child: E. B. (Ervin Brown) Lowery, 23, born July 1876 in Texas (NARA Film T623:1655:240A). Also listed are two boarders: Della Morrow and R. J. Hargrove. Their son “J. L. Lowery,” 25, and wife, Icy (Head), 24, and child, Vida (L.), 2, all born Texas, lived next door. Martha and Moses Sanford P.’s children are Matilda Ann, born Aug. 20, 1871, Eutaw, Limestone Co., Tex., and died Jan. 2, 1960, Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., who married William Alford Williams; James Lafayette, born Jan. 21, 1875, Eutaw, Tex., and died July 7, 1962, in Kosse, Tex., who married Icy P. Head; and Ervin Brown Lowery, born July 9, 1876, Kosse, and died there April 5, 1951. He married Exa Ophelia Ayers in 1903.
Eliza A. Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born circa 1839 in Jasper Co., Ga. She lived with her parents in 1850.
Elvira Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born July 9, 1840, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died July 12, 1921, in Wingate, Runnels Co., Tex., and was buried in Wingate Cemetery. “Elvira Brown,” 10, born Texas, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 49, and Irvin, 49, and siblings (NARA Film M432:916:293A). “Elvira Brown,” 18 born Texas, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 54, and Ervin, 58, and siblings (NARA Film M653:1300:323B). “Elvira Brown,” 30, born Georgia, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Dist. 48, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., with parents, Matilda, 68, and Irvin, 68, and siblings (NARA Film M593:1596:174A). She attended Fairfield Female College. She married Francis Marion “Frank” Durham on Dec. 8, 1870, in Limestone Co., Tex. He was born Jan. 5, 1830, in Monroe Co., Ga., the son of Col. Sherman Durham. Francis died Dec. 23, 1895, in Cherokee Co., Tex., and may have been buried in Thompson Cemetery there. He was a Mexican War and Civil War veteran and a farmer by occupation. He served as a private in Company K, Twentieth Regiment, Texas Cavalry, for the Confederacy and survived the war. He first married Emily M. McDaniel on Dec. 26, 1849, in Koscuiscko, Attala Co., Miss. She was born Jan. 29, 1834, in Pike Co., Ga., and died in 1870 in Texas. Francis and Elvira’s children, all born Texas, are William W., born March 15, 1874, and died Sept. 15, 1951; Matilda, born Aug. 3, 1876, who married Wiley J. Cathey; Ira Ervin, Oct. 10, 1877, and died Sept. 8, 1946; Lillie, June 22, 1879, who married C. H. Harter; F. M., born July 1, 1880; and Shelman Durham, born Aug. 29, 1884, and died Dec. 6, 1963.
Emily “Emma” Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born Jan. 8, 1842, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died after 1920 in Runnels Co., Tex., and was most likely buried beside her husband in North View Cemetery, Winters, Tex. “Emily Brown,” 8, born Texas, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 49, and Irvin, 49, and siblings (NARA Film M432:916:293A). “Emily Brown,” 17, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 54, and Ervin, 58, and siblings (NARA Film M653:1300:323B). She attended Fairfield Female College in Texas. She married Sanford F. Flynt on Oct. 8, 1865. He was born April 28, 1837/8, in Tennessee. He died Aug. 8, 1913, and was buried in North View Cemetery. He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States and survived as a veteran. He enlisted as a private in Company K, Twentieth Regiment, Texas Cavalry, on June 23, 1862, at Limestone Co., Tex. He was captured and later paroled Sept. 14, 1863, as a prisoner of war. “Emma Flynt,” 27, born Georgia, keeping house, and husband, Sandy F., 33, born Tennessee, planting, $780 real estate, $130 personal estate, head of the family, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., with one child: Irvin F. (Franklin), 2, born Texas (NARA Film M593:1596:175A.) Not yet located in 1880. “Emma Flynt,” 58, born in June 1842 in Georgia to a mother born North Carolina, father South Carolina, mother of nine children, three living, married 35 years, and husband, S. F., 64, born April 1836 Tennessee, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Precinct 3, Runnels Co., Tex., with two grown children born Texas: Thomas, 26, born December 1873, married three years, farmer, and Frank, 17, born in December 1882, and three others: Ella (Bryan) Flynt, 24, born August 1875 Texas to parents born Texas, married three years, mother of one child, daughter-in-law; J. T. Flynt, 2, born March 1898 Texas, grandson; Emma Morrow, 19, born June 1880 Texas to parents born Texas, niece) (NARA Film T623:1667:52A). “Emma Flynt, 65, born Georgia to parents born there, mother of nine children, two living, married 44 years, with husband, S. Frank, 74, born Tennessee to parents born there, owner of a mortgage free home, and three others born Texas (Ella, 33, daughter-in-law, widowed; J. T., 12, grandson; Sanford, 7?, grandson), 1910 Precinct 5, Runnels Co., Tex., census (NARA Film T624:1586:160A). They lived on East Pierce Street. Emma Flynt, 77, born Georgia, widowed, with one grandchild (Santford, 10, born Texas), 1920 Precinct 5, Winters, Runnels Co., Tex., census (NARA Film T625:1841:252A). Emma and Sanford’s children, all born Kosse, Limestone Co., Tex., are Ellie, Ervin Franklin, Bobbie J., E. B., V. Thomas B., Bryant, James P., Mary A. and Wiley F. Flynt.
Ellie Flynt, child of Emily “Emma” Brown and Sanford Frank Flynt, was born Aug. 1, 1866, and died Sept. 22, 1866.
Ervin Franklin Flynt, child of Emily “Emma” Brown and Sanford Frank Flynt, was born Oct. 16, 1867. He married Cassie Ella Seal.
Bobbie J. Flynt, child of Emily “Emma” Brown and Sanford Frank Flynt, was born July 15, 1870, and died Dec. 18, 1887.
E. B. Flynt, child of Emily “Emma” Brown and Sanford Frank Flynt, was born Oct. 22, 1870, and died Nov. 31, 1872.
V. Thomas B. Flynt, child of Emily “Emma” Brown and Sanford Frank Flynt, was born Dec. 11, 1873, in Texas. He died July 21, 1904 ,and was buried in North View Cemetery, Winters, Tex. He married Ella Bryan. She was born June 3, 1874, the daughter of E. R. Bryan. She died April 25, 1918, at Winters, Runnels Co., Tex. Her Texas Death Certificate 18168 indicates she died of Pellegra and was buried in Winters Old Cemetery. “Thomas Flynt,” 26, born December 1873, married three years, farmer, and wife, Ella (Bryan), 24, born August 1875 in Texas to parents born Texas, and one child, J. T. Flynt, 2, born March 1898 in Texas, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Runnels Co., Tex., living with his parents, S. Frank Flynt, 74, and Emma, 65, born Georgia, and others (NARA Film T623:1667:52A). Ella Flynt, 33, born in Texas, widowed, and two children, J. T., 12, and Sanford, 7, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Runnels Co., Tex., living with her in-laws, S. Frank Flynt, 74, and Emma, 65 (NARA Film T624:1586:160A). They lived on East Pierce Street. Thomas and Ella’s son “Santford Flynt,” 10, born Texas, is listed with his grandmother Emma Flynt, 77, born Georgia, widowed, in the 1920 U.S. Census for Precinct 5, Winters, Runnels Co., Tex. (NARA Film T625:1841:252A). Thomas and Ella’s children are J. T. Flynt, born circa 1898, and Sanford Flynt, born circa 1903-10.
Bryant Flynt, child of Emily “Emma” Brown and Sanford Frank Flynt, was born Feb. 17, 1876. He married Delia Gates.
James Petty “Jim” Flynt, child of Emily “Emma” Brown and Sanford Frank Flynt, was born April 19, 1878. He died Feb. 26, 1966, and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Ballinger, Tex. He married Carrie Jane Patterson on May 14, 1899. She was born in 1876. She died in 1967 and was buried beside James in Evergreen Cemetery. James is featured in A History of Central and Western Texas (Chicago and New York: Lewis Publishing, 1911, Vol. 1, pp. 361-362).
J. P. Flynt is one of the most popular and efficient public officials of Runnels county, its present sheriff, elected on the 3rd of November, 1908. He is a thorough Texan in all that the word implies, one of its native sons, and he is a man of many and stanch friends and honest convictions. He was born at Kosse in Limestone county, on the 19th of April, 1878, but when he was a little lad of five years the family moved to McLenna county, and from there he came to Runnels county in 1896, first locating at Winters, but later spent two years at Wingate, and then returning to Winters he resided there until elected the sheriff of Runnels county. Both Mr. Flynt’s parents were from Georgia, and they are living now at Winters, aged seventy-two and sixty-two years respectively, but of their nine children all have passed away with the exception of the Sheriff and his brother, W. F. Flynt, who is living at Wingate.
Although the Republican party is represented in Texas it is yet greatly in the minority, and the real political battles are fought within the ranks of the Democratic party. So in Texas the Democratic primaries are the most important and hardest fought elections. In the July primary of 1908 candidates for the office of sheriff were J. P. Flynt and R .P. Kirk, the latter the incumbent of that office for many years and an exceptionally strong man with the people, but Mr. Flynt won the nomination by a majority of fourteen votes. He was regularly elected in the following November and later duly inducted into office. He is proving an efficient officer, capable and fearless in the discharge of his duties, strictly enforcing the law but at the same time granting all necessary leniencies in its discharge.
He married at Ballinger, May 14, 1899, Carrie Patterson, and their five children are Carrie, Marion, Frank, Jim and Joe. Mr. Flynt is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias and a member of the Missionary Baptist church.
James served as sheriff of Runnels County in 1908-1914 and 1920-1924. He also served as tax collector and was elected secretary-treasurer of the Runnels County Fair Assn. He was a Texas Ranger during World War I and World War II. He served with the Texas State Game Department from 1924 to 1940. James and Carrie’s children are Carrie, Marion, Frank, James Petty (“Jim”) Jr. and Joe Martin Flynt.
Mary A. Flynt, child of Emily “Emma” Brown and Sanford Frank Flynt, was born March 30, 1880, and died Feb. 12, 1888.
Wiley Frank Flynt, child of Emily “Emma” Brown and Sanford Frank Flynt, was born Dec. 5, 1883. He died in 1936 and was buried in North View Cemetery, Winters, Tex.
Sarah Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born Oct. 30, 1843, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died there May 30, 1844.
Matilda A. “Tillie” Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born Aug. 17, 1845, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died March 28, 1875, in Redlands, Leon Co., Tex., during childbirth while she and her husband were traveling in a wagon to Brazos Co., Tex. She lived with parents in 1850-1870. “Matilda Brown,” 5, born Texas, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 49, and Irvin, 49, and siblings (NARA Film M432:916:293A). “Matilda Brown,” 14, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 54, and Ervin, 58, and siblings ((NARA Film M653:1300:323B). “Matilda A. Brown,” 25, born in Georgia, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Dist. 48, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 68, and Irvin, 68, and siblings (NARA Film M593:1596:174A). She married Winfield Scott Wyatt. He was born circa 1853 in Mississippi. Their child is Pearl Rivers Wyatt, born March 28, 1875, in Redlands, Leon Co., Tex., who was first reared by Matilda’s cousin Eliza Nettie Brown and husband, John Pinckney Cox. Pearl’s father, Scott Wyatt, assigned the guardianship of her to Eliza and John on Jan. 6, 1876. Then when he remarried to a woman named Elizabeth J., Pearl went to live with them in Brazos County. Scott W. Wyatt, 27, born Mississippi to parents born Alabama, farmer, and (second) wife, Elisabeth J., 19, born in Texas to parents born there, keeps house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Brazos Co., Tex., with three children born Texas: Ernetta, 3; Pearl R., 5; and Missouri, 1 (NARA Film T9:1292:277A). Also listed: Elisabeth Hudson, 78, born Tennessee to parents born there, Elisabeth’s grandmother, in bed with ill health due to old age.
Ervin A. Fleming Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born Feb. 14, 1847, in Washington Co., Tex. He may have died after 1912 in Sherman, Tex., and was buried in Pecan Grove Cemetery, McKinney, Washington Co., Tex. “Irvin Brown,” 3, born Texas, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 49, and Irvin, 49, and siblings (NARA Film M432:916:293A). “E. A. Brown,” 12, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 54, and Ervin, 58, and siblings (NARA Film M653:1300:323B). He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States and survived. He studied medicine and law and decided to become a lawyer, studying under his brother Thomas Jefferson Brown and Gov. J. W. Throckmorton. He was admitted to practice law at McKinney, Tex., by the district court and then by the state supreme and federal Texas courts. He opened his own office and then joined the law firm of Throckmorton and Brown in 1872 and continued to practice law with Throckmorton in Collin and adjoining counties after his brother Thomas left the firm in 1880. He opened a law firm in Sherman in 1886 after Throckmorton retired in 1885. He married Icy Phina “Phenie” Burns on Dec. 10, 1868, in Kosse, Tex. She was born Nov. 28, 1848, in Pickens, Ala., the daughter of Mary Louisa Gates and Benjamin Franklin Burns. Icy died July 24, 1916, in Sherman, Grayson Co., Tex., and may be buried beside her husband in Pecan Grove Cemetery. “Irvin F. Brown,” 23, born Texas, attorney, and wife, Icy P., 21, born Mississippi, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Eutaw P.O., Dist. 48, West Texas, Limestone Co., Tex., living with Julius A. McDaniel, 25, born Mississippi, planter, $760 real estate, $100 personal estate, and wife, Francis M., 21, born Alabama, keeping house, and their child (Geo. McDaniel, 5/12, Texas) (NARA Film M593:1596:173B). “E. F. Brown,” 33, born Texas to a mother born South Carolina, father North Carolina, lawyer, and wife, I. P., 31, born Mississippi to parents born Alabama, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for McKinney, Collin Co., Tex., with three children born Texas: Emma, 5; Ella, 3; and Eva, 10/12, and one other: Icy’s sister Julia Burns, 17 (NARA Film T9:1296:40A). “Ervine Brown,” 53, born February 1847 in Texas, to a mother born South Carolina, father North Carolina, lawyer, married 31 years, and wife, Icy P., 51, born November 1848 in Mississippi to parents born Alabama, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 4, Sherman, Grayson Co., Tex., with four children born Texas: Emma R. Williams, 25, January 1875, married five years; Sims T. Brown, 16, May 1884; Ernest B. Brown, 13, June 1886; and Willie F. Brown, 11, August 1888, and one other Thaudere A. Williams, 31, born Texas to parents born there, son-in-law, married five years, dry goods salesman (NARA Film T623:1639:10A). “Ervin F. Brown,” 63, born Texas to parents born Georgia, lawyer, rents home, married 42 years, and wife, Icy P., 61, born Mississippi, parents born Tennessee, mother of ten children, four living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for San Angelo, Tom Green Co., Tex., with one grown son, Ernest B., 24, born Texas, bookkeeper, married two years, and his wife, Edna Brown, 20, born Texas, mother of one child, none living, and two others: son-in-law Will E. Mathews, 36, born Texas, widowed, and grandchild Mary B. Mathews, 3, born Texas (NARA Film T624:1592:6B). They lived on West Eighth Street. A city directory indicates “Ervin F. Brown,” travel agent, and wife, Icy P. Brown, lived at 802 S. Montgomery, Sherman, Tex., in 1912. Their known children include Five Infants, Emma R., Ella Eliza, Eva, Sims T., Ernest B. and Willie F. Brown.
Ann Jordan “Anna” Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born June 8, 1848, in Texas. She died Jan. 11, 1886. “Ann J., Brown,” 2, born Texas, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Washington Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 49, and Irvin, 49, and siblings (NARA Film M432:916:293A). “Ann J. Brown,” 10, born Texas, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 54, and Ervin, 58, and siblings (NARA Film M653:1300:323B). “Anna J. Brown,” 25, born Texas, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Dist. 48, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 68, and Irvin, 68, and siblings (NARA Film M593:1596:174A).
Clarissa Florence Brown, child of Matilda Burdett and Adam Ervin Brown Jr., was born May 10, 1850. She died Jan. 11, 1864. “C. H. Brown,” 8, born Texas, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Precinct 2, Eutaw P.O., Limestone Co., Tex., living with parents, Matilda, 54, and Ervin, 58, and siblings (NARA Film M653:1300:323B).
William Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born circa 1802-03 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died circa 1822 in South Carolina.
Mahalah “Mahaly” Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born circa 1805 in Laurens Co., S.C. She died April 2, 1852, in Spalding Co., Ga., and was buried in Mitchell Graveyard on the family’s Double Cabins Plantation. She married Shatteen Coker Mitchell in 1824 in South Carolina. He was born July 31, 1802, in Amherst Co., Va., the son of James Cocke Mitchell. Shatteen died Sept. 27, 1866, in Griffin, Spalding Co., Ga., and was buried there in Oak Hill Cemetery. Mahalah and Shatteen moved to Jasper Co., Ga., and then to Henry, later Spalding Co., Ga., where they established a plantation and settled there near Griffin, Ga. Shatteen was a wealthy man involved in civic affairs. When he lived in Henry County in the country before moving to Griffin, he served on the grand jury in 1838, on the superior court jury in 1838-1839, as a county commissioner in 1840-1845, and as justice of the peace in 1849. That portion of Henry became Spalding County in 1851. He served as justice of the peace in Spalding County in 1852-1853.

Mahalah Burdett Mitchell sleeps in eternal peace at Mitchell Graveyard on Double Cabins Plantation, Spalding Co., Ga.

Shatteen Coker Mitchell is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Griffin, Spalding, Ga.
“Shateen C. Mitchell,” white male 30-39, employed in manufacturing and trade, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Dist. 490, Henry Co., Ga., as head of a family that includes a white female 30-39 (Mahalah) and 12 children: a female 15-19, four females 10-14, two females 5-9, two males 5-9, a female under 5, two males under 5. Eight persons were employed in agriculture. Shatteen owned fifteen slaves: two females 24-35, three females 10-23, two males 10-23, four females under 10, and four males under 10. “M. [Mahalah] Mitchell,” 46, born Georgia, and husband, S.C. (Shatteen Coker), 48, born Virginia, mechanic, $7,000 real estate, head of the family, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga., with ten grown and minor children born Georgia: N. (Nancy) E. Malone, 23; J. H. (John Henry) Mitchell, 17, farmer; W. P. (William Presley), 16, farmer; M. S. (Martha Susan), 14; J. J. (Thomas James Jefferson), 12; S.C. (Shatteen Claud), 10; E. (Edmond “Edgar”) H. (Harper), 8; M. (Mahala) J., 5; J. (Josephine), 3, female; J. (Mary Ann), 1, female (NARA Film M432:73:226B). Also listed are two others (granddaughter M. H. Malone, 5; and J. W. Bowen, 30, born South Carolina, mechanic). The 1860 Dist. 1001, Spalding Co., Ga., Slave Census indicates S.C. Mitchell owned seven slaves: a black female, 40; a black female, 35; a mulatto female, 22; black male, 8; mulatto female, 6; mulatto male, 21; black male, 18 (NARA Film M653:5).
Shatteen and Mahalah’s children ae Mary Ann, Nancy E., Judith Lilla, Sarah Elizabeth, Maria Jane, John Henry, William Presley, Martha Susan, Thomas James Jefferson, Shatteen Claud, Edmond Harper (“Edgar”), Mahala J., George Washington, Josephine and Mary Ann Mitchell.
After Mahalah’s death, Shatteen married again to Delia Ann Roan in 1853. She was born circa 1817, the daughter of Leonard Roan. She died during childbirth in 1854. They had one Child Mitchell, given name unknown, born and died in 1854. Shatteen third married Elizabeth R. Liverman Lockhart of Augusta in late 1854 or 1855. She was born circa 1825 in Georgia. She died sometime after the 1870 census. Shatteen bought a city lot on Ninth Street between Taylor and College Streets in downtown Griffin in December 1854 for Elizabeth and built on it a large boarding house named the “Planters Hotel.” They lived there in Griffin in 1860. “S. C. Mitchell,” 58, born Virginia, (cotton) gin maker/farmer, $10,000 real estate, $40,000 personal estate, and (second) wife, Elizabeth, 35, born Georgia, home duties, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Dist. 1001, Griffin P.O., Spalding Co., Ga., with 16 boarders living in his boarding house and nine children all born Georgia: Thos. (James Jefferson), 22, physician; Shatteen (Claud), 20, law student; Edmond (“Edgar” Harper), 18; Mahala (J.), 14; Josephine, 12; Mary Ann, 10; Francis, 5; Elizabeth, 4; and James E., 1 (NARA Film M653:136: 175-176). (The last four are children with Shatteen’s second wife, Elizabeth.) Shatteen was a wealthy man. He owned about 2,000 acres of land and slaves. One section of the Slave Schedule indicates S. C. Mitchell owned seven slaves in Dist. 1001, Spalding Co., Ga., in 1860: a black female, 40; a black female, 35; a mulatto female, 22; a black male, 8; a mulatto female, 6; a mulatto male, 21; and a black male, 18 (NARA Film M653:353:5). After Shatteen’s death, Elizabeth headed her family. E. L. Mitchell, 45, William Hendryfemale, born in Georgia, housekeeper, $4,200 real estate and $300 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Griffin P.O., Griffin Twp., Spalding Co., Ga., with three children: Fannie, 12, attending school, $800 personal estate; James, 11, attending school, $800 personal estate; and Milton, 7 (NARA Film M593:173:402A). All were born in Georgia. Also listed are five others who boarded with the family. Shatteen and Elizabeth’s children are Francis (“Fannie”), Elizabeth S., James Evans, Lida and Milton Daniel Mitchell.v

Shatteen Coker Mitchell constructed the family’s Greek Revival style plantation manor house in 1842.
Son John Henry Mitchell inherited the estate after Shatteen died. Then his Walker and Holmberg family members owned the property. Listed on the National James Petty of Historic Places in 1973, the mansion once was restored, preserved and furnished with antiques. The structure and property, comprising 112 acres of land, functions as Double Cabins Bed & Breakfast, located at 3335 Jackson Road, Griffin, GA. The plantation includes the family graveyard, two old cabins once used as a stagecoach stop and inn, a garden and nature walking trails.
Mitchell descendant Mary Mitchell Clarke of Fruitland Park, Fla., wrote a book about the family: Shatteen Coker Mitchell, 1802-1866, published in 1991 by Anundsen in Decorah, Iowa.
Mary Ann Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Oct. 8, 1825, or Aug. 10, 1826, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died Sept. 15, 1850, in Spalding Co., Ga., and was buried there at Mitchell Graveyard. She married Meriweather Johnson on Dec. 30, 1843. He was born 1810 in Georgia. He died after 1850. Their children are Elizabeth Florence, Jan. 29, 1845, Henry Co., Ga., died April 3, 1911, Noble, Cleveland Co., Okla.; George Martin, Oct. 9, 1846, Spalding Co., Ga., died Jan. 6, 1918, Comanche, Stephens Co., Okla.; and Mary Ann Johnson, born 1848 Georgia.
Nancy E. Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Feb. 15, 1827, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died circa 1867-1873 in Arkansas. She married Henry Malone. They had one child: M. H. (Mahalah?) Malone, born circa 1845 in Georgia. “N. [Nancy] E. Malone,” 23, born Georgia, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga., with her parents and nine siblings and her child: M. H. Malone, 5, born Georgia (NARA Film M432:73:226B-227A).
Judith Lilla Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born April 11, 1829, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died circa 1910. She married William B. Kimbell circa 1848. He died circa 1880. Their children are Mary E. (“Mollie”), born 1849 and died 1920; Mahalia Frances, born 1852; Martha J., born 1856; William Dawson, 1860; Zollicoffer Shatteen, 1863; Lila Mahalia, 1865; Nancy, 1867; and Edmond Kimbell, born 1869.
Elizabeth L. “Eliza” Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Oct. 15, 1830, in Georgia. She died in, in 1847 in Spalding Co., Ga., and was buried in Mitchell Graveyard. She married Howard McLendon.

John Henry Mitchell

John Henry Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born April 6, 1833, in Jasper Co., Ga. He died Dec. 22, 1912, in Griffin, Spalding Co., Ga., and was buried there at Mitchell Graveyard, Double Cabins Plantation. He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He was wounded in action, shot in the leg, and discharged due to disability. As the eldest son, John inherited his father’s estate. He married Rebecca Anderson Freeman. She was born Dec. 1, 1840, in Coweta Co., Ga., the daughter of Nancy Unknown and Henry Freeman. Rebecca died Nov. 8, 1917, in Spalding Co., Ga., and was buried at Mitchell Graveyard. They did not have children but adopted at least one child who also inherited Double Cabins.

John Henry Mitchell and William Presley Mitchell and spouses are buried at Double Cabins Plantation
William Presley Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born April 21/24, 1834, in Jasper Co., Ga. He died Aug. 31, 1861, in Claiborne, La., and his remains were returned to Georgia for burial in Mitchell Graveyard at Griffin, Spalding Co., Ga. His grave marker is inscribed with his birth and death dates and adorned with an open Bible and Masonic seal.
Martha Susan Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Jan. 8, 1835, in Jasper Co., Ga. She died Oct. 19, 1899, in Boonesville, Tex. She married Dr. Robert Y. Russell.

Thomas James Jefferson Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Jan. 21, 1837, in Jasper Co., Ga. He died March 12, 1912, in Spalding Co., Ga. He was a medical doctor. He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company , Georgia Infantry for one year. He later resigned but returned later to re-enlist as an assistant physician after he completed medical studies. He survived the war. He married Nancy Jane Smith Jackson, a widow. She was born circa 1839 in Georgia. She died sometime after 1870. “Thomas J. Mitchell,” 33, born in South Carolina, physician, $1,500 real estate, $1,000 personal estate, and wife, Nancy J., 31, born in Georgia, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Cabin Dist., Spalding Co., Ga., with one child: Shateen C., 8/12, at home (NARA Film M593:173:395B). Also listed are two Jackson children, a male age 9 and a female age 7 (names illegible), both born in Georgia, both attending school. Thomas and Nancy’s child is Shatteen Coker Mitchell, born circa 1869.

Shatteen Claude Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Dec. 28, 1839, in Henry (now Spalding) Co., Ga. He died instantly Sept. 19, 1864, after being struck in the heart by a bursting bombshell fragment during the Battle of Winchester, Frederick Co., Va., while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He was buried there in the Consecrated Mound of the Unknown, Stonewall Confederate Cemetery, two weeks before his wife learned of his death. Shatteen enlisted May 28, 1861, as a third lieutenant in “Spalding County Stark Volunteers,” which later became Company I, 13th Regiment, Georgia Infantry. His daughter’s diary says he left Griffin on July 16, 1861, to join the Army of Virginia. He returned home Aug. 25, 1861, and stayed until Sept. 9, 1861. He also came home April 1, 1862, and stayed two weeks before going to Savannah. He was at home again from Nov. 18, 1862, to Jan. 21, 1863. He was stationed at Causton’s Bluff in May 1862. He also visited home June 7-10, 1863, and for the final visit Feb. 27–March 21, 1864, before his death, during which time his only surviving child was conceived. After mustering in on July 8, 1861, Shatteen was on recruiting duty and had been sick several weeks at Jackson Depot and Blue Sulphur Springs. He was admitted Aug. 23, 1862, to private quarters in General Hospital No. 1, Lynchburg, Va., with an undisclosed illness and returned to duty before Sept. 5, 1862. He was furloughed 60 days Nov. 7, 1862, and promoted to 1st lieutenant Dec. 20, 1862. He was listed Jan. 30, 1863, as absent on sick leave 27 days. He returned to duty Jan. 28, 1863, Port Royal, Va. He was wounded in action July 1, 1863, during the Battle of Manassas, Gettysburg, Pa. He recovered and was promoted to captain Feb. 17, 1864; he last appeared on the Company Muster Roll for April 30 to Aug. 31, 1864, dated Nov. 24, 1864, with the remark: “Killed at Winchester Sept. 19, 1864.”

Chloe Bartlett Mitchell, who learned of her husband’s death two weeks after he fell in the Battle of Winchester, Va., and was already buried, honors him in perpetuity with a memorial tombstone in Stonewall Confederate Cemetery: “In Hallowed Memory Of Captain Shatteen Claude Mitchell Co I 13th Regt Ga Vol Evans’ Brigade Gordon’s Div Early’s Corps CSA. Born Dec. 28, 1839 Griffin, Ga. United in holy matrimony on May 14, 1861 with Chloe Bartlett. Commissioned Stark Vol May 20, 1861. Served with Floyd’s Brigade Western Virginia and under General Robert E. Lee Army of Northern Virginia. Killed in action Winchester, Va. Sept. 19, 1864 and rests in the consecrated mound of the Unknown.”
S. C. Mitchell, 10, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga., living with parents, M. [Mahalah], 46, born Georgia, and S.C. (Shatteen Coker), 48, born Virginia, mechanic, $7,000 real estate, head of the family, and nine siblings born Georgia (NARA Film M432:73:226B). S. C. Mitchell, 20, born Georgia, law student, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Dist. 1001, Griffin P.O., Spalding Co., Ga., living with father, S. C., 58, born Virginia, (cotton) gin maker, farmer, $10,000 real estate, $40,000 personal estate, and stepmother, Elizabeth (Livermore Lockhart), 35, born Georgia, home duties, and eight siblings and four step-siblings (NARA Film M653:136:175-176). Shatteen married Chloe Bartlett on May 14, 1861, in Sunnyside, Ga. She was born Jan. 11, 1844, the daughter of Tabitha Napier Harvey and Dr. Myron Bartlett. Chloe and Shatteen had two children: Infant Daughter/Son, born and died during 1861-1863, and Shatteen Claude “Chattie” “Shattie” Mitchell, born after her father’s death in the war at the home of Chloe’s sister in Columbus, Ga. Widow Chloe Mitchell, 25, $100 real estate, $2,800 personal estate, and daughter, Shatteen, 5, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Africa Dist., Griffin P.O., Spalding Co., Ga., living with Martha C. Varner, 67, keeping house, $18,500 personal estate, all born Georgia, (NARA Film M593:173:494A). Chloe B. Mitchell, 25, born Georgia, mother born Georgia, father New Hampshire, widowed, keeping house, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Griffin, Spalding Co., Ga., with one child (Shattine C. Mitchell, 15, daughter, born Georgia, attending school) and one other (Becky Green, 16, Georgia, black, servant) (FHL Film 1254165:165:365A). Widow Cloe Mitchell, 55, born January 1845 Georgia, mother born Georgia, father New Hampshire, rents home, mother of two children, one living, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 6, Atlanta, Fulton Co., Ga., with a daughter, Shatteen Mitchell, 35, born December 1864 Georgia, parents Georgia, teacher, single (NARA Film T623:200:7B). “Cloe B. Mitchell,” widow of Shatteen C., resident 60 E. Baker, 1905 Atlanta, Ga., City Directory. Chloe Bartlett Mitchell died June 6, 1905, in Columbus, Muscogee Co., Ga., and was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Bibb Co., Ga. An obituary in the June 8, 1905, edition of the Macon Telegraph announced her death:
Mrs. Chloe B. Mitchell Died in Columbus Yesterday
Yesterday morning in Columbus, Ga., Mrs. Chloe Bartlett Mitchell died at the home of her nephew, Mr. Lloyd Bowers. Her remains will arrive here this afternoon and will be interred at Rose Hill cemetery, where the funeral services will be conducted by Rev. S. Y. Jameson of Atlanta. Accompanying the remains will be Mr. Lloyd Bowers, Miss May Bowers, Miss Blanche Ward and Miss Chatteen Mitchell, her only daughter. Mrs. Mitchell was a daughter of Dr. Myron Bartlett, the founder of the Macon Telegraph, and was an exceptionally brilliant woman, her natural attainments having been accentuated by extensive travel in this and foreign countries. She was a member of the Baptist church and for a long time resided in Griffin, Ga, where she took an active part in the charities maintained by the Dorcas society. On leaving Griffin with her only daughter, Miss Chatteen Mitchell, she moved to Atlanta, where there was a greater scope for the dramatic talents of Miss Mitchell and at the time of her death was on a visit to her nephew in Columbus. Mrs. Mitchell belonged to one of the best families of the old South and was related to the Kells, Varners, Napiers and others equally as prominent. The news of her death will be received with sadness wherever she was known and her devoted and sorely stricken daughter has the sympathies of everyone that knew Mrs. Mitchell in life. The funeral will take place from the 4:15 p.m. train this afternoon.
The funeral and burial were reported in the newspaper on the following day:
Mrs. Chloe Bartlett Mitchell whose death at Columbus was mentioned in yesterday’s Telegraph, was laid to rest in Rose Hill cemetery yesterday afternoon amid impressive ceremonies. The remains arrived on the 4:15 train from Columbus and was escorted to their last resting place, the following acting as pallbearers: J Wingfield Nisbet, Henley V. Napier, Hitt M. Brown, Tris Napier, J. N. Neal, Harry P. Brown. The casket was literally covered with choice flowers that had been sent from friends in Columbus, Griffin, Macon and other points and the grave was a bloom with the fragrance that the deceased loved so much in life. Dr. S. Y. Jameson, who conducted the service, read the 7th chapter of Revelations, giving emphasis to its beauty by his application. He then spoke of the life and character of the deceased whom he knew so well, and paid a beautiful tribute to a character that was noble in all details. Miss Chatteen Mitchell, the heartbroken daughter who survives her, is in the city, the guest of her cousin, Mrs. J. Wingfield Nisbet.

Chloe Bartlett Mitchell’s tombstone in Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Bibb Co., Ga., also honors her husband: “Chloe Bartlett Mitchell Wife of Captain Shatteen Mitchell January 11, 1844 June 6, 1905. Capt. Mitchell was slain in battle Sept. 19, 1864, and rests with the Unknown at Winchester, Va.”
Infant Daughter/Son Mitchell, first child of Shatteen Claude and Chloe (Bartlett) Mitchell, was born and died between 1861 and 1863 in Georgia.
Shatteen Claude “Chattie” “Shattie” Mitchell, second child of Shatteen Claude and Chloe (Bartlett) Mitchell, was born Dec. 27, 1864, after her father’s death in the war, at the home of at aunt in Columbus, Ga. She died at age 94 on Oct. 10, 1959, in Macon, Ga., and was buried there in Rose Hill Cemetery. She taught elocution at Agnes Scott College in Atlanta. She married William Walker Brookes on Feb. 7, 1912. He was born March 28, 1858. He died May 26, 1924, and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery. They share the distinctive tombstone shown below.

Shatteen Claude Mitchell pictured with other faculty at Agnes Scott College in 1911.

Edmond Harper “Edgar” Mitchell and wife, Margaret Sarah “Maggie” Lockhart are buried in Brigham Cemetery
Edmond Harper “Edgar” Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Nov. 4, 1841, in Spalding Co., Ga. His Texas Death Certificate 10308, which identifies him as Edgar Harper Mitchell, indicates he died at age 89 of complications from a broken hip and senility on Feb. 13, 1931, at Confederate Home, Austin, Travis Co., Tex., and was buried in Brigham Cemetery, Campbell, Hunt Co., Tex.

Edgar served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted Sept. 1, 1861, as a private in Company B, Second Independent Battalion, later Company D, Second Battalion, Georgia Infantry. He was ill much of the time he served and was detailed in November 1863–April 1864 to work as a nurse/steward at military prison in Atlanta, Ga. He was discharged in 1864 at Hendersonville, Ga., and survived the war. He moved to Texas after his father died in 1866. He applied for and obtained a pension, 42664, as “E. H. Mitchell” at age 85 on Jan. 4, 1927, while living in Big Sandy, Upshur Co., Tex. It was approved Jan. 13, 1927, and allowed from Dec. 1, 1926.
Edgar married Margaret Sarah “Maggie” Belieu/Bellew in 1868 in Collins Co., Tex. She was born Oct. 12, 1844, in Humboldt, Gibson Co., Tenn., the daughter of Mary Elizabeth “Betsie” Curtis and Zachariah Calvin Belew. Maggie died Oct. 1, 1906, and was buried in Brigham Cemetery, Campbell, Tex. “E. H. Mitchell,” 8, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga., with his parents, M., 46, and S. C., 48, and ten siblings (NARA Film M432:73:226B). “Edmond Mitchell,” 18, born Georgia, with father, S. C., 58, born Virginia, (cotton) gin maker, farmer, $10,000 real estate, $40,000 personal estate, and stepmother, Elizabeth (Lockhart), 35, born Georgia, and eight siblings and four step siblings, 1860 Dist. 1001, Griffin P.O., Spalding Co., Ga. (NARA Film M653:136:175-176). “Edger H. Mitchell,” 25, Georgia, and wife, Margaret, 24, Tennessee, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Farmersville, Hunt Co., Tex., with one child: Alva, 4/12, Texas (NARA Film M593:1579:377A). (Maggie’s mother, Elizabeth Belew, 60, born South Carolina, and two other Belew families, perhaps Margaret’s brothers, lived nearby.) “Ed. H. Mitchel,” 38, Georgia, parents South Carolina, farmer, and wife, Margaret, 35, Tennessee, parents South Carolina, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Pct. 4, Hunt Co., Tex., with four children born Texas: Alva, 10, agriculture; (Robert) Emmet, 7; Otis, 3; Lula (D.), 1 (FHL Film 1255312:1212:528C). “Edgar H. Mitchell,” 58, and wife, Margaret S., 55, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Pct. 4, Hunt Co., Tex., with three grown children born Texas: Robt. E., 28; Lula, 21; Edgar L, 29 (NARA Film M593:1579:377A). “Edgar N. Mitchel,” 68, born Georgia, parents South Carolina, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Pct. 4, Hunt Co., Tex., with one grown son: Robert E., 37, Texas, mother Tennessee, father Georgia, commercial traveler, dry goods (NARA Film T624:1566:1B). Edgar and Maggie’s children include Alva, Robert Emmett, Otis, Lula D., Edgar L. and Infant Daughter Mitchell.
Mariah Jane Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, twin of Sarah Elizabeth, was born and died April 15, 1843, at Double Cabins Plantation, Henry, now Spalding Co., Ga. She was buried in Mitchell Graveyard.
Sarah Elizabeth Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, twin of Mariah Jane, was born April 15, 1843, in Georgia. She died Oct. 16, 1843, and was buried in Mitchell Graveyard, Double Cabins Plantation, Henry, now Spalding Co., Ga.
Mahalia Jane “Mahaly” “Jennie” Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Jan. 10, 1845, at Double Cabins Plantation, Henry, now Spalding Co., Ga. She died Dec. 11, 1881, and was buried there. She married John W. Cates.
George Washington Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Dec. 20, 1846, in Spalding Co., Ga. He died Sept. 10, 1847, in Henry Co., Ga.
Josephine N. Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born Feb. 1, 1848, in Spalding Co., Ga. She died May 4, 1883, in Aiken Co., S.C. She married George Williams.

Mary Ann Mitchell, child of Mahalah Burdett and Shatteen Coker Mitchell, was born May 27, 1849, in Spalding Co., Ga. She died Oct. 17, 1930, in Atlanta, DeKalb Co., Ga., and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. She married Thomas Russell Cooke on Jan. 10, 1872 in Spalding Co., Ga. He was born Dec. 25, 1841. He died Aug. 5, 1930, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. “Mary Cooke,” 31, born Georgia to a mother born South Carolina, father Virginia, keeping house, and husband, Dr. Thomas, 38, born Georgia, mother born South Carolina, physician, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Sulphur, Miller Co., Ark., with one child: Virgil, 2, born Texas (FHL Film 1254051:51:170A). “Mary M. Cook,” 51, born May 27, 1849, Georgia to parents born Georgia, mother of two living children, and husband, Thomas R., 59, born Dec. 25, 1841, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 3, Atlanta, Fulton Co., Ga., with two children: Virgil, 43, born May 20, 1877, Texas, parents born Georgia, and Bertha L., 14, born May 30, 1886, Georgia, parents Georgia (NARA Film T623:199:6B). City Directory indicates they also lived in Atlanta in 1904. Their children are Virgil and Bertha L. Cooke.
Elvira Elizabeth Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born circa 1810 in Laurens Co., S.C. She died circa 1866 in Austin Co., Tex. “Elizabeth Burdett” married “Lewis Whitly” there on Nov. 29, 1850 (MB-1:15).
Clarissa Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born circa 1812 in Laurens Co., S.C. She died in Gaffney, Cherokee Co., S.C. She married Redmond or Burrell Peebles Watts on Oct. 6, 1834, in Georgia. Her three children, all born Georgia, lived with her parents in Washington Co. Tex., in 1850: Henry Berdet, 72, and Nancy, 65: Hunter Watts, 12; Thomas Watts, 11; Burrell Watts, 6 (NARA Film M432:916:294B-295A).

Presley P. Burdett’s tombstone in Spruce Cemetery was vandalized and removed. His second wife, Mary Angeline Ann Lewis Burdett, died in Texas and rests with an inscribed tombstone in Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Travis Co., Tex.
Presley P. Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born April 22, 1814, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Nov. 2, 1867, in Spalding Co., Ga., and was buried there in Spruce Cemetery, in the woods off High Falls Road, Aikens Dist., Griffin, Spalding Co., Ga. Presley moved with parents to Jasper Co., Ga., in the early 1820s and later to Newton Co., Ga. County records indicate Presley was the first tax collector commissioned in Spalding County. He was appointed to the position on Feb. 5, 1852, about two months after Spalding was created from Henry County. He was also a school teacher and mechanic. Presley first married Missouri Weldon on May 24, 1840, in Henry Co., Ga. She was born Nov. 29, 1823, in Henry (now Spalding) Co., Ga., the daughter of Rebecca Gill and William Weldon. They cared for two of Missouri’s children in 1850 after she died on June 2, 1848. “Presley Burdett,” white male 20-30, with white female 15-20 (first wife, Missouri Weldon) and one other white female 30-40 (unknown), is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Dist. 490, Henry Co., Ga. (NARA Film M704:43:339). “Presley Burditt,” 36, born in South Carolina, no occupation, is listed alone in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga., living with first cousin Jno. R. Clark, 39, born South Carolina, physician, $5,000 real estate, and his wife, Martha Clark, 35, born Georgia, and their six children born Georgia (NARA Film M432:73:207A). Presley and his first wife had four children: Virginia Ann, Nancy Beatrice, Rebecca Jane and Martha Missouri Elizabeth “Mattie” Burdett. After Missouri died, the four daughters went to live with relatives. Nancy lived with her uncle Burwell Weldon and family in Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga. Rebecca lived with her aunt Martha Akin and husband, Elisha. The other two are listed with grandparents as V. A. (Virginia Ann “Jennie Ann”) Burditt, 9, and M. E. (Martha Missouri Elizabeth “Mattie”) Burditt, 5, both born in Georgia in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga., living with (maternal grandparents) William Weldon, 69, born Georgia, farmer, $3,000 real estate, and Rebecca, 68, born South Carolina (NARA Film M431:73:202B).
Presley second Mary Angeline “Ann” Lewis on Jan. 19, 1858, in Spalding Co., Ga. She was born May or June 2, 1836, in Butts Co., Ga., the daughter of Mary “Polly” Duke and Thomas Lewis. Mary (Angeline) Lewis, 14, and twin, Joseph (Greene) Lewis, 14, both born Georgia, lived with parents, Thomas, 62, mechanic, $250 real estate, and Mary, 57, both born North Carolina, and one sibling, Jesse, 16, born Georgia, and one other (Esther Lewis, 37, born North Carolina), 1850 Dist. 8, Butts Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M432:62:340A). Mary Angeline died Feb. 8, 1908, in Austin, Travis Co., Tex., and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery. “Presley Burdett,” 46, born Georgia, (actually South Carolina) farmer, $1,000 real estate, $500 personal estate, and (second) wife, Mary A. (Angeline), 23, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Griffin P.O., Cabin Dist., Spalding Co., Ga., with two children: William (Henry), 1; and Thomas A. (Addison), 4/12 (NARA Film M653:136:222). Also listed are two of Presley’s daughters from his first marriage: Nancy B., (Beatrice) 18, and Martha E. (Missouri Elizabeth “Mattie”), 14. All were born in Georgia. Presley’s widow, Mary A. (Angeline “Ann”) Burdett, 32, $800 real estate, $500 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Griffin P.O., Cabin Dist., Spalding Co., Ga., with four children born Georgia: Wm. H. (William Henry), 11, attending school; Thos. A. (Addison), 10, attending school; John R. (Robert), 8, attending school; and Mary F. (Florence), 5, at home (NARA Film M593:173:394A-B). Also listed: Mary Angeline’s father, Thomas Lewis, 82, born in North Carolina, cabinet maker, $500 real estate, $500 personal estate, and William Allen, 36, born in Virginia, farm hand. The family moved after the census to Union Parish, La. Mary Angeline Lewis Burdett moved with three children (William Henry, Thomas Addison, Mary Florence) circa 1886 to Austin, Travis Co., Tex. Presley and Mary Angeline’s children are William Henry, Thomas Addison, John Robert and Mary Florence Burdett.

Virginia Ann Burdett and Calvin J. “Cad” Barrett, courtesy Wayne C. Barrett
Wayne C. Barrett contributes the following about Virginia Ann Burdett Barrett and family.
Virginia Ann “Jennie Ann” Burdett, child of Presley and Missouri (Weldon) Burdett, was born April 12, 1841, in Henry or Pike Co., Ga. “V. A. (Virginia Ann) Burditt,” 9, and one sibling (“M. E. [Martha Missouri Elizabeth]) Burditt,” 5, both born Georgia, living with grandparents William Weldon, 69, born Georgia, and Rebecca, 68, born South Carolina, 1850 Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M432:73:202B). Jennie Ann died Dec. 2, 1902, in Bernice, Union Parish, La., and was buried there in Barrett Cemetery with an inscribed tombstone: “‘Jennie Ann’ Virginia Ann Burdett Wife of C. J. Barrett April 20, 1840 December 2, 1902.” She married Calvin John “Cad” Barrett on Jan. 5, 1855. He was born May 4, 1832, in Pike Co., Ga., the son of Susan Porter and John Barrett. (Susan, 1814-1904, may be daughter of Sarah and Jedithian Porter.) Calvin Barrett, 18, born Georgia, laborer, with mother, Susan, 34, born North Carolina and seven siblings born Georgia (Hannah, 16; Emily, 14; Rebecca, 10; Francis, 8; Tilman, 6; Susan, 4; John, 2), 1850 Dist. 68, Pike Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M432:80:199B). Calvin died Dec. 7, 1913, in Bernice, La., and was buried there in Barrett Cemetery with an inscribed tombstone: “‘Cad’ Calvin John Barrett May 4, 1832 December 7, 1913 Civil War Record Co. E, 44th Reg., Ga. Vol. – Private Entered: Spalding County, Ga. Mar. 4, 1862 Surrendered: Appomattox, Va. April 9, 1865.”

Calvin John Barrett served as a Confederate soldier in same unit with brother-in-law Joseph Greene Lewis: Company E, “Freeman Rangers,” Forty-Fourth Regiment, Georgia Infantry, C.S.A. NARA compiled miitary service records indicate Calvin, a resident of Spalding Co., Ga., enlisted March 4, 1862 (Film M266 Roll 465). He served as a teamster from Aug. 31, 1862, to August 1864. He was captured and was held as a prisoner of war. His name “Appears on a Roll of Prisoners of War belonging to the Army of Northern Virginia, who have been this day surrendered by General Robert E. Lee, C.S.A., commanding said Army, to Lieut. Genl. U. S. Grant, commanding Armies of the United States. Paroled at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865.” He survived the war.

Calvin John Barrett’s mother, Susan Porter, wife of John Barrett, born in 1814 and died in 1904.
Census Data for Virginia Ann Burdett and Calvin John Barrett
“Virginia A. Barrett,” 20, with husband, Calvin J., 29, head of the family, overseer, $300 personal estate, and two children (John P. [Presley], 3; Thomas J. [Jefferson], 1), all born Georgia, 1860 Cabin Dist., Griffin P.O., Spalding Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M653:136:222). “Virginia Barrett,” 26, with husband, Calvin J., 37, head of the family, farmer, $150 personal estate, and six children (John [Presley], 13; Thomas [Jefferson], 10; Mary [Elizabeth], 8; Anna [Lee “Annie”], 6; Susan [Beatrice], 4; [Mattie] Emiline, 2), all born Georgia, 1870 Ward 4, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film M593:534:80B). “V. A. (Virginia Ann Burdett) Barrett,” 39, born Georgia, parents born Georgia, keeps house, with husband, C. J., 49, born Georgia, parents born South Carolina, farmer, head of the family, and ten grown and minor children, five eldest born Georgia, five youngest born Louisiana (J. P. [John Presley], 23, son, works on farm; M. E. [Mary Elizabeth], 17, daughter; A. L. [Anna Lee], 15, daughter; S. B. [Susan Beatrice], 13, daughter; M. E. [Mattie Emiline], 12, daughter; F. W. [Fannie Wells], 10, daughter; C. W. [Charles Willis], 8, son; R. T. [Robert Turner], 5, son; L. B. [Laura Belle], 2, daughter; F. [Flora] B., 4/12, February, daughter), 1880 Ward 4, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film T9:473:488A). “Virginia A. Barrett,” 57, born April 1843 Georgia to parents born there, mother of 15 children, 10 living, married 45 years, with husband, Calvin J., 68, born May 1832 Georgia, mother born South Carolina, father North Carolina, head of the family, farmer, mortgaged farm, and two grown and minor children born Louisiana (Laura, 23, January 1877; Calvin F., 16, August 1883, farm laborer), 1900 Ward 4, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film T623:585:113A). Calvin J. Barrett, 75, born Georgia to parents born Georgia, father, retired, own income, living with son Calvin F., 26, married eight years, and his wife, Emma P., 28, mother of two children, and their sons (Commie [Calvin C.], 7; Vergie [Virginia M.], 2), all born Louisiana, 1910 Ward 4, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film T624:533:112A).

Calvin John Barrett and five sons: John Presley, Thomas Jefferson, Charles Willis, Robert Turner, Calvin Franklin
Calvin and Virginia’s children are Missouri, John Presley, Thomas Jefferson, Mary Elizabeth, Annie Lee, Susan Beatrice, Mattie Emiline, Fannie Wells, Charles Willis, Robert Turner, Daughter/Son, Laura Belle, Flora B., Stella and Calvin Franklin Barrett. After Virginia died, Calvin second married J. Bettie Benson, a widow, on Oct. 28, 1903, in Webster Parish, La. She may have predeceased him; she did not live with him in 1910.
Missouri Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born and died circa 1855 in Spalding Co., Ga.

John Presley Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born May 25, 1856, in Spalding Co., Ga. He died July 26, 1944, in Monroe, Ouchita Parish, La., and was buried in Pisgah Baptist Church Cemetery near Bernice, Union Parish, La. He married Laura Ophelia Johnson on Nov. 7, 1886, in Spalding Co., Ga. She was born between 1860 and 1869. She died April 8, 1928, and was buried in Pisgah Baptist Church Cemetery. They had six children: Emma, Jesse, William, and three who died young.

Thomas Jefferson Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born May 25, 1859, in Spalding Co., Ga. He died April 21, 1947, in Beaumont, Jefferson Co., Tex., and was buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery. He married Hannah Belzora “Bell” Thaxton on Feb. 5, 1880, in Union Parish, La. She was born Oct. 12, 1857, and died May 16, 1930. She is buried beside Thomas in Forest Lawn.
Mary Elizabeth Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born July 20, 1861, in Spalding Co., Ga. She died Sept. 24, 1933, in Union Parish, La., and was buried in Pine Grove Baptist Church Cemetery. She married John Lee Strickland on Oct. 2, 1884. He was born Feb. 26, 1851, in Georgia, and died March 3, 1915. He is buried in Pine Grove. Their children include Drew Eurel, Larkin and Barney Strickland.

Grave markers of Anna Lee “Annie” Barrett Tubb and John Brown Tubb

Anna Lee “Annie” Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born Oct. 14, 1863, in Spalding Co., Ga. She is named by her Confederate father to honor his venerated military commander Gen. Robert E. Lee. She died Dec. 25, 1938, and was buried in Ashbury Cemetery, near Tolar, Hood Co., Tex. She married John Brown Tubb Jr. on Sept. 27, 1885, in Union Parish, La. He was born Jan. 28, 1862, the son of Elizabeth and John Brown Tubb Sr. John Jr. was a Baptist Preacher, charter member of Pine Grove Baptist Church, Bernie, La. He died June 12, 1904, and was buried in Ashbury Cemetery with an inscribed tombstone: “Tubb J. B. 28 Jan 1862 12 Jun 1904 Beloved husband of Annie Tubb. Weep not that his race is run. God grant we may rest as calmly When our work like his is done.” Anna and John Jr. are parents of Calvin Robert, Anna Lee Barrett and John Brown Tubb are grandparents of the famous American country music pioneer, singer and songwriter and Grand Ole Opry star Ernest Tubb, featured bel0w. Ernest is son of Sarah Ellen Baker and Calvin Robert Tubb.

“The Texas Troubadour” Ernest Dale Tubb, 1914-1984
Susan Beatrice Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born circa 1865 in Spalding Co., Ga. She died about age 16-18 circa in 1881-1883 and was buried in Barrett Cemetery, Bernice, La. She did not marry.
Mattie Emiline Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born circa 1867 in Spalding Co., Ga. She died in January 1890 in Union Parish, La., and was buried there in Barrett Cemetery. She married Robert Lee Blackburn on Nov. 10, 1889, in Union Parish. He was born Oct. 15, 1866.
Fannie Wells Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born circa 1870 in Spalding Co., Ga. She died in 1909 and was buried in Barrett Cemetery. She married her brother-in-law Robert Lee Blackburn on July 27, 1890, about six months after her sister Mattie died.
Charles Willis “Charlie” Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born March 17, 1873, in Union Parish, La. He died May 24, 1939, and was buried in Shiloh Baptist Church Cemetery He married Mary Hannah Kelley on Feb. 8, 1900. She was born March 6, 1873. She died Oct. 31, 1950, and was buried in Shiloh Baptist Church Cemetery. Their children are Infant Stillborn Daughter, Charles Presley, Clyde Lamar “Bo” Barrett. Charlie and Mary are grandparents of Wayne Calvin Barrett of Arkansas who contributes to this history.
Willie Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett and twin to Charles Willis Barrett, was born March 17, 1873, in Union Parish, La., and died there three weeks later. He rests in Barrett Cemetery.
Robert Turner Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born in 1875 in Union Parish, La. He died Aug. 11, 1940, in Lincoln Parish, La., and was buried in Fellowship Baptist Church Cemetery. He married Myra Tubb and Ruth Fuller.
Daughter/Son Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, may have been born in 1876 in Union Parish, La., and died there before 1880. This child may be buried in Barrett Cemetery, Bernice, La.
Laura Bell Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born Jan. 30, 1877, in Union Parish, La. She died Dec. 3, 1960, in Union Co., Ark., and was buried in Barrett Cemetery. She married Samuel Floyd; and after her sister Stella Barrett Blocker died, she married her brother-in-law Eugene Theophlis “Gene” Blocker.
Flora B. Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born in 1880 in Union Parish, La. She died in 1884 and was buried in Barrett Cemetery.
Stella Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born Oct. 18, 1881, in Union Parish, La. She died Dec. 11, 1902 and was buried in Barrett Cemetery. She married Eugene Theophlis “Gene” Blocker. After Stella died, Gene married her sister Laura Barrett Floyd.
Calvin Franklin Barrett, child of Virginia Ann “Jennie” Burdett and Calvin John Barrett, was born Aug. 15, 1884, in Union Parish, La. He died Sept. 22, 1957, and was buried in Barrett Cemetery. He married Emma Pauline Johnson.
Nancy Beatrice Burdett, child of Presley P. and Missouri Ann (Weldon) Burdett, was born Sept. 7, 1842, in Henry or Pike Co., Ga. She died May 24, 1907, in Henry Co., Ga., and was buried in Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery. After her mother died, “N. [Nancy] B. [Beatrice] Burdett,” 7, lived with uncle Burwell Weldon, 43, farmer, $1,500 real estate, and aunt M. E. (Elizabeth McCutchen), 37, and three Weldon children (W. M., 16, male; J. W., 13, male; J. B., 11, male), all born Georgia, in 1850 Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga. (NARA Film M432:73:205B). “Nancy B. Burdett,” 18, lived with her father, Presley, 46, farmer, and his (second) wife, stepmother Mary A. (Angeline Lewis), 23, and three minor and grown siblings (half brothers: William, 1; Thomas A., 4/12; sister: Martha E., 16), all born Georgia, in 1860 Cabin Dist., Spalding Co., Ga. (NARA Film M653:136:222). Nancy married Joseph Greene Lewis on Oct. 10, 1860, in Spalding Co., Ga. (MB-A:157). He was born circa 1834 in Butts Co., Ga., the son of Mary “Polly” Harris Duke (1793-1869) and Thomas Lewis (1788-1878) and twin brother of Mary Angeline Lewis, second wife of Presley P. Burdett. (Mary Angeline is Nancy’s sister-in-law and stepmother.)

Joseph died between May 10-15 and May 23, 1864, while serving as a soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He served in same unit with brother-in-law Calvin John Barrett: Company E, “Freeman Rangers,” Forty-Fourth Regiment, Georgia Infantry, C.S.A. Joseph G. Lewis, according to his NARA compiled military service records, enlisted March 4, 1862, at Griffin, Spalding Co., Ga., as a private for three years (Film M266 Roll 468). His file contains a fairly complete record of his service. He received a $50 bounty for his enlistment. He was later promoted to sergeant before Aug. 31, 1862. He was ill in General Hospital No. 18, Richmond, Va., Sept. 7, 1862, and furloughed for 30 days on Oct. 11, 1862. He returned to duty and later was ill in General Hospital, Howard’s Grove, Richmond, Va., July 6-11, 1863. He returned to duty April 1, 1864, and served in his unit as private due to his illness and absence. He fought in many skirmishes and battles, including Seven Pines, Beaver Dam Creek, Mechanicsville, Gaines Mill, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Shenandoah Valley, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and Bristoe and Mine Run campaigns. He fought in the Battle of the Wilderness on May 5-6. He was wounded in action in the Battle of Old Wilderness Tavern, also known as Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, captured there May 10, 1864, and held as a prisoner of war. His company reported him missing since May 10, 1864–a date described as the unit’s darkest day with more than 200 taken as P.O.W.s and many killed. Joseph appears on a Federal “Report of prisoners of war in Hospitals at Fredericksburg, Va., May 23, 1864,” captured between May 10-15, 1864, with the notation “The above Prisoners of War are wounded men who were brought, with our own, off the field at Old Wilderness Tavern, Va.” Joseph apparently died there at the Fredericksburg hospital and may be Georgia soldier “J. S. Lewis” (J. G.–Joseph Greene Lewis), who was captured at Spotsylvania and was buried near there at Fredericksburg in Grave D-7 in the Confederate Cemetery. Nancy and Joseph’s child is Thomas Jefferson Lewis.
Thomas Jefferson Lewis, child 0f Nancy Beatrice Burdett and Joseph Greene Lewis, was born Aug. 24, 1861, in Spalding Co., Ga. He died March 9, 1945, at Vaughn, Ga. He married Edna Eleanor Mitcham on Nov. 9, 1887, in Henry Co., Ga. She was born Sept. 1, 1869, the daughter of Catherine Rebecca Fears and Wilson Whatley Mitcham. Edna died Sept. 12, 1949, in Spalding Co., Ga. Edna and Thomas had several children.

Nancy Beatrice second married Abner Paine or Payne on March 6, 1870, in Spalding Co., Ga. (MB-A:416). He was born circa 1823 in Georgia, perhaps the son of Dorothea Colwell and Flem Payne. Abner died Jan. 17, 1902, in Henry Co., Ga. He is buried there with an inscribed military marker installed in 1932 at Lebanon Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Hampton, Ga.: “Abner Payne Co. G. 63 GA. Inf. C.S.A.” Abner also served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.

Abner Payne’s Confederate tombstone in Lebanon Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, courtesy Findagrave Volunteer Aleta Walters

NARA compiled military service records indicate Abner enlisted Jan. 23, 1863, at Griffin, Ga., as a private in Company G, Gordon’s Sixty-Third Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. (Film M266 Roll 566). He was absent sick on Aug. 18, 1863, and returned to his company. The records, which are incomplete, indicate he and his unit served as a private until January 1864. He survived the war. Abner first married Elizabeth Caroline Johnson. She was born circa 1830 in Georgia. She died circa 1869-1870 Their children are Mary F. Payne Allen, John A., Thomas M., Joseph Alonzo, Sallie, William F. Paine. Abner Payne, 28, farmer, $400 real estate, with (first) wife, Elizabeth, 20, and child (Mary, 8/12), all born Georgia, 1850 Div. 60, Monroe Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M432:78:57B). Nearby: Flem Pain, 58, born Virginia, farmer, $1,800 real estate, with wife, Doratha, 55, born Georgia, and three grown and minor children born Georgia: Mary, 22; Safronia, 17; Carolin, 13). Abner Payne, 37, farmer, $1,000 real estate, $6,000 personal estate, with (first) wife, Elizabeth C. (Caroline), 30, and four children (Mary F., 10; John A., 6; Thomas M., 3; Joseph A., 11/12), all born Georgia, 1860 Griffin P.O., Cabin Dist., Spalding Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M653:136:222). They lived next door to Presley Burdett, 46, Abner’s future father-in-law, and near Virginia A. Barrett, Abner’s future sister-in-law.
“Nancy A. (Beatrice Burdett) Pain,” 28, keeping house, married in March 1870, with husband, Abner, 47, farmer, $400 real estate, $600 personal estate, head of the family, and five children (John A., 16, farm hand; Thomas M., 14, farm hand; Joseph H., 12, farm hand; Sallie, 7; William F., 11/12 born August 1869) and one other, Nancy’s child from her previous marriage (Thos. J. Lewis, 9, attending school), all born Georgia, living in 1870 Griffin P.O., Cabin Dist., Spalding Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M593:173:152:394B). “Nancy (Beatrice Burdett) Payn,” 37, born Georgia to parents born there, keeping house, with husband, Abner, 57, born Georgia, mother born Georgia, father Virginia, farmer, head of the family, and eight grown and minor children born Georgia (Thomas [M.], 23, laborer; Joseph [H.], 20, laborer; Thomas [J. surname] Lewis, 18, son, laborer; William [F.], 11, laborer; Missouri, 9; Abner [Jr.], 6; Robert A., 2; and Kittie A., 2; and Nancy J., 4/12, born January), living in 1880 Dist. 498, McDonough, Henry Co., Ga., census (NARA Film T9:152:178A). “Nancy B. Payne,” 57, born September 1842, mother of seven children, five living, married 30 years, with husband, Abner, 77, born January 1823, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, head of the family, and four grown children (Abner P., 26, November 1873; Edgar, 22, February 1878; [Nancy] Jennie, 20, January 1880, daughter) and one grandson (Wm. E. Allen, 23, February 1897, farm laborer) and one other (Thomas Brown, 12, April 1888, black, servant), all born Georgia to parents born there, living 1900 Dist. 52, McDonough, Henry Co., Ga., census (NARA Film T623:204:16B). (William E. Allen is son of Mary F. Payne Allen.) Nancy and Abner’s children are Missouri, Abner Presley Jr., Robert Addison, Edgar, Kittie Adeline, Nancy Jane “Jennie” Payne (Mrs. Emmett Howard Farris).

Rebecca Jane Burdett, child of Presley P. and Missouri Ann (Weldon) Burdett, was born Feb. 2, 1844, in Henry or Pike Co., Ga. After her mother died, Rebecca went to live with her aunt Martha Weldon Akin and husband, Elisha. She married H. J. Williamson on Aug. 6, 1868, in Spalding Co., Ga. (MB-A:268).
Martha Missouri Elizabeth “Mattie” Burdett, child of Presley P. and Missouri Ann (Weldon) Burdett, was born Jan. 20, 1846, in Henry or Pike Co., Ga. She died March 30, 1890, in Union Parish, La., and was buried there at Pisgah Baptist Church Cemetery. After Martha’s mother, Missouri, died, she and her three sisters went to live with relatives. Martha and Virginia Ann are listed with grandparents as V. A. (Virginia Ann “Jennie Ann”) Burditt, 9, and M. E. (Martha Missouri Elizabeth “Mattie”) Burditt, 5, both born in Georgia in the 1850 U.S. Census for Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga., living with (maternal grandparents) William Weldon, 69, born Georgia, farmer, $3,000 real estate, and Rebecca, 68, born South Carolina (NARA Film M431:73:202B).

Martha married on Sept. 5, 1867, in Spalding Co., Ga., Tilmon H. “Tid” Barrett, brother of Calvin John Barrett and son of Susan Porter and John Barrett. Tilmon was born March 11, 1843, in Pike Co., Ga. He died June 22, 1934, in Union Parish, La., and was buried in Pisgah Baptist Church Cemetery. Tilmon served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. NARA compiled military service records indicate he enlisted as a private in Company C, Thirteenth Regiment, “Bartow Light Infantry,” Georgia Volunteer Infantry, on July 8, 1861, at Griffin, Ga. (Film M266 Roll 276). He was treated at Receiving and Wayside Hospital, General Hospital No. 9 and admitted with bronchitis Oct. 14-Nov. 1, 1862, at General Hospital No. 21, Richmond, Va. He was admitted to General Hospital No. 21, Div. 2, Camp Winder, Richmond, Va., with typhoid fever Nov. 18-28, 1862, and returned to duty. He was captured Sept. 22, 1864, at the Battle of Fisher’s Hill, Va., and held as a prisoner of war. He was sent via Harper’s Ferry, W.Va., to Point Lookout, Md., Oct. 1-4, 1864. He was paroled and transferred to Aiken’s Landing, Va., for exchange March 17, 1865. He was received at Boulware’s Wharf March 19 and released with 816 other Confederates. He survived the war.

Tilman Barrett, 6, born Georgia, is listed with mother, Susan, 34, born South Carolina, and seven siblings born Georgia (Calvin, 18, laborer; Hannah, 16; Emily, 14; Rebecca, 10; Francis, 8; Susan, 4; John, 2) in the 1850 Dist. 68, Pike Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M432:80:199B). Tilman Barrett, 18, farm laborer, is listed with mother, Susan, 45, weaving and spinning, and siblings (Susan, 15; John, 14) in the 1860 Dist. 3, Griffin P.O., Spalding Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M653:136:215). “M. E. [Martha Missouri Elizabeth] Burditt,” 5, and one sibling (V. A. [Virginia Ann], 9), both born Georgia, are listed with maternal grandparents William Weldon, 69, born Georgia, and Rebecca, 68, born South Carolina, are listed in the 1850 Dist. 42, Henry Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M432:73:202B). “Martha E. Burdett, 14,” is listed with father, Presley, 46, farmer, $1,000 real estate, $500 personal estate, and stepmother, Mary A. (Angeline Lewis), 23, and one sibling (Nancy B., 18) and two half-siblings (William, 1; Thomas A., 4/12), all born Georgia, in the 1860 Griffin P.O., Cabin Dist., Spalding Co., Ga., census (NARA Film M653:136:222). “Martha [Burdett] Barrett,” 22, keeping house, is listed with husband, Tillman, 26, farmer, $100 personal estate, head of the family, and two children (John, 5; Eugenia, 2) and one other (Mariah Barrett, 35), all born Georgia, in the 1870 Ward 4, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film M593:534:76A). “M. E. [Martha Missouri Elizabeth Burdett] Bassett [Barrett],” 32, is listed with husband, T. H., 37, farmer, head of the family, and five children, four born Louisiana (Eugenia [A.], 11, Georgia; [Emma Lula] Loula, 9; L. B. [Laura], 7; [Nancy] Ella, 5; W. C. [Willie Clare], 3) and one other (John [Andrew] Bassett/Barrett, 17, Georgia, works on farm, nephew), in the 1880 Ward 4, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film T9:473:489B). (Children born between 1880 and 1900 who do not appear in census data: Essie Ophelia, Addie Beck, Jettie Sue Barrett.)
After Mattie died, Tilmon second married Louisiana Victoria “Louissy” Webster Johnson on June 14, 1891. Tillman H. Barrett, 57, March 1843, Georgia, mother born Georgia, father North Carolina, farm laborer, married ten years, with (second) wife, Louissy, 51, born January 1849 Louisiana, mother born North Carolina, father Virginia, mother of seven children, one living, and one grown child ([Tillman] Gordon, 18, March 1882 Louisiana, farm laborer), 1900 Ward 4, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film T623:585:134A). Tillman H. Barrett, 67, born Georgia, widowed, farmer, mortgage-free farm, and two grown children (Eugenia, 29, Georgia; T. [Tillman] Gordon, 27, Louisiana), 1910 Ward 4, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film T624:533:143B). Tillman H. Barrett, 75, born Georgia, mother Georgia, father North Carolina, and one grown son (Tillman, 36, Louisiana) living with daughter Eugenia Byram, 49, born Georgia, and husband William H., 59, born Louisiana, head of the family, and their children born Louisiana (Amber, 16; Melba, 14; Lois, 12), 1920 Ward 3, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film T625:632:55B). T. (Tilmon) H. Barrett, 87, born Georgia, father-in-law, retired, with one grown son (T. G. [Tilmon Gordon], 48, Louisiana, crippled) living with daughter “Ugenia Byrom,” 60, born Georgia, married age 15, and husband, W. H. (William Henry), 69, Louisiana, head of the family, married age 23, farmer, 1930 Ward 3, Union Parish, La., census (NARA Film T626:819:182).
Tilmon and Martha’s children include Eugenia A., Emma Lula, Laura, Nancy Ella, Willie Clara, Essie Ophelia, Tilmon Gordon, Lillie June, Addie Beck, Jettie Sue Barrett. Mattie and Tilmon also reared his nephew, John Andrew Barrett, his sister’s child, born 1863 in Spalding Co., Ga.

William Henry Burdett and Charles Henry Schepper, father of Mae Schepper Burdett, undated, Texas
William Henry Burdett, child of Presley P. and Mary Angeline “Ann” (Lewis) Burdett, was born Dec. 10, 1858 or 1859, in Spalding Co., Ga. He died March 27, 1935, at Austin, Tex., and was buried there in Austin Memorial Park Cemetery. Henry was superintendent of transportation of the Austin Electric Railway Company in Austin, Tex. He and his wife were members of Missionary Baptist Church. He married Katherine Van “Kittie” Thomason on Nov. 18, 1883. She was born Jan. 29, 1859, in Butts Co., Ga. She died on Jan. 6, 1938, at home in Austin, Tex., and was buried beside William. “W. H. Burdett,” 42, born December 1858 Georgia to a mother born there, father South Carolina, married 16 years, with wife, Kittie V., 41, born January 1859 in Georgia to a mother born South Carolina, father Georgia, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Austin, Travis Co., Tex., with six children: Emma F., 15, born November 1884 Georgia, and others born Texas: Thomas P., 13, March 1887; Maggie L., 10, November 1889; Raymond L., 7, June 1892; Ross, 4, October 1895; and Ray, 4, October 1895. Also listed: Mary A. Burdett, mother of William, 64, born June 1835 Georgia, mother of four children, three living. William and Kittie’s children, all born Texas except the eldest between 1884 and 1900, include Emma Florence, Thomas Pinkney, Maggie Lenora, Raymond Lee, Ross Henry, Ray W. and Lois Mildred Burdett.

Thomas Addison Burdett, child of Presley and Mary Angeline “Ann” (Lewis) Burdett, was born Feb. 1, 1860, in Spalding Co., Ga. He died Feb. 8, 1906, in Austin, Travis Co., Tex., and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery. He was a hotel owner and keeper and merchant in Texas in 1900. He married Mattie Holbrook in Texas. She was born Nov. 18, 1865, in Maryland. She died March 24, 1902, in Travis Co., Tex. She also rests in Oakwood Cemetery. Their children, all born Texas between 1891 and 1899, include Grace C., Thomas., William Allen and Blanche Burdett.
John Robert Burdett, child of Presley P. and Mary Angeline “Ann” (Lewis) Burdett, was born Sept. 26, 1862, in Spalding Co., Ga. He died there April 13, 1872.
Mary Florence Burdett, child of Presley P. and Mary Angeline “Ann” (Lewis) Burdett, was born March 21, 1865, in Spalding Co., Ga. She died Dec. 24, 1916, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex. She married Zedock Pinkney Dempsey on Nov. 10, 1885. He was born May 19, 1863, in Georgia, the son of Martha E. Waters and Alvin G. Dempsey. Zedock died April 18, 1950, in Los Angeles Co., Calif., and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery. Their children include Mitchell Anderson, Mary Drew, Mabel America, Willie Kate, Mattie Ruby, Frank Goodall Dempsey.
Martha E. Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born Aug. 23, 1818, in Laurens Co., S.C. She married a man named Carruthers.

Addison Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born circa 1819 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died between 1864 and 1866 and probably was buried in the family plot in Bethlehem Cemetery, Washington Co., Tex. A foot stone marked “A. B.” is located in his parents’ plot there. “Adison Burditt,” 39, born in South Carolina, farmer, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Brenham P.O., Washington Co., Tex., with (first wife) Susan, 28, born in Georgia, and mother, Nancy, 72, born South Carolina. (NARA Film M653:1307:209A). Also listed: nephews T. Watts Burditt, 21, and Burwell Burditt, 14, both born in Georgia. (This Susan listed with Addison was born circa 1832. She cannot be Addison’s sister: Susan Jane Clark Burdett was born circa 1815 and died in 1854.) Addison second married Lucinda Emma Woods Fincher, the daughter of Mary “Polly” Lee and Andrew Woods, on Sept. 3, 1864, in Washington Co., Tex. After Addison died, she married again to William R. Woods, perhaps a relative, on Sept. 15, 1866, there (MB-2:364).
Elizabeth Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born Jan. 15, 1822, in Mechanicsburg, Jasper Co., Ga. She died in Gorman, Tex.

Susan Jane Clark Burdett, child of Henry and Nancy (Clark) Burdett, was born circa 1815 in Mechanicsburg, Jasper Co., Ga. She died in December 1854 in Washington Co., Tex. She rests in Bethlehem Cemetery, Klump, Tex. Her tombstone there identifies her as “Susan J. Burdett Died 1854 Sister to Addison Burdett.” Susan’s grave is the earliest known burial in the cemetery, which was established in the 1850s by land-owner Adam Erwin Brown Sr. A memorial marker at the site notes its historic significance:
Located on land granted to Josiah Lester by the Mexican government prior to Texas independence, this cemetery began in the 1850s after subsequent land-owner Erwin Brown set aside land for a school and church. The site also served as a community burial ground, and the earliest documented grave is that of Susan J. Burdett, who died in 1854 at age 39. Also located here are a number of children’s graves, attesting to the often harsh conditions of frontier life. The cemetery remains as a visible reminder of Washington County’s pioneer heritage. — From the Texas Historic Sites Atlas
Margaret Burdett, daughter of Marianne and Frederick
Margaret Burdett, child of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette, was born Dec. 3, 1781, in Laurens Dist., S.C. She died there circa 1812-13. After Margaret’s siblings William, Ailsey and Mary Ann “Molly” died without heirs/children, their father Frederick’s estate was sold in 1873 and the proceeds were distributed among the surviving heirs of Frederick’s other children or their heirs who could be identified and located, including Margaret Gray and three of her brothers: Henry, Reuben and John Burdett. The distribution of the estate was settled March 21, 1873. Part of the settlement was recorded March 22 in Laurens. The settlement documents indicate four shares of Frederick’s estate, each amounting to $436.46, were paid out. Margaret may have first married a man named Rhodes. Margaret may have second married Hezekiah Gray circa 1805 or earlier in Laurens Dist., S.C. He was born circa 1775 or earlier, the son of Ailsey Hiatt and John Gray Sr. who lived in Laurens Dist., S.C., from 1771 to 1800 or later. (John was born circa 1735 in Ireland. He and Aisey Hiatt married circa 1761 and lived in Ninety-Six Dist., S.C. She was born circa 1738-40 and died in 1787 or 1794 in South Carolina. South Carolina Equity Records indicate John Gray Sr. died in Union Co., S.C., in 1806 (Box 4 Pkg. 49). John Gray Sr. was compensated with a payment of 19 pounds, two shillings, one and a half penny, sterling, June 18, 1875, after the Revolutionary War for his service as a militia soldier, as a patriot who supplied provisions to the military and for property lost. His home was burned by Tories. His military and patriotic service is documented in A. S. Salley’s Stub Entries to Indents Issued in Payment of Claims Against South Carolina Growing Out of the Revolution (Book S No. 502, p. 184.) (Hezekiah Gray is the brother of Elizabeth Gray, born Jan. 29, 1765, who married Nathan Bramlett, son of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr., and Hezekiah is the brother of Ailsey Gray who married Reuben Bramlett, son of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramlett III and grandson of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr.) Hezekiah witnessed a deed in Laurens County on Feb. 1, 1804, when Ezekial Lindsay sold “Nathan Bramblett” some land on Enoree River (DB-H:71). “Henry Burditt” also witnessed the deed, which was recorded Feb. 12, 1805. Hezekiah farmed land on Durbin Creek. His farm is mentioned as a landmark in a deed dated Nov. 12, 1811, when (his brother-in-law?) Henry Burdett bought land that bounded Hezekiah’s property from Sarah and Joel Fowler (DB-K:309). The deed was recorded Dec. 22, 1820. Hezekiah Gray and (his father-in-law?) “Frederick Burditt” and his (brothers-in-law?) John and Henry Burdett and Nathan Bramlett, foreman, among others were called to a Laurens District Coroner’s Inquisition at a Laurens County plantation on Feb. 6, 1815, to view the bodies of two men who had drowned the previous day in Enoree River and determine how they had died (SCMAR 24-4:198). Hezekiah and Margaret had at least one child: Ailsey Gray. Hezekiah Gray is listed as a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church during 1842-50 and a church trustee in 1842. An undated note by his name in the 1850 Class Book indicates Hezekiah had died.
Ailsey “Elise” “Eliza” Gray, child of Margaret Burdett and Hezekiah Gray, was born July 27, 1812, in Laurens Dist., S.C. She died Aug. 14, 1874. “Ailsey Gray” is mentioned in her grandfather Frederick Burdett’s 1826 will: “I give to my grand daughter Ailsey Gray a certain Red cow and calf which she now claims, Eight head of sheep, and the bed and furniture which she has always claimed.” Ailsey later married Thomas Barnett before 1841. Thomas Barnett, on her behalf, received payment from Ailsey’s uncle William in 1841 as part of her legacy from her grandfather Frederick’s estate. Laurens District:
Return of William Burditt Excr. of Frederick Burditt Decd. paid Thomas Barnett in Right of his wife Ailsey. The legacy under the will of said Frederick Burditt and paid ordinary’s fee $14.00 Sworn to before me the 3rd of May 1841 William his x mark Burditt Excr.” (Box 83, package 2)
Ailsey Barnett, married, is listed as a member in some Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church Class Book in 1842, 1844, 1845, 1848 and 1850. Thomas was born circa 1810 and died circa 1906. “Eliza Barnett,” 43, and husband, Thomas, 49, farmer, $1,800 real estate, $300 personal estate, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Glassy Mountain, Regiment 5, Pickens Co., S.C., with four daughters: Duranda, 14; Addeline, 12; Angeline, 8; and Louisa, 6 (NARA Film M653:1225:142). Thomas Barnett, 90, born 1810, father-in-law, widowed, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with son-in-law Samuel Barnett, 50, 1849, farmer, married 28 years, and daughter Mary, 56, born 1844, mother of three children, and their son Wallace, 26, 1873, and wife, Henrietta, 22, 1877, and child: May, 2, 1899 (NARA Film T623:1534:11A). Ailsey and Thomas Barnett’s children are Margaret, Mary A. (“Polly”), Duranda, Melinda Adeline, Angeline Artimisha and Louise Barnett.
Margaret Barnett, child of Ailsey “Elise” “Eliza” Burdett and Thomas Barnett, was born in 1840. She died in 1877 and was buried at Padgett’s Creek Baptist Church Cemetery, Cross Keys, Union Co., S.C. Margaret married Lyles Gordon Bishop in 1858. He was born in 1830, the son of Verla Vashti Prince and John Bishop. Lyles died Jan. 1, 1875, in Cross Keyes, S.C. Lyles served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.

His tombstone in Padgett’s Creek Cemetery indicates he attained the rank of sergeant in Company C, Eighteenth Regiment, South Carolina Infantry. He was a prisoner of war captured at Five Forks April 1, 1865, transported April 6 to Point Lookout, City Point, Va. He took the Oath of Allegiance to the U.S. and was released June 24, 1865. Lyles and Margaret’s children, born between 1859 and 1886, are William Walter (“Willie”), married Elizabeth Johnston; Clary; Richard Clarence, married Sallie Jane Greer; John Thomas, married Lou Greer Willard; Kelly; Charles E., married Martha Victoria Greer; Eugene George; Lawrence Gordon, married Mattie Tallulah Sparks; Jesse Monte; Margaret Elizabeth; and Calvin P. Bishop, married Sallie Bailey.
Mary A. “Polly” Barnett, child of Ailsey “Elise” “Eliza” Burdett and Thomas Barnett, was born Feb. 23, 1843. She died June 30, 1919, in Spartanburg Co., S.C. Mary married Samuel Barnett circa 1872. He was born circa 1849-50, the son of Cassandra “Cassie” and Theophilus Barnett. Samuel died Jan. 28, 1934, and was buried at Bogansville, S.C. “Mary Barnett,” 56, born 1844, mother of three children, married 28 years, and husband, Samuel, 50, born 1849, farmer, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with their grown son Wallace, 26, born 1873, and his wife, Henrietta, 22, 1877, and their children, May, 2, 1899, and Willie, 7/12 (NARA Film T623:1534:11A). Also, Mary’s father, Thomas Barnett, 90, born 1810, widowed. Mary and Samuel’s children are Wallace Thompson Barnett, Jessie Jenelle Barnett Baughcombe and Forrest Moneen Barnett.
Duranda Barnett, child of Ailsey “Elise” “Eliza” Burdett and Thomas Barnett, was born 1845. She died June 30, 1919, in Spartanburg Co., S.C. She married James Waldrop. He was born 1832, the son of Mahulda Bishop and Harmon Waldop. James died after 1900. Their children are Zania, Josie, Stephen, Adaline, Thomas, Josiah and Elijah Waldrop.
Melinda Adeline Barnett, child of Ailsey “Elise” “Eliza” Burdett and Thomas Barnett, was born 1848. She died July 25, 1921, in Canton, Cherokee Co., Ga.
Angeline Artimisha “Angie” Barnett, child of Ailsey “Elise” “Eliza” Burdett and Thomas Barnett, was born July 7, 1851. She died April 29, 1929. in Decatur, Wise Co., Tex. She married William Louis Mann. He was born circa 1852 and died in 1924. Their children are Samuel E., William A., Lonzo L., Elizabeth C., James Daniel, Etta Louisa, Slone T., Hulet Theo, Janie Gladys and Emma Leola Mann.
Louise Barnett, child of Ailsey “Elise” “Eliza” Burdett and Thomas Barnett, was born Nov. 15, 1853. She died Jan. 30, 1930. She married Ira Potter Hollingsworth. He was born circa 1853. Their children, born between 1875 and 1895, are Henry Arthur, Elizabeth, Andrew Brooks, Rowley Marshall, Pheby N. and Fred Jason Hollingsworth.

Mary Ann “Molly” Burdett, daughter of Marianne and Frederick
Mary Ann “Molly ”Burdett, fourth child of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette, was born May 22, 1784, in Laurens Dist., S.C. She died there at age 83 years, 6 months, 22 days, on Nov. 13, 1867. Mary is named as Molly Burdett when ordered to appear in court in Laurens County in 1842 to settle a lawsuit she and some of her siblings filed to contest her Uncle Nathan Bramlett’s 1839 will. Mary Ann married John Barker Rhodes. He was born June 17, 1806, in Enoree, Spartanburg Co., S.C., the son of Mary “Molly” Asbury and Benjamin Rhodes. (Some of John’s siblings married Mary Ann’s relatives: Frances B. “Franny” Rhodes who married John Burdett and Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” Rhodes who married Frederick Reuben Burdette.) John and Molly did not have children who survived. “Molly Rhodes,” married, was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1842-1867. “Molly Rhodes, Infirm” is listed in the 1866 Class Book preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke. “Molly Rhodes Infirm Deceased November 16th, 1867” is listed in the 1867 Church Class Book. Her husband, John Barker Rhodes, died in 1877. He wrote his will on July 22, 1876, in Spartanburg Co., S.C.; and it was proved in court on April 3, 1877 (WB-E-F:600). He appointed his friend Martha P. Cheek his executor and left his personal property and some land to her. Other bequests include the opportunity for his nephew Frederick Henry Burdett to purchase a tract of 77 acres of land at the cost John had paid plus interest. John indicated the land previously was owned by Frederick’s mother (John’s sister), Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” Rhodes Burdett (second wife of Frederick Reuben Burdett). Molly lived with her siblings in 1850-60: “Molly Rhodes,” 66, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Dist., S.C., living with brother William Burdett, 60, farmer, head of the family, and sisters Betsy Hand, 64, and Alcy Burdett, 57 (NARA Film M432:855:260B). All were born in South Carolina. Mary [Ann “Molly” Burdett Rhodes] Burdett, 77, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Pleasant Mound P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., living with her sisters Ailsey Burdett, 59, and “E.” [Elizabeth “Betsy” Hand], 75, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1222:331A).
Elizabeth “Betsy” Burdett, daughter of Marianne and Frederick
Elizabeth Betsy Burdett, fifth child of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette, was born Sept. 1, 1786, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died there at age 84 years, 8 months, 11 days, on May 12, 1871, and most likely was buried in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery near Gray Court. Elizabeth married Robert R. or Sherill Hand Sr. by 1826: She is not enumerated with her parents in the 1830 census or with her father and siblings in the 1840 census. “Robert Hand Sr.” is named as an executor of his father-in-law Frederick Burdett’s 1826 will. “Robt. Hand,” 60-70, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with a female 40-50 (wife, Elizabeth) (NARA Film M19:169:262). Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church records indicate “Elizabeth Hand,” “married,” was a member in 1842 and through 1871. The 1871 Class Book preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicates “Elizabeth Hand died the 12th of May 1871.” “Robt. Hand Sr.,” 80-90, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with a female 50-60 (wife, Elizabeth) and nine slaves: one female 55-100, a male 55-100, a female 24-36, a male 24-36, a female 10-24, a male 10-24 and three males under 10 (NARA Film M704:513:49). Four persons were engaged in agriculture. Robert R. Hand wrote his will in 1840, and his estate was probated in Laurens County (WB-A:8). Those mentioned in the will are his widow, Elizabeth Hand (Betsy); Polly Thomason, E. Young, Sally Thomason, Thomas Wright, Nancy Thomason, Robert Thomason, Lewis, a slave; Faney, a slave; Elizabeth’s brother Reuben Burditt; Robert Hand; and Archibald Young. In 1842 “Elizabeth Hand, wife of Robert Hand” was ordered to appear in court in Laurens County to settle a lawsuit she and some of her siblings filed to contest her Uncle Nathan Bramlett’s 1839 will. Robert most likely died between 1842 and 1850, when “Betsy Hand,” 64, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Dist., S.C., living with her brother William Burdett, 60, farmer, head of the family, and sisters [Mary Ann Burdett] Molly Rhodes, 66, and Alcey Burdett, 57 (NARA Film M432:855:260B). “E. Burdett” (Elizabeth Hand), 75, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Pleasant Mound P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., living with her sisters “Ailsey Burdett,” 59, farmer, head of the family, and Mary [Ann Molly Burdett Rhodes] Burdett, 77 (NARA Film M653:1222:331A). All were born in South Carolina. “Elizabeth Hand,” 84, housekeeper, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with her sister “Alice” (Ailsey) Burdett (NARA Film M593:1501:275B). Elizabeth died the following year.
Frederick Reuben Burdette, son of Marianne and Frederick
Martha Anne Curry Duke provides much of the following about Frederick Reuben Burdett. Frederick Reuben Burdett, sixth child of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette, was born Nov. 26, 1787, in Laurens Dist., S.C. He may have been named in part after his maternal uncle Reuben Bramlett (born March 15, 1757, Fauquier Co., Va., and died Sept. 11, 1844, Gallatin Co., Ill.) and in part after his maternal great-uncle Reuben Bramblett Sr. (born circa 1734 Virginia, who settled in Bourbon Co., Ky., in 1794). He is named as Reuben in official records and census data, and also is sometimes referred to as Reuben Frederick Burdett; however, relatives in his direct line refer to him as Frederick Reuben Burdett. He died intestate at age 74 years, 1 month, 22 days, on Jan. 18, 1862, in Laurens County and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. Frederick Reuben was a farmer who owned land near Lanford and Bramlett Methodist Church in Laurens County. Frederick Reuben first married Elizabeth Bramlett, according to descendants Ruth (Council) Brown and her mother, Blanche (Burdett) Council, Grants Pass, Ore. Frederick Reuben and Elizabeth married circa 1808 in Laurens District. Elizabeth was born circa 1784-88, most likely in Virginia, but perhaps in South Carolina, parents unknown. The names of her sons suggest she is a descendant of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr. Some researchers believe she is the daughter of Elizabeth Gray and Nathan Bramlett; however, they do not have any children in any early census record, and the one female who is listed with them in 1830, after Elizabeth had died–a housekeeper or niece perhaps–is not their child and could not be Elizabeth, who reportedly died before Frederick Reuben married again in 1826. No children are mentioned in Nathan’s estate records. No documentation has been found to prove Elizabeth’s parentage. Elizabeth died after her youngest son, Nathan Bramlett Burdett, was born in September 1820 and before Frederick Reuben married again circa 1826. Her burial place is unknown. She may have been buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery or in the old section of Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery. “Reuben Burdit,” 16-26, born 1784-94, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 16-26, born 1784-94 (first wife, Elizabeth Bramlett) and a female under 10, born 1800-10 (Eunice “Nicey”) (NARA Film M252:61:87). “Reuben Burdell [Burdett]” 26-45, born 1774-94, is listed in the 1820 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 26-45, born 1774-94 (first wife, Elizabeth Bramlett); a female over 45, born in/before 1774 (mother-in-law? aunt?); two females 10-16, born 1804-10 (Eunice “Nicey” and Mildred “Milley”); and four males under 10, born 1811-20 (Jesse Bramlett, Wesley Bramlett, John Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett Burdett) (NARA Film M33:121:57). One person was engaged in agriculture.
Reuben and Elizabeth Bramlett’s children are Eunice (“Nicey”), Mildred (“Milley”), Jesse Bramlett, Wesley Bramlett, John Bramlett and Nathan Bramlett Burdett. Descendant Mildred Burdette of Hogansville, Ga., provided the names of Elizabeth and Frederick Reuben’s children to Martha Anne Curry Duke. Their source of the information is a small diary, notebook that had been kept by one of Reuben and Elizabeth’s descendants. Frederick Reuben owned land and farmed in Laurens County in 1821. Adjacent properties to his land owned by “Reuben Burdit” and “John Burdet,” Mrs. Brag, Joel Fowler and Daniel McKey (McKie) are mentioned in a plat for 125.5 acres on Enoree River, Laurens Co., S.C., surveyed for Zachariah Gray by William Cowen on June 27, 1821 (SCDAH S213192:46:525:1).
Frederick Reuben second married Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” Rhodes circa 1826 in Laurens County. She was born Feb. 5, 1790, in Enoree, Spartanburg Co., S.C., the daughter of Mary “Molly” Asbury and Benjamin Rhodes. (Some of Sarah Elizabeth’s siblings who married siblings of Frederick Reuben Burdett are John Barker Rhodes who married Mary Ann “Molly” Burdett and Frances B. “Franny” Rhodes who married John Burdett. Her other sibling is Christopher Rhodes. All are named in Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt’s Diary.) Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” Rhodes Burdett’s son Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette inherited land previously owned by his mother from her brother John Barker Rhodes in 1877. Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” Rhodes Burdett died before Nov. 31, 1873, in Laurens County and most likely was buried in the old section of the cemetery at Bramlett Methodist Church where she was a member. Her estate is documented in a ledger with entries dated in 1873-1876 by her son Rev. Frederick Henry “Burdette”:
The Estate of Elizabeth Burdette. Due F. H. Burdette Nov 31, 1873 $7.75 / 1876 Nov 31 Due F. H. Burdette 6.33 / 1875 Nov 1 Due F. H. Burdette 6.00 / J. B. Wm Peterson May 4 10 Bushels corn per B $1.35 9.00 / May 4 J. B. Wofford Peterson 4 Bushels corn 200 bunches Fodder…7.40 / H. Peterson 5 bushels corn 40 bunches Fodder 8.00. Dec 19 / 8.83 (+) 6.75 (+) 6.00 / 21.58 (+) 15.00 (Total) 36.58
“Reubin Burdett,” 40-50, is listed in the 1830 U S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 40-50 (second wife, Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” Rhodes), another female 40-50 (sister/in-law?) and nine children: a female 20-30, born 1800-10 (Eunice “Nicey”); two females 15-20, born 1810-15 (Mildred, unknown); a male 10-15, born 1815-20 (Jesse Bramlett); three males 5-10, born 1820-25 (Wesley Bramlett, John Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett); one female under 5, born 1825-30 (Eliza Ann); and one male under 5, born 1825-30 (Reuben Thomas) (NARA Film M19:169:274).
“Reuben Burdette,” Friend, and brother-in-law, was named executor in the will of Robert Hand in Laurens Co., S.C. Then a codicil dated Oct. 8, 1838, revoked the appointment. The will was proved July 24, 1840. William Hand had married Frederick Reuben Burdett’s sister Elizabeth “Betsy” Burdett. “Reuben Burdett,” 50-60, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 50-60 (second wife, Sarah Elizabeth “Salley” “Betsy” Rhodes), and five children: a male 20-30, born 1810-20 (Wesley Bramlett Burdett); a male 10-15, born 1825-30 (John Bramlett Burdett or Nathan Bramlett Burdett); a female 10-15, born 1825-30 (Elisa Ann); a male 10-15, born 1825-30 (Reuben Thomas); a female 5-10, born 1830-35 (Elizabeth F.), and a male under 5, born 1835-40 (Frederick Henry, actually about age 7) (NARA Film M704:513:15). “Reubin Burdith,” 68, farmer, $2,000 real estate, and (second) wife, Elizabeth, 45 (actually 60?), are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: (Reuben) Thomas, 21, farming; Frederick (Henry), 17; Elizabeth (F.), 18 (NARA Film M432:855:259A). Also listed: Frances Wells, 12. All were born in South Carolina. “Reuben Burdett,” 74, farmer, $3,000 real estate, and (second) wife, Elzh. (Elizabeth), 70, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Youngs Store P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with one child: Fk., (Frederick Henry), 27 (NARA Film M653:1222:329B-330A). Also listed: Sarah Gray, 16, attending school. All were born in South Carolina. Elizabeth Burditt/Burdett was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1842-1873. “Elizabeth Burditt Infirm” is listed in the 1866-1867 and 1873 Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke. “Elizabeth Burdett,” 80, born in South Carolina, infirm, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with her son Fred H. Burdett and family (NARA Film M593:1501:278A). Class Books indicate Reuben Burditt/Burdett joined Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church on Sept. 29, 1842. The records also indicate he was a member in 1844-1862. A note later added to the 1861 record indicates he was “Deceased.”
Descendant Franklin Donald Burdette provides the following estate records.
Since Frederick Reuben did not leave a will, his heirs signed a document of agreement on the distribution of his estate in 1862, which is transcribed verbatim below:
South Carolina Laurens District This agreement mad This Third day of February one Thousand eight hundred and Sixty Two between the heirs of Ruben Burdit deceiced Witnesseth that Jesse Burdit one of the said hiers doth covanant and agree on his part to take charge of and Sell to the best of his abilities all of the estate both Real and Personal of the said Ruben Burdit deceiced to manage and conduct the Sale of Said Estat to the best interest of all parties concerned to manage and conduct the same as if he was Admr of said Estate as near as he can make Settlements and pay out to each legatee their Distribative share as the law Directs in Such cases and we the legatees of said Deceased namely Elizabeth Burdid the Widdow of said Deceiced and John Barker and his wife Nisey Barker Wm Page and his wife Milly Westley Burdid John Burdit Nathan B. Burdit Ivery Curry and his wife Elizabeth Curry R. T. Burdit James Burton and his wife Elizabeth Burton Fredrick H. Burdit do hereby constitute and appoint Jessee Burdit Burdit our Agent to conduct manage and Sell the Estate both personal and Real of Ruben Burdit Deceiced for and in behalf of us and we also agree to allow the said Jessee Burdit the same commission on said Estate that he would be afford as Admr or Exc of said Estate and it is Further agreed between the parties hereto that the party or parties that shall fail to perform this agreement on his or their part will pay to the other parties the full sum of one hundred Dollars as liquidated fixed and settled Damages In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and Seals the day and year above written Signed Sealed in present of Elizabeth (her mark) Burditt Jesse Burditt Test Hains Riddel Draden (his mark) Riddel I. T. Burditt John F Burditt.
Those who signed the agreement: Draden (his mark) Riddel, Hains Riddel, J. B. Page, Jas. C. Page, B. F. (his mark) Rodes, William Biggs, Catharin (her mark) Rhodes, John F. Rhodes, Daniel Robertson, Sean (his mark) Robertson, M. A. Curry, T. P. Putnam, Reubin Guin, Jas. M Burton, Elizabeth F. Burton, William Page, Milley (her mark) Page, H./W. S. Berdett, John Burditt, John R. Barker, Nicy Barker, N. B. Burdett, Ivory Curry, Elis Ann Curry, R. T. Burditt.
Reuben’s land was appraised in 1862:
South Carolina, Laurens Dist October 4th, 1862 we the under signed chosen by legatees do appraise the real Estate of Reuben Burditt Decsd at the under named prices Homestead at $8.50 per acre Robertson Tract at 6.00 per acre W. Wallace, F. Martin R. Martin.
Several receipts recorded with Reuben’s estate indicate payments to his heirs in 1863-1866:
August the 18 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of the estat of Reuben Burditt desest twenty dollars in setlement Milley (her x mark) Page William Page August the 19 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of the estat of Ruben Buditt desest too dollars and 10 cts in full Jas Parks. August the 18 1863 Recd…twenty dollars Jesse Burditt August the 18 1863 Recd for Commission ten dollars and 90 cts Jesse Burditt November the 21 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent…of Reuben Burditt desest forty dollars in setelment Elizabeth F. Burton Elizabeth (her mark) Burditt November the 21 1863 Recd for Commission fiv dollars Jesse Burditt November the 21 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest ten dollars in setelment John Burditt November the 21 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest ten dollars in setelment N. B. Burdett November the 21 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent…of Reuben Burditt desest ten dollars in setelment W. S. Burdett Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest Twenty dollars in setelment August the 17 1863 Elisann Curry August the 17 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest twenty dollars in setelment John Burditt August the 17 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest twenty dollars in setelment Nicy Barker John R. Barker August the 17 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest twenty dollars in setelment N. B. Burdett August the 17 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest twenty dollars in setelment R. T. Burditt August the 18 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest twenty dollars in setelment W. S. Burditt August the 18 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest twenty dollars in setelment Elizabeth F. Burton Jas. M. Burton August the 18 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest fifty fiv dollars in setelment Jas M. Burton Elisabeth (her mark) Burditt November the 21 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent…of Reuben Burditt desest ten dollars in setelment Elizabeth Burton November the 21 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent…of Reuben Burditt desest ten dollars in setelment Milley (her mark) Page November the 21 1863 Recd of Jesse Burditt agent of…Reuben Burditt desest ten dollars in setelment R. T. Burditt November the 21 1865 Recd ten dollars in setelment and one dollar and no cts for comition Jesse Burditt November the 2 January the 12 1865 Recd of Jesse Burditt agt of…Reuben Burditt desest fiv dollars in setelment R. T. Burditt Elisabeth (her mark) Burditt” February 3 1865 Recd of Jesse Burditt agt of the estat of Reuben Burditt desest twenty fiv dollars in full up to this dat F. H. Burditt February 3 1865 Recd of Jesse Burditt agt of the estat of Reuben Burditt desest twenty fiv dollars in full up to this dat F. H. Burditt Elisabeth (her mark) Burditt February 3 1865 Recd of Jesse Burditt agt of the estat of Reuben Burditt desest fiv dollars in full up to this dat R. T. Burditt February 3 1865 Recd of Jesse Burditt agt of the estat of Reuben Burditt desest fiv dollars in full up to this dat John Burditt February 3 1865 Recd of Jesse Burditt agt of the estat of Reuben Burditt desest fiv dollars in full up to this dat N. B. Burditt February 3 1865 Recd of Jesse Burditt agt of the estat of Reuben Burditt desest fiv dollars in full up to this dat Elisann Curry Ivory Curry February 3 1865 Recd of the estat of Reuben Burditt desest fiv dollars in full up to this dat Jesse Burditt February 3 1865 Recd commison twenty dollars Jesse Burditt Received of Jesse Burditt my Equal part of the Rent in full up to this date This November the 6 1865 N. B. Burditt Received of Jesse Burditt my Equal part of the Rent in full up to this date The November the 7th 1865 Elisann Curry Ivory Curry Received of Jesse Burditt my Equal part of the Rent in full up to this date This November 16th 1865 Elisabeth F. Burton Received of Jesse Burditt my Equal part of the Rent for 1865 in full up to this date This November the 16 1865 John Burditt Received of Jesse Burditt my Equal part of the Rent in full up to this date This November the 16 1865 F. H. Burditt January the 15th 1866 Recd of the estat of Reuben Burditt desest three dollars and 30 cts for commison Jesse Burditt January the 15th 1866 Recd of Jesse Burditt sixty three dollars and 65 cts in full of the sail bill of Reuben Burditt desest John Burditt.

Eunice “Nicey” Burdett and John R. Barker rest in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery.
Eunice “Nicey” Burdett, first child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Frederick Reuben Burdett, was born July 13, 1809, in Dials, Laurens Co., S.C. She died April 14, 1889, in Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried there in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery near Simpsonville, S.C. She is listed as Nicy Barker (wife of) John R. Barker in her father Reuben’s estate records. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate “Nicey Barker” was a member of Bramlett Methodist Church in 1842-1844. Nicey married John Rhodes Barker before 1840 in Laurens County. “John R. Barker,” married, was a member of Bramlett Methodist Church in 1842 and was “removed” from the Class Book in 1844, perhaps when he and Nicey moved to Greenville County and joined Bethel Methodist Church there. John was born Jan. 1, 1812, in Scuffletown, Laurens Co., S.C., the son of Judith Rhodes and John Barker. (Judith Rhodes is the daughter of Judith Couch and Christopher Rhodes Sr.) John Rhodes Barker died March 9, 1894, in St. Albans, Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried two days later at Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. “Eunice Barker,” 44, keeping house, and husband, John, 50, farmer, $100 personal estate, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Scuffletown swp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: Jane, 23, and Pinkney, 12, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M593:1501:158A). Also listed: Sousan Stone, 10, at school. “Nicey Barker,” 67, keeping house, and husband, J. R. Barker, 78, farmer, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with two family members: son Pinkney Barker, 23, works on farm, and grandson Willie Barker, 5, all born South Carolina (NARA Film T9:1230:203). John and Nicey’s children are Benjamin A., Elizabeth Frances, David Seal, James, Anne Jane, John Gamewell and Pinckney Ezell Barker.
Benjamin A. Barker was born Sept. 22, 1840, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Nov. 8, 1915, in Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried there in Fellowship Methodist Church Cemetery.

Benjamin A. Barker served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He joined for duty and enrolled Aug. 19, 1861, age 21, as a private in Capt. Robert S. Owens’ Company, later Company F, Fourteenth Regiment, South Carolina, Infantry, at Lightwood Knot Springs. His NARA compiled military service records indicate he was mustered in Sept. 10, 1861, at Camp Butler (Film M267 Roll 270). He was hospitalized with debilitas on Nov. 3, 1862, and returned to duty March 27, 1863. He was wounded twice. He suffered a gunshot wound to the hand and was hospitalized at Chimborazo Hospital No. 4, Richmond, Va., on June 28, 1862. He was furloughed July 14–Aug. 14 1862. He then suffered a gunshot wound to the left knee on May 3, 1863, and was admitted to Receiving and Wayside Hospital No. 9 and transferred May 10, 1863, to Chimborazo Hospital No. 5, Richmond. He was furloughed home June 7, 1863, for 35 days but was still absent in October 1863. He returned to his unit and was later discharged Jan. 20, 1864, with surgeon’s certificate. He survived the war.
Benjamin married Cuziah A. “Lizzie” Craig on Aug. 28, 1862. She was born April 16, 1834. She died April 13, 1908, in Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried in Fellowship Methodist Church Cemetery. “Benjamin Barker,” 30, farmer, $100 personal estate, and wife, Cuziah A., 36, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Scuffletown Twp., Laurens Co., S.C. (NARA Film M593:1501:158B). Also listed: Harriet L. Stone, 8. All were born in South Carolina. “Ben A. Barker,” 59, born September 1840, farmer, owns mortgage-free farm, married 1862, and wife, Lizzie A., 66, born April 1839, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Grove, Greenville Co., S.C., with two others: (cousin?) Mary E. Dalton, 15, May 1885, servant, and cousin Ernest Dalton, 13, April 1887, farm laborer (NARA Film T623:1529:6A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
Elizabeth Frances Barker was born May 21, 1843, in Laurens Co., S.C., and died Aug. 18, 1865. She may have married a man named Epps.
David Seal Barker was born June 11, 1845, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Feb. 15, 1920, in Greenville, S.C., and was buried there in Graceland West Cemetery.

David served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He may have served in another unit before enlisting May 22-28, 1864, as a private in Company E, Eighteenth Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, at Petersburg, Va. His NARA compiled military service records indicate he was present in that unit on existing muster rolls from May 1864 until January-February 1865 while his unit was still stationed at Petersburg (Film M267 Roll 297). He survived the war.
David first married Sarah J. Cowan Wise circa 1875. She was born circa 1850, the daughter of Mary Cowan. Sarah died Nov. 11, 1888. “David S. Barker,” 34, farmer, and wife, Sarah J., 28, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Scuffletown Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: Franklin, 4, and Nancy M., 1 (NARA Film T9:1233:206B). Also listed: Mary Cowan, 50, mother-in-law, and John Wise, 9, stepson. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Other children may have been born after the 1880 census. David and Sarah’s children are Franklin and Nancy M. Barker. David second married Leah Jemima Ballard circa 1890. She was born April 15, 1870, in Fork Shoals, Greenville Co., S.C., the daughter of Mary J. Walker and Rev. B. E. Ballard. She died Dec. 30, 1952, and was buried beside David. “David S. Barker,” 54, born in June 1845, farmer, owner of a mortgaged farm, married ten years, and wife, Leah J., 30, born in February 1870, mother of six children, four living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Grove Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with four children: Ebbie, 8, born in June 1891, son; John B., 7, March 1893; Maud, 5, October 1894; and Annie, 3, November 1896 (NARA Film T623:1530:144). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “David S. Barker,” 74, and wife, Leah J., 49, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Ward 6, Greenville, Greenville Co., S.C., with five grown and minor children: John B., 27; Annie N., 23, sewing; Agnes M., 19, bander, cigar factory; Sarah A., 15, bander, cigar factory; Grace, 12, all born South Carolina (NARA Film T625:1698:27A). David and Leah’s children are Benjamin Ebenezer (“Ebbie”), John B., Maude A., Annie N., Agnes M., Sarah A. and Grace Barker.
James Barker was born circa 1846 in Laurens Co., S.C.
Anne Jane Barker was born April 29, 1848, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died May 18, 1922, in Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried there in Rock Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. She married Andrew B. C. “Doc” Griffith. He was born circa 1850. He died Jan. 18, 1896, in Greenville County and was buried there in Rock Creek Baptist Church Cemetery.
John Gamewell Barker was born Feb. 22, 1852, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there May 16, 1856.
Pinckney Ezell “Pink” Barker was born Sept. 10, 1856, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died of pellegra June 20, 1915, in Gantt Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried in Poplar Springs Cemetery. South Carolina Death Certificate 11404 indicates he was married and a mill hand. He married Nancy Linda Glenn. She was born circa 1858. She may have died circa 1910 in Greenville Co., S.C. “Pink Barker,” 43, born September 1856, cotton mill worker, rents home, married 18 years, and wife, Nancy, 42, born March 1858, mother of eight living children, both born South Carolina, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Gantt Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with eight children born South Carolina: Mary, 18, May 1882, cotton mill; Duffie, 16, April 1884, cotton mill; Laura, 13, August 1886, cotton mill; Eva, 12, May 1888, cotton mill; Eugene, 9, June 1890, cotton mill; Bessie, 7, July 1892; Preston, 5, September 1894; and Infant Son, 10/12, August 1899 (NARA Film T623:1529:6A). Pinckney and Nancy’s children are Mary, Duff M. (“Duffie”), Laura, Eva, Pierce Eugene, Bessie, Preston and Infant Son Barker.
Mildred “Milley” Burdett, second child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Frederick Reuben Burdett, was born March 9, 1811, in Dials, Laurens Co., S.C. She died after 1880. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate Milley Burditt/Burdett was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1842-1845. Milley first married Stephen Wells on April 23, 1848, in Laurens Co., S.C. Rev. Tolaver Robertson, Baptist Minister, performed their marriage ceremony. Milley second married William Page before 1861. Church records indicate “Millie Page” was a member in 1861-1871 and paid a subscription fee for her slave’s attendance to Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1862. Class Books last list Milley Page as a member of the church in 1873. “Milly Page,” 69, aunt, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., S.C., living with her nephew William Henry Burdett, son of Abigail Page and Nathan Bramlett Burdett, and aunt Elizabeth Page, 52 (NARA Film T9:1240:409D). All were born in South Carolina.
Jesse Bramlett Burdett and wife, Agness Barker, courtesy Franklin D. Burdette and Martha Anne Curry Duke

Jesse and wife, Agness, in later years, courtesy Franklin D. Burdette and Martha Anne Curry Duke

Descendant Franklin D. Burdette provides much of the following about Jesse Bramlett Burdette.
Jesse Bramlett Burdett, third child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Frederick Reuben Burdett, was born Feb. 22, 1813, according to his Burdett Bible, in Laurens Co., S.C. His grave marker indicates he was born Feb. 13, 1813. The Bible and his grave marker indicate he died May 20, 1897. He died in Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville, S.C. His grave marker also is inscribed with the epitaph: “Asleep in Jesus.” His obituary, published on July 8, 1897, in the Southern Christian Advocate, provides the birth and death dates and marriage date of Jesse and his wife:
BURDETT – Jesse Burdett was born February 22d, 1813, and died at his own home in Greenville County May 20th, 1897, after three years of affliction in great age. His wife, Agnes B. Burdett, was born in July, 1811, and died June 9th, 1893. They were married November 30th, 1831. They were two of the most pious and highly respected members of Bethel church. Uncle Jesse and Aunt Aggie were well known to all who attended camp meeting for years. While their children and friends mourn their loss, it is great gain to those called home. [signed] John Attaway” (Vol. 61, No. 3, p. 6, col. 3 or Vol. 123, No. 1, p. 11, col. 1).
Jesse named his wife executrix in his last will and testament in Greenville County on Oct. 13, 1887:
Last Will and Testament of Jesse Burdett, Sr., deceased. The State of South Carolina, County of Greenville I, Jesse Burdett, of the State and County aforesaid, being of Sound mind and memory and understanding, and knowing the uncertainty of life, do make, ordain and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following: “It is my will and desire that my wife Agnes Burdett be principal Executrix during her natural life of my whole estate, both real and personal, and that she be assisted in the management of the same by my Executors hereinafter named; that they collect all debts due me and pay all my just debts as soon as they can, without depriving my wife of the necessaries of life; that they have my lands cultivated by renting or otherwise, the income of it and of the debts due me or so much of it as may be necessary, to be applied to the support of my wife, and that the remainder, if any over and above my wife’s support, be safely invested as a part of my estate; but should the income of the debts due and my lands be insufficient for the necessary comfort and support of my wife, I then desire that my Executors shall cut off a piece or parcel of my land and sell it for my wife’s necessary support; and at the death of my said wife, I desire my Executors to sell my whole estate both real and personal, by dividing my lands into lots or sell it all together as they may think best for my children; and when that is done, I desire in equal division to be made between all of my children or their legal representatives, share and share alike, each one of them to account for all advancements made them by me, as will be shown by a little book kept by me for that purpose. And I do hereby nominate, constitute and appoint my two sons David W. Burdett and Thomas O. Burdett, Executors of this my last will and testament, with full power to sell, convey and make titles to any and all property that they may wish to dispose of. In witness whereof, I hereunto set my hand and affix my seal, this 13th day of October, 1887. [Signed] Jesse Burdett LS Signed, sealed and acknowledged in the presence of G. [J.?] P. League, J. E. Baldwin, Robert League.
A document marked “Account of the several children of Jessee Burdett on the day of his last will and testament” names some of Jesse’s children and the amounts they owed him, is recorded with his will:
State of South Carolina} Greenville County.} A/c of my several children at the time of my last will and testament. J. W. [John Wesley] Burdett ($156.) One hundred and fifty six Dollars. B. W. [Benjamin William] Burdett ($144.) One hundred and forty four Dollars. J. J. [Joseph Jesse] Burdett ($118.) One hundred and Eighteen Dollars. D. W. [David Wilcut] Burdett ($116.) One hundred and sixteen Dollars. Mary Ann [R.] Ninnally ($90) Ninety Dollars. Fanny E. [Frances Elizabeth] Ninnally ($78.85) Seventy Eight and 85/100 Dollars. T. O. [Thomas Oscar] Burdett ($95.) Ninety five Dollars. M. G. [Martin Gamewell] Burdett ($179.) One hundred and seventy nine Dollars. L. C. [Louisa Caroline] McHugh ($80.) Eighty Dollars. M. J. [Martha Jane] Bramlett ($63.10) sixty three and 10/100 Dollars [Signed] Jesse Burdett
Four of Jesse’s children were not named in the account: Reuben Carolile (Carlisle Coleman) who had died in 1862; William Henry, who had died in 1837; Frederick Nathan, who had died in 1857; and Nancy Isabella, who was unmarried and probably still living at home (apparently debt-free, not owing any amount to Jesse) in 1887 when her father created the account. Nancy did not marry John B. Dawson until 1892. The account book is in the possession of Franklin D. Burdette of Shalimar, Fla. A codicil was added to Jesse’s will to change the executors on Jan. 12, 1893:
Whereas, I, Jesse Burdett, Sr., of the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, having made my last will and testament in writing, bearing date thirteenth (13) day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven, in which I appointed my sons David W. Burdett and Thomas O. Burdett Executors to my last will and testament.
Now, therefore, I, being of sound and disposing mind and memory, by this my writing which I hereby declare to be a codicil to my last will and testament and to be taken as a part thereof, order and declare that it is my last will, that I revoke the appointment of my sons David W. Burdett and Thomas O. Burdett, and that I nominate and constitute and appoint in their places B. P. [Benjamin Perry] Holland and Franklin Maxwell, Sr., with full powers to carry out this my last will and testament.
In witness whereof, I hereunto set my hand and seal, this 12th day of January 1893. Jesse Burdett LS Signed in presence of J. E. Baldwin, J. B. Dawson [son-in-law], W. H. Austin.
Jesse married Agness Barker on Nov. 30, 1831, according to his family Bible and his obituary, in Laurens Co., S C. She was born in July 1811, the daughter of Judith Rhodes and John Barker and sister of John Rhodes Barker who married Jesse’s sister Eunice “Nicey” Burdett. Agness’ birth month and year, July 1811, is inscribed in the Burdett Bible. Agness died June 9, 1893, according to the Bible, in Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried there in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. Jesse’s obituary indicates Agnes died June 9, 1893. “Jesse Burditt,” white male 20-30, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 20-30 (wife, Agness) and four children: one male 5-10, born 1830-35 (John Wesley); one female 5-10, born 1830-35 (Mary Ann R.); and two males under 5, born 1835-40 (Reuben Carolile/Carlisle, Frederick Nathan) (NARA Film M704:513:31). One person was employed in agriculture. “Jesse Burditte,” 40, farmer, $520 real estate, and wife, Agness, 40, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with ten children: John W. (Wesley), 18, farmer; Mary A. (Ann R.), 16; Reubin C. (Carolile), 14; F(r)edrick N. (Nathan), 12; Joseph J. (Jesse), 10; William B. (Benjamin), 8; David W. (Wilcut), 6; Fra(n)ces E. (Elizabeth), 4; Thomas O. (Oscar), 3; and Nancy I. (Isabella), 3/12 (NARA Film M432:855:297A-B). All were born in South Carolina. Jesse and Agness moved their family to Greenville County circa 1852. Jesse purchased 290 acres on Horsepen Creek, Enoree River, in Greenville County, and a house in Simpsonville on what is now known as Harts Lane from Samuel Townsend for $1,500 on Sept. 13, 1852. The house was deeded to Daniel C. Stogner in November 1932 after the death of Melville Lee Burdette, a grandson of Jesse and Agness, who had been living in the house. Franklin D. Burdette visited the old homeplace in 1992 and noted some evidence of the family remained:
There were some rotting, wooden enclosures I estimate to have been about three feet by eight feet in the creek behind the Stogner place; and Toy Burdette, my father, told me they used to be vats for making and holding Tannic acid, used for curing animal hides in the making of leather. Some large, iron castings in our yard were from the ‘grinder’ that was used to grind the oak bark to make the acid. An unfortunate incident which happened during the Second World War wiped out the large grinding wheels that Jesse (or Thomas) used for grinding the oak bark, except for one large conical piece. When metal got very scarce during World War II, a little man came around in a pickup truck one day buying scrap “for the war effort.”John braml Dear little ole patriotic Franklin, wanting to do his part, rounded up all the scrap metal he could find, and sold it to him. The only part that escaped sale was the conical cylinder that was in use as a planter for flowers in the front yard. (It was still there the last time I visited the old home place in 1992.) Needless to say, I was not in my father’s favor for a while after that….Anabel Stogner Taylor and her siblings found an iron shoe form…[on the property], and my daddy told her that someone in the family had been a cobbler. She remembers that daddy had a collection of shoe forms, lending credence to his claim.
“Jesse Burdit,” 45, farmer, $1,300 real estate and $800 personal estate, and wife, Agnes, 50, domestic, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Buena Vista P. O., Rocky Creek Div., Greenville Co., S.C., with ten children: Mary A. (Ann R.), 25, domestic; Josiah J. (Joseph Jesse), 18, farmer; Benjamin W. (William), 16, farmer; David W. (Wilcut), 15, farmer; Frances E. (Elizabeth), 14; Thomas A. (Oscar), 13; Nancy I. (Isabella), 10; Martin G. (Gamewell), 9; Louisa (Caroline), 7; and Martha (Jane), 4. All were born in South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1220:487A).

Jesse served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company B, Col. Charles J. Elford’s Third Regiment, First South Carolina Reserves, State Troops, for 90 days in November 1862–February 1863. His NARA compiled military service records indicate he was pressnt (he regiment formed in January 1862 and disbanded Feb. 10, 1863. Men over age 40, like Jesse, were sent home after their term of duty was over, not conscripted to join other units. Five of Jesse’s older sons also served as Confederate soldiers. Jesse and his son Benjamin William are mentioned in letters (quoted below) that were written home from the war by a neighbor and fellow soldier, Capt. William McKittrick.
“Jesse Burdett,” 57, farmer, $1,000 real estate and $744 personal estate, and wife, Agyness, 59, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Greenville Court House P.O., Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with five children: Jesse (Joseph Jesse), 29, farm work; Nancy (Isabella), 20; Louiza (Caroline), 15; Martin (Gamewell), 18, farm work; and Martha (Jane), 13 (NARA Film M593:1498:471A). All were born in South Carolina. “Jesse Burdett,” 67, farmer, and wife, Agnis, 69, keeps house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with two grown children: (Nancy) Isabella, 25 (31), and M. J. (Martha Jane), 21, both assists in keeps house (NARA Film T9:1230:205D). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Jesse Burdett is named on a 1882 membership list for Bethel Methodist Church. He taught a Bible Class there.
A Burdett Bible that belonged to Jesse Bramlett Burdette and then Thomas Oscar Burdette uses the surname spelling “Burdett” for inscriptions of “Marian” and Frederick and their children on a Memoranda Page and uses “Burdett” for the inscribed births, marriages and deaths of Agness and Jesse’s family. Thomas Oscar and wife, Jemima Victoria (Willis) Burdette, had possession of Jesse’s Bible in the 1930s and later. Their son Toy Donald Burdette owned it at one time. Melvin Louis Burdette Sr.’s son Melvin Louis Burdette Jr., had possession and passed it to his son. It is preserved in an airtight, waterproof container in a fireproof safe. Melvin Louis Burdette Jr. and Franklin D. Burdette of Shalimar, Fla., contribute copies of the original Bible pages.

Fredrick Burdett b. Oct. 15 – 1753
Ag. 87 yrs. 3. mons. d. Feb. 10 – 1841
Maryan Burdett b. Sept. 15 – 1752
Ag. 81 yrs. 5 mons. 21 days d. March 8 – 1834
John Burdett b. Feb. 4 – 1776
83 yrs. 1 m. 6 days d. Mar. 11, 1859
Henry Burdett b. Sept. 5 – 1778
74 yrs. 9 m. 8 days d. May 29, 1853
Margret Burdett b. Dec. 3 – 1781
Mary Burdett Rhodes b. May 22 – 1784
83 yrs. 6 m. 23 days d. Nov. 13 – 1867
Reuben Burdett b. Nov. 26 – 1787
75 yrs. 1 m. 12 days d. Jan. 6 – 1862
Elizabeth Burdett Hand b. Sept. 1 – 1786
84 yrs. 8 m. 11 days d. May 12 – 1871
William Burdett b. Jan. 1[8?] – 1790
70 yrs. 16 days d. Feb 3 – 1860
Alcy Burdett b. March 18, 1793
78 yrs. 2 m. 10 days d. May 28, 1871
Jesse Burdett b. Oct. 18 – 1795
(no death date)

Births
Jesse Burdett was born Feb. 22d 1813.
Agness Burdett was born July … 1811.
John W. Burdett, son of Jesse and Agness Burdett, was born Sep. 29th 1832.
Mary A. R. Burdett, daughter of J. & A. Burdett, was born April 20th 1834.
Reuben C. Burdett, son of J. & A. Burdett, was born Jan. 6th 1836.
William H. Burdett, son of J. & A. Burdett, was born Nov. 8th 1837.
Frederick N. Burdett, son of J. & A. Burdett, was born Sept. 20th 1839.
Joseph J. Burdett, son of J. & A. Burdett, was born April 13th 1841.
Benjamin W. Burdett, son of J. & A. Burdett, was born June 9th 1843.
David W. Burdett, son of J. & A. Burdett, was born April 4th 1845.
Frances E. Burdett, daughter of J. & A. Burdett, was born Nov. 23d 1846.
Thomas O. Burdett, son of J. & A. Burdett, was born Sep. 29th 1848.
Nancy A. Burdett, daughter of J. & A. Burdett, was born April 30th 1850.
Martin Gamewell Burdett, son of J. & A. Burdett, was born May 23d 1852.
Louisa C. Burdett, daughter of J. & A. Burdett, was born Sept. 2d 1854.
Martha J. Burdett, daughter of J. & A. Burdett, was born Feb. 11th 1857

Marriages
Jesse Burdett and Agnes Barker were married Nov. 30th 1831.
John W. Burdett and Caroline P. Holland were married Dec. 23d 1855.
Benjamin W. Burdett and Eliza Smith were married August 31st 1865.
Frances E. Burdett and F. F. Nunnelly were married August 30th 1866.
Mary A. R. Burdett and D. Nunnelly were married Feb. 11th 1870.
Thomas O. Burdett and Martha Smith were married Oct. 1st 1868.
Joseph J. Burdett and C. J. S. Yeargin were married Oct. 13th 1870.
Louiza C. Burdett and Melvin McHugh were married Dec. 22d 1872.
(The following two entries have different handwriting.)
M. G. Burdett was married to Martha McHugh November the 20 1873.
D. W. Burdett was married to Zelean McPherson December the 16 1875.
(The following two entries have different handwriting.)
Martha Jane Burdett and A. L. Bramlett was married Dec. 22d 1880/88.
Nancy I. Burdett & J. B. Dawson was married Dec. first (1)/92.

Deaths

Bible Back Cover
Agness and Jesse’s children are John Wesley, Mary Ann R., Reuben Carolile/Carlisle (“Coleman”), William Henry, Frederick Nathan, Joseph Jesse (“Josiah”), Benjamin William, David Wilcut, Frances Elizabeth, Thomas Oscar, Nancy Isabella, Martin Gamewell, Louisa Caroline and Martha Jane Burdett.

John Wesley Burdett, first child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born Sept. 29, 1832, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died April 19, 1900, in Greenville County and was buried there in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. John lived with his parents in 1850. He married Caroline Permelia Holland on Dec. 23, 1853/55, in Greenville County. She was born there May 2, 1830, the daughter of Mary Washington “Polly” Yeargin and Benjamin Perry Holland who lived at Middle Plantation in the Bethel Community of Greenville County (Benjamin Perry Holland [11 September 1797–15 May 1870] is the son of Amelia “Millie” Tarrant Phillips [1764–1849] and Solomon Holland [1768–1848] who came to Greenville County from Virginia.) When growing up in the 1830s and 1840s, Caroline may have spent many shining childhood hours at her Holland grandparents’ plantation, Golden Grove, located on Golden Grove Creek in Greenville County just across the Saluda River from Holland’s Ford in Anderson County. (At one point, Amelia and Solomon Holland moved close to Simpsonville. They were involved in the early development of Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church where Solomon was a charter member and co-founder with Devereaux Yeargin and John Bramlett.) Caroline died at age 69 years on July 26, 1899, in Greenville County and was buried there in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. John and family lived in Greenville County in 1860 before the war. “John W. Burdit,” 27, farmer, $300 personal estate, and wife, Elizabeth, 35, domestic, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Buena Vista P.O., Rocky Creek Div., Greenville Co., S.C., with two children: Mary A. (Agnes), 2, and Frances C. (Caroline), 3/12 (NARA Film M653:1220:486B-487A). All were born in South Carolina.

John Wesley Burdett served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. John Wesley may be J. W. Burdett who served as a private in (Second) Company F, First (Hagood’s) Regiment, “Dixie Guards,” South Carolina Infantry Volunteers. The company was organized in Greenville County. J. W. Burdett who served in that company enlisted at Charleston May 5, 1862. He served at least until Feb. 28, 1865. Or John Wesley may be J. W. Burdett/John Burditt who enlisted on Nov. 17/18, 1862, for ninety days at Laurens Court House as a private in Company C, Laurens County, Ninth Regiment, South Carolina Reserves, State Troops, and served until Feb. 14, 1863. This same soldier may be J. Burditt who enlisted April 16, 1864, at Laurens and served as a private in Company E, Fourth Battalion, South Carolina Reserves, State Troops, until Dec. 31, 1864, or longer. He survived the conflict and returned home.
“J. W. Burdett,” 36, farm work, and wife, Caroline, 39, are listed in the 1870 U S. Census for Greenville Court House P.O., Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: Mary (Agnes), 12; Frances (Caroline), 11; and James (Coin), 1 (NARA Film M593:1498:459A). All were born in South Carolina. The family lived with Caroline’s mother, Mrs. Mary Holland, 66, keeping house, $1,200 real estate and $720 personal estate, head of the family, and her son Perry Holland, 21, farm work, both born in South Carolina. “J. W. [John Wesley] Burdett,” 47, farmer, and wife, P. C. (Permelia Caroline), 50, keeps house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with four children: M. A. (Mary Agnes), 22, assists in keeps house; F. C. (Frances Caroline), 19, assists in keeps house; J. C. (James Coin), 11, works on farm; and L. (Lovick) Pierce, 3, other (NARA Film T9:1230:205D). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “J. W. Burdett” is named on an 1882 membership list for Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church. “John W. Burdette,” 67, born in September 1832, farmer, mortgage-free farm owner, married 45 years, and wife, Caroline (Permelia), 70, born in May 1830, mother of six children, four living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with two children: James C. (Coin), 29, born in June 1870, farmer, and (Lovick) Pierce, 24, born in November 1875, farm laborer (NARA Film T623:1529:9A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Caroline and John’s children, all born in Greenville County, are Mary Agnes, Frances Caroline, Daughter/Son (died before 1900 census), Daughter/Son (died before 1900 census), James Coin and Lovick Pierce Burdett.
Mary Agnes Burdett, first child of John Wesley and Caroline Permelia (Holland) Burdett, 78was born Dec. 7, 1857, in Greenville Co., S.C. She died there Feb. 16, 1925, and was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. She married Nathaniel C. Austin circa 1882 or earlier in Bethel Methodist. Church. He was born May 11, 1858, in Greenville County, the son of Susan Davis and William Austin. Nathaniel died April 24, 1925, in Greenville County and was buried there in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. “Mary Agnes Austin,” 53, mother of eight children, six living, and husband, Nathaniel C. Austin, 52, head of the family, married 29 years, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Greenville Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with fur children: Lawrence, 19; Kate (Sarah Catherine), 16; Herman (D.), 14; and Earle (W.), 12. All were born in South Carolina. The family lived on Draper Street in Brandon Mill Village. Mary and Nathaniel’s children are Beattie, G. Leonard, Sam W., Lawrence, Florence, Sarah Catherine (“Kate”), Herman D. and Earl W. Austin.
Frances Caroline Burdett, second child of John Wesley and Caroline Permelia (Holland) Burdett, was born Dec. 22, 1859, in Greenville Co., S C. She died there Oct. 28, 1959, about two months before her 100th birthday and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery Mausoleum. She married Robert Sloan Coleman circa 1882 in Greenville County. He was born there Dec. 15, 1859, in Traveler’s Rest, S.C., the son of Caroline Cureton and Elisha Coleman. Robert died at age 79 on Oct. 29, 1939, in Greenville County and was buried in Berea Baptist Church Cemetery. His obituary indicates he died in a Columbia hospital. He had been an employee of Gallivan Construction before retiring. He lived with his son Benjamin Jesse Coleman at 306 Summit St., City View, in Greenville before his death. “Frances C. Coleman,” 40, born in December 1859, married 18 years, mother of eight children, five living, and husband, Robert S., 41, born in December 1859, cotton mill, stripper, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Greenville Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with five children: Jesse, 14, February 1896; Telitha J./L. (Cue), 12, January 1888; Annie L., 10, May 1890; Virginia C., 7, January 1893; Claud, 6, September 1895 (NARA Film T623:1529:253B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Frances and Robert apparently separated and may have divorced by 1909. Frances bought land in Greenville that year, and they are listed in different residences in three editions of the Greenville City Directory. Frances C. Coleman acquired a lot on Pine Street in Greenville from J. Peden in 1909 (DB-4:65). Frances C. Coleman sold the Pine Street lot to F. F. Capers for $2,000 on July 26, 1909. The deed, which indicates the lot was previously deeded to her by J. R. Peden, was recorded July 28, 1909. Frances C. Coleman acquired a lot on McCall Street in Greenville from W. S. Pack in 1909 (DB-000:444). Frances C. Coleman sold the McCall Street lot to J. R. Peden for $1,100 on Feb. 18, 1909. The deed was recorded Feb. 25, 1909. Frances C. Coleman, who lived at 211 W. Carrier (Park Avenue), is listed in the 1910 Greenville City Directory as the widow of “Ralph” S. Coleman. “Frances C. Coleman,” 50, owner of a mortgaged home, own income, widowed, mother of nine children, five living, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Ward 1, Greenville, Greenville Co., S.C., with four grown children: Cue, 22, laborer, cigar mill; Annie, 19, laborer, cigar mill; Virginia, 17, laborer, cigar mill; Claude, 14 (NARA Film T624:1461:170B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Frances Coleman, who lived at 211 W. Park, is listed in the 1919 Greenville City Directory. Robert S. Coleman, Carpenter, who lived at Riverside, is listed in the 1913 Greenville City Directory. R. S. Coleman, an employee of Monaghan Mill, boarded at a residence on Colonial Drive at Riverside, according to the 1919 Greenville City Directory. “Frances Coleman,” 60, owner of a mortgage-free home, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Ward 1, Greenville, Greenville Co., S.C., with three grown daughters: Cue, 30, roller, cigar mill; Annie Lee, 28, roller, cigar mill; Virginia, 25, saleslady, department store (NARA Film T625:1698:47B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Frances and Robert’s known children are Calvin, Benjamin Jesse, Telitha Cue, Annie Lee, Virginia C. and Claude Coleman.
Daughter/Son Burdett, third? child of John Wesley and Caroline Permelia (Holland) Burdett, may have born between 1860 and 1868 and died young, before 1870.
Daughter/Son Burdett, fourth? child of John Wesley and Caroline Permelia (Holland) Burdett, may have born between 1860 and 1868 and died young, before 1870.
James Coin “J. C.” Burdett Sr., fifth? child of John Wesley and Caroline Permelia (Holland) Burdett, was born June 8, 1869, in Greenville Co., S.C. He died there April 27, 1938, and was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville. His obituary in the Southern Christian Advocate on June 22, 1939, identifies him as James C. Burdette (Vol. 103, No. 25, p. 13, col. 1). James married Caroline K. “Carrie” Templeton circa 1902. She was born Aug. 14, 1874 or 1875, in Greenville County. She died there March 30, 1946, and was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. Two obituaries for her in the Southern Christian Advocate on April 25, 1946, and July 25, 1946, identify her as Carrie Templeton Burdette and list her death date; her spouse, J. C. Burdette; and her parents: Perry and Mattie J. Templeton (Vol. 110, No. 17, p. 11, col. 3 and Vol. 110, No. 30, p. 15, col. 3). Carrie K. Templeton, 24, born in August 1875 in South Carolina, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., living with her parents, Martha, 45, born in August 1854, mother of five living children, and Perry F., 49, born in June 1850, farmer, rents farm, head of the family, and four siblings: Mary A., 22, April 1878; Clark S., 20, April 1880; Maggie F., 16, February 1884; and James W., 9, February 1891 (NARA Film T623:1529:19A). Carrie then married James, a farmer. They lived in a large house by a lake near Bethel Church, of which they were dedicated members. James served as Sunday School Superintendent and a Church Steward and held most of the church offices at various times during his adult life. James and his family sang and were involved in the church music program, Carrie as church pianist. “James C. Burdette,” 40, farmer, farm owner, married eight years, and wife, Carrie C., 36, mother of six living children, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with six children: Nora L., 7; Lucy C., 6; Willie N., 5, daughter; Pansy L., 3; J. C. (James Coin Jr.), 2; and Emma J., 2/12 (NARA Film T624:1460:16B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. They lived on Bethel Church Road. “J. C. Burdette,” 50, farmer, and wife, Carrie, 44, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with eight children: Nora, 17; Lucy, 15; Willie, 14, daughter; Pansy, 13; J. C. Jr. (James Coin), 12; Emma, 9; Robert, 7; and Ralph, 7 (NARA Film T625:1697:1A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “James C. Burdette,” 60, farmer, married 24 years, and wife, Carrie, 54, are listed in the 1930 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Dist. 3, Greenville Co., S.C., with six children: Lucy, 26; Willie, 24, daughter; Pansy, 23; Emma J., 20; Robert W., 18; and Ralph P., 18 (NARA Film T626:2198:27A). All were born in South Carolina. James and Carrie’s children are Nora Lee, Lucy Caroline, Willie N., Pansy L., James Coin Jr. (“Jake”), Emma J. and twins P. Ralph and Robert W.“Bob” Burdett.
Lovick Pierce Burdett, sixth? child of John Wesley and Caroline Permelia (Holland) Burdett, was born Nov. 2, 1875, in Greenville Co., S.C. He died there July 31, 1950, and was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. His obituary, published Nov. 2, 1950, in the Southern Christian Advocate, identifies him as the son of Caroline Holland and Wesley Burdette. “He was a well known citizen and farmer and churchman of the Bethel Methodist area, Simpsonville” (Vol. 114, No. 43, p. 11, col. 3). “He was a member of Bethel Methodist Church, where he served as a trustee and a teacher in the church school.” He married Leila L. James circa 1907 in Greenville County. She was born there Sept. 20/29, 1882. She died Sept. 26, 1954, in Spartanburg Hospital and was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. “Lovick P. Burdette,” 32, farmer, general farm, farm owner, married three years, first marriage, and wife, Leila L., 27, mother of three children, one living, farm laborer, home farm, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with one child: James W., 10/12 (NARA Film T624:1460:16A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. They lived on Mauldin and Pelham Road. “Pierce L. Burdette,” 43, farmer, general farm, and wife, Leila L., 37, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: James W., 11; Pierce H., 8; and Lucille, 4 2/12 (NARA Film T625:1697:12A). They lived on Bethel Road. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Pierce and Leila’s children are Infant, Infant, James Wesley, Harold Pierce, Lucille and Mary Burdett.
Mary Ann R. Burdett, second child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born April 30, 1834, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died June 29, 1908, in Greenville County and was buried there in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. Mary Ann lived with her parents in 1850-60 and with her husband and then children in Alabama in 1900. She married Daniel Nunnely/Nunnelly on Feb. 11, 1870. He was born circa 1807 in Prince Edward Co., Va., the son of Daphne Taylor Richardson and Peter Nunnally. He was previously married and had several children in 1828-1847 with his first wife. David died at about age 79 on Dec. 12, 1885, in St. Clair Co., Ala. Daniel and Mary Ann moved there circa 1875. “Mary Nunley,” 37, born in South Carolina, keeping house, and husband, Daniel, 63, born in Virginia, house carpenter, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Greenville Court House P.O., Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C. (NARA Film M593:1498:467B). “Mary A. Nunnelly,” 46, born in South Carolina to parents born there, keeping house, and husband, Daniel, 72, born in Virginia to parents born there, carpenter, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Beat 1, Branchville, St. Clair Co., Ala., with three children, the first two born in South Carolina and the youngest in Alabama: Mattie M. (Mamie), 8; Mary J., 6; Minnie A., 5 (NARA Film T9:31:12A).
Martha Anne Curry Duke and Franklin Donald Burdette contribute some of the following.
Reuben Carolile/Carlisle (“Coleman”) Burdett, third child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born Jan. 6, 1836, in Laurens Co., S.C. Reuben lived with his parents in 1850His father’s Burdett Bible indicates “Reuben C. Burdett Fell in battle near Richmond, Va., May 31st, 1862, Age 26 years, 4 months and 25 days” on May 31, 1862. He died in the Battle of Seven Pines while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. His burial place John is undocumented: He may have been buried as an unknown soldier in National Cemetery of Seven Pines or returned to South Carolina for burial.

“Reuben C. Burdett” served as a private in Company F, Infantry Regiment, Hampton Legion, South Carolina Volunteers. His NARA compiled military service records indicate he enlisted Aug. 4, 1861, at Camp Johnson, S.C., by Maj./Col. Griffin for one year; and he is last listed on the March-April 1862 company muster roll (Film M267 Roll 363). “Reuben C. Burdett” served as a private in Company F, Infantry Regiment, Hampton Legion, South Carolina Volunteers. His NARA compiled military service records indicate he enlisted Aug. 4, 1861, at Camp Johnson, S.C., by Maj./Col. Griffin for one year; and he is last listed on the March-April 1862 company muster roll. (Film M267 Roll 363). Family records show he was killed in action on May 31, 1862, during the Battle of Seven Pines near Richmond, Va. His brother Joseph Jesse “Josia Burdett was wounded on the same day in the same battle.
William Henry Burdett, fourth child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born Nov. 8, 1837, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there at age 1 year, 10 months, 21 days, on Sept. 29, 1839.
Frederick Nathan Burdett, fifth child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born Sept. 20, 1839, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died at age 18 years, 7 days, on Nov. 27, 1857, according to the Burdett Bible, and was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery near the grave of his sister Mary Ann R. (Burdett) Nunnelly. His grave marker, inscribed “F. N. B.” with his death date, is in a plot that also contains the grave of a person with the initials D. T. L., who also died on the same day as Frederick; and the two graves share a headstone. The identity of D. T. L. is unknown. Frederick lived with his parents in 1850: “Fedrick N. Burditte,” 12, born in South Carolina, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with his parents, Jesse, 40, and Agness, 40, and nine siblings: John W., 18; Mary A. R., 16; Reubin C., 14; Joseph J., 10; William B., 8; David W., 6; Fra(n)ces E., 4; Thomas O., 3; Nancy J., 3/12 (NARA Film M432:855:297A).

Joseph Jesse “Josiah” Burditt, sixth child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born April 13, 1841, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Aug. 6, 1922, in Greenville County and was buried there in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville, S.C. (His birth date is inscribed as April 13 in a family Bible. His grave marker is inscribed with a different birth date: May 17, 1841. Jesse lived with his parents in 1850-1870. Jesse married Caroline Josephine Seal/e Yeargin on Oct. 13, 1870. She was born Jan. 10, 1841, in Greenville County, the daughter of Jane Caroline McDaniel and Rufus Yeargin.

(Rufus Yeargin is the son of Permelia Shell and Devereaux Yeargin, who were prominently involved in the early development of Bethel United Methodist Church in Greenville County.) Caroline died Oct. 25, 1900, in Greenville County and was buried there in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville, S.C.

Jesse J. Burdett served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company F, Hampton Legion, South Carolina Infantry, C.S.A. His NARA military service records indicate he was age 20 and a resident of Greenville County who enlisted June 13, 1861, at Columbia, S.C. Jesse was admitted to Chimborazo Hospital No. 3, Richmond, Va., on April 16, 1862, as “J. Birdett.” He returned to duty April 29, 1862. He was wounded May 31, 1862, during the Battle of Seven Pines, Va. (His brother Reuben Carolile Burdett was killed in action on the same day during the same battle.) Jesse’s foot and part of his leg were amputated two inches above the ankle on June 1, 1862. He is last listed as being on wounded furlough on the company muster roll dated Nov. 30-Dec. 31, 1862. “J. J. Burditt,“ Company F, Hampton’s Legion, appears on a list of beneficiaries of Association for the Relief of Maimed Soldiers, Richmond, Va. He signed his surname as “Burditt” on the application for a prosthetic device for his lost foot.
“J. J. [Joseph Jesse] Burdett,” 38, and wife, J. C. (Caroline Josephine), 38, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: Lou A. (Tululah Adella), 8; Jesse Mc. (McSwain), 6; and Coke C. (Carlisle), 1 (NARA Film T9:1230:206A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Jesse J. Burdette,” 59, born in April 1841, farmer, farm owner, married 30 years, and wife, Caroline, 59, born in February 1841, mother of four children, three living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with one grown child: Jesse M. (McSwain), 26, born in May 1874, farm laborer (NARA Film T623:1529:10A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Joseph J. Burdette,” 69, farmer, general farm, widowed, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., living with his son Jesse M. Burdette, 34, day guard, convict camp, widowed (NARA Film T624:1460:12A). Both were born in South Carolina to parents born there. They lived on Mauldin and Pelham Road. Jesse and Caroline’s children are Tululah Adella, Jesse McSwain, Rufas D./S. and Coke Carlisle Burditt/Burdette.
Joseph Jesse Burditt, standing sixth from the right, at the Old Soldier’s Reunion, Bethel Methodist Church, Simpsonville, S.C., in 1900. A cousin, Judge John Thomas Bramlett, who served in Company A, 16th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry and Company F, Hampton Legion, South Carolina Infantry, is kneeling fourth from right. Courtesy Franklin D. Burdette.
Benjamin William Burdette, seventh child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born June 9, 1843, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died of pneumonia at age 94 years 6 months 9 days at 1:30 a.m. on Dec. 17, 1936, at home, Rte. 4, Greer, in Butler Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried there Dec. 18, 1936, in McCarter Presbyterian Church Cemetery. His grave marker, courtesy Findagrave volunteer Robin Farley Dixson, is inscribed with his full birth and death dates and the following designation: “Co I 16 SC Regt C.S.A.” His South Carolina Death Certificate, 19958, documents his full name, birth, birth place, names of parents, time and place of death and burial and his occupation. The death certificate indicates he was born in Greenville County, but his parents did not move there from Laurens County until 1852. He was a farmer for 70 years. He last worked in January 1936. His son Edwin Burdette, R.F.D. #4, Greer, S.C., is listed as informant on the document, which was filed Jan. 4, 1937. Benjamin William lived with his parents in 1850-1860. “William B. (Benjamin) Burditte,” 8, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with parents, Jesse, 40, farmer, $520 real estate, and Agness, 40, and nine siblings, all born South Carolina (John W. [Wesley], 18, farmer; Mary A. [Ann R.], 16; Reubin C. [Carolile], 14; F[r]edrick N. [Nathan], 12; Joseph J. [Jesse], 10; David W. [Wilcut], 6; Frances E. [Elizabeth], 4; Thomas O. [Oscar], 3; and Nancy I. [Isabella], 3/12) (NARA Film M432:855:297A-B). “Benjamin W. Burdit,” 16, farmer, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Buena Vista P.O., Rocky Creek Div., Greenville Co., S.C., with parents, Jesse, 45, farmer, $1,300 real estate, $800 personal estate, and Agnes, 50, domestic, and nine siblings, all born South Carolina (Mary A. [Ann R.], 25, domestic; Josiah J. [Joseph Jesse], 18, farmer; David W. [Wilcut], 15, farmer; Frances E. [Elizabeth], 14; Thomas A. [Oscar], 13; Nancy I. [Isabella], 10; Martin G. (Gamewell), 9; Louisa [Caroline], 7; Martha [Jane], 4) (NARA Film M653:1220:487A).

“B. William Burdett” served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company I, Sixteenth (Greenville) Regiment,
Brigade, South Carolina Infantry Volunteers. His NARA compiled military service records indicate he was ill with measles in February 1862 in camp in Columbia, S.C. (Film M267 Roll 285). He also was ill or wounded and hospitalized in June 1864 in Marietta, Ga. A Burdette chart, author unknown, in Martha Anne Curry Duke’s possession indicates Benjamin William lost the top of one ear when wounded. Benjamin William and his father, Jesse, are mentioned or referenced in several letters written home from the war by Capt. Samuel McKittrick, a fellow soldier and neighbor of the Burdettes in Greenville County.
Camp Hampton near Columbia January 26, 1862 Dear Wife …we got to camp on Friday night about dusk….on the next morning each man drew his rations. Every man drew a knife and fork, a tin plate and cup every mess a coffee and Beef kettle. The boys beef flour and molasses have lived well since we left home, all seem in fine spirits. Tell Mr. Burdettes folks that William is doing very well and seems well satisfied…. Columbia, S.C. Feb. 17, 1862 Dear Wife, …I arrived [at camp] safely I found [William] Burdett with measles he was broken out the doctor pronounced his case a light one. On last Saturday morning he [was] sent [to] the doctor and made application to go to the hospital the doctor said there would be more danger in moving than for him to stay in camp. So he was put in an affected tent and is still there. David Taylor, Andrew Allsion G. M. White and Wilburn Cur[r]y are all poorly I am now at the Hospital. Lt. McCrary is here with measles but is doing very well he is mending so he can go home in a few days….I am going to get Wm. Burdette here as soon as he can be moved I think he get on very well though now he is pretty sick. Lt. McCrary gives a good account of the treatment at the hospital. As soon they get better they can go home I want you to let Mr. Burdett’s people see this letter though I may write one to them soon….Saml. McKittrick
Capt. McKittrick mentions the Burdetts again in two letters in March:
Camp Greenville March 12, 1862 Dear Wife I received Mr. Burdette’s letter. Saml. McKittrick….Camp Greenville March 14th 1862 Dear Wife Your letter brought both sorrow and joy. I am glad to hear that you yourself was up and here let me caution you not out do yourself….I want you to hire a hand a while to help line work….Get Mr. Burdett or someone else…to alter the coal if it can be done….
Capt. McKittrick also mentions a “Burdett back home” in two letters written in November:
Camp Hampton November 16 [1862] Dear Wife …I am acting orderly Sergeant in the absence of others. When you write direct your letters thus Samuel McKittrick, Company B 3D Regt. South Carolina Reserves care Captain Roberts, Columbia, S. C….Be sure to send the note to Robert League and he can let Burdett see it. Your loving husband until death. Samuel McKittrick Camp Hampton November 19, 1862 Dear Wife Another Regt. From Richmond have just arrived and are going into camp now and I understand that the Laurens Regt. will be here within a day or two….if you see or can send word to Mr. League and Burdett tell them to bring some Rye send some more goobers. Samuel McKittrick
Benjamin William Burdett was wounded or ill and hospitalized in June 1864 in Georgia, according to Capt. Samuel McKittrick in a June 27, 1864, letter to his wife from the battle lines in Marietta, Ga.: “Tell Mr. Brditt I have not heard from William, he left the line [at] Greenbury….” In a letter written the following day he reports “William Burdett is gone to the hospital and I hope he will get a furlough home….” (See the full text of the McKittrick letters online, courtesy Steve Batson.) B. W. Burdett of Greenville, S.C., applied for a pension based on his war service in Captain McKittrick’s Company I, Sixteenth Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, on April 12, 1919, in Greenville County (SCDAH S126088:4208). J. S. Jones and J. T. (John Thomas) Bramlett vouched for his service. B. W. Burdett vouched for the service of T. J. Garrison of Piedmont, Greenville Co., S.C., when Garrison applied for a pension based on his war service in Company B, Sixteenth Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, on April 18, 1919 (SCDAH S126088:4351).

Tombstone of Eliza Margaret (Smith) Burdette, courtesy Robin Farley Dixson
Benjamin William married Eliza Margaret Smith on Aug. 31, 1865, in Laurens County. She was born Feb. 18/19, 1845, in Spartanburg Co., S.C., the daughter of Eliza Unknown and Dean Smith. Eliza died Jan. 5, 1923, in Diamond Hill Twp., Abbeville Co., S.C., and was buried in McCarter Presbyterian Church Cemetery. Her tombstone is inscribed “Eliza M. Wife of B. W. Burdette Feb. 18, 1845 Jan. 5, 1923.”
“B. W. [Benjamin William] Burdette,” 27, farmer, $75 personal estate, and wife, Eliza (Margaret Smith), 25, keeping house, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Greenville Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: Mary Ann, 5; Thomas L., 5; and Ervine D., 1 (NARA Film M593:1498:618A). The eldest two children were born in South Carolina and the youngest in North Carolina. “Wm. B. [Benjamin] Burdette,” 36, farm laborer, and wife, Eliza M., [Margaret Smith] 35, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Butler Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with five children: Thos. L., 12, farm laborer; (Roy Irvin) Ervan D., 10, farm laborer; Edwd. (Edwin), 5; (Flossie) Harlee, 3, daughter; and Ellen, 1 (NARA Film T9:1230:247A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Benjamin Burdette,” 56, born in June 1843, farmer, mortgage-free farm owner, married 35 years, and wife, Eliza, 55, born in February 1845, mother of nine children, five living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Butler Twp., Greenville Co., S C., with one grown child: (Flossie) Harlie, 23, born in August 1876, daughter (NARA Film T623:1529:73A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “William B. Burdette,” 67, farmer, general farm, farm owner, married 47 years, and wife, Eliza M. [Margaret Smith], 65, mother of nine children, five living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Butler Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with one grown son, Edwin, 35, and his wife, Onie, 25, and their two sons (NARA Film T624:1460:78B-79A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Also listed are two black servants: Walter Glimpse, 22, and Taylor Glimpse, 20. “Benjamin W. [William] Burdette,” 76, and wife, Eliza M. [Margaret Smith], 74, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Diamond Hill, Abbeville Co., S.C., living with their daughter Carrie M. McCarter, 38, and son-in-law Enoch N. McCarter Sr., 43, head of the family, and their four children, all born South Carolina, (NARA Film T625:1682:1A). Benjamin William Burdette not yet located in 1930. Benjamin William and Eliza’s children, born between 1865 and 1886, are Mary Ann (“Anna”), Thomas L., Roy Irvin D., Edwin, Flossie Harley, Ellen (“Ellie”), Carrie M., Ilah Dean and Little Jeff Burdette.

David Wilcut Burdett Sr., eighth child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born April 4, 1845, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Dec. 22, 1919, in Greenville County and was buried there in Simpsonville City Cemetery. His grave is marked with an inscribed tombstone shared with his wife. David married Zelene “Zelena” McPherson on Dec. 16, 1875, probably in Greenville County. Their marriage date is inscribed in Jesse Bramlett Burdett’s Bible. She was born there Dec. 5, 1845. She died there Sept. 18, 1919, and was buried in Simpsonville City Cemetery. David lived with parents and siblings in 1850-1860. “David W. Burdit,” 15, farmer, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Buena Vista P.O., Rocky Creek Div., Greenville Co., S.C., living with his parents, Jesse, 45, farmer, $1,300 real estate, $800 personal estate, and Agnes, 50, domestic, plus nine siblings, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1220:487A).

David served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. “D. Burdit” enlisted as a private in Second Company K, Seventh Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, on Aug. 9, 1862, in Virginia (Film M267 Roll 215). His NARA compiled military service records indicate David left the regiment about three months after his enlistment. He was wounded in action, suffering a gunshot wound, during the Battle of Antietam, Sharpsburg, Md., on Sept. 17, 1862, the bloodiest single day in American military history, and was admitted to General Hospital, Culpeper, Va., on Sept. 25, 1862. He was absent on wounded furlough through February 1863. In July-August he was reported absent without leave since Nov. 17, 1862, and never returned to his unit. He is last listed on a company muster roll as AWOL in June 1864. He may have been separated and unable to return to his company after being released from the hospital. He apparently joined another infantry unit, Company B, Third Regiment, First South Carolina Reserves, State Troops, in which his father, Jesse, was serving, before Dec. 3, 1862. That is when Capt. Samuel McKittrick of the Third Reserves mentioned in a letter to his wife that “D. Burdett” (David) was in his company in the same camp:
December 3, 1862 Wednesday Dear Wife …I left you last Wednesday at Hampton on Thursday evening we received orders to cook 5 days rations to march to Pocatalico on Friday morning at half past 8 o’clock we struck tents and embarked on the South C.R.R. about 8 o’clock. We arrived at Charleston about one o’clock at night. We rode in boxcars we had a very disagreeable trip as it was so cold. On Saturday we struck up camp near Charleston and remain[ed] there till yesterday morning I saw many of neighbors on the way to Charleston….On yesterday morning we left Charleston and arrived her[e] at Pocotalico about dusk last night…..We have a mess [a group living and cooking together within the camp] of I. M. Howard, D. Burdett, Mr. Wardell of Greenville Vill[age] who is also commissary of our co. We have a fine little mess….When you write direct your letter as follows (To Sergeant McKittrick Pocotaligo Co. B Third Regt. First S.C. Reserves….Mr. League, I. M. Howard, and D. Burdett are all well and doing well…. Samuel McKittrick
Two other letters indicate David, who was camping with Capt. McKittrick, was still with the Third Reserves into the second week of December:
Pocotaligo Camp Perry Dec. 7, 1862 Sunday Afternoon Dear wife …We are now within a mile of Savannah Rail Road or between the road and old Pocotaligo or about a mile from the battleground….R. League, I. M. Howard D. Burditt and myself make one mess. We are all well pleased we have bought our own cooking utensils and cook plentifully and eat all we cook. We are all hearty fortunately….
Dec. 9 Tuesday night…I have been busy fixing for housekeeping having moved yesterday. You ought to have seen I. M. Howard and D. Burdett and myself start with our dirty cloth[es] to a pond nearby with our camp kettle to boil them in and camp bucket to wash them in all of us being new hands I cannot brag on our washings yet we took lessons from an old Irishman who was engaged nearby we got them clean but not white. …R. League and I. M. Howard have sent for some possessions from home. If you and Mrs. League and Mrs. Burditt can manage to get us some sent to his house he could bring it. We want some flour butter and bacon you can get some butter from some neighbors and send a few pounds of flour. We want a little more variety now. I know you have no bacon or pork to spare each one should make what they send. When you write direct your letter to Sergeant McKittrick Co. B 3rd Regt. S.C. Reserves Camp Goldsmith, Pocotaligo S.C….the men are all well. Our Regt. Generally are healthy….Wednesday morning 10 o’clock I and all our mess are well….Samuel McKittrick
The captain mentions the Burdett sons again in three additional letters written in 1864. Military records have not been located for Thomas Oscar Burdette, but he was in the military camp with his brother and most likely engaged in war activities as a soldier and/or Confederate patriot:
Camp near Dalton, Ga. April 24th, 1864 Mrs. M. A. Mckittrick. Dear Wife, ….Give all my love to Mr. & Mrs. Bu[r]ditt and tell them their sons [David Wilcut and Thomas Oscar] are well and doing well….
Wednesday 27th [1864] Dear wife, ….We are expecting something to do here before long. We have received orders to move all surplus baggage to the rear. We have boxed our heavy and surplus baggage to be sent off and home. The box was sent to Mr. Burditt you will find I have sent home a pair of new shoes and my old pantaloons. I can draw plenty of clothing here and if we have to march I cannot carry it. I wish I had not brought so many from home. If you get the shoes, keep them till next winter….You need not expect them very shortly. I got the shoes for $10.00. I suppose they will be worth eight or ten times that next winter. I want to send some more clothes home when I get a good chance. The clothing is worth a great deal more than the commutations’ money…. Your ever loving husband until death
Samuel McKittrick May 8th 1864 Dear Wife, ….We are now about a mile beyond Dalton. We left our old camp yesterday and after a very fatiguing march of some 7 miles we took camp in the woods. Our whole, and many of the Divisions, are now lying here awaiting orders to march to the front. I am now only in camp. I cannot here describe the scene. The green-clad hills are (for this is very hilly country) alive with the bustle of soldiers and battling wagons, etc. All appear ready to meet the enemy. There were some collisions yesterday….Tom [Thomas Oscar] and Davis [David] Bircliff [Burditt] [illegible or degraded writing in original]…are well…. Your loving husband, Samuel McKittrick

A Point Lookout Monument
After the Third Reserves disbanded, David W. Burditt/Burdett enlisted July 1, 1863, at Jackson, Miss., as a private in Company I, Sixteenth (Greenville) Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, C.S.A. David’s NARA compiled military service records describe him as a resident of Greenville County (Film M267 Roll 285). In September-October 1863 he was absent sick in Rome, Ga., Hospital and returned to duty in November. He was hospitalized June 3, 1864, for general debility at Floyd House and Ocmulgee Hospital Macon, Ga. He was furloughed home to Greenville District on June 18, 1864. He returned to duty and was furloughed again for 15 days by the enrolling officer to Greenville, S.C., on Aug. 15, 1864. He was again wounded in action by gunshots that struck his left arm and thigh on Nov. 30, 1864, at Franklin, Tenn. He also was captured there on Dec. 18, 1864, and held as a prisoner of war at Nashville, Louisville and Camp Chase, Ohio, and Point Lookout, Md., where he was exchanged March 26, 1865. While David was imprisoned, his regiment was ending the war in North Carolina and surrendered April 26, 1865. David took the Oath of Allegiance to the United States at Point Lookout, Md. He was sent from Nashville to Louisville, Ky., Jan. 17, 1865, and then transferred to Camp Chase, Ohio. He was released from prison June 9, 1865. D. W. Burdett of Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C., applied for a pension based on his war service in Company I, Sixteenth Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, on April 26, 1919, in Greenville County (SCDAH S126088:4209). Ed Roberts, W. P. League and W. T. Jones verified his military service.
“D. W. Burdett,” 35, born in South Carolina to parents born there, farmer, and wife, Zellina, 35, born in South Carolina to a mother born in North (actually South?) Carolina and father born in South Carolina, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children born South Carolina: Fedrick (Frederick McPherson), 3; Benjamin (William), 2; and Son (Clyde), 7/12 (NARA Film T9:1230:209D). “David W. Burdett,” 55, born in April? 1845, farmer, married 25 years, and wife, Zelena, 54, born in December 1845, mother of five living children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Fairview Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with five children: Frank M. (Frederick McPherson), 23, August 1876, farmer; Ben W. (Benjamin William), 22, May 1878, general merchant; Clide, 20, November 1879, farm laborer; DeWilks (D. W./David Wilcut Jr.), 18, June 1881, farm laborer; and Robt. (Jesse), 15, January 1885, farm laborer (NARA Film T623:1529:174A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “David W. Burdett,” 65, farmer, married 34 years, and wife, Zelena, 64, mother of five living children, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C. (NARA Film T624:1460:38B). Both were born in South Carolina to parents born there. David and Zelena’s children are Frederick McPherson Sr., Benjamin William, Clyde, David Wilcut Jr. and Robert Jesse Burdett.
Frances Elizabeth “Anna” Burdett, ninth child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born Nov. 23, 1846, in Laurens Co., S C. She died Jan. 25, 1923, in Greenville County. Her grave marker in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery, Gantt, Greenville Co., S.C., is inscribed. Frances lived with her parents in 1850-60. She married Franklin Francis “Frank” Nunnally on Aug. 30, 1866. He was born Aug. 1, 1835, son of Nancy Herndon and Peter Francis Nunnelly. Frank died Dec. 18, 1916, in Greenville Co., S.C., according to his South Carolina Death Certificate, and was buried in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery.

Francis F. Nunnelly served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted Dec. 22, 1861, in Capt. McKittrick’s Company, later Company I, Sixteenth (Greenville) Regiment, South Carolina Infantry Volunteers, at Camp Hampton in Greenville County. He was attached as a nurse and later ward master to a hospital in Adams Run, S.C. He was promoted to fourth corporal by November 1863 and later promoted to fifth sergeant on Aug. 24, 1864. He was a patient Nov. 8, 1864, in Madison House Hospital, Montgomery, Ala. He was wounded and admitted Jan. 10, 1865, to Way Hospital, Meridian, Miss. He was present at the surrender and paroled May 1, 1865, at Greensboro, N.C.
“Anna E. Nunnally,” 32, born in South Carolina to parents born there, farm laborer, and husband, Francis F., 44, born in Virginia to a mother born in South Carolina, father born in Virginia, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Brushy Creek Twp., Anderson Co., S.C., with six children: Mamie B., 12; Lilly E., 8, daughter; Ellen M., 7; James C., 6; Jesse J., 4; and Agnes A., 1 (NARA Film T9:1219:214A). Frank F. Nunnelly, 64, born in August 1835 in South Carolina to parents born there, widowed, living alone, rents home, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Grove Twp., Greenville Co., S.C. (NARA Film T623:1529:133). Francis F. Nunley, 76, born in South Carolina to a mother born there, father born in Virginia, widowed, agent, patented medicine, rents home, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for West End of Grove Twp., Greenville Co., S.C. (NARA Film T624:1461:16A. He lived alone on Greenville Road. Francis and Anna’s children are Mamie B., Lilly E., Ellen M. (“Ella”), Dora, Grover Cleveland, James C. (“Jim”), Jesse J., Agnes A., J. E. and I. M. Nunnally.

Jemima Victoria “Vicky” Willis and Thomas Oscar Burdette, courtesy Franklin D. Burdette
Descendant Franklin D. Burdette provides information about Thomas Oscar Burdette and family.
Thomas Oscar Burdette, tenth child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born Sept. 29, 1848, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Nov. 14, 1919, in Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried there in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville, S.C. Thomas and his third wife, Victoria, had their own Burdette Bible inscribed with the birth and death dates of early “Burdett” family members, including “Fredrick” and “Maryan,” and dates of later “Burdette” family members, including Thomas Oscar’s son Toy Donald Burdette, who later owned the Bible, and his children. Helen Gossett Burdette, wife of Melvin Louis Burdette Sr., copied the Bible’s inscriptions on Feb. 19, 1950. A copy of Helen’s transcription and photocopies of the Bible from Melvin Louis Burdette Jr. are in the possession of Franklin D. Burdette and in this history.

At least three of Thomas Oscar’s brothers served as Confederate soldiers during the Civil War/War Between The States. One of them, Joseph Jesse Burditt, lost a foot and part of his ankle after he was wounded in the Battle of Seven Pines, Va. Another brother, Reuben Carolile, was killed in action during the same battle–Seven Pines–on May 31, 1862. A third brother, David Wilcut, who was twice wounded and captured, was released at the end of the war. Thomas also may have served as a Confederate soldier during the war. Capt. Samuel Mckittrick, an officer in the Confederate Army and a neighbor of Jesse Bramlett Burdett in Greenville County, mentions Tom and David Burdett in a letter written home to his wife from military camp in Georgia in 1864:
May 8, 1864 Dear Wife, ….We are now about a mile beyond Dalton. We left our old camp yesterday and after a very fatiguing march of some 7 miles we took camp in the woods. Our whole, and many of the Divisions, are now lying here awaiting orders to march to the front. I am now only in camp. I cannot here describe the scene. The green-clad hills are (for this is very hilly county) alive with the bustle of soldiers and battling wagons, etc. All appear ready to meet the enemy. There were some collisions yesterday….Tom [Thomas Oscar] and Davis [David] Bircliff [Burditt] [misspelling in the transcript due to illegible or degraded writing]…are well…. Your loving husband, Samuel McKittrick
Thomas was in the Confederate camp with his brother David and may have participated in military or supportive activities. It is not yet known if he actually enlisted or served.
Thomas, who first spelled his surname “Burdett,” added an “e” to it circa 1900. Thomas lived with his parents in 1850-1860. He first married Martha A. Smith on Oct. 1, 1868, most likely in Greenville County. She was born Oct. 14, 1847, the daughter of Elizabeth and Baylis/Baylir Smith. A receipt dated Nov. 4, 1874, indicates T. O. Burdett paid “five dollars in full for coffin made for Mrs. Baylis [or Baylir] Smith (his mother-in-law) decd….” Martha died July 9, 1882. A receipt dated May 19, 1883, in Greenville, S.C., indicates Thomas paid J. C. C. Turner McPhail “Eight Dollars in full for coffin” for his wife. “T. O. Burdeth,” 19, farmer, $240 personal estate, and wife, M. A. (Martha), 19, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Batesville P.O., Butler Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with one child: Mims (Sullivan), 1 (NARA Film M593:1498:504B). All were born in South Carolina. Martha’s mother, Elizabeth Smith, 54, born in South Carolina, keeping house, lived next door. “T. O. Burdett,” 27, works on farm, and wife, Martha, 25, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: Mims (Sullivan), 6; William (Wiley Green), 4; and Lou/Lee, 2, female, daughter (actually son Melville Lee?) (NARA Film T9:1230:206A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
“T. O. Burdett” is named on a 1882 membership list for Bethel Methodist Church. His wife, Martha, may have taught Sunday School there before her death in 1882. Thomas and Martha’s children are Mims Sullivan, Wiley Green and Melville Lee Burdette Sr. Thomas second married Mary E. Smith, sister of his first wife, Martha, on June 22, 1884, most likely in Greenville County. They did not have children. Mary died before Thomas married again in 1897. Thomas third married Jemima Victoria “Vicky” Willis on Aug. 15, 1897, at Bethel Methodist Church Camp Meeting Grounds near Simpsonville, S.C. She was born Feb. 9, 1868, in Locust Hill, S.C., the daughter of Martha Jane Styles and James Irvin Willis, a Confederate veteran of the Civil War/War Between the States. Victoria died Oct 6, 1957, in Greer, S.C., and was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery.
A copy of Victoria’s letter to Thomas accepting his proposal when she was age 29 is in the possession of Franklin D. Burdette. (The original is held by Victoria’s granddaughter Edith Stoddard of Coral Springs, Fla.)
Locust, S.C. July 29, 1897 Dear Mr. Burdett, With pleasure I will try to answer your very much appreciated letter received in due time was glad to hear from you and hear you got home safe. I was very sorry to hear you have been sick. Hope you are well ere this. I have been enjoying good health since you was here. Papa is not very well has not bin well in some time. I was glad to hear you all had a good time at Bethel. You certainly had a crowd to spend the night with you I know you enjoyed it. The protracted meeting is going on at Locust this week and I wish you was here to attend. We have bin having good deal of company two Preachers spent the night here Tuesday night one of them is from N. C. they seemed to enjoy their visit very much. Mr McCarrel has bin here he come twice since you was here he come last Friday and then come back again Tuesday. Sister was not looking for him until the later part of this week he come very unexpected to her both times. A young lady come with him Friday and I showed her your Photo she said O are’nt it Sweet. You have received several Compliments since you was here. They all try to tear me but they don’t make very much.
I would of sent this letter to Greenville but for fear you would not get it. I will send it to Simpsonville. I hope you will come soon and then I will tell you when to come after me. I think you must come once more before you come after me. Hope you will not think anyways hard of me for I told you I would tell you when you come back. I will not have you to wait long. Hope it will be allright I will look for you real soon. You can write and let me know when you are coming if you wish if not come when it suits you. I will be glad to see you any time hope to see you or hear from you real soon.
I am going to church today. One of my brother-in-laws is here today and him and the boy are teasing me and telling me what to write you. I told them I could write it myself. I guess I had better close for this time hope to hear from you or see you real soon. Fondly yours, Victoria
Thomas and Victoria were married in the Arbor during the last Campground Meeting held at Bethel Methodist Church on Aug. 15, 1897. Victoria loved to joke that their marriage “broke up the camp meetings forever” because the camp meetings were never held again after their wedding. The Arbor was adjacent to and opposite of the cemetery which was next to the original church building and between the cemetery and the Elementary School building. The Arbor was about 120 feet long by 60 feet wide and open on all sides. It was constructed with large hand-hewn timbers and covered with a wood-shingle roof. Franklin Donald Burdette, son of Toy Donald Burdette, said he “used to play in the rafters” of the Arbor when he was attending Bethel Elementary School. “Thomas O. Burdett,” 52, farmer, owner of a mortgaged farm, married three years, and wife, Victoria, 32, mother of two living children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: (Melville) Lee, 26, 1874; Toy (Donald), 2, 1898; and James (Oscar), 6/12, December 1899 (NARA Film T623:1529:27A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Thomas O. Burdette,” 60, farmer, farm owner, married 12 years, second (actually third) marriage, and wife, Victoria, 42, married 12 years, first marriage, mother of six living children, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with seven children: (Melville) Lee, 36, farmer; Toy (Donald), 11, farm laborer, home farm; Jimmie (James Oscar), 10, farm laborer, home farm; Minnie (Victoria), 7; Asa (Clyde), 5; Carl (B.), 3; and Dora (Allie), 10/12 (NARA Film T624:1460:37A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Victoria Burdette,” 51, widowed, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with four children: Toy (Donald), 21, farmer, general farm; Minnie (Victoria), 17; Asa (Clyde), 15, farm laborer, home farm; and Dora (Allie), 11, who had attended school within the year (NARA Film T625:1697:43B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
Thomas and Victoria’s children are Toy Donald, James Oscar, Minnie Victoria, Asa Clyde, Carl B. and Dora Allie Burdette.
Nancy Isabella “Bell” Burdett, eleventh child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born April 30, 1850, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died after 1920 and most likely was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. Bell lived with her parents in 1850-1880. She married John B. Dawson on Dec. 1, 1892, according to an inscription in a Burdett Bible. “J. B. Dawson” witnessed one of his father-in-law’s probate records in 1893. John was born circa 1846 in Ohio. He died April 5, 1915, according to the Bible, in Greenville County, and most likely was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. His and Bell’s graves are unmarked. William Ralph Burdette in his family notes identifies John B. Dawson as a “Yankee.” They farmed in Greenville Co., S.C., in 1900-1920. “Bell Dawson,” 69, farm owner, general farm, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes Melvin L. (Lee) Burdette, 46, nephew, farmer (NARA Film T625:-1697:31A). Both were born in South Carolina to parents born there. They do not have children in the 1900-1920 census records.
Descendant Ralph Ellis James of Wylie, Tex., provides the following about Martin G. Burdette.
Martin Gamewell Burdette, twelfth child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born May 23, 1852, in Laurens or Greenville Co., S.C. He died June 29, 1935, in Laurens County and was buried in Salem Methodist Church Cemetery. Martin lived with his parents in 1860-1870. Martin first married Martha Caroline “Mattie” McHugh on Nov. 20, 1873. She was born July 3, 1853. She died Nov. 1, 1897. “M. G. Burdett,” 28, laborer on farm, and wife, M. C., 21, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: Melville (Sidney), 6, daughter; Mary J. (Josephine), 4, daughter; and Starling/Sterling L. (Luther), 2, son (NARA Film T9:1230:206B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Martin Burdett,” 67, farmer, general farm, and wife, Eliza, 47, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Bates Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with four children: Dollie, 14; DeWitt, 11; Gamwell, 9; and Agnes, 6 (NARA Film T625:1697:57A). The children had attended school within the year. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Martin and Mattie’s children are Melville Sidney, Mary Josephine (“Minnie”), Starling/Sterling Luther, Samuel Keiffer, Lee Augustus, Ralph McHugh, Mitte Corda, Lois Quime, Ira Pier and Nan Marie Burdette. Martin second married Eliza F. McCall circa 1900. She was born Oct. 27, 1872. She died April 4, 1936. Their children are Mattie, Alice, Dollie, DeWitt, Gamewell and Agnes Burdette.
Louisa Caroline “Lou” Burdett, thirteenth child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born Sept. 2, 1854, in Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C. She died June 22, 1919, and was buried in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery at Gantt in Greenville County. Her grave marker identifies her as “Lou C. Burdette McHugh,” the wife of M. S. McHugh and L. A. McHugh. Louisa Caroline lived with her parents in 1860-1870. She married Melville S. “Melvin/Malvern” McHugh on Dec. 22, 1872. He was born Oct. 16, 1848. He died March 13, 1881, and was buried in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery. “Louisa McHugh,” 25, keeping house, and husband, Melville, blacksmith, are listed in the 1880 U S. Census for Greenville Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with four children: Marvin, 5; Palmer, 3; Polie, 2; and Pierre, 4/12 (NARA Film T9:1230:76). Louisa and Melville’s children are Marvin J., Palmer W., Perla M. (“Polie”), Pierre and Cora McHugh. Louisa second married L. Augustus McHugh after 1889. He was born May 14, 1861. He died Aug. 5, 1891, and was buried in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery. “Lou C. McHugh,” 53, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Ward 6, Greenville Co., S.C., with two children: Palmer, 33, motorman, street cars, and Perla or Paula, 29, dressmaker (NARA Film T624:1461:299A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
Martha Jane Burdett, fourteenth child of Jesse Bramlett and Agness (Barker) Burdett, was born Feb. 11, 1857, in Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C. She died there July 31, 1901, and was buried beside her husband in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. Her grave marker there lists her birth and death dates and identifies her as the wife of A. L. Bramlett. Martha lived with her parents in 1860-1880. She married a distant cousin, Austin L. “Bud” Bramlett, on Dec. 22, 1880. He was born April 12, 1860, in Greenville County, the son of Nancy Lavina “Viney” Holland and Robert Hulett/Hugh Bramlett. (Robert is the grandson of Mary Peak and John Bramlett of Fauquier Co., Va., and Laurens and Greenville counties, S.C.) Austin died of cancer on May 26, 1894, at home in Greenville County and was buried in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery. His obituary, published Sept. 6, 1894, in the Southern Christian Advocate, identifies his wife as Jane Burdett (Vol. 58, No. 12, p. 6, col. 3). Martha and Austin lived with their parents in 1880. “M. J. Burdett,” 21, is listed in the 1880 U S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S. C., living with her parents, Jesse, 67, and Agnis, 69, and siblings (NARA Film T9:1230:205B). “Austin L. Bramlett,” 20, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Austin Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., living with his parents, R. H., 43, and Levina, 45, and siblings (NARA Film T9:1230:206A). “Martha J. Bramlett,” 40, born February 1860, widowed, boarder, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., living with Margaret Thornburg, 70, widowed, no children, owner of a mortgage-free home (NARA Film T623:1529:108A). They lived on Pendleton Street. Both were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Martha and Austin did not have children.

Caroline Burdett, fourth child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Frederick Reuben Burdett, was born Jan. 20, 1815, in Dials, Laurens Co., S.C. He died April 14, 1877, in Laurens County and was buried in Dials Cemetery, Gray Court, S.C., in an unmarked grave. He married Anna Irene “Irena” “Arena” Curry circa 1841-1842. She was born circa 1817-1822 in South Carolina. She died circa 1880 and was buried in Dials Cemetery in an unmarked grave.Wesley enlisted Nov. 18, 1862, as a private in Company I, Ninth Battalion, South Carolina Infantry Reserves, State Troops (Ninety Days, 1862-1863), at Spartanburg, S.C., during the Civil War/War Between the States. His NARA compiled military service records indicate his name appears on the Nov. 18, 1862–Feb. 14, 1863, company muster roll; but he did not report for duty (NARA Film M267 Roll 237). He was marked absent, perhaps due to his age, 47, and large family with eight children in 1862. Wesley and family lived in Laurens County. “Wesley Burditt,” 36, mechanic, and wife, Arena (Anna Irene), 36, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens, Laurens Co., S.C., with four children: Sarah E., 8; Mary, 6; Nathan R., 4; and James A., 2 (NARA Film M432:855:310B). All were born in South Carolina. “W. Burdett,” 50, carpenter, and wife, (Anna) I. (Irene), 40, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Pleasant Mound P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with eight children: S. (Sarah E.), 20; M. (Mary), 17; N. (Nathan R., 15; Jas. (James A.), 12; C. (Cate), 10; Wm. (Crawford), 7; L. (Lou), 5, daughter; and John, 3, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1222:331A). “Wesley Burdet,” 57, carpenter, and wife, Anna, 48, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Laurens Court House P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with eight children at home: Mary, 23; James, 21, farm laborer; Cate, 19; William, 17; Lou, 15; John, 13; Jane, 9; and Clayton, 4, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M593:1501:201B). “Irene Burdett,” 55, keeping house, widowed, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dial Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with five children, all farm laborers: James (A.), 32; Lula (Lou), 21; John, 20; Janie, 16; and Claton, 14 (NARA Film T9:1233:109C). Also listed: Jefferson Campbell, 19, other, single, farm laborer. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Wesley and Anna’s children are Sarah E., Mary, Nathan R., James A., Cate, William Crawford, Lula (Lou), John, Jane and Clayton Burdett.
Sarah E. Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born Nov. 27, 1842, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died Dec. 28, 1921, in South Carolina.
Mary Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born circa 1844-47 in Laurens Co., S.C.

Nathan R. Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born circa 1846 in Laurens Co., S.C. Family tradition holds he died in 1864 while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.

James A. Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born Dec. 9, 1848, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died March 5, 1938. He married Mary E. Willis. She was born March 28, 1854, and died July 5, 1938. “James A. Burdett,” 50, born in December 1849, farmer, farm owner, married 18 years, and wife, Mary, 46, born in March 1854, mother of five living children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with five children: (E.) Haskell, 18, May 1882, farm laborer; (Fannie) Dee, 16, May 1884; Rapley (W.), 13, August 1886, attending school; (James) Robt., 11, March 1889; and Nannie, 8, February 1891 (NARA Film T623:1533:73A). Also listed is a boarder: Robt. Evans, 19, November 1881, day laborer. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “James A. Burdette,” 61, married 28 years, first marriage, farmer, general farm, and wife, Mary E., 57, first marriage, mother of five living children, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with four children and a daughter-in-law: Edgar H., 27, farmer, married four months, first marriage; his wife, Sue, 25, first marriage; Rapley W., 23, farmer; Robert W., 21, laborer house and farm; and Nannie A., 18 (NARA Film T624:1464:80A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Jim Burdette,” 71, farmer, and wife, Mary, 65, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children and two grandchildren: Robert Burdette, 30, farmer; (Fannie) Dee Bolt, 24 (34/36?); Eugene Bolt, 12; and James Bolt, 11 (NARA Film T625:1699:102A). All were born in South Carolina. “James A. Burdette,” 81, married at age 32, and wife, Mary E., 76, married at age 27, are listed in the 1930 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children and one grandchild: Willis R. (Rapley) Burdette, 41, farmer; Fannie D. Bolt, 46, widowed, married at age 22; and James S. Bolt, 20 (NARA Film T626:2203:39A). All were born in South Carolina. James and Mary’s known children are Edgar Haskell, Fannie Dee, Rapley Willis, J. Robert and Nannie Burdette.
Cate (O.?) Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born circa 1850 in Laurens Co., S.C.
William Crawford Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born circa 1853 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there Aug. 16, 1927, and was buried in Green Pond United Methodist Church Cemetery, Gray Court, S.C. “William C. Burdett,” 45, born in September 1854, boarder, farm laborer, who is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Sullivan Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with Jonathan Babb, 81, born in May 1818, married 58 years, and daughter Lou J. Babb, 40, born in April 1860 (NARA Film T623:1534:312A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. William married Lou J. Babb by 1910. She was born circa 1866 in South Carolina. She died after 1920 and was buried in Green Pond Methodist Church Cemetery. “William Burdette,” 55, farmer, general farm, married two years, first marriage, and wife, Lou, 54, first marriage, no children, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Sullivan Twp., Laurens Co., S.C. (NARA Film T624:1465:154A). Also listed: William Babb, 63, widower, farmer, general farm, brother-in-law. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Will C. Burdett,” 68, cotton mill laborer, and wife, Lou, 65, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Laurens Twp., Laurens Co., S.C. (T625:1700:71B). Also listed: William C. Babb, 73. All were born in South Carolina. They lived on Wallace Street in Watts Mill Village.
Lula (“Lou”) Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born circa 1855 in Laurens Co., S.C. She died Feb. 13, 1924, at 175 Wright, Samson, in Greenville, Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried there in American Spinning Cemetery. Her South Carolina Death Certificate 2571 identifies her as Lou Stevens, daughter of Irene Curry and Wesley Burdette. J. W. Stevens signed the document as informant.
John L. Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born circa 1857-60 in Laurens Co., S.C.
Jane Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born circa 1861 in Laurens Co., S.C. She may have died before 1900.
Clayton Burdett, child of Wesley Bramlett and Anna Irene (Curry) Burdett, was born 1863 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Nov. 6, 1952.

Nancy Elizabeth and John Bramlett Burdett, courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke

John Bramlett Burdett, fifth child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Frederick Reuben Burdett, was born March 3, 1817, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there on July 17, 1905, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate “John Burditt” was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church near Gray Court, S.C., in 1842. John first married a woman named Mary. Mary was born circa 1820 in South Carolina. She died between 1850 and 1854. Mary and John’s children are George R. and Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” Burdette. “John Burditt,” 33, mechanic, and wife, Mary, 30, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: George R., 8, and Mary E., 6, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M432:855:294B). After Mary died, John second married Nancy Elizabeth Thomason circa 1853-1854. She was born April 24, 1821, near Fountain Inn, S.C., the daughter of Elizabeth Bell (Thomason?) and George Thomason who moved to South Carolina from Georgia. Nancy died Sept. 21, 1905. A niece of Alice (Burdett) Moore wrote about John and Nancy and children in a letter to Patrick Bowler dated Feb. 23, 1988:
The old log house [owned by George and Elizabeth Thomason] and the home of John & Nancy Thomason Burdette were destroyed by a cyclone. I spent some happy childhood days there. The homes of two sisters Mahaley Leak (sister of Nancy) and Lizzie Godfrey [second child of Nancy and John Burdett] were within walking distance from the old Thomason house. Alice (third child of Nancy and John Burdett) and Sam Moore lived a few miles away. They raised 6 boys and 3 girls. She was our favorite. Aunt Haley Leak and Aunt Liz never made us happy as Aunt Alice did. All this family buried at Dials M. E. Church which Grandfather Burdette helped to build.

John Burdett’s property is mentioned as a landmark in a plat for 684 acres on Mountain Creek, Rabon Creek, Laurens Co., S.C., re-surveyed for Abner Putnam by Thomas Wright on Oct. 30, 1848 (SCDAH S213192:55:117:2). Other adjacent properties mentioned were owned by Mrs. Thomason, Francis Tomason, R. Henderson, J. Henderson, M. Armstrong, Mrs. Smith, J. Armstrong, J. Glen and Mrs. Coker. “Jno. Burdett,” 42, farmer, $900 real estate and $500 personal estate, and (second) wife, Nancy, 40, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Highland Home P.O., Laurens Co., S.C, with four children: Geo. (George R.), 17, farmer; Elizh. (Mary Elizabeth), 16; Alice, 6; and Wm. (Wylie Andrew), 4 (NARA Film M653:1222:282A). Elizabeth and Alice had attended school within the year. “John Burditt,” 50, carpenter, $350 real estate and $200 personal estate, and (second) wife, Nancy, 47, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Laurens Court House P.O., Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with one child: Willey (Wylie Andrew), 13 (NARA Film M593:1501:249A). All were born in South Carolina. John and Nancy’s daughter Alice was living nearby with Elizabeth E. Thomas (Thomason?) and family in 1870. “John Burditt,” 63, farmer, and wife, Nancy, 59, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with one grown child and his family: “Wiley A. [Andrew] Burditt,” 23, farm laborer; his wife, Nannie C., 18, daughter-in-law, at home; and Fannie, 5/12, granddaughter (NARA Film T9:1233:99D). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “John Burdett,” 83, born in March 1817, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, married 60 years, and wife, Nancy, 79, born in April 1821, mother of four children, three living, both born in South Carolina to parents born there, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C. (NARA Film T623:1533:55A). John and Nancy’s children are Alice and Wylie Andrew (“William”) Burdett.

George R. Burdett, child of Mary and John Bramlett Burdett, was born circa 1841 in Laurens Co., S.C. His military records indicate he was killed in action May 4, 1863, at Zoar Church near Chancellorsville, Va., while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He may have been buried there. He enlisted as a Private in Company D, Third (Laurens’ and James’) Battalion, South Carolina Infantry, on Jan. 26 or Feb. 2, 1862, at Camp Brooks, S.C. He suffered a gunshot wound on Sept. 12, 1862, near Richmond, Va., and was hospitalized there Oct. 4-18, 1862, before returning to duty. George was the only fatality in his battalion during the Battle of Chancellorsville. Eight other soldiers in his unit were wounded. George’s father, John, presented his death claim to the Office of the Confederate States Auditor for the War Department. He filed the claim July 14, 1863 (Confederate Archives, Chap. 10, File No. 33, p. 8). George lived with his parents in 1860. “Geo. Burdett,” 17, farmer, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Highland Home P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with his father, Jno. Burdett, 42, and stepmother, Nancy, 40, and three siblings (NARA Film M653:1222:282A).
Mary Elizabeth (“Lizzie”) Burdett, child of Mary Unknown and John Bramlett Burdett, was born Aug. 25, 1844, in South Carolina. She died of stomach cancer and exhaustion on March 18, 1928, in Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried March 19 in Dials United Methodist Church Cemetery. Her South Carolina Death Certificate 4640 identifies her father as John Burdette and her mother (actually stepmother) as Nancy Thomason. Mary Elizabeth Burdett married John C. Godfrey. He was born Sept. 27, 1847, the son of Nicy and James R. Godfrey, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there Aug. 26, 1911, and was buried in Dials Cemetery. They lived near her father close to Gray Court, S.C. Their children are Nancy L., George Edward, Hattie E., James Wyley, David Butler and Ida Rosanna Godfrey.
Alice Burdett, child of John Bramlett and Nancy Elizabeth (Thomason) Burdett, was born April 23, 1853. She died June 12, 1931. “Alice Burditt,” 16, born in South Carolina, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Laurens Court House P.O., Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with Elizabeth E. Thomas, 46, keeping house (NARA Film M593:1501:249A). Alice “belongs to family 1198” (the family of her father, John Burditt). Also listed are two others: Philless Wright, 18, black, domestic servant, and Elizabeth Bryant, 40, white. Alice married Samuel Moore after 1870. He was born Sept. 23, 1853. He died Oct. 2, 1911. They had three daughters and six sons. Alice and Samuel lived a few miles away her parents. Alice, who also lived in Chester, S.C., owned two prints of the same photograph of her parents, John Bramlett and Nancy (Thomason) Burdett, standing outside of their home near Gray Court. After Alice died the photos were owned by Ruth (Council) Brown’s mother, Blanche (Burdett) Council, and by John Dessie Burdett.
Wylie Andrew Burdett, second child of John Bramlett and Nancy Elizabeth (Thomason) Burdett, was born Aug. 18, 1856. He died Nov. 11, 1935, in Auburndale, Fla. He married Nancy Cynthia Rebecca McHugh on Feb. 6, 1877. She was born Jan. 19, 1862. She died April 12, 1896. “Wiley A. Burditt,” 23, farm laborer, and wife, Nannie C., 18, and child Fannie, 5/12, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with Wylie’s parents, John, 63, farmer, and Nancy, 59 (NARA Film T9:1233:279A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Wylie and Nancy’s children are Fannie May, Daisy Belle, Dorcas, Hattie Mallee, John Dessie, Alice Lois and Infant Son Burdett. Wylie second married Cornelia Frances Malone/Moore circa 1896. “Willie/Wilie Burdett,” 43, born in August 1856, mill cloth folder, married five years, and wife, Fanny, 47 (actually 37), born in June 1863, mother of two children, one living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Greenville Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with five children: Ruth, 3/12, October 1899; Fanny, 14, January 1886 (actually 20, January 1880), cotton mill weaver; Mally, 11, January 1889, mill day laborer; Dessie, 9, March 1891, son; and Alice, 6, May 1894 (NARA Film T623:1529:268B). All were born in South Carolina. Also listed: Emma Brow(n?), 28, May 1872, black, cook, and four boarders: Edward Godfrey, Alford Beard, Lewis Hollis and Robert David. “Wylie A. Burdette,” 52, overseer, cotton mill, rents house, married ten years, second marriage, and wife, Fannie, 46, first marriage, mother of five children, four living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Brandon Mill, Greenville Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with four children: Ruth, 10; Blanch, 7; John D., 5; and Claire, 2 (NARA Film T624:1461:101B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. The family lived on Mason Street. Also listed: Carrie E. Berry, 16, servant, born in North Carolina to parents born there, single. Wylie and family moved to North Carolina by 1920. “Willey Burdet,” 62, carpenter, aluminum plant, and wife, Fannie, 56, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Tallassee Power Co., North Albemarle Township, Stanly Co., N.C., with two children: Blanche, 17, post office clerk, and Claire, 12 (NARA Film T625:1323:207A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. They lived on Walnut Street. Wiley and Fannie lived in Florida in 1930. “Wiley A. Burdette,” 73, blacksmith, own shop, married at age 42, and wife, Fannie, 65, married at age 34, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1930 U.S. Census for Auburndale, Election Dist. 6, Polk Co., Fla. (NARA Film 330:129A). Wylie and Fannie’s children are Ruth (Burdett) Dickie of Auburndale, Fla.; Blanche (Burdett) Council; and Claire Burdett.
Nathan Bramlett Burdett, sixth child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Frederick Reuben Burdett, was born Sept. 20, 1820, in Dials, Laurens Co., S.C. He died there April 14, 1877, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. He was a miller and farmer. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate Nathan B. Burditt/Burdett, single, was a member Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1842. The records indicate Nathan Burditt/Burdett, married, was a member in 1844-45, and he “removed to Salem” in 1845. Nathan first married Janie Stone in or before 1843. She was born in Dials. She died circa 1844-1846 and may have been buried in Dials Cemetery. Janie and Nathan’s children are Reuben W. and Mary Ann Burdett. Nathan second married Abigail “Aggie” Page circa 1847. She was born March 8, 1829, the daughter of Anna Smith and William “Billie” Page of Dials, S. C. Abigail died Dec. 4, 1860, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. “Nathan Burdett,” 30, miller, and (second) wife, Abagil, 21, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with four children: Reubin W., 7; Mary A., 5; William H., 3; Martha E., 1/12 (NARA Film M432:755:305-306). Nathan and Abigail’s children are William Henry, Martha Elizabeth, Milly Frances, Amanda Catherine, Alfred Monroe, John Lafayette and Alexander Caldwell Burdett.

Nathan enrolled but may not have served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. N. Burditt, Private, Company E, Fourth Battalion, South Carolina Reserves, “Appears on Company Muster Roll…for July 14 to Dec. 31, 1864.” He was enrolled April 16, 1864, at Landrum by Lt. McGowan for and during the war but was listed as absent and remarks indicate he “never reported.” Descendant David Burdette on March 8, 2001, suggested Nathan may have enrolled to serve in the reserves unit. “My great-great-grandfather [Nathan Bramlett Burdette] probably enrolled to serve in the senior reserves…in the Fourth Battalion State Troops, Company E (Laurens County). He probably missed the draft in active service because of his age (40) and the loss of his wife in 1860 with nine children ages 2 to 12 years old. The [reserve] assignments were Columbia Military Hospital, Florence Stockade, Chestnut’s Brigade.” Nathan’s son Reuben W. Burdett served and died in Charleston during the war. Nathan third married a woman named Elvira before 1870. She was born circa 1818 or 1825 in North Carolina. She died after 1880. They lived near Dials in 1870. “Nathen Burditt,” 50, farmer, $100 real estate, $100 personal estate, and wife, Elvira, 45, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Laurens Court House P O., Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: Milley, 20, at home; John, 14; and Alexander, 13 (NARA Film M593:1501:250B). All were born in South Carolina. Elvira Burdett, 62, born in North Carolina to parents born there, stepmother, keeping house, widowed, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dial Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with her stepson “Alexander [Caldwell] Burdett,” 21, farmer, head of the family, and his sister, “Millie [Frances] Burdett,” 28, farm laborer, both born in South Carolina (NARA Film T9:1233:108B).

Reuben W.’s old and new military markers in Confederate Section, Magnolia Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis

Reuben W. Burdett, child of Nathan Bramlett and Janie (Stone) Burdett, was born circa 1843 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Oct. 1, 1864, of yellow fever in First Louisiana Hospital, Charleston, S.C., while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He is buried in the Confederate Section of historic Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C. His inscribed military grave marker that has since been replaced with a new military tombstone. “Reubin W. Burdett,” 7, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with father, Nathan Burdett, 30, miller, and stepmother Abagil (Page), 21, and three siblings (Mary A., 5; William H., 3; Martha E. Burdett, 1/12), all born South Carolina (NARA Film M432:755:305-306). His NARA compiled military records indicate he was enrolled as a private in Capt. E. M. Cooper’s Company E, Lt. Col. James Henderson Williams’ Fourth Battalion, South Carolina Senior Reserves, State Troops, at Laurens. (Film M267 Roll 189.) His unit was assigned to Ripley’s Brigade in July-August. The only record in Reuben’s card file indicates he enlisted April 16, 1864, at Laurens, S.C., by Lt. McGowan for and during the war and “Appears on Company Muster Roll…for July 1 to Dec. 31, 1864.” His pay was due from July 14, and he “Died Oct. 1, 1864, Yellow Fever.”
Mary Ann Burdett, child of Nathan Bramlett and Janie (Stone) Burdett, was born circa March 1, 1845, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died July 4, 1895, and was buried in Cedar Shoals Baptist Church Cemetery, Hobbyville, Spartanburg Co., S.C., with an inscribed tombstone. She married James A. “Dock” Waddell before 1867. He was born Oct. 17, 1847, the son of Elizabeth “Betsey” Phillips and James P. Waddle. James died Feb. 5, 1902, and was buried in Cedar Shoals Baptist Church Cemetery, with an inscribed tombstone. “Mary Waddle,“ 24, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Glenn Springs P.O., Cross Anchor Twp., Spartanburg Co., S.C., with husband, James Waddle, 23, farmer, and two children: Ann, 3; Martha 10/12, born July (NARA Film M593:1508:421). Also listed: Charlie Waddle, 21, and Francis Waddle, 17, female. All were born in South Carolina. “Mary A. Waddle,” 30, keeping house, and husband, James A., 34, farm laborer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Cross Anchor Twp., Spartanburg Co., S.C., with four children: Anna, 12; Martha L., 10; Ida A., 7; and Tolivar R., 3 (NARA Film T9:1240:171C). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. James second married a woman named Mary J. circa 1895-1900. She was born Feb. 5, 1853. She died Oct. 12, 1909, and was buried in Cedar Shoals Cemetery with an inscribed tombstone. James A. Waddle 52/53, born October 1847, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, head of the family, and (second) wife, Mary (J.), 47, born February 1853, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Cross Anchor Twp., Spartanburg Co., S.C., with one grown child: Homer, 18, born April 1882, farm laborer (NARA Film T623:1541:214B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. James and Mary Ann’s children are Anna “Annie” Waddell Hughes, Martha L., Ida A., Tolivar R., Judd A., Homer and John Allen Waddle.
William Henry Burdette, child of Nathan Bramlett and Abigail (Page) Burdett, was born Feb. 6, 1849, in Dials, Laurens Co., S.C. He died April 8, 1904, in Spartanburg Co., S.C., and was buried there in Philadelphia Baptist Church Cemetery. He married Drucilla Smith after the 1870 census. She was born circa 1838 in Spartanburg County, the daughter of Jane Meadows and William S. Smith, both natives of Spartanburg County. Drucilla died March 7, 1925, in Spartanburg, S.C., after breaking a hip, and was buried at Philadelphia Baptist Church Cemetery. “William H. Burdett,” 21, born in South Carolina, farmer, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Glenn Springs P.O., Glenn Springs Twp., Spartanburg Co., S.C., living with David H. Smith, 63, farmer, and wife, Sarah, and their four grown children (NARA Film M593:1508:461A). “Henry W. Burdett,” 31, farming, and wife, Drucy, 40, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., S.C., with three others: Milly Page, 69, aunt, widowed; Elizabeth Page, 52, aunt, single; and Mark Pascor, 40, rock mason, married (NARA Film T9:1240:409D). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there except Pascor, who was born in England to parents born there. “Wm. H. Burdette,” 51, born in February 1849, farmer, mortgage-free farm owner, and wife, Drucilla, 61, born in August 1838, married 28 years, no children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Glenn Springs Twp., Spartanburg Co., S.C. (NARA Film T623:1541:262B). Also listed: Tom E. Smith, 64, born in April 1836, farm laborer, brother-in-law. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Drusilla Burdette,” 72, widowed, sister-in-law, mother of two children, none living, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Ward 2, Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., S.C., living with T. C. Grogan, 53, and wife, Mattie, 55, and two of their grown children: Mamie, 31, office bookkeeper, and Evelyn, 29, law office stenographer (NARA Film T624:1473:128B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Drucilla Burdette,” 81, born in South Carolina, widowed, aunt, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Ward 4, Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., S.C., living with Mary F. Bearden and daughters (NARA Film T625:1711:138B). All were born in South Carolina. Census data indicate Drucilla and William Henry had two children who did not survive.
Martha Elizabeth “Mattie” Burdett, child of Nathan Bramlett and Abigail (Page) Burdett, was born circa 1850 in Laurens Co., S.C. She may have died in 1915. She married Dock W. H. Curry circa 1869. He was born circa 1847, the son of Mary Elizabeth Armstrong and John Franklin Curry Sr. and grandson of Frances Rachel Robertson and Nathan Curry. Dock died after the 1910 census. “Martha E. Curry,” 21, keeping house, and husband, D. W., 22, farm laborer, head of the family, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C. (NARA Film M593:1501:283B). “Mattie Curry,” 27, keeping house, and husband, Dock, 32, farmer, both born in South Carolina to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C., with five children born in South Carolina: Mary, 9, at school; Lee, 8, son, at school; Minnie, 4; Louis, 3; and John P., 3, born in April (NARA Film T9:1233:102B). “Martha Curry,” 50, born in April 1850, mother of six children three living, married 31 years, and husband, Dock, 53, born in February 1847, farmer, rents farm, head of the family, both born in South Carolina to parents born there, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C. (NARA Film T625:T623:1533:77B). “Mattie Curry,” 55, mother of five children, three living, married 45 years, mother-in-law, and husband, Dock W. H., 66, father-in-law, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Fairview Township, Greenville Co., S.C., living with Mary and John T. Leopard and family (NARA Film T624:1460:232A). Martha and Dock’s children are Mary, Lee, Minnie, Louis and John P. Curry.
Millie Frances Burdett, child of Nathan Bramlett and Abigail (Page) Burdett, was born Oct. 9, 1850, in Dials, Laurens Co., S.C. She died Dec. 10, 1934, in Chester Co., S.C., and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery. She married William “Billie” Mitchell. He was born circa 1849.
Amanda Catherine Burdett, child of Nathan Bramlett and Abigail (Page) Burdett, was born May 14, 1855, in Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C. She died in 1923 or April 8, 1947. She married Peter Waddle. “Amanda Waddle,” 26, keeping house, and husband, Peter, 29, tenant, head of the family, both born in South Carolina to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Cross Anchor Township, Spartanburg Co., S.C., with three children born in South Carolina: George W., 6; Pinkney, 3; and Simpson, 1 (NARA Film T9:1240:167D). “Amanda Waddle,” 45, born in August 1854, mother of ten children, nine living, married 30 years, and husband, Peter, 49, born in August 1850, carpenter, head of the family, both born in South Carolina to parents born there, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Cross Anchor Township, South of Buncombe Road, Spartanburg Co., S.C., with seven children born in South Carolina: Simpson, 20, August 1879; Maxey, 18, June 1881; Clara, 17, June 1882; Bettie, 14, May 1886; Addie, 12, October 1888; Docia, 7, October 1892; and Robert, 6, May 1894 (NARA Film T623:1541:15B). The eldest five children worked at a cotton mill. Addie is further designated as a spinner. “Amanda Waddle,” 57, mother of nine children, nine living, married 38 years, and husband, Peter, 58, house carpenter, head of the family, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Cross Anchor Township, Spartanburg Co., S.C., with two children born in South Carolina: Docia, 19, and Robert, 15, cotton mill worker (NARA Film T624:1472:241B). Amanda and Peter’s children are George W., Pinkney, Simpson, Maxey, Clara, Bettie, Addie, Docia and Robert Waddle.
Alfred Monroe Burdett, child of Nathan Bramlett and Abigail (Page) Burdett, was born March 19, 1855, in Dials, Laurens Co., S.C. He died Feb. 19, 1936, in Cowpens, Spartanburg Co., S.C., and was buried there in Glendale Cemetery. “Monroe Burditt,” 16, born in South Carolina, laborer, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Laurens Court House P.O., Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C., living with John Owens, 87, and his wife, Nancy, 77, both born in South Carolina (NARA Film M593:1501:250B). The record indicates Monroe “belongs to family 1219” (the family of Nathan Burdett). Alfred married Amanda Tallulah Morris on Nov. 13, 1879, in Spartanburg County. She was born Sept. 10, 1855, in Cedar Springs, Spartanburg Co., S.C., the daughter of Chacey Coggins and William Simpson Morris. Amanda died Dec. 13, 1932, in Cherokee Co., S.C., and was buried in Glendale Cemetery. “Monroe Burdett,” 25, farm laborer, and wife, Amanda, 24, keeping house, both born in South Carolina to parents born there, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Spartanburg Township, Spartanburg Co., S.C. (NARA Film T9:1240:410B). “A. Munroe Burdett,” 45, born in March 1855, shingle maker, married 21 years, and wife, Amanda T.(?), 44, born in September 1855, mother of eight children, four living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Spartanburg Township, Spartanburg Co., S.C., with four children: Willie V. (Victor), 18, January 1882, cotton mill weaver; C. Maud, 16, March 1884, cotton mill weaver; Clara I. (Idella), 14, December 1885, cotton mill weaver; and Marvin M., 3, November 1896 (NARA Film T623:1542:98A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “A. M. Burdett,” 55, farmer, general farm, married 31 years, and wife, Manda, 54, mother of eight children, four living, born in South Carolina, farm laborer, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Draytonville Township, Cherokee Co., S.C., with one child: Marvin M., 13, farm laborer, home farm (NARA Film T624:1454:5B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Alfred M. Burdett,” 64, cotton mill sweeper, and wife, Amanda T., 64, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Gaffney, Limestone Twp., Cherokee Co., S.C., with one child: Marvin M., 23, cotton mill weaver (NARA Film T625:1690:6B). All were born in South Carolina. “A. Monroe Burdette,” 75, father, married at age 24 years, and wife, Telulah A., 74, mother, married age 24, are listed in the 1930 U.S. Census for Greenville Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., living with their son Marvin M. Burdette, 32, mail carrier, and wife, Gladys E., 29, and their two children, all born South Carolina (NARA Film T626:2199:1A). Amanda and Alfred’s children are Infant Son, William Victor (“Willie”), James Arthur, Maude Chasy/Chacy, Clara Idella, Infant Daughter, Infant Daughter and Marvin Moroni Burdett.
Researcher Cheryl Cundick, Ogden, Utah, provides some of the following about John L. Burdettte.
John Lafayette Burdette, child of Nathan Bramlett and Abigail (Page) Burdett, was born Aug. 4, 1856, in Dials, Laurens Co., S.C. He died June 4, 1927. He married twice. John married Nancy Mae “Nannie“ Hill circa 1875. She was born circa 1850-52, the daughter of Enoch Hill. She died in 1884. “John L. Burdett,” 23, farmer, labor, and wife, Nancy, 30, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: Thomas (Reuben), 4, and Walter (Means), 10/12 (NARA Film T9:1233:279A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. John and Nannie’s children are Thomas Reuben, Walter Means, William Knight and John Jackson Burdette. John second married Nancy Elizabeth Mitchell circa 1886. She was born circa 1853. She died sometime after 1910 and was buried in Dunkin Cemetery. John was working in Greenville County and is not listed with the family in 1900: “John L. Burdett,” 44, manager, brickyard, boarder, married ten years, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Chick Springs Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three sons: Walter (Means), 20, born in July 1879; William, 19, April 1881; and John, 17, May 1883 (NARA Film T623:1529:106B). The sons worked as brick yard laborers. All were born in South Carolina. “Nancy E. [Elizabeth Mitchell] Burdett,” 47, born in May 1853, farmer, owner of a mortgaged farm, married 14 years, mother of six children, four living, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Laurens Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with four children: Mack, 13, March 1887, farm laborer; Samuel, 11, September 1888, farm laborer; Della, 8, August 1891; and Anna, 6, May 1894 (NARA Film T623:1534:375A). All were born in South Carolina. “John L. Burdette,” 53, farmer, home farm, farm owner, married 26 years, second marriage, and wife, Nancy E., 56, first marriage, married 26 years, mother of seven children, four living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: Samuel L., 21, farmer, home farm; Nannie L. D., 18, farm laborer, home farm; and Annah V., 15, farm laborer, home farm (NARA Film T624:1464:265B). “John L. Burdette,” 63, farmer, home farm, and wife, Nancy E., 64, laborer, home farm, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C. (NARA Film T625:1700:223A). John and Nancy’s children are Mack M. (Mitchell?), Samuel L., Infant, Infant, Nannie Lou Della and Annah Vernall (“Annie”) Burdette.
Alexander Caldwell “Alex” Burdett, child of Nathan Bramlett and Abigail (Page) Burdett, was born Sept. 27, 1858, in Dials, Laurens Co., S.C. He died Nov. 27, 1925. He married Julia Ann Green in 1880. “Alexander Burdett,” 21, born in South Carolina to parents born there, farmer, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dials, Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes his sister Millie, 28, born in South Carolina, farm laborer, and stepmother, Elvira Burdett, 62, born in North Carolina to parents born there, keeping house (NARA Film T9:1233:108B). “Alexander C. Burdett,” 41, born in September 1858, farmer, married 20 years, and wife, Julia A., 45, born in October 1854, mother of four children, three living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Fairview Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: William M., 18, July 1881, farm laborer; James H., 16, February 1884, farm laborer; and Annie L., 12, October 1887, at school (NARA Film T623:1529:161A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Alex C. and Julia A. Burdett’s children, born between 1880 and 1893, are are William Murray, James Herbert, Annie L. and Lula Jane “Lulu” Burdett. “Zander Burdett,” 55, farmer, general farm, rents farm, married 35 years, and wife, Julia, 45, mother of four children, three living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Fairview Twp., Greenville Co., S.C. (NARA Film T624:1460:234B).
Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” Rhodes and Frederick Reuben Burdett’s children are Eliza Ann (“Lizzie”), Reuben Thomas, Elizabeth Frances, Frederick Henry and possibly Frances (“Fanny”) Burdette.
The late Evelyn (Burdette) Hinton of Easley, S.C., daughter of William Edgar Burdette and granddaughter of Hiram Peterson Burdette, provided names of Frederick Reuben and Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” (Rhodes) Burdette’s children from her father’s Bible to Martha Anne Curry Duke.

Eliza Ann (Burdette) Curry, courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke
Eliza Ann “Lizzie” Burdette, first child of Frederick Reuben and Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” (Rhodes) Burdett, was born March 1, 1827, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died Oct. 18, 1908, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery, Gray Court, S.C. Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate “Elisa Ann Burditt,” single, joined Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church on July 31, 1842. The records also indicate she was a member in 1844-45. She married Ivory Curry on Dec. 23, 1847, in Laurens County. Rev. Tollaver Robertson, Baptist Minister, performed their marriage ceremony. Church Class Books last list her as Elisa Curry, married, in 1848. Ivory was born Jan. 23, 1825, in Gray Court, Laurens Co., S.C., the son of Nathan Curry Jr. and his first wife, Frances Robertson. (Frances is the sister of Rev. Tollaver Robertson. Nathan Curry Jr. is son of Nathan Curry Sr., also of Laurens County.) Ivory died May 31, 1887, in Laurens County and was buried in Dial’s Methodist Church Cemetery. His grave is marked with a soldier’s stone.

Ivey Curry, 24, farmer, and wife, Eliza A., 23, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children (Martha Curry, 1; Wm. T. Fuller, 9), all born South Carolina (NARA Film M432:855:310). Ivary Currey, 34, farmer, and wife, Eliza, 30, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Highland Home P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with six children: ([Martha] Isabella, 11; [William Collier] Colyer, 9; Ella [Melissa], 6; [Jasper] Jno., 5; Elizh. Fs. [Elizabeth Francis], 2; and A. McD. [Austin McDuffie], 1/12) and Ivory’s stepmother, Sally Currey, 73, widow, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1222:290A). “Irby” Curry, 45, farmer, and wife, Liza, 43, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Laurens P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with eight children ([Martha] Isabella, 20; [William Collier] Calyer, 19; Elizabeth [Elizabeth Francis], 16; [Jasper] John, 14; Duffy [Austin McDuffie], 8; Fead [Sally A.?], 10, Donke [Lucius Dunklin], 4; and [Calvin] Plummer, 2), all born South Carolina, (NARA Film M593:1501:250A). Ivory Curry, 54, farmer, and wife, Eliza A., 57, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with four children (Duffie [Austin McDuffie], 20; Lucius D. [Dunklin], 14; [Calvin] Plumer, 12; and Samuel [Luther], 9), and a cousin (Nicey C. Ball, 24), all born South Carolina (NARA Film T9:1233:102B). Eliza Curry, 73, born March 1827, widowed, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with son Sam (Samuel Luther) Curry, 27, born November 1872, farmer, and wife, Nannie, 25, born August 1874, mother of one living child, and one child, Jewell, 2, born August 1897, all born South Carolina (NARA Film T623:1533:77B). (Eliza died Oct. 18, 1908.)

Ivory served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a Private in Company C, Nint Regiment, South Carolina Reserves, State Troops, on Nov. 17, 1862, at Laurens (NARA Film M381 Roll 8). The unit organized in June 1862 in Laurens District for 90 days and disbanded in January or February 1863. Ivory then enlisted as a Private in Company A, Sixth Regiment, South Carolina Cavalry, on Feb. 15, 1863 (NARA Film M381 Roll 8; M267 Rolls 38-40). The unit, also known as “Aiken’s Partisan Rangers” and “First Partisan Rangers” and “Dixie Rangers,” organized in January 1863 with the Sixteenth South Carolina Cavalry Battalion as its nucleus and soldiers who had served in other units. Ivory was hospitalized, illness or injury not specified, Oct. 25, 1863, at Adams Run, S.C., and then furloughed home by the Medical Examining Board. He most likely did not return and survived the war.

Ivory and and Eliza lived in Laurens County. “Eliza A. Curry,” 23, and husband, “Ivey” Curry, 24, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with one child: Martha E. (Isabella), 1 (NARA Film M432:855:310). Also listed: Wm. T. Fuller, 9. All were born in South Carolina. “Eliza Currey,” 30, and husband, “Ivary,” 34, farmer, $1500 real estate, $700 personal estate, head of the family, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Highland Home P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with six children: (Martha) Isabella, 11; (William Collier) Colyer, 9; Ella (Melissa), 6; (Jasper) Jno., 5; Elizh. Fs. (Elizabeth Francis), 2; and A. McD. (Austin McDuffie), 1/12 (NARA Film M653:1222:290A). Also listed is Ivory’s stepmother, Sally Currey, 73, widow. All were born in South Carolina. “Liza Curry,” 43, keeping house, and husband, “Irby” Curry, 45, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Laurens P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with eight children: (Martha) Isabella, 20; (William Collier) Calyer, 19; Elizabeth (Elizabeth Francis), 16; (Jasper) John (Rhodes), 14; Duffy (Austin McDuffie), 8; Fead (Sally A.?), 10, Donke (Lucius Dunklin), 4; and (D. F. Calvin) Plummer, 2 (NARA Film M593:1501:250A). All were born in South Carolina. “Eliza A. Curry,” 57, keeping house, and husband, Ivory Curry, 54, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with four children: Duffie (Austin McDuffie), 20; Lucius D. (Dunklin), 14, farm laborer; (D. F. Calvin) Plumer, 12, farm laborer; and Samuel (Luther), 9 (NARA Film T9:1233:102B). Also listed: Nicey C. Ball, 24, cousin, at home. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Eliza lived with her son Samuel in 1900: “Eliza Curry,” 73, born in March 1827, widowed, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C., with her son Sam (Samuel Luther) Curry, 27, born November 1872, farmer, married six years, and wife, Nannie, 25, August 1874, mother of one living child, and their child, Jewel, 2, August 1897 (NARA Film T623:1533:77B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Ivory and Eliza’s children are Martha Isabella, William Collier, Ella Melissa, Jasper John Rhodes, Elizabeth Francis, Austin McDuffie, Sally A., Lucius Dunklin, D. F. Calvin Plummer and Samuel Luther Curry.
Martha Isabella Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born Sept. 19, 1849, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died April 3, 1925, in Fountain Inn, Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried in Fountain Inn Municipal Cemetery. She married Henry Jacob “Jake” Watson circa 1876. He was born Oct. 6, 1856, in South Carolina. He died May 26, 1939, and was buried in Fountain Inn Municipal Cemetery.
William Collier Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born May 1, 1851, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there Dec. 24, 1928, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. He married Martha Melanie “Mattie” Yeargin circa 1872-77. She was born May 29, 1850, in Laurens County. She died there Oct. 5, 1934, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. Their child isIvory Eldridge Curry, who was born May 5, 1878. He died May 26, 1911.
Ella Melissa Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born April 5, 1853, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died Sept. 15, 1913, and was buried in Fountain Inn Municipal Cemetery. She married Jefferson Davis Owings on July 13, 1879. He was born Oct. 27, 1860. He died July 8, 1899, and was buried in Fountain Inn Municipal Cemetery.
Jasper John Rhodes Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born Aug. 6, 1855, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there March 9, 1939, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery, Gray Court, S.C. He married Sarah Elizabeth Owings on Aug. 5, 1879. She was born April 17, 1866, in Laurens County. She died there April 24, 1931.
Elizabeth Francis “Freddie” Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born circa 1857 in Laurens Co., S.C. She married William D. Leslie circa 1874. He was born circa 1852 in South Carolina. “Feddie Leslie,” 20, keeping house, and husband, William Leslie, 27, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with two children: Marvin, 4, and Samuel, 2 (NARA Film T9:1233:102B). Also listed: Elijah Leslie, 24, brother, farmer. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Freddie Leslie,” 43, born in March 1857, mother of four children, three living, married 24 years, and husband, Wm. Leslie, 46, born in November 1853, carpenter, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Part of Williamston Twp., Anderson Co., S.C., with three children who all worked at a cotton mill: Sam’l E., 21, October 1878; Rob’t M., 18, December 1881; and Marvin D., 23, January 1872, newly married (NARA Film T623:1517:146B). Also listed: Marvin’s wife, Ollie Leslie, 17, August 1882, cotton mill weaver, no children, and a nephew: Frank/Frances Leslie, 16, July 1874, cotton mill weaver. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Francis and William’s children are Marvin Devant, Samuel E. and Robert M. Leslie.
Austin McDuffie Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born May 4, 1860, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there April 11, 1898, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery, Gray Court, S.C. He married Nancy Lou Ida Yeargin circa 1894. She was born April 9, 1862, in Laurens County. She died there Jan. 11, 1937, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery.
Sally A. Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born July 25, 1862, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died there May 30, 1864, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery, Gray Court, S.C.
Lucius Dunklin “Dunk” Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born March 29, 1866, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there April 3, 1936, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. He married Lula Langston. She was born June 5, 1872, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died there Dec. 14, 1937, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery.
D. F. Calvin Plummer Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born circa 1868 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there May 29, 1926, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. He first married a woman named Elizabeth S. circa 1892-93. She was born circa 1871 in South Carolina. She died in Laurens County and was buried there in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. “Plumer Curry,” 33, born in August 1866, farmer, married six years, and wife, Elizabeth, 28, born in June 1871, mother of three living children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: Brucie, 5, September 1894, daughter; Noree, 4, September 1895, daughter; and [Cl__?] age ? born ? son? (entry damaged) (NARA Film T623:1533:7A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “D. F. Plumer Curry,” 42, farmer, general farm, married 18 years, first marriage, and wife, Lizzie, 37, laborer, house farm, mother of eight children, five living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C., with five children: Brucie, 15, laborer house farm; Nora, 13, laborer house farm; Leona, 11, laborer, house farm; Susie, 5; and John, 3 (NARA Film T624:1464:76B). All were born in South Carolina. “Plumer Curry,” 54, farmer, and wife, Lizzie, 48, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C., with four children: Leona Switzer? 18, married; Susie Curry, 14; John Curry, 12; and Leo/Lou? 4 1/12 (NARA Film T625:11699:104A). All were born in South Carolina. “D. Plumer Curry,” 64, farmer, general farm, married age 26, and wife, Elizabeth S., 55, married age 17, are listed in the 1930 U.S. Census for Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C., with four children and a daughter-in-law: Leona, 27, single; Sally R., 24; John, 21, farmer, general farm, married; Clara M., 21, daughter-in-law; and Leo/Lou? 15 (NARA Film T626:2203:47B). All were born in South Carolina. Plummer second married Helen Pope Payne. Plummer and Elizabeth’s known children are Brucie, Nora, Son (died young?), Leona, Child, Child, Susie/Sally R., John and Leo/Lou? Curry.
Samuel Luther Curry, child of Eliza Ann Burdett and Ivory Curry, was born Nov. 15, 1871, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there Jan. 15, 1938, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. He married Nancy Emma “Nannie” Moore circa 1893. She was born Aug. 30, 1872, in Laurens County. She died there April 30, 1958, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. “Sam Curry,” 27, born in November 1872, farmer, married six years, and wife, Nannie, 25, born in August 1874 (1871), mother of one living child, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Dials Township, Laurens Co., S.C., with one child: Jewel, 2, August 1897 (NARA Film T623:1533:77B). Also listed is Sam’s mother, “Eliza Curry,” 73, born in March 1827, widow. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
Reuben Thomas Burdette’s grave in Bramlett UM Church Cemetery, courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke

Reuben Thomas “R. T.” Burdette, second child of Frederick Reuben and Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” (Rhodes) Burdett, was born June 30, 1829, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died there May 18, 1866, and was buried in Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery. His obituary appears in the Oct. 12, 1866, edition of the Southern Christian Advocate:
R. Thomas Burditt, was born June 30th, 1829, embraced religion and joined the M. E. Church, South, Laurens Ct., So. Ca. Conf., April 18th, 1842, married Miss L. C. Peterson, March 27, 1851, and died in the faith, May 18, 1866. His mother was a zealous Christian, and, in early life, trained him in the way in which he should go. He never doubted his conversion, and was truly a practical follower of Christ. His seat was rarely vacant in the Lord’s house up to his last illness. When present he was all attention. He loved to sit in meek humility and learn. Though, of moderate means, his house was the preacher’s home. Many have shared his unpretending hospitality. His circumscribed means prevented his doing much his heart was free to for the Church and people of God; yet he promptly met the Church’s demands. He was an unassuming, humble patient, and self denying Christian, “who feared God and eschewed evil” He served the Church efficiently as class steward for a year before his decease. He was the subject of much physical anguish, never able to walk without a staff, for many years, yet his confidence in God remained unshaken to the end. He leaves a wife, and three promising sons to mourn his loss. We all miss him at Bramlets. J R. L. (SCA, Vol. 29, No. 41, p. 7, col. 2)
Reuben was a member of Wallace Masonic Lodge, located in the country near Bramlett Church. “R. T. [Reuben Thomas] Burditt,” “Joseph T. Burditt” and “W. S. [B.?]Burdett” as well as several other citizens of Laurens District residing near Mountain Shoals and Pool Town, Laurens Co., S.C., signed a petition on Nov. 17, 1859, against opening a road from Mountain Shoals through Pool Town to Craigs Cross Roads in Laurens Co., S.C. (SCDAH S165015:77).

“R. T. Burditt/Burdett” served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He began preparing for war by joining the local militia on Aug. 9, 1860, according to Burdette descendant Dennis Hembree of Laurens and Columbia, S.C. An historical marker at Bramlett United Methodist Church near Gray Court, S.C., indicates local residents engaged in military training on the grounds in 1860 before war was declared. Reuben joined as a third corporal and later served as a private in Company E, Laurens County “Enoree Mosquitoes,” Fourteenth Regiment, Gregg’s Brigade/McGowan’s Brigade, South Carolina Infantry, C.S.A. His NARA compiled military service records indicate he enlisted at age 35 on July 15, 1861, at Laurens, S.C. (Film M267 Roll 271). He was reduced to private on Jan. 23, 1862 due to illness. He is last listed on the January-February 1864 company muster roll. He was discharged “because of disability (spinal irritations)” on April 19, 1864. Family members say he had suffered a spinal injury and contracted a disease before the war which may have later caused complications and contributed to his death on May 18, 1866. His obituary indicates he was “the subject of much physical anguish, never able to walk without a staff, for many years.” His regiment organized in July 1861 at Lightwoodknot Springs, near Columbia, S.C., with recruits from Laurens, Greenville, Spartanburg and other nearby counties.
Class Books preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicate Reuben T. Burditt, who was married, joined Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church on April 24, 1842. The records also indicate he was a member in 1844-1866.

Louise Caroline Peterson, wife of Reuben Thomas and Frederick Henry Burdette
“Thomas Burdett” married Louise Caroline Peterson on March 27, 1851, in Laurens Co., S.C. Rev. Tolaver Robertson, Baptist Minister, performed their marriage ceremony. She was born April 12/23, 1833, the daughter of Hiram Peterson and his first wife, Nancy Pitts. Louise died Sept. 28, 1904, and was buried in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery. After Reuben Thomas Burdett died, Louise married his brother Rev. Frederick Henry Burdett in 1866. “R. T. Burdett,” 31, farmer, $2,000 real estate and $300 personal estate, and wife, C. (Louise Caroline), 27, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Youngs Store P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: Jas. C. (James Capers), 7; H. P. (Hiram Peterson), 6; and “no name” (Hilliard Jackson), 10/12, male, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1222:329B). Caroline and Reuben’s children are James Capers, Hiram Peterson and Hilliard Jackson Burdett. Louise Caroline is listed in two additional census records with R. T.’s children and then in 1900 a few years before she died: Caroline Burdett, 37, with second husband, Fred. H. Burdett, 37, farmer, head of the family, and three of Reuben’s children and two of Frederick’s children: (Capus [James Capers], 17; Hiram [Peterson], 15; [Hilliard] Jackson, 10; and Nancy, 2; and Babe [Thomas Olinthus], 5/12) and Reuben’s mother, Elizabeth Burdett, 80, all born South Carolina, 1870 Young’s Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., census (NARA Film M593:1501:278A). Caroline Burdett, 47, with (second) husband, Fred, 47, farmer, head of the family, and five children ([James] Capers, 27; [Hilliard] Jackson, 20; Nannie [Nancy], 11; Thomas [Olinthus], 10; Carrie [Purchase], 2), all born South Carolina, 1880 Young’s Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., census (NARA Film T9:1233:293B).
James Capers Burdett, child of Reuben Thomas and Louise Caroline (Peterson) Burdett, was born circa 1853 in Laurens Co., S.C. He may have died by Sept. 28, 1904: He is not listed as a survivor in his mother’s 1904 obituary. Church records indicate “Jas. Capers Burdett” was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1870-1875. “Capus Burdett,” 17, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with his mother, Caroline, and stepfather/uncle, Frederick H. Burdett (NARA Film M593:1501:278A). “Capers Burdett,” 27, laborer, born in South Carolina to parents born there, (step)son, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with his mother, “Caroline Burdett,” 47, and stepfather/uncle, “Fred Burdett,” 47, farmer, and four siblings (NARA Film T9:1233:293B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Family tradition holds that he married, probably after 1880.

Hiram Peterson Burdette, born Dec. 9, 1854, and wife, M. E., born June 19, 1854, Bramlett UMC Cemetery

Hiram Peterson Burdette and Melissa Elizabeth Canaday, courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke
Hiram Peterson Burdette, child of Reuben Thomas and Louise Caroline (Peterson) Burdett, was born Dec. 9, 1854, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died in 1929 in Kirk, Limestone Co., Tex., while visiting relatives. His remains were shipped back to Laurens County for burial in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery. He is listed as “H. P. Burdett,” a survivor, in his mother’s Sept. 28, 1904, obituary. “Hiram Burdett,” 15, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with his mother, Caroline, and stepfather/uncle, Frederick H. Burdett (NARA Film M593:1501:278A). All were born in South Carolina. Hiram married Melissa Elizabeth Cannady on Jan. 8, 1877, in Laurens County. She was born circa 1860 in South Carolina. She died in September 1904. Her grave in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery is marked with a companion tombstone. “Hiram Burdett,” 25, laborer, and wife, Malisa, 20, laborer, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: Collier (Ezell), 2; Euna (Valarie), 1; and (James) Clarence, 4/12, born in February (NARA Film T9:1233:293B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Hiram P. Burditte,” 45, born in December 1854, farmer, rents farm, married 23 years, and wife, Malissa E., 45, born in June 1854, mother of 11 children, nine living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Woodruff Twp., Spartanburg Co., S.C., with nine children: Collier Ezell, 22, November 1877, farmer; Una (Euna Valarie), 21, January 1879; (James) Clarence, 20, January 1880, at school; Bertha (Odelus), 18, February 1882; (William) Edgar, 17, March 1883; (Hiram) Speer, 13, January 1887; (Thomas) Brooks, 11, May 1889; Columbus (Roy), 9, April 1891; and (Nancy) Ila (“Leah”), 6, September 1893 (NARA Film T623:1542:317B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Hiry P. Burdett,” 55, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, married 33 years, and wife, Malissa, 55, mother of 11 children, nine living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with five children: (James) Clarence, 30, public school teacher; (Hiram) Speer, 22; (Thomas) Brooks, 21, general farmer; Columbus (Roy), 18, farm laborer; and Leah (Ila) Burdett, 16 (NARA Film T624:1464:284A). All were born in South Carolina. Hiram and Melissa’s children are Collier Ezell, Euna Valarie, James Clarence, Bertha Odelus, William Edgar, Luther Guy, Hiram Speer, Thomas Brooks, Columbus Roy, Nancy Ila (“Leah”) and Mary Leola Burdett.

Charlie and Euna Burdette Poole and child, unidentified man at far left

Nancy Ila Burdette, daughter of Hiram and Melissa, and her brothers, below

Bramlett Church Cemetery: Mary Leola, Dau. of H. P. & M. E. Burdett, Aug. 6, 1898, Jan. 14, 1900. “Darling we miss thee.”
Hilliard Jackson Burdett, child of Reuben Thomas and Louise Caroline (Peterson) Burdett, was born in 1859 in Laurens Co., S.C. He was a contractor who died of chronic nephritis and arteriosclerosis on April 3, 1920, in Laurens County, according to his South Carolina Death Certificate 7960. His son W. P. Burdette, Clinton, S.C., signed the document as informant. He was buried in Greenwood Cemetery. “Jackson Burdett,” 10, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with his mother, Caroline, and stepfather/uncle, Frederick H. Burdett (NARA Film M593:1501:278A). All were born in South Carolina. “Jackson Burdett,” 20, born South Carolina, single, laborer, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with mother, Caroline Burdett, 47, keeps house, and stepfather/uncle Fred, 47, farmer, and four siblings (Capers, 27, laborer; Nannie, 11, laborer; Thomas, 10, laborer; and Carrie, 2), all born South Carolina (NARA Film T9:1233:293B). Hilliard married Sarah Eula Watts on May 6, 1885, in Clinton, S.C. She was born circa 1868 in South Carolina. “Hillard J. Burdett,” 40, born in September 1859, house contractor, rents home, married in 1885, 15 years, and wife, Sarah E., 34, March 1866, both born South Carolina to parents born there, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Greenwood, Greenwood Co., S.C., with four children born South Carolina: Florence, 11, April 1889; Pierre, 8, October 1891; Kenneth, 6, February 1894; and Lawrie (Lowry) W., 2, October 1897 (NARA Film T623:1530:26A). “H. J. Burdette,” 50, house builder, married 25 years, and wife, Eula S., 44, mother of seven children, five living, both born South Carolina, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Clinton, Laurens Co., S.C., with five children born South Carolina: Florrie M., 21, stenographer, furniture store; W. Pierre, 18, bookkeeper, advertising syndicate; E. Kenneth, 15; Lowry W., 12; and Sybil M., 5 (NARA Film T624:1464:17A). “Hilliard J. Burdette,” 60, architect, born in Laurens, S.C., to parents born there, rents home, and wife, Sara M., 52, born in Clinton, S.C., to a mother born there and father born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Ward 6, Clinton, Hunter Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with three children born in Clinton, S.C.: Florrie M. (Mills), 30, bookkeeper; Pierre W. (William), 27, bookkeeper; and Cybble M. (Sybil Mayes), 19 (NARA Film T625:1699:254). They lived on North Broad Street. All were born in South Carolina. Hilliard and Sarah’s children are Frances Louise (“Frannie”), Florrie Mills, William Pierre, Kenneth Edward, Columbus Rhett, Lowery Wilson and Sybil Mayes Burdette.

Florrie Mills Burdette, pictured here in childhood and as a young woman, who lived in Laurens County, shared a wealth of family history with Martha Anne Curry Duke when Martha visited the area in 1975.
Elizabeth Frances Burdett, third child of Frederick Reuben and Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” “Betsy” Rhodes Burdett, was born Jan. 7/8, 1831, in Laurens Co., SC. She died April 28, 1915, and was buried in Dials Methodist Church Cemetery. Her South Carolina Death Certificate 7080 identifies her as Frances Elizabeth Burton, daughter of Elizabeth Rhodes and Reuben Burdett, born Jan. 8, 1831, and died April 28, 1915, at age 84 years 3 months 20 days of acute congestion of kidneys. J. R. Burton, Waterloo, S.C., signed as informant. “Elizabeth Burdith,” 18, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., with her parents, Elizabeth (Frances Rhodes), 45, and Reubin (Frederick), 65, farmer, $2,000 real estate, and two siblings: (Reuben) Thomas, 21, farming, and Fredrick, 17, and one other, Frances Wells, 12 (NARA Film M432:855:259A). All were born in South Carolina. Elizabeth is named in her father’s estate records as “Elizabeth F. Burton” wife of “James M. Burton.” She married James M. Burton on Sept. 25, 1851. Rev. Tolaver Robertson, Baptist Minister, performed their marriage ceremony. James was born circa 1819. He died April 16, 1865. “Elizabeth F. Burton,” 26, and husband, James M., 41, harness maker, head of the family, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., S.C., with four children: Wm. C., 7; Mary C., 6; John W., 4; and Laura, 2 (NARA Film M653:1226:311B). All were born in South Carolina. James does not appear with his wife and family in the 1870 census.

James served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He died of a fever as a prisoner of war on April 17, 1865, at Point Lookout, Md., and was buried there in Grave 1488 at the Confederate Cemetery. James served in two units during the war. He first enlisted in June or July 1862 as a private in Company C, Ninth Regiment, South Carolina Reserves, State Troops, and most likely served until January 1863 (NARA Roll M381:8). Four brothers-in-law—Ivory Curry, John Bramlett Burdett, Nathan Bramlett Burdett and Wesley Bramlett Burdett—enlisted in the same unit. His NARA compiled military service records indicate he was conscripted as a private in Company C, First Regiment, South Carolina Heavy Artillery, on May 12, 1864, at Columbia, S.C. (NARA Film M267 Roll 82). He was captured March 16, 1865, at Smiths Ford and arrived at Newburn, N.C., in April. He was sent to Point Lookout, Md., where he died April 17, 1865, after the surrender but before he could be paroled and released.
After James died, Elizabeth moved into Laurens County. “Elizabeth Burton,” 40, keeping house, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Laurens P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with six children: William (C.), 18; Mary C., 16; John (W.), 14; Laura, 12; Fredrick (H.), 9; and James, 5 (NARA Film M593:1501:157). All were born in South Carolina. “Elizabeth Burton,” 49, keeping home, widowed, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dials Twp. Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: Laurie, 23; Frederick, 18; and James, 15, farm laborer. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there (NARA Film T9:1233:43). “Elisabeth F. Burton,” 69, widowed, mother, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 5, Greenville, Greenville Co., S.C., living with her daughter Mary C. Garrett, 45, born October 1854, widowed, mother of two living children, owner of a mortgage-free home, and her two children (Ford P., 15, May 1885, student and Minnie Y., 10, January 1890, student) (NARA Film T623:1529:93A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. They lived on Rhett Street. “Elizabeth Burton,” 78, mother, widowed, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Laurens Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., living with her son Fred H. Burton, 47, and wife, Kittie M., 36, and their two children (NARA Film T624:1465:7B). James and Elizabeth’s children are William C., Mary C., John W., Laura, Frederick Henry and James M. Burton Jr.

William C. Burton, child of Elizabeth F. Burdett and James M. Burton, was born circa 1852 in Laurens or Spartanburg Co., S.C. He lived with his parents in 1860 and 1870. He married a woman named Martha. “William Burton,” 28, farm laborer, and wife, Marther, 26, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Dial Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with one child: Demetariah, 10/12, born August, son (NARA Film T9:1233:109B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
Mary C. Burton, child of Elizabeth F. Burdett and James M. Burton, was born circa 1854 in South Carolina. She died sometime after 1900. She married a man named Garrett. “Mary C. Garrett, 45, born in October 1854, widowed, mother of two living children, owner of a mortgage-free home, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Ward 5, Greenville, Greenville Co., S.C., with two children: Ford P., 15, born in May 1885, student, and Minnie Y., 10, January 1890, student (NARA Film T623:1529:93A). Also listed: Elizabeth F. Burton, 78, widowed, mother of six children, five living. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. They lived on Rhett Street.
John W. Burton, child of Elizabeth F. Burdett and James M. Burton, was born circa 1856 in Spartanburg Co., S.C.
Laura Burton, child of Elizabeth F. Burdett and James M. Burton, was born circa 1858 in Laurens or Spartanburg Co., S.C.
Frederick Henry Burton, child of Elizabeth F. Burdett and James M. Burton, was born circa 1861 in Laurens or Spartanburg Co., S.C. He married a woman named Kittie M. circa 1897. She was born circa 1874 in South Carolina. She died sometime after 1910. “Fred H. Burton,” 37, born in November 1862 in South Carolina to parents born there, farmer, married three years, and wife, Kittie M., 26, born in September 1873 in South Carolina to parents born there, mother of one living child, and one child: Almer S.? son, 8, born December 1897 in South Carolina, 1900 Dials Twp., Laurens Co., S.C. (NARA Film T623:1533:61-62). “Fred H. Burton,” 47, farmer, married 13 years, and wife, Kittie M., 36, mother of three children, two living, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Laurens Township, Laurens Co., S.C., two children: Almer, 12, and Mildred, 4/12 (NARA Film T624:1465:7B). Also listed: Elizabeth Burton, 78, Fred’s mother, widowed. All were born in South Carolina. Frederick and Kittie’s known children are Almer S. and Mildred Burton.
James M. Burton Jr., child of Elizabeth Frances Burdett and James M. Burton, was born Feb. 24, 1865, in Spartanburg Co., S.C. He died March 11, 1899, and was buried in Springwood Cemetery.
Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt/Burdette
Son of Frederick Reuben Burdette
Wrote Burditt Diary with Bramlett Church & Family History

Portrait of of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette holding Rotteck’s History of the World — Illustrated,
courtesy Great-Granddaughter Martha Anne Curry Duke
The book held by Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt in the portrait above is a volume of world history written by Charles von Rotteck, first published in Europe and found originally in Germany and Holland. The latter place, specifically Amsterdam, is believed to be Frederick Burdette’s birthplace. The book merely may be a prop from the professional photographer or a prized possession of Frederick who may have known of the family tradition his great-grandfather’s geographical and genealogical connection to Holland. The book may be a visual clue to the origin of his ancestors, who may have gone to Amsterdam from Norrmandy. Or perhaps he was merely interested in world religious and military history. The book’s full title is History of the World – Illustrated, from the earliest period to the year 1840, with an account of the origins, manners and customs of all the nations of the earth, the rise and progress of Judaism, Paganism and Christianity and an account of the various revolutions and wars. The history book, published in America in 1852 by W. A. Leary & Co. in Philadelphia, suggests or indicates Frederick’s portrait was taken in or after that year. Portrait courtesy of Martha Anne Curry Duke and the late Viola Pruitt (Mrs. Oscar) Cannon, wife of Thomas Olinthus Burdette, of Brevard, N.C. Viola inscribed the back of the photo:
Thomas Burdette, Louise Caroline Peterson’s (first husband); second-married his brother, Frederick. Both men were Masons, Wallace Lodge near Bramlett’s Church, Laurens Co. This picture Frederick Burdette, L. Caroline Peterson’s 2nd. h[usband].
Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, fourth child of Frederick Reuben and Sarah Elizabeth (Rhodes) Burdette, was born Jan. 21, 1833, in Laurens Co., S.C. He signed his surname “Burditt” in the 1860s, but other records identify him as a Burdett or Burdette. He died Nov. 5, 1892, at home in Laurens County and was buried as Rev. F. H. Burdette in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery near Gray Court, S.C.

Tombstone of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, Bramlett UMC Cemetery, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis
Frederick’s tombstone, ordered Sept. 16, 1896, from Clark & Cooper at Youngs, S.C., is made of dark Georgia marble. The dimensions are three feet tall by about one foot wide and two inches thick. The marker was set in a base. The inscription, created with porcelain-lined lettering, identifies Frederick as “Rev. F. H. Burdette” and provides his full birth and death dates and the following epitaph: “He has gone to reap the reward of life well spent and duties well fulfilled.” A matching footstone was installed with the initials F. H. B. The total cost was $13.50. The order indicates the marker was to be delivered at Gray Court (courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke Family Papers).
Frederick’s death is noted in “A Tribute of Respect” which was included with the preamble and resolutions adopted by Enoree Quarterly Conference, sent to the family and published in the Southern Christian Advocate on March 16, 1893:
Whereas it has pleased God in His wisdom to remove from the Church militant to the Church triumphant,“as in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye,” our brother, Rev. Fred H. Burdett, a member of this Quarterly Conference; and, whereas, we, the members of the same, desiring to give some expression of our appreciation of his high moral worth and Christian character; therefore Resolved, That in the death of Brother Burdett, the Church has lost one of its truest members, who, by his simple faith and perfect trust in God, by his earnest, generous nature, unswerving fidelity to truth and right, won, and through his long Christian life maintained, the confidence and affection of the Church which he so faithfully served. Resolved, 2: That as a minister of the Gospel, his sermons were entertaining and instructive, and remarkable for their clearness and strength, his own mind being greatly enriched by a careful and laborious study of God’s Word. Resolved, 3. That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded the family of our deceased brother, spread on the Journal of this Conference, and also request that the same be published in The SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. C. R. Wallace, Committee. J. M. Boyd, President. J. M. Switzer, Secretary. (Vol. 56, No. 39, p. 6, col. 6)

Tribute of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, courtesy Great-Granddaughter Martha Anne Curry Duke
Rev. Frederick H. Burdette also recorded his maternal Rhodes genealogy in his Diary. Courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke

Rev. Frederick H. Burdette’s Rhodes genealogy in his Diary. Permission, courtesy, copyright Martha Anne Curry Duke.

Pages from Frederick H. Burdette’s Diary: Permission, courtesy, copyright Martha Anne Curry Duke.

Frederick lists the names and birth dates of his Rhodes relatives in his Diary under the heading “Memoranda” and with unrelated notations, a list of food staples, including flour and coffee: “Christifer Rhodes was Born Dec. 21, 1784. Betsy Rhodes was Born Feb. 5, 1790. John Rhodes was Born June 17, 1806. Franny Rhodes was Born Jun [Jan?] 24, 1796.” He repeats his mother’s name and birth date on the next page after some unrelated notes, the name “Nelson Gray” and a few lines of two-digit numbers separated by periods: “Betsy Rhodes was born Feb. 5, 1790.” The others mentioned are her siblings.
Frederick also documented in his Diary the 1780-1781 founding date of Bramlett Church and the names of the founders–Henry Bramlett III, John Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett and their mother (Margaret)–from information that came from, that was “sent” by his great-uncle John Bramlett of Greenville Co., S.C., sometime before John died in 1853. Nathan, who is biologically connected as brother to John and Henry III in the Diary and other records, also is legally connected to Marianne through her grown children’s 1842 petition to contest her brother and their uncle Nathan’s 1839 will in Laurens County. Nathan, Henry III, John, and their brother Reuben, who died 1844 Illinois, are all connected to their parents, Margaret and Henry Jr., and connected to Fauquier Co., Va., through a variety of records and historical references. And there is evidence they had other siblings.
“Frederick H. Burditt” had the opportunity in 1877 to purchase from an uncle land in Laurens County that previously belonged to his mother, Sarah Elizabeth (Rhodes) Burdett. He is named as a heir of his maternal uncle John Barker Rhodes in 1877. John Rhodes did not have children, and all of his siblings, including Sarah Elizabeth (Rhodes) Burdett, were deceased when he wrote his will on July 22, 1876. Rhodes bequeathed to Frederick the opportunity to purchase “a certain tract of land in Laurens Co., S.C., cont. 77 acres formerly belonging to Elizabeth Burditt, decd.” (referring to Sarah Elizabeth “Betsy” Rhodes Burdette). The land would
“…belong to [Frederick] his life time & at his death to belong to his bodily heirs provided said Frederick Burditt pays to my Executrix what the land cost me with interest from the date of purchase of said land together with the principle of a note I hold against him, and if he does not fulfill those cond. within 3 yrs. & 4 months from the date hereof then this item to be made null & void and the said land [would] belong to Martha P. Cheek….”
Martha P. Cheek, whom he designated a friend, was his executrix; and she inherited most of Rhodes’s other property. Benjamin F. Waldrop, John Young and M. P. Patton witnessed the will, which was proved April 3, 1877, in Laurens County.
A Class Book preserved by Martha Anne Curry Duke indicates “Frederic H. Burdett” joined Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church in November 1847. He also is listed on the church membership rolls in 1840 and 1850. The 1850 entry indicates he was single and Class Leader. Frederick was authorized in 1857 to officiate as an Exhorter: Someone who has the ability to encourage, comfort, challenge and motivate others towards right action.

This certifies that Frederick H. Burditt, has been duly authorized to officiate as an Exhorter in the M. E. Church, South, he having been properly recommended by the Society of Bramlet’s Laurens Circuit S.C. Conf. July 9th 1857. M. Puckett, P. E. [Frederick was also re-certified as an exhorter in 1858:] This is to certify that Frederick H. Burditt’s license to exhort was renewed by the 4th quarterly conference of Laurens Circuit held at Bramlet[t]’s Church Oct. the 23rd 1858….on behalf of the conference. R. I. Boyd, P. E.
Frederick later became an ordained Methodist Minister who preached at Bramlett Methodist Church and other area churches. He was licensed to preach in 1866:
Frederick H. Burdit, having been examined as the Discipline requires, is judged by us a proper person to preach the gospel and is accordingly hereby licensed. Done at the Third Session of the Quarterly Conference of Laurens and Reedy River ch. (for 1866) South Carolina Conference Methodist E. Church, South, held at Pisgah June 30th 1866.
“Fredrick Burdith,” 17, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., living with his parents, Reuben, 68, farmer, $2,000 real estate, and Elizabeth, 45, and two siblings: (Reuben) Thomas, 21, farming and Elizabeth (F.), 18 (NARA Film M432:855:259A). All were born in South Carolina. “Fk. [Frederick] Burdett,” 27, is listed in the 1860 US. Census for Youngs Store P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., living with his parents, Reuben, 74, farmer, and Elzh. (Elizabeth), 70 (NARA Film M653:1222:329A). Also listed is Frederick’s cousin Sarah Gray, 16. All were born in South Carolina.

Frederick H. Burditt/Burdett served as a private in Company E, Capt. Joseph N. Brown’s Laurens County “Enoree Mosquitoes,” Fourteenth Regiment, Gregg’s Brigade/McGowan’s Brigade, South Carolina Infantry Volunteers, during the Civil War/War Between the States. His NARA Compiled Military Service Records indicate he was age 26 and a resident of Laurens, S.C., when he enlisted on Aug. 16, 1861, at the Lightwood Knot Springs, S.C., military instruction camp, about five miles from Columbia. He was mustered in Sept. 10, 1861. His regiment, organized in July 1861 with recruits from Laurens, Greenville, Spartanburg and other nearby counties, moved in October to the South Carolina coast near Pocotaligo. The unit was under fire from Federal gunboats on Jan. 1, 1862. The men were ordered to Virginia in April and assigned to Gen. Gregg and Col. Samuel McGowan’s Brigade. They fought from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor (including Gaines’ Mill, Second Manassas, Shepherdstown, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Deep Bottom, Fussell’s Mill and Poplar Springs Church) and in the Petersburg Siege north and south of the James River. They ended the war at Appomattox. Frederick is last listed on the November-December 1864 Company Muster Roll. However, he was still serving when he was captured at Ford’s Depot on April 8, 1865, and held as a prisoner of war at Point Lookout, Md., for about four months. Frederick took the Oath of Allegiance to the United States on June 23, 1865, and was released from prison:
United States of America. I, F. H. Burdett of the county of Laurens Dist., State of South Carolina, do solemnly swear that I will support, protect, and defend the Constitution and Government of the United States against all enemies, whether domestic or foreign; that I will bear true faith, allegiance, and loyalty to the same, any ordinance, resolution, or laws of any State, Convention, or Legislature, to the contrary notwithstanding; and further, that I will faithfully perform all the duties which may be required of me by the laws of the United States; and I take this oath freely and voluntarily, without any…reservation or evasion whatever. Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 23 day of June, A. D. 1865, A. M. Brady, Maj. and Provost Marshal. The above-named has light complexion, dark hair, and hazel eyes; is 5 feet 9 or 6 1/2 inches high.
Private Frederick Henry Burditt wrote the following touching poem about home while stationed near Caroline Co., Va., Court House during the 1860-1865 war:
Dream of F. H. Burditt
in the War Near Caroline C. H. Va.
I’ve been thinking of thee Mother, all this long, long winter’s day,
For last night I dreamed I met you in our old house far away;
And methought you smiled upon me; as you used to do of yore,
And Mother, I was happy then; but that sweet dream is o’er;
My Father’s welcome, too ’twas sweet, his words were soft and mild
Just as they used to sound to me when I was but a child;
I pressed his hand within mine own, its clasp was warm and true;
And Mother, I was happy then with Father dear and you.
My Sister’s lips I pressed to mine, and clasped her to my heart.
And she murmured softly in mine ear, we never more must part,
She told me she had lonely bin; and often wept for me.
As she feared the wayward wanderer she never more might see.
And last my Brother’s welcome, his love had never grown cold;
He pressed me to his throbbing heart, as he’d often done of old.
He told me I was strongly grown, since I crossed the stormy main.
But Mother, if my form is changed, my heart is still the same.
Then methought I stole away and sought the garden fair,
Where blossomed many a fragrant flower, of beauty rich and rare,
Then down beneath the orchard trees, where oft a child I played.
Once more I sat upon the grass beneath the pear tree’s shade;
Then with a smile upon my brow, I sought the home still fair.
Lightly I bounded through the door; hush! ’twas the voice of prayer;
My Father read the Holy Page, Oh! how lifelike it seemed,
And Mother, then it was I woke, and found I had but dreamed.
F. H. Burditt
Original poem preserved and shared by Martha Anne Curry Duke of Denton, Tex.

Rev. Frederick Henry and wife, Louise Caroline, and family, courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke
Frederick married a widowed sister-in-law, Louise Caroline (Peterson) Burdett, circa 1866. She first married Frederick’s brother Reuben Thomas Burdett, who died in 1866 a few years after returning home ill with a worsening long-term, pre-war spine ailment after serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. Reuben Thomas and Caroline are included in the 1860 census: “R. T. Burdett,” 31, farmer, and wife, C. (Louise Caroline), 27, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Youngs Store P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., with three children: Jas. C. (James Capers), 7; H. P. (Hiram Peterson), 6; and “No Name” (Hilliard Jackson), 10/12, male, all born South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1222:329). Caroline was born April 12, 1833, in Laurens County, the daughter of Nancy Pitts and Hiram Peterson (1802-1882). Caroline died Sept. 28, 1904, in Laurens County and was buried in Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery near Gray Court. Caroline’s obituary identifies her as a widow and mother:
Mrs. Burdett Dead. Mrs. Caroline Burdett, widow of Rev. Frederick Burdett of Youngs township, died quite suddenly last Wednesday at the home of Mr. O. O. Cox, where she had gone to spend the morning. She was a consecrated Christian and was a devoted member of Bramlett’s Methodist Church. The funeral and burial services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Burns Thursday at the above church. Mrs. Burdett was before marriage a Miss Peterson, and has quite a large connection throughout the county. Her surviving children are Messrs. H. P. Burdett and Thomas Burdett, of Lanford; John Burdett, of Greenville; and Mrs. Will [Carrie Purchase Burdette] Curry, of Texas.
“Fred H. Burdett,” 37, farmer, $100 real estate, $150 personal estate, and wife, Caroline, 37, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with five children: (James) Capers, 17, farm laborer; Hiram (Peterson), 15, farm laborer; Jackson, 10, farm laborer; Nancy, 2; and Babe (Thomas Olinthus), 5/12, born in February (NARA Film M593:1501:278A). Frederick’s mother, Elizabeth Burdett, 80, infirm, also is listed with the family. All were born in South Carolina. “Fred Burdett,” 47, farmer, and wife, Caroline, 47, keeps house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with five children: (James) Capers, 27, laborer (step)son, (son of Caroline and Reuben Thomas Burdett); (Hilliard Jackson, 20, laborer; Nannie (Nancy), 11; Thomas (Olinthus), 10, laborer; and Carrie Purchase), 2 (NARA Film T9:1233:293B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Lewisa Burdett,” 67, born in April 1833, widowed, owner of a mortgage-free farm, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., with one grown child: Thomas (Olinthus) Burdett, 30, born in August or February 1869, school teacher (NARA Film T623:1534:360B). Both were born in South Carolina. Caroline and Frederick’s children are Nancy (“Nannie”), Thomas Olinthus and Carrie Purchase Burdette.
Images of Rev. Frederick Burdette’s descendants, courtesy Martha Anne Curry Duke
Nancy “Nannie” Burdette, child of Louise Caroline Peterson and Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, was born Dec. 28, 1868. She died Jan. 20, 1890. She married Rev. John Elrod Rhodes. Their child is Eugene E. Rhodes, pictured below.

Nancy “Nannie” Burdette Elrod

Eugene E. Rhodes
Thomas Olinthus Burdette, child of Louise Caroline Peterson and Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, was born 1869-1870 in Laurens Co., S.C. He married Viola Pruitt.

Thomas Olinthus Burdette above, and Thomas and wife, Viola Pruitt
Carrie Purchase Burdette, child of Louise Caroline Peterson and Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette, was born Jan. 10, 1878, in Laurens Co., S.C. She died Dec. 6, 1957, in McLennan Co., Tex., and was buried in Kirk Cemetery. She married William Clinton “Will” Curry on Jan. 16, 1899, in Laurens Co., S.C. He was born there Sept. 15, 1868, the son of Ann Hellams and Harvey W. Curry. He died Sept. 17, 1960, in Waco, McLennan Co., Tex., and was buried in Kirk Cemetery.

Carrie Purchase Burdette, left, and sister Nancy

Carrie’s husband, William Clinton “Will” Curry

Carrie and Will Curry and son Horace Olin Curry in later years

William Burdett, son of Marianne and Frederick
William Burdett, seventh child of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdett, was born Jan. 18, 1790, in Laurens Dist., S.C. He died there at age 70 years, 16 days, on Feb. 3, 1860. William probably did not marry. He lived with his father and with sisters inherited and farmed his father’s land. William was ordered to appear in court in Laurens County in 1842 to settle a lawsuit he and four of his siblings filed against the executors of her maternal uncle Nathan Bramlett’s 1839 will. “William Burdett,” 60, farmer, $2,000 real estate, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Dist., S.C., as head of a family that includes three sisters: Molly (Burdett) Rhodes, 66; Betsy (Burdett) Hand, 64; and Alcey Burdett, 57 (NARA Film M432:855:260B). Also listed: Stephen Marlow, 28, farmer.
Ailsey “Ailsa” Burdett, daughter of Marianne and Frederick
Ailsey “Ailsa” Burdett, eighth child of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdett, was born March 18, 1793, in Laurens Co., S.C. Her name and birth and death dates are inscribed in the old Burdett Bible. She died there at age 78 years, 2 months, 10 days, on May 28, 1871. Ailsey did not marry. She lived with her father in 1840. Ailsey Burdett was ordered to appear in court in Laurens County in 1842 to settle a lawsuit she and four of her siblings filed against the executors of her Uncle Nathan Bramlett’s will. Church records indicate Ailsey Burdett was a member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1842-70. “Alcey Burdett,” 57, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Laurens Dist., S.C., with her brother William Burdett, 60, farmer, head of the family, and sisters Molly (Burdett) Rhodes, 66, and Betsy (Elizabeth Burdett) Hand, 64 (NARA Film M432:855:260B). “Ailsey Burdett,” 59 (actually 67), farmer, $1,840 real estate, $200 personal estate, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Pleasant Mound P.O., Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes her sister Mary Burdett (Rhodes), 77, and sister E. (Elizabeth Hand) Burdett, 75 (NARA Film M653:1222:331A). All were born in South Carolina. “Alice Burdett,” 75, keeping house, $900 real estate and $150 personal estate, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Youngs Twp., Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes her sister Elizabeth (Burdett) Hand, 84, housekeeper (NARA Film M593:1501:275B). Also listed: Truelove Hand, 25, black, farm laborer. All were born in South Carolina.
Jesse Burdett, son of Marianne and Frederick
Jesse Burdett, ninth child of Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette, was born Oct. 18, 1795, in Laurens Dist., S.C. His name and birth date are inscribed in the old Burdett Bibles. He may have died before 1840 or moved from the area. If he died young, he may be buried in Bethel or Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery. Jesse is not listed as head of a family in the 1840 Laurens County census, and he is not named with the other surviving adult children of Marianne (Bramlett) Burdette in their 1842 lawsuit in Laurens County contesting their Uncle Nathan Bramlett’s 1839 will.
End Notes
1 Marianne Bramlett Burdette’s father, Henry Bramlett Jr., is documented in Fauquier Co., Va., land records as the son of Henry Bramlett Sr., wife unknown. Henry Jr. had possession of his father’s 1735 Prince William/Fauquier Co., Va., plantation in 1758 and 1770, according to tax records, and later; while his two brothers, William and Reuben, had other land there (William farmed 100 acres and Reuben 123 acres). This indicates Henry Jr. was Henry Sr.’s eldest living son who had inherited his father’s plantation through primogeniture when Henry Sr. died intestate. No will or probate records have been found in Virginia for Henry Sr. Although no documentation has been found to prove the connection, Henry Bramlett Sr., is believed to be the eldest son of William Bramlett I/Sr., a Virginia planter and surveyor of Essex, Caroline, Lunenburg and Bedford counties in Virginia. William I/Sr., who was age 21 or older when he witnessed a deed in Essex Co., Va., in 1715-16, definitely was born in or sometime before 1694; and he is the only definite Bramlett found in existing Virginia records who is old enough to be the father of Henry Bramlett Sr., who was born in or before 1710. One other man who may be our earliest ancestor and the father of William Bramlett I/Sr., Ambrose “Bamblet,” most likely born before 1669, immigrated from England in 1690 to help settle New Kent Co., Va.; but New Kent is a burned county and no other record of Ambrose has been found. Geographical proximity also suggests a close connection between Ambrose, William Bramlett I/Sr. and Henry Bramlett Sr. since they all lived in the same general area of Virginia. William Bramlett I/Sr. was a planter in Essex (later Caroline) Co., Va., in the 1730s and earlier; and Henry Bramlett Sr. was a planter in adjacent King George Co., Va., in 1735. That is the year Henry Sr. purchased 250 acres, part of a larger tract of 500 acres of land in Prince William Co., Va., from a man named John Ambrose, also a planter in King George Co., Va. Plat maps and later deeds indicate both men moved their families there to settle on adjacent farms in an area that later became Fauquier Co., Va., in 1759. The relationship between the Bramlett and Ambrose families is unknown. John Ambrose could be Henry Bramlett Sr.’s father-in-law, uncle, other relative, or very close friend. Henry Sr. is mentioned in a 1751 record and then last methntioned in a Prince William Co., Va., record in 1752 when the county court replaced him as constable. No reason was given, but he may have been ill or already deceased. He died intestate; and since primogeniture was in effect, his plantation passed to his eldest son. No record of a transaction for the land transfer has yet been found, but his son Henry Jr. had possession of his land in the 1759 tax record. Two other Bramletts–William and Reuben Sr.–who are also presumed to be be sons of Henry Sr., appear in the same 1759 and 1770 Virginia tax records. The given name of Henry Jr.’s wife–Margaret–and three of his children–Henry III, Reuben and John–are found in Virginia land records–a 1780 land resurvey, tax lists and plantation sale deeds–following Henry’s 1780 death. After moving to Laurens Co., S.C., in 1790, Margaret is associated with her sons John Bramlett and Nathan Bramlett and grandson John Burdett (4 Feb 1776–11 Mar 1859) in land transactions there. John Bramlett and brother Nathan Bramlett witnessed a deed in May 1790 when their widowed mother, Margaret, bought fifty acres of land on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of the Enoree River, adjacent to Nathan’s land, from Ezekiel Griffith (DB-D:5). The deed was recorded when the land was purchased. Margaret’s farm is located next to property owned by her son Nathan and near land granted to Richard Fowler, who had sold Nathan Bramlett his land in 1789. When Margaret sold her land to her son Nathan Bramlett on April 16, 1809, John Burdett (Margaret’s grandson and Marianne’s son) and Jesse Gray (Nathan’s brother-in-law) witnessed the deed (DB-J:73). Margaret does not appear in the 1810 census as head of a household, so it is presumed she died between 1809 and 1810. Family tradition holds that she is buried beside or near her son Nathan Bramlett’s marked grave in the old section of Bramlett Methodist Church Cemetery, where several unidentified graves, some with fieldstones, are located. Margaret’s daughter Marianne and Frederick Burdette may be buried there as well since Frederick was a trustee of the church. Margaret’s maiden name, and the maiden name of her sister-in-law Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?), wife of William Bramblett, and their marriage dates are still unknown and unproven. Parish records, which may have contained several marriage bond references, do not survive for Prince William/Fauquier County. Margaret’s other sister-in-law, Margaret “Peggy” (Darnall?) Bramblett, survived her husband, Reuben Bramblett Sr., who named all of his children in his will and died in Bourbon Co., Ky. Margaret, who died there after 1810, is believed to be a member of the Darnall family of Fauquier Co., Va., based on references in land records there, but there is no definite proof of her maiden name.
2 Marianne was born in Prince William (now Fauquier) Co., Va., where her parents lived in 1752 and lived there until moving to South Carolina with relatives or as the wife of Frederick Burdette circa 1775. Laurens Co., S.C., deeds indicate Frederick was in South Carolina by 1775. Their first child was born there in 1776.
3 Frederick Burdette, of Ninety-Six (Laurens) Dist., S.C., and perhaps his two brothers–William Sr. of Edgefield Co., S.C., and possibly John of Orangeburg Co., S.C.–could be the grandsons or nephews of an older William Burdette who lived in Caroline Co., Va., in the 1730s. That is where William Bramlett I/Sr. and family and Thomas and Susannah (Quarles) White and son Stephen White lived, from at least 1732. The elder William Burdette served on a jury in Caroline County Court in 1733 and may be the same man of that name who signed as a bondsman on Aug. 12, 1752, in Caroline County for Susannah (Quarles) White when she asked the court to renew her ordinary license. Susannah, widow of Thomas White, deceased, is the mother of Stephen White who married Agatha Bramlett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr. Susannah was licensed from 1750 through at least 1759 to operate her deceased husband Thomas White’s stand at White’s (Burk’s) Shop in Caroline County. The inventory and appraisement of the estate of Thomas White was returned on Aug. 12, 1752, in Caroline County. Frederick Burdett and possibly his brothers? William R. Burdett Sr. and John Burdett could be related in some way to James Burdett, Humphrey Burdett and a different Frederick Burdett who are included on the 1759 tax list for Fauquier Co., Va., where Marianne Bramlett and her parents and siblings lived in the 1750s. One other Burdett on the 1759 tax list, John Burdett, who married Mary Kent, did have a son named Frederick but he moved into Kentucky, not South Carolina. And Mary Kent and John Burdett had a son named William, but that William lived and married in Fauquier County in 1788. The elder William Burdett of Edgefield Co., S.C., perhaps the brother of Frederick and John, served as a soldier in South Carolina during the American Revolution. Loose Papers in the State House in Columbia, S.C., indicate “Mr. William Burdet” served “101 Days’ militia duty on horseback“ in Capt. Hugh Wardlaw and in Capt. John Wilson’s company in 1779, according to an article published in The State in 1904 (Record File Z [No.] 607 dated Dec. 31, 1784). File 911 in Accounts Audited recorded in Charleston, S.C., indicate “William Burdet” served as a soldier and patriot in the American Revolution and was paid for his services. The document is smudged and more of it is difficult to decipher.
4 Descendant William Ralph Burdette indicates in an undated, typewritten, two-page history in possession of Franklin D. Burdette that “The ancestral home of the Burdettes was in Normandy. They chose to go to Holland, where Frederick was born Oct 15 1753 in Amsterdam. Frederick’s wife was Marianne, and could be assumed to have been of French ancestry also, was born Sept. 15, 1752.” (Please note: Marianne, an American perhaps of English and/or French descent, most likely was born in Prince William [now Fauquier] Co., Va., where her parents lived in 1752, not in France or Holland.) The Burdettes “came to the New World landing at Charleston to seek a new home and way of life, along with other French who settled in South Carolina.” (Note: There were Burdettes in Virginia as early as 1635, but their relationship to Frederick is not yet known. No record of the family in Charleston has been yet found.) Frederick and Marianne may have married in Fauquier Co., Va., where she was most likely born and lived with her family before leaving the state for South Carolina. It is also possible that they married in Laurens Co., S.C., where some of her close relatives were already living. Frederick was in South Carolina in 1775, and their first child was born there in 1776. Ralph continues, “Frederick and Marianne did indeed find a new home. Settling near Enoree River on the west side. They had nine children and lived to be 88 and 82 years old, Frederick died Feb. 1, 1841 and Marianne Mar. 8, 1834, and were buried at Bramlett Methodist Church Laurens District….”
5 Descendant Mary Mitchell Clarke said Frederick is buried in Bramlett Cemetery. This information was written as notes on a chart given to Franklin D. Burdette of Shalimar, Fla., several years ago by Mary: P.O. Box 166, Fruitland Park, FL 34731.
6 William Burdett, who may be the brother of Frederick Burdett and John Burdett and perhaps Giles Burdett (born circa 1745, who married Averilla DeLoach circa 1765), received three land grants in Ninety-Six Dist., S.C.: 1) ninety-seven acres on Red Bank Creek, Little Saluda River, in (present-day Edgefield County) Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., adjoining land owned by Gains, granted on Feb. 5, 1787, for two pounds, five shillings, two and a half pence, sterling money, surveyed by John Abney and certified by F. Bremar, surveyor general, on Sept. 5, 1785 (SCDAH S213190:3:1); 2) eighty acres granted by Gov. Charles Pinckney on March 3, 1788, situated on DeLoach’s Branch, Little Saluda River, in (present-day Edgefield County) Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., and bounded by property running north owned by Frederick Gipson (Sisson?), by land running south to west owned by James Hart (William Burdett’s inlaw?), by vacant land, by land running southeast owned by Christopher Brooks, and by land running northeast by vacant lands, for one pound, seventeen shillings, four pence, surveyed by John Abney and certified by F. Bremar, surveyor general, on June 22, 1787 (SCDAH S213190:22:9:1); and 3) fourteen acres on Red Bank Creek, Little Saluda River, Edgefield Co., Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., adjoining property owned by Jesse Johnegin, Jacob Smith, Osborn and Henry King, surveyed by John Abney on March 7, 1797 (SCDAH S213192:36:58:2). William Burdett’s land on Red Bank Creek, Little Saluda River, Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., is mentioned as a landmark in a land grant surveyed for Daniel Brown and John Abney by John Abney on Nov. 7, 1786 (SCDAH S213212:1:23:3). Other bounding land was owned by Sterling Turner, Peter Foy, Duglas, Bartlett Bledsoe and George Mayson. William Burdett’s property is mentioned as a landmark in a plat for 252 acres on Red Bank Creek, Little Saluda River, Edgefield Co., Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., surveyed by John Abney on Aug. 26, 1793, for Elizabeth Sisson (Gipson?) (SCDAH S213190:33:326:3). Other neighbors with adjoining property listed are Robert Stark, James Hart, John Smedley and Larkin Brown. William Burdett’s property is mentioned as a landmark in a plat of 420 acres surveyed for William Daniel by Alexander B. Stark on DeLoaches Branch, Red Bank Creek, Little Saluda River, Edgefield Co., Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., on July 18, 1794 (SCDAH S213190:32:91:1). Other adjacent properties owned by William Brown, Bland, Robert Stark, Brooks, Gaffton, Tomlin, William Humphrey and Little also are mentioned. William Burdett’s property is mentioned as a landmark in a plat of 142 acres surveyed for John Pope by Michael Blocker on Red Bank Creek, Edgefield Co., Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., on March 21, 1805 (SCDAH S213192:40:3861:2). Other adjacent properties owned by James Vann, Robert Newport and Henry King also are mentioned. William Burdett later sold the properties before moving to Bedford Co., Tenn., after 1805. William and his wife, Patience Delaney/Delacey (Hart) Burdett, sold the the second land grant property to Mumford Perryman on Oct. 20, 1792 (DB-1-12:112). They sold the first land grant property on May 7, 1794 (DB-1-12:213).
7 John Burdett may be the brother of William and Frederick, according to family tradition which holds that three brothers came to America: William, Frederick and John. One John Burdett who was born in or before 1752 lived in Saint Matthews Parish, Royal Berkeley Co., S.C., in early June 1773. His name is mentioned in a land memorial recorded in Charleston in reference to his land which was adjacent to property owned by John Cross there on June 7, 1773, when Cross paid taxes on his 200-acre land grant at Charleston (SCDAH: S11101:12:224:6). John Burdett apparently had adjoining land. To be a landowner in South Carolina in 1773, John had to have been at least age 21 and was thus born in/before 1752. His land grant is located in an area that later became Orangeburg Co., S.C.
8 The Reuben Bramlett who witnessed the 1789 deed in Laurens County when Nathan Bramlett bought land from Richard and Debby Fowler is identified here as the brother of Nathan and Marianne through a process of elimination: Reuben Bramblett Jr. of Fauquier Co., Va., and Laurens Co., S.C., did not arrive in Laurens County until 1794, according to his Revolutionary War pension application; and the other Reuben Bramblett of this generation, the son of Elizabeth and William Bramblett Sr. of Fauquier Co., Va., and Laurens Co., S.C., and Gwinnett Co., Ga., may have been born as late as 1774 and thus would not have been old enough in 1789 to have legally witnessed a deed. (All census data that refers to the latter Reuben indicates he was born between 1770 and 1780, including the 1840 census, which is inconsistent with an 1841 pensioner schedule that indicates Reuben was a Revolutionary War Pensioner, aged 75, born circa 1765.)
9 Parents of Frederick Reuben Burdett’s first wife, Elizabeth Bramlett, are undocumented, unknown. However, the names of her children suggest she is a direct descendant, a granddaughter, of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr. Elizabeth Gray and Nathan Bramlett have been eliminated as her parents. They did not have children enumerated in any census data, and Nathan did not name any children in his 1839 will. She may be daughter of young William Bramlett who married a Hendricks/Hendrix and lived in Laurens in 1790 and Spartanburg in 1800 and moved out of the state circa 1808-1810, about the same time Elizabeth married Frederick Reuben Burdett. Young William lived in Kentucky and then Tennessee where he died circa 1830. He and his wife had a large family of children.

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Benjamin Bramlett
(Possible Son of Margaret and Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr.)

Benjamin Bramlett, most likely first or second child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., and reportedly their eldest son, according to family tradition, may have been born circa 1751 in a portion of Prince William Co., Va., that later became Fauquier County. No public, recorded evidence has been shared about his birth or death; however, according to family tradition and documents owned by family members, Benjamin reportedly did exist and died on a British prison ship while serving as a soldier or as a civilian patriot during the American Revolution. Family tradition held by some descendants of Henry Bramlett III identify Benjamin as the son of Henry II/Jr. and his death as the cause or reason for Henry II/Jr.’s suicide in 1779 or 1780. Whether or not Ben married is unknown. No documentation of this sad tradition has been shared; but Benjamin is included in this history in memoriam with a hope that, no longer imprisoned by the enemy’s chains or tortured by the tragedy and fragility of life, his spirit and the anguished soul of his father both rest in eternal peace.

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Jalilah “Jaly” Bramlett and John Riley Jr.
(Children: Mary, Nancy, John Charles, Margaret, Nelly, Lewis, Smith, Delitha)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

John Riley Jr. Served as a Soldier during the Revolution
Jalilah “Jaly” Bramlett, most likely first or second child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born in 1751 or 1753 in Fauquier Co., Va. She died in Mercer Co., Ky. Her maiden name is provided in a letter to the Fauquier County Clerk by her attorney when she was in the process of applying for a widow’s pension based on her husband’s Revolutionary War service. Her attorney was seeking a record of her marriage. She married John Riley on Jan. 1, 1771, in Fauquier Co., Va. John was born March 11, 1748, in Virginia, the son of John Riley Sr. John is named in his father John Riley Sr.’s 1791 will in Fauquier County. John served as a soldier during the American Revolution. He is included on the 1792 tax list there. He and Jalilah later moved to Kentucky.
John Riley wrote his will April 5, 1820, in Mercer Co., Ky., and died a few months later:
In the name of God amen I John Riley of the county of Mercer and state of Kentucky Farmer being in … state of Boddy but of perfect mind & memory thanks be to God calling unto mind the mortality of my body & knowing that is appointed for man once to die do make and ordain this my last will and Testament. that is to say principally & first of all I give & recommend my soul unto hand of almighty God who gave it & my body I recommend to the Earth to be buried in decent Christian form at the discretion of Executors as to … my worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me within this life I give demise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form … First, I give and bequeath to Jaly Riley my dear and beloved wife during her widowhood all the tract of land whereon I now live together with all my household goods, debts, & moveable effects & after the Expiration of her death my will is that all the property herein above mentioned shall be equally divided amongst my children except Nelly Massey to which I give her one dollar over and above what I have all ready given her. Leonard Harly is to have his mother’s part. Also I do appoint, constitute & ordain William Maddox and Lewis Riley my sole Executors of this my last will & Testament and I do hereby utterly disallow, revoke and disannul all & every other former wills and bequeaths by me in any wise before named, willed & bequeathed, ratifying & confirming this and no other to be my last will and Testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal this fifth day of April in the year of our Lord Eighteen hundred and twenty.
Signed sealed in the presence of Benjamin B. Rose James Ellis Susan (her X mark) Rose
John (his X mark) Riley [seal]
Codicil: Witness I give and bequeath unto Lewis Riley, my son, twenty seven acres & half for his services he has done for me and a equal division with the rest of my children after his mother’s death.
Test: James Ellis Samuel Conner
John (his X mark) Riley [seal]
The will was probated in October 1820 in Mercer County Court:
The foregoing last will & Testament of John Riley Dec’d was this day produced into court and proved by the oaths of Benjamin B. Rose & James Ellis two subscribing witnesses thereto and the codicil was proven by the oaths of the said James Ellis and ordered to be recorded. Att. Tho Allin CC

Jalilah and John’s eight children: Mary (“Polly”), Nancy, John Charles, Margaret (“Peggy”), Nelly, Lewis, Smith and Delitha Riley.

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Henry Bramlett III and Elizabeth Moss
(Children: Reuben, Margaret, John, Lott, Elizabeth, Emeline Emelia, Nathan, Mary Ann)

Henry Bramlett III served as a Soldier during the American Revolution

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants
Henry Bramlett III, child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born circa 1755 in Prince William (now Fauquier) Co., Va. He died around 1828, most likely in Elbert Co., Ga., where he and his family were then living. His burial place is unknown. He married Elizabeth Moss before 1775 in Virginia or South Carolina. She was born circa 1755-1760, perhaps in South Carolina. She died circa 1850 in Elbert or Forsyth Co., Ga. Henry was living in Laurens Co., S.C., by 1776. He served as a soldier during the American Revolution. He returned to Virginia to claim his father’s plantation in 1780 after Henry Jr. had died and returned to South Carolina. He sold the property in 1784 to James Dobie/Dobey.

Henry Bramlett III’s 1780 plat map of Bramlett Plantation on Elk Marsh Run where he grew up

Henry “Harry” II/Jr.’s former plantation is documented in Virginia Land Office Proprietory Records, VLO entry 117 Box 1.
Henry Bramblett Advertisement, Land Office, Northern Neck of Virginia, Lord Proprietor’s Office. To Mr. John Moffett–Whereas Henry Bramblett of South Carolina hath set forth to this Office that there is a certain tract of land on the Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County containing by estimation Two hundred and fifty Acres and formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett Father of Henry aforesaid & which said Henry (the Father) died seized thereof in Fee simple but dying a Suicide the said Tract Escheated to the Lord of the Fee. And the Rules of the Office having been complied with as to issuing and affixing at the Court House at Fauquier County an Advertisement at three several Courts & no person offering to shew Cause why the said Land should not be granted as Escheat to the said Henry Bramblett And the said Henry Bramblett desiring a Warrant to resurvey the same in order to obtain an Escheat Deed being ready to pay the Composition & Office Fees, These are therefore to impower you to resurvey the said Land for the Said Henry Bramblett A Plat of which Resurvey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 5th Day of February next. Given under my Hand & the Office Seal the 5th Day of August 1780. B. Martin. By virtue of a warrant from the Proprietor’s office to me directed, I have surveyed for Henry Bramblett, of South Carolina, a tract of Land on Elk Marsh Run, in Fauquier County, formerly the property of A Henry Bramblett father to the aforesaid Henry, who dying a suicide the said Land became Escheatable: the said Land being Bounded as followeth Viz Beginning at A a white oak corner to Jonas Williams thence along the said Williams’s Line S 31 (degrees) E 60 Poles to B two Hicories thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two small hicories, thence 35 1/2 W 216 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & sundry saplings, thence S 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G two small hicorys in the said Williams’s Line, thence along the same to the Beginning Containing 231 Acres. … J. Moffett 20th Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett} Chain Carriers
“Henry Bromlet,” white male over 16, is listed in the 1790 Census for Laurens, Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., as head of a family of four females and three males under age 16. Henry III may have obtained a post-war land grant in 1792 southwest of the other Bramlett properties in Laurens County and lived there before he relocated his family to Georgia. Henry III and Elizabeth and family moved from Laurens County where they farmed to settle in Elbert Co., Ga., circa 1800. “Henry Bramblett” of Capt. Dunston Blackwell’s District, Elbert Co., Ga., had two draws in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery as as a married man over age 21, a taxpayer and citizen, resident of Georgia during the three years previous to passage of the lottery act, and father of a child or children under age 21. Henry drew land as a Revolutionary War veteran in the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery. His wife, Elizabeth, after he died drew land in the 1832 Georgia Land Lottery as the widow of a Revolutionary War Soldier. (Land Lottery information for Henry, Elizabeth and family in 1806 is documented in Historical Collections of Georgia, Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol. III, p. 239.)
Henry III and Elizabeth’s children include Reuben, Margaret, John, Lott, Elizabeth, Emelia (“Milly”), Nathan, Mary Ann Bramblett.
Reuben Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1775 in Laurens Co., S.C. “Reuben Bramblett” of Capt. Dunston Blackwell’s District, Elbert Co., Ga., had two draws in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery, which indicates he was married with a child or children. He married Ailsa “Ailsey” Gray in 1799. Reuben and Ailsey are direct ancestors of Mike Bramblett, administrator of Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center online. Reuben and Ailsa’s children include Jesse Bramlett who married Mary “Polly” Palmore. Their child is Reuben W. Bramlett, born circa 1827, who married Martha Worley.
Margaret Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1776 in Laurens Co., S.C. “Margrett Bramblett” of Capt. Dunston Blackwell’s District, Elbert Co., Ga., had one draw in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery. Her one draw indicated she was then single. She married William Gober III later in 1806 and moved to Jackson Co., Ga. He was born circa 1765 and died circa 1860.
John Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1784 in Laurens Co., S.C. “John Bramblett” of Capt. Dunston Blackwell’s District, Elbert Co., Ga., had two draws in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery, which indicates he was married with a child or children under age 21.
Lott Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born before 1785 in Laurens Co., S.C. He and his wife, unknown, lived in Elbert and Franklin Co., Ga. “Lott Bramblett” of Capt. Dunston Blackwell’s District, Elbert Co., Ga., had one draw in the 1806 Georgia Land Lottery, which indicates he was single and over age 21. One Georgia history indicates he was a minister at Double Branches Baptist Church with a wife in Franklin County. No children for them have been found.
Elizabeth Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1790 in Laurens Co., S.C.
Emeline Emelia “Milly” Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1792 in Laurens Co., S.C. She may have died circa 1840. She married John Young Gober. He was born circa 1768 and died circa 1866.
Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born Sept.. 15, 1794. in Laurens Co., S.C. He died of cholera Aug. 20, 1852, west of Boise, Ida., while traveling west by wagon train on the Oregon Trail. He was buried along the trail. He married Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober. She was born Oct. 13, 1797. She died Aug. 17, 1852, of cholera west of Boise, Ida., and was buried along the Oregon Trail. Their children include Elizabeth Ann (“Betsy”), Francis Clayton, Henry M., Nancy Jane, George Washington, Martha Lorana, William Henry Bramblett.
Elizabeth Ann “Betsy” Bramlett, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlett, was born circa 1823 and died circa 1854.
Francis Clayton Bramlett, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlett, was born circa 1827 and died 1911. He married Martha Ellen Tower. She was born circa 1844. She died circa 1913. Their children include Nathan Hull, William Henry, Sarah Jane, George Edwin, Mary Nancy, Martha Ellen, Lewis/Louis Francis, Charles David, James Abraham Bramlett.
Henry M. Bramlett, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlett, was born circa 1829.
Nancy Jane Bramlett, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlett, was born circa 1832 and died circa 1853. She married Moses Preston Rice.
George Washington Bramlett, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlett, was born Aug. 12, 1835, in Bradley Co., Tenn. He died April 16, 1910, in Lakeport, Calif. He married Mary Malissa Smith. She was born Dec. 9, 1850. She died Oct. 8, 1910, in Lakeport, Calif. They had several children between 1871-1888, including Abigal Jane, Charles David, Elisa Ellen, John William, Henry Lafayette, Walter, Mary Elizabeth, Emmet Edgar, Ella Ann, Oscar George Bramlet.
Martha Lorana Bramlett, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlett, was born circa 1838 and died circa 1899. She married Ica Foster “Ike” Rice. They had some children.
William Henry Bramlett, child of Jane “Jenny” “Jinny” Gober and Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlett, was born circa 1841 and died circa 1893.

Mary Ann Bramblett, child of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, was born circa 1797 in Laurens Co., S.C. She died Feb. 18, 1860, in Cherokee or Forsyth Co., Ga. She married John G. Gober.

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Reuben Bramlett and Elizabeth Brown
(Children: Benjamin, Henry, John, Nathan, Coleman Brown, Margaret, Elizabeth)

Reuben Bramlett served as a Soldier during the American Revolution

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants
Direct Ancestors of Deborah G. Dennis
Reuben Bramlett, child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born March 15, 1757, on his parents’ plantation in Prince William (now Fauquier) Co., Va. He died at age 86 on Sept. 11, 1844, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill., at home on his farm and was buried beside his wife, Elizabeth, in her family’s Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery. Reuben served three tours of duty as a soldier from Virginia during the American Revolution. His detailed service record is included below. His mother, Margaret “Peggy,” was a Patriot who supplied provisions–beef and brandy–to the military; a brother named Benjamin may have perished as a soldier or patriot; his brother Henry III served as a soldier, most likely from South Carolina; and his brother-in-law Frederick Burdette served as a soldier from South Carolina. Other extended family members were also soldiers or patriots of the Revolution. Reuben married Elizabeth Brown circa 1784, most likely in Fauquier County. No marriage record for them has been located: the parish records are lost, and they did not record their union at the county court house, which actually was not a common custom until after the Revolution. Elizabeth was born circa 1760-1765, the child of Mary Coleman and William Brown by family tradition. Elizabeth’s full name, Elizabeth Brown, is recorded by Meeks Haley Bramlet in his 1924 history A Pioneer Family – Bramlet. Her mother, Mary Coleman Brown, and some siblings, including Lucy, Coleman, William, John, Francis and Thomas, lived in Kentucky after the war and also settled in Gallatin County between 1813 and 1816 before the Illinois Territory became a state in 1818. Elizabeth died there circa 1830 and was buried in Brown Graveyard, established circa 1814-1816 on her brother Coleman Brown’s land on the sad occasion of the death of Elizabeth’s daughter-in-law Liddy Stephens Bramlett, first wife of Henry “Harry” Bramlett. The graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery, preceded Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church, which was first constructed in the center of the oldest and highest section of the burial ground. The church later was rebuilt closer to the cemetery entrance. The cemetery and church are now within the city limits of Eldorado. Elizabeth and some of her children were members of Bethel Baptist Church, Wolf Creek and perhaps one other Baptist church in Gallatin County.

Reuben, Elizabeth and many descendants are buried in Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery
Reuben’s Life in Virginia
Reuben and his brothers John and Henry III are named in two surveys for deeds in Virginia relating to their father’s former plantation: a survey of Henry III’s newly inherited land and a survey of a small parcel of adjoining land for a neighbor, Robert Henson. Reuben, born 1757, was about age 23, and John, born 1764, was about age 16 in 1780.
A resurvey of their father’s former plantation, requested by Henry III after his father’s death, which was recorded in Fauquier County in 1780 with an accompanying plat map, documents Reuben, John and Henry III’s connection to the land, each other and thus to their father, Henry Bramlett Jr. The 1780 resurvey record mentions Reuben and his brother John as chain carriers, their brother Henry III as the current new owner of the land, and their deceased father, “Henry Bramblett,” as the former owner:
Northern Neck of Virginia. Lord Proprietor’s Office.To Mr. John Moffett–Whereas Henry Bramblett [III] of South Carolina hath set forth to this Office that there is a certain Tract of Land on the Elk Marsh Run in Fauquier County containing by Estimation Two hundred and fifty Acres and formerly held by a certain Henry Bramblett [Jr.], Father of Henry [III] aforesaid, which said Henry (the Father) [Jr.] died seized thereof in Fee simple but dying a Suicide the said Tract Escheated to the Lord of the Fee. And the Rules of the Office having been complied with as to issuing & affixing at the Court House of Fauquier County an Advertisement at three several Courts & no Person offering to shew Cause why the said Land should not be granted as Escheat to the said Henry Bramblett [III]. And the said Henry Bramblett [III] desiring a Warrant to resurvey the same in order to obtain an Escheat Deed being ready to pay the Composition & Office Fees. These are therefore to empower you to resurvey the said Land for the said Henry Bramblett [III] A Plat of which Resurvey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 5th Day of February next. Given under my Hand & the Office Seal the 5th Day of August 1780. B. Martin
Plat Map of Henry Bramblett’s [III] Land Area 231 Acres By virtue of a warrant from the Proprietors office to me Directed, I have surveyed for Henry Bramblett [III], of South Carolina, a tract of Land on Elk Marsh Run, in Fauquier County, formerly the Property of A Henry Bramblett [Jr.] father to the aforesaid Henry [III]; who dying a suicide, the said Land became Escheatable: the said Land being Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at a white oak corner to Jonas Williams, thence along the said Williams’s Line, S 31 E 60 Poles to B two Hicories, thence Leaving the said Line N 56 E 59 Poles to C two Small hicories, thence N 35 1/2 W 21 6 Poles to D five Red Oaks, thence S 72 N 74 Poles to E a dead red oak & Sundry saplings, thence Call 37 W 164 Poles to F a white Oak & black Oak by a glade, thence S 49 E 132 Poles to G 2 small hicorys in the said Williams’s Line, thence along the same to the Beginning. Containing 231 Acres. J. Moffitt 20th Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett Chain Carriers
The above record is the only official documentation found for the biological connection between brothers John, Reuben and Henry III and their father, Henry Jr. Close family members or neighbors traditionally participated as chain carriers in land surveys since they knew boundaries best and were in a position to protect the landowner’s (their relative’s or neighbor’s) interests. The original 1735 Bramlett-Ambrose deed for Henry Sr. lists the property as 250 acres more or less, but the new deed and plat map from the official resurvey for his grandson Henry III contains only 231 acres.

Reuben and John also are named Nov. 1, 1780, in Fauquier Co., Va., as chain carriers for their neighbor John Henson’s survey of 12 1/2 acres of waste or vacant land adjacent to their father’s former Bramlett plantation. Henson had earlier obtained a warrant to survey the land on Nov. 8, 1779:
Northern Neck of Virginia Lord Proprietor’s Office No. 961. To Mr. John Moffett whereas Robert Henson of Fauquier County hath informed that there are about Four Hundred acres of waste land and ungranted Land adjoining Jennings, Bramlet & Dodd near the Head of Ratcliff Run in the said County. And desiring a Warrant to Survey the same in order to Obtain a Deed being ready to pay the composition and Office Fees — these are therefore to empower you to Survey the said waste and ungranted Land for the said Robt. Henson Paying due regard to your instructions a Plot of which Survey with this Warrant you are to return to this Office on or before the 8th Day of May next given under my Hand and the Office Seal the 8th Day of November 1779. B. Martin.
The survey for 12 1/2 acres of the above mentioned land includes a small plat map that also contains a reference to “B” (Henry) “Bramblett’s Land,” which is adjacent the the surveyed acreage, as well as land owned by Jennings at “C” and Dodd at “D” “E” and “F”:
By Virtue of a warrant from the Proprietors Office, to me directed I have Surveyed for Robert Hinson of Fauquier County, a Tract of Waste Land, adjoining the Lands of Jennings, Bramblett, & Dodd near the head of Ratcliff’s Branch, in the said County, Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at A a white Oak & Black Oak by a glade corner to Bramblett, thence along the said Bramblett’s Line S 49 (degrees) E 132 Poles to B two small hicories in Jennings’s line, thence along the said Line – S 61 (degrees) W 20 Poles to C a hicory sapling, thence N 30 (degrees) W 3 Poles to D a hicory of fallen Red Oak Corner to Dodd, thence binding along the said Dodd’s Lines N 47 (degrees) W 66 Poles to E a Large Hicory stump & small white Oak by the road, thence N 42 (degrees) W 59 1/2 Poles to F a box Oak by the said Road, thence N 37 (degrees) E 9 Poles to the Beginning, Containing 12 1/2 acres … J. Moffett 1st Novr. 1780 Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett} Chain Carriers
This survey, recorded in the Land Office of the Northern Neck of Virginia Proprietary, 1725-1792, VLO Entry 117, Box 2, documents the residence of Reuben and John at home in Fauquier County on Nov. 1, 1780. The previous resurvey record quoted in this text above for Henry Bramlett III, which also names Reuben and John as chain carriers, documents their residence on Nov. 20, 1780. Reuben used his 1780 surveying experiences in Virginia later when he was asked to survey a road while living in Kentucky between 1805-1814.
Reuben and Elizabeth’s Life in South Carolina
Reuben and Elizabeth moved their family from Virginia to Laurens Co., S.C., by 1787 when their son Henry “Harry” Bramlett was born. Their son John also was born there, and son Nathan was born there in 1799. Reuben bought 100 acres of land on Durbin’s Creek, branch of Enoree River, from William Brown, perhaps his father-in-law or brother-in-law. He then sold the land to Benjamin Brown, perhaps his brother-in-law, for 30 pounds on Feb. 22, 1798 (DB-F:328). The land was part of Frazier’s grant, first conveyed to James Frazier, then to William Brown, then to the said Reuben Bramlett. It bounded on land owned by Francis Allison, John Deen, William Gilbert Jr. The deed was witnessed by Joseph Line and William Gilbert. Reuben bought other land from John Robinson and farmed in Laurens County until he sold it to William Brown on Sept. 2, 1800. (William Brown is most likely a close relative of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett, perhaps her father or brother?) The tract of land originally was granted to John Robinson on Aug. 10, 1797, and conveyed to Reuben Bramlett (Son of Henry II/Jr. and Margaret). Lewis Allison and Reuben’s brother “Nathan Bramblett” witnessed the 1800 deed. All were from Laurens County. (John Robinson/Robertson is husband of Martha Mary “Polly” Bramblett, sister of Mildred “Milley” Bramblett who married Menoah Robertson and sister of Reuben Bramblett Jr., who reported on his Revolutionary War pension application that he moved to Laurens County in 1794. The three siblings’ father, Reuben Bramblett Sr., named them in his 1806 will as residents of South Carolina.) Reuben sold the land he had purchased in 1798 in 1800 as he and Elizabeth and family were preparing to move to Christian Co., Ky. Reuben begins to appear in tax records there in 1801.
Reuben and Elizabeth’s Life in Kentucky
Reuben and Elizabeth bought land from John Reeves and farmed it for about seventeen years before selling the property back to Reeves in 1818. Reuben paid taxes on the farm in 1802 for the year 1801 and in 1819 for the year 1818. “Reuben Bramblet” witnessed the will of John Brown, most likely a close relative of Elizabeth, in Christian County: “The last will and testament produced in Court of John Brown by William Brown one of the Executors therein named sworn to by Reuben Bramblet a subscribing witness thereto and ordered to certify.” The record appears between Oct. 14, 1805, and 1808 in Christian County Court Order Book B, page 256.
“Reuben Bramlet” and son “Benjamin Bramlet” and three others are referenced in a Christian Co., Ky., court record to survey a road and report on it:
On the motion of Abram Morris it is ordered that Mathias Earley, Ezekiel Dunning, Reuben Bramlet, Benjamin Bramlet, and Reubin Cook or any three of them after being first sworn to be appointed viewers to view and mark a road from Earley’s Horse Mill to the Caldwell County line where the road that leads from Hopkinsville to Eddyville crosses said line and report.
The record appears between Oct. 14, 1805, and May 2, 1814, in Christian County Court Order Book B, page 332. Reuben’s son Henry Bramlett also is referenced in a later Christian Co., Ky., court record: “It is ordered that Henry Bramlett take into his care charge and custody Patsy Williams and infant orphan of _ Williams deceased for the ensuing twelve months and that he receive therefore $30 to be laid off in the next levy.” The record appears in Christian Co., Ky., Court Order Book C, page 11. The relationship between Henry and the Williams family members is unknown.
Reuben’s Revolutionary War Service

Reuben and Elizabeth’s tombstone in Brown Family Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery,
ordered and installed by Deborah G. Dennis and Gary M. Dennis
Reuben Bramlett 1757-1844
Son of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr.

Reuben Bramlett of Fauquier County, Virginia and Gallatin/Saline County, Illinois:
Revolutionary War Service
By Deborah G. Dennis
(This article first appeared on http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/)
Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, served three tours of duty as a private from Virginia during the Revolutionary War in 1777-1781. His pension claim is documented in National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, D. C. His pension number is S.30896, and his pension certificate bears the number 7814. (His surname is spelled Bramblet, Bramlett and Bramlet in various pension documents, census data and estate records.) He is sometimes confused by family researchers with two other contemporary men named Reuben Bramlett/Bramblett–his paternal first cousins–who were associated with the war or other military action in Virginia and South Carolina or Georgia, respectively. Census data indicate that long after the Revolutionary War these other two men lived separately in South Carolina and Georgia during 1818-1840 while the subject of this biographical sketch, their first cousin Reuben, lived in Gallatin (now Saline) County, Illinois.¹
Reuben’s pension claim provides the exact date and place of his birth–March 15, 1757, in Fauquier County, Virginia, as well as detailed information about his war service. (He actually was born in Prince William County before land boundaries changed and that area became Fauquier County when it was created two years later in 1759.) Additional biographical information is provided in a court document filed after Reuben died on September 11, 1844, in Gallatin County, Illinois. His seven children filed a survivors’ application for a final payment of his military pension there on March 21, 1845.2 The record names all seven children and indicates that, at the time of his death, Reuben had lived in Gallatin County, Illinois, for twenty-six years since moving in 1818 from Christian County, Kentucky.
A legal brief filed by W. R. Turner with Reuben Bramlett’s pension application indicates “Reuben Bramblet, County of Gallatin, in the State of Illinois” made his declaration of Revolutionary War service before a court in Gallatin County, Illinois, when he was 75 years old. His service was documented by the court with records from the war department and with “traditionary evidence” given in court by Reuben Bramlett and by a clergyman and a neighbor who both stated Reuben was well known as a veteran of the Revolution in the neighborhood where he lived.
A Summary of Reuben Bramlett’s War Service
Reuben Bramlett served as a private in the Virginia Line with General George Washington in Virginia and under Col. Williamson in South Carolina. Reuben first enlisted in the militia in Fauquier County, Virginia, in September 1777 and served three months as a private in Captain Samuel Blackwell’s Company in Colonel Armistead Churchill and Major Francis Triplett’s Regiment. Reuben said he marched with his unit through Maryland to Pennsylvania where they joined General George Washington’s army and were attached to the Third Virginia Regiment. He enlisted again in the spring of 1778 or 1779 in Fauquier County, Virginia, as a private and served three months in South Carolina in Captain William Berry’s Company in Colonel Williamson’s Regiment. While stationed at a fort on the Indian Line in northwest South Carolina, Reuben and two other soldiers were taken prisoner there by Tories commanded by Captain or Colonel Boyd when their officers and the other troops were out ranging. Reuben and the others were later released and left unharmed when the enemy took supplies and left the fort. After his discharge Reuben returned to Fauquier County and later enlisted there as a private for a third time in June 1781. He served three months under Captain William Triplett in Major/Colonel Francis Triplett’s Regiment in the Fauquier Militia before being honorably discharged in 1781 before Lord Cornwallis and the British surrendered at Yorktown. He applied for and received a pension based on his military service in 1832 while living in Illinois.
Reuben Bramlett’s Court Deposition
Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of act of congress passed June 7th 1832
State of Illinois}
Gallatin County}
On this 5th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the Hon. Thomas C. Browne Judge of the Circuit Court for the county aforesaid now sitting–Reuben Bramblet a resident of said county in the state of Illinois aged 75 years on the 15th day of Last March who being duly sworn according to Law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7, 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated. He first volunteered under Capt. Samuel Blackwell of Fauquier County Virginia for the Term of three months in what year exactly he does not recollect but it was the same year of the Battle of Brandywine for he recollects that while out and just after he had joined his Corps he was marched by the Battle ground to join Genl. Washington’s army with whom he remained until his three months had expired. He is pretty sure he volunteered in September of that year. The Col[onel] of the regiment that he started with was of the name of Armstead Churchill but he did not command them long, but went back on the march and the regiment was then conducted to Head Quarters by Maj. Francis Triplet. There was two companies–one commanded by Capt. Harrison (Benjamin he thinks) and the other by Capt. Blackwell. They marched from Fauquier County through Maryland to Pennsylvania where they joined the army under Genl. Washington not more than 15 miles from Brandywine river. After his arrival at Head Quarters they joined the 3d Virginia Regiment. He remembers a Col. Ennis but whether he commanded the 3d Reg[imen]t or not he does not know. He turned out under him to fight the Hessians who had landed on this side of the Schuyeskill but they run and no fight took place. He was discharged at the same place where he joined the army at the end of his 3 months. He volunteered a second time for three months a year or two afterward in the spring of the year under Capt. William Berry to go into South Carolina on the Indian line where he was stationed under Col. Williamson several companies at different places. Col. Williamson commanded them all but was not much with his company which was stationed at a Block House. Their march had been by Orange Court house, Guilford Courthouse, Sal[i]sbury, across Broad river, Catawba river & Inaree [Enoree] river where his time was all but out and Capt. Berry & the whole company, but three, were absent rangeing. Those three of whom this applicant was one were taken prisoners by several hundred Tories under the command of Capt. or Col. Boyd who was proceeding to join the British. He was not taken away but the Tories after taking what they wanted went on & left him & his comrades at the fort & when Capt. Berry returned from his rangeing expedition he was discharged his second Tour of three months being expired. he was in no battle during this Tour nor served with any Continental regiment or company.
We, Wilson Henderson a clergyman residing in the County of Gallatin state of Illinois and William Sutton, residing in the same hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Reuben Bramblet who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration. That we believe him to be 75 years of age that he is reputed in the neighborhood where he lives to have been a soldier in the revolution & that we concur in that opinion.
Sworn & subscribed the day and year aforesaid} Wilson Henderson Wm Sutton Leod. White cl[erk
And the said court do hereby Declare their opinion after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogatories prescribed by the War Department that the above named applicant served as he states and the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Wilson Henderson who has signed the preceding certificate is a clergyman resident in the County of Gallatin aforesaid and that William Sutton who has also signed the same is a resident in the same County and is a credible person and that their statement is entitled to credit.
I Leonard White Clerk of the Circuit Court in afor[e] Said County do hereby certify that the foregoing contains the original proceedings of the said Court in the matter of the application of Reuben Bramblet for a pension.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal of office this 5 day of September 1832 Leod. White cl[er]k²
He volunteered for a third term of three months the same year that Cornwallis was taken under Capt. William Triplett son of Maj. Francis Triplett before named. He entered the service this time in the month of June at Fauquier County Virginia and marched through Falmouth and Fredricksburgh to Little York where he joined the main army. He does not remember what regiment he was attached to on this occasion nor the names of his colonel or major, but recollects to have seen there Genl. Wayne and to have been commanded by him–was in no battle being discharged & returned home before the surrender of Cornwallis his three months being out & heard of the surrender of Cornwallis a few weeks after his return.
Certificate of Pension
“Reuben Bramblet of Gallatin in the State of Illinois who was a private in the company commanded by Captain Black[well] of the Regt. commanded by Col. Armstead [Churchill] in the Va. line for nine months” was inscribed on the Illinois Pension Roll in 1833. His pension amounted to “30 Dollars 00 Cents per annum, to commence on the 4th day of March 1831.” The certificate of pension was issued on April 6, 1833, and sent to Henry Eddy, of Shawneetown, Illinois, who paid Reuben $75. William R. Palmer, Clerk of the Gallatin County Commissioner’s Court, recorded the payment document in Book E, Volume 8, page 55.
Reuben’s Survivors’ Application for Final Pension Payment
Reuben died intestate at age 86 on September 11, 1844, in Gallatin County, Illinois. His youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlet, administered his estate, which was divided between all of his legal heirs, and recorded at the county courthouse. His seven children filed their survivors’ application for a final payment of his military pension on March 21, 1845:
State of Illinois}Gallatin County}
Be it known that before me, James Murray, a Justice of the Peace, in and for the said county, personally appeared Benjamin Bramlett, Henry Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett, Coleman B. Bramlett, John Bramlett, Margaret Easley, & Elizabeth Baker, and made oath in due form of law that they are the children of Reuben Bramlet, deceased, who was the identical person who was a pensioner and is now dead, and to whom a certificate of pension was issued which is herewith surrendered. That the deceased pensioner resided in Gallatin County with his children for the space of twenty six years before his death, and that previously thereto he resided in Christian County in the State of Kentucky. Sworn to and Subscribed before me this 21st day of March, 1845 James Murray, Justice of the Peace [Signed] Benjamin Bramlet³ Henry Bramlet John Bramlet Nathan Bramlet Coleman B. Bramlet Margaret Easley Elizabeth Baker
Two witnesses who write} John M. Burnett Joseph Easley Know all men by these presents that we, Benjamin Bramlett, Henry Bramlett, Nathan Bramlett, Coleman B. Bramlett, John Bramlett, Margaret Easley, & Elizabeth Baker, of the County of Gallatin, State of Illinois, the children of Reuben Bramlett, deceased, who was a pensioner of the United States, do hereby constitute and appoint Erastus Wright our true and lawful attorney for us and in our names to receive from the agent of the United States for paying pensions in the State of Illinois the balance of said pension from the 4th day of March, 1844, to the 11th day of September, 1844, being the day of his death. Witness our hands and seals this 21st day of March, 1845 Benjamin Bramlet Henry Bramlet John Bramlet Nathan Bramlet Coleman B. Bramlet Margaret Easley Elizabeth Baker
Two witnesses who write} John M. Burnett Joseph Easley

Final Pension Payment Vouchers, showing Reuben’s death date, courtesy NARA
Michael Hillegas Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution at one time placed a copper marker on Reuben Bramlett’s grave in the oldest section of Wolf Creek Cemetery, Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill. Elder descendants in the area designated the grave’s location for the group from personal knowledge. The copper marker and its placement was not mapped or documented; and some time later the copper marker was removed, disappeared. Graves for Reuben and Elizabeth are now marked with an inscribed companion stone acquired by Deborah G. Dennis and late husband, Gary Michael Dennis, from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and installed in the old section of the cemetery next to the marked graves of their daughter Margaret and her husband, Joseph Easley, and the unmarked graves of some of their family members.

Reuben Bramlett’s name is inscribed with others on a monument honoring Revolutionary War veterans buried in Saline County. The monument was first placed on the courthouse lawn there in Harrisburg by Michael Hillegas Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and unveiled on Oct. 11, 1931. It was later moved to its current position in Sunset Lawn Cemetery in Harrisburg. The copper plaque inscription: “TO REUBEN BRAMLET, MALACHI HEREFORD, THOMAS HAMILTON, LEWIS HANCOCK AND WILLIAM ROARK, SOLDIERS OF THE REVOLUTION, BURIED IN SALINE COUNTY.” The monument was unveiled on the courthouse lawn at Harrisburg under auspices of the Michael Hillegas Chapter of the D. A. R. Mr. A. J. Cook and Mrs. Carl Rude unveiled the monument and the Rev. T. Leo Dodd and Mrs. David Peffer of Aurora, Illinois, State Regent, spoke at the ceremony.
End Notes
1 Reuben Bramlett of Gallatin County, Illinois, is the son of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr. and grandson of Henry Bramlett Sr. of Fauquier County, Virginia. Two of his first cousins who share his given name were associated with the Revolutionary War in Virginia and South Carolina or the military as pension applicants: 1) Reuben Bramblett Jr., the son of Reuben and Margaret Bramblett of Virginia and Bourbon County, Kentucky, who served in Elias Edmonds’ Company of the First Virginia Regiment of Artillery commanded by Colonel Thomas Marshall as a paid teamster in Virginia and later filed a pension application (R.1152) in South Carolina in 1832 that was twice rejected, and 2) Reuben Bramblett, the son of William and Elizabeth Bramblett of Virginia and Laurens County, South Carolina, whose Revolutionary War service is suggested in a reference to him as a military pensioner in the 1840 U.S. Census for Gwnnett County, Georgia. No record of Revolutionary War service has been found for him. Reuben Jr. (1) moved from Fauquier County, Virginia, to Laurens County, South Carolina, in 1794 and lived there until he died after 1840. His cousin Reuben (2) moved from Laurens County, South Carolina, to Gwinnett County, Georgia, circa 1820 and lived there until he died after 1840. Their cousin Reuben, the pensioner whose service is documented and featured here, moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to Gallatin (now Saline) County, Illinois, in 1818 and lived there until he died in 1844.
2 Reuben and Elizabeth (Brown) Bramlett and children all moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to Gallatin County, Illinois. Elizabeth, who died circa 1830 in Gallatin County, is the daughter of Mary Coleman and William Brown, according to family tradition. Elizabeth and Reuben’s marriage in Virginia circa 1783-1785 has not been documented due to lost parish records. Elizabeth’s mother, Mary, and siblings also moved from Christian County, Kentucky, to Gallatin County, Illinois. (Her brother Coleman Brown was in the territory as early as 1816, bought land and built a blockhouse with brothers there on the site of Brown Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery, and present-day Eldorado.) Elizabeth and Reuben moved from Virginia by 1787 to South Carolina where several of his relatives had relocated before and after the Revolution. (The 1850 census indicates his son Henry was born in South Carolina in 1787 and his son Nathan was born there in 1799.) Tax records show Reuben later owned a farm in Kentucky for several years, between 1802 and 1818, before he moved his family to Illinois. Elizabeth predeceased Reuben: She is not enumerated in the 1840 census, nor mentioned in Reuben’s pension application and estate records. Their seven children, who are named in Reuben’s pension and 1844-1847 estate records in Gallatin County, are 1) Benjamin Bramlett, who married his cousin Mary “Polly” Brown in Kentucky and died in 1830 (most likely buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery); 2) Henry Bramlett, who first married Liddy Stephens (first person buried at Brown Family Graveyard on Coleman Brown’s land, now Wolf Creek Cemetery, in present-day Eldorado, Illinois) and second married Malinda Easley (buried beside Henry with inscribed markers at Bramlet Cemetery), and died in 1865; 3) John Bramlett who most likely did not marry and died after 1847; 4) Nathan Bramlett who married Mary “Polly” Upchurch in Illinois in 1820 and died in 1858; 5) Coleman Brown Bramlet who married Susannah Upchurch in Illinois and died in 1889 (both buried with inscribed markers at Bramlet Cemetery); 6) Margaret Bramlett who married Joseph Easley in Christian County, Kentucky, (both buried with inscribed markers at Wolf Creek Cemetery); and 7) Elizabeth Bramlett who married Elijah Baker in Gallatin County in 1829 (death dates and burial places unknown).
3 Benjamin Bramlett did not actually, physically appear in court as stated since he was already deceased. He died of measles circa 1830 and definitely before his father’s estate was probated in Gallatin County in 1844-1847: Ben’s name, signed by his brother Henry with the same handwriting used for Henry’s own name, is included in the court record since Ben was a child/heir of Reuben. Benjamin’s children are named in their grandfather Reuben Bramlett’s probate records as recipients of their father Benjamin’s share of his father Reuben’s estate because Ben had already died of measles in 1830.
4 Transcript of pension declaration is taken from three copies ordered from NARA. Each had different blurred, illegible and legible sections, allowing a full transcript.
Author’s Note: Deborah G. Dennis is a fifth-great-granddaughter of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, descending through their son Coleman Brown Bramlet and his wife, Susannah Upchurch and their son Thomas Brown Bramlett and wife, Rebecca Jane Hanley. Deb also is an fifth-great-granddaughter of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett’s brother Coleman Brown, descending through his son Marvel Brown and wife, Paletire Ellis Cox, and their daughter Susan Brown and husband, Montgomery Miner, and their daughter Mary Matilda Miner who married her cousin Henry Coleman Bramlett. Henry Coleman Bramlett is son of Thomas Brown Bramlett and grandson of Coleman Brown Bramlet and great-grandson of Reuben Bramlett and Elizabeth Brown. Deb is a native of western Illinois–the Land of Lincoln, Obama, and Clinton–who now lives in Charleston, S.C. For more information, contact debdenn@gmail.com.
Reuben and Elizabeth’s Life in Illinois
Reuben is listed in Gallatin County census data during 1820-1840. “Reuben Bramlett,” 82, resident of Gallatin County, Illinois, and head of his family on June 1, 1840, is listed in the 1841 Census of Pensioners, created from the 1840 U.S. Census for Gallatin County, Illinois.
Reuben’s Estate
Reuben’s probate records, naming seven children in receipts for their shares of his estate, and containing an appraisement bill of his personal estate and payment receipts, indicate he was well invested in family and farm land. He owned vital necessities at the end of his life: oven and pot hooks, coffee mill, large kettle; a cow for milk and butter, hogs, steers, two horses with one saddle. He owned one plough, used by him and later, sons, to cultivate his land. His youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlet, administered the estate. Reuben died intestate at his home in Raleigh Township.
Reuben Bramlett (1757-1844) Probate Records
“Illinois, Wills and Probate Records, 1772-1999”
1844-1847 Gallatin Co., Ill., Box 6-B

H. R. Coffee’s Bill “For 1 Coffin — $6.00” in September 1844 provides proof Reuben died and was prepared for burial in Gallatin Co., Ill. He and wife, Elizabeth Brown, rest in Brown Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery.

Appraisement Bill of Reuben’s Personal Effects 18 October 1844

Reuben and Elizabeth’s Children
Elizabeth and Reuben’s first child, Benjamin, was born in Virginia in 1785, according to a published historical account in Gallatin/Saline County, quoted below. They moved to Laurens Co., S.C., before their son Henry was born in 1787 and son Nathan was born in 1799. Their son John may have been born there as well in 1788 before Reuben and Elizabeth moved the family to Kentucky. They began farming in Christian Co., Ky., in 1800-1801. Bible records indicate their youngest son, Coleman Brown Bramlett, was born in Kentucky in 1802. Their two daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth, were born in Kentucky as well. The entire family moved by 1818 into southern Illinois where they established Bramlett Settlement, a community of individual family farms south of Raleigh and west of Eldorado that eventually included a rural school, cemetery and church.

Benjamin Bramlett, first child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born Aug. 29, 1785, in Virginia, most likely Fauquier County. He died circa 1830 of measles in Saline Co., Ill., and was most likely buried at Brown Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery. Benjamin purchased 80 acres of land in section 9, township 8 south, range 7 east, Gallatin County, for $100 on Jan. 12, 1824. He married a cousin, Mary “Polly” Brown, circa 1812 in Christian Co., Ky. She was born circa 1790-1794 in Kentucky, the daughter of Nancy Wilhoit/Wilhite and Coleman Brown. She died circa 1824-26 in Gallatin County and most likely was buried at Brown Graveyard (Wolf Creek Cemetery). Their son’s name and the names of their daughters’ husbands are listed as representatives of heirs of their grandfather Reuben Bramlett’s estate in his 1844-1847 probate records: Eliza, Clarinda, Nancy M., Elizabeth “Betsy” and Alfred J. Bramlet.

Eliza Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born April 13, 1813, in Christian Co., Ky. She died Aug. 7, 1885, in Hamilton Co., Ill. She married Joseph Choisser on April 4, 1839, in Gallatin (now Saline) County. He was born July 7, 1814, in Kentucky and died July 16, 1851, in New Orleans, La. He signed the receipt on Nov. 29, 1847, for his wife’s share of her grandfather Reuben Bramlett’s estate. Their children are Joseph Jr. born and died 1840 and William Parish Choisser born Sept. 3, 1843, and died Oct. 12, 1845. Eliza second married James A. Twigg on Dec. 16, 1852, in Saline County. He was Aug. 31, 1804, in Tennessee. He died at age 91 on March 31, 1896, in Hamilton Co., Ill., and was buried at Hickory Hill Cemetery, Walpole, Ill. James first married Polly Barker, born 1805, died 1843; and their child is Polly Twigg Hall.
Clarinda Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born April 11, 1820, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She died Nov. 8, 1847, in Saline Co., Ill. She married William George Burnett on Feb. 23, 1840, in Saline County. He was born there Sept. 21, 1819, the son of Sarah Burnett Graham and William George Burnett Sr. He died there April 11, 1849. He signed the receipt on Nov. 29, 1847, for his wife’s share of her grandfather Reuben Bramlett’s estate.

Nancy M. Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born Sept. 26, 1821, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She died Oct. 17, 1899, at Rural Broughton, Hamilton Co., Ill., and was buried there in Old Hickory Hill Cemetery. She married John Henry Irvin on Feb. 7, 1840, in Gallatin (now Saline) County. He signed the receipt on Nov. 29, 1847, for his wife’s share of her grandfather Reuben Bramlett’s estate. He was born Feb. 10, 1821, in Hamilton County. He died Nov. 22, 1864.
Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born circa 1822 in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She died there circa 1872. She married Andrew H. Benson on March 25, 1841, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He signed the receipt on Nov. 29, 1847, for his wife’s share of her grandfather Reuben Bramlett’s 1844-1847 estate. Andrew was born circa 1823, the son of Mary B. “Polly” Riggin and Charles Robbins Benson. He died Jan. 29, 1901, in Gallatin Co., Ill. “Elizabeth Benson,” no age (29), and husband, Andrew H. Benson, 28, farmer, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Curran Twp., Saline Co., Ill., with two children, all born Illinois: William E. F., and Eliza J., no ages (NARA Film M432:127:63A). “Elizabeth E. Benson,” 39, and husband, A. H., 38, Baptist preacher, $1,100 real estate, $560 personal estate, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Twp. 8 Range 7 East, Saline Co., Ill., with four children: Wm. F., 12, farmer; Eliza J., 12; Rebecca A., 6; Charles A., 2 (NARA Film M653:223:861). Andrew and Elizabeth’s children are William E. F., Eliza Jane, Rebecca Anna, Charles Andrew, Frances and Amanda Ellen Benson.
William E. F. Benson, child of Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born circa 1844. He died March 25, 1879.
Eliza Jane Benson, child of Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born circa 1848 in Saline Co., Ill.
Rebecca Anna Benson, child of Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born circa 1854 in Saline Co., Ill.
Charles Andrew Benson, child of Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born circa 1858 in Saline Co., Ill.
Frances Benson, child of Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born in Saline Co., Ill.
Amanda Ellen Benson, child of Elizabeth ‘Betsy” Bramlet and Andrew H. Benson, was born in Saline Co., Ill.
Alfred J. Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Benjamin Bramlett, was born March 11, 1824, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died Feb. 12, 1887, in Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery. “Alford J. Bramlet” signed (made his mark on) the receipt Nov. 29, 1847, for his share of his grandfather Reuben Bramlett’s estate. He married Emeline A. Herrin/g. She was born Nov. 9, 1829, in Kentucky, the daughter of Nancy Renshaw and Heli Herring. Emeline died Feb. 12, 1887, and was buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery. Their children are Nancy Elizabeth, George Ewing, Hetty E. and Charles Alfred Bramlet.
Nancy Elizabeth Bramlet, child of Emeline A. Herrin/g and Alfred J. Bramlet, was born 1856 in Saline Co., Ill. She died May 10, 1933, and rests in Oakwood Cemetery, Alton, Madison Co., Ill. She married Richard Damascus Swain.
George Ewing Bramlett, child of Emeline A. Herrin/g and Alfred J. Bramlet, was born July 27, 1860, in Saline Co., Ill. He died Oct. 27, 1946. He married Emma Sisk. They rest in Wolf Creek Cemetery. Their children are Bernice, Henry Alfred, Verbyl E. Bramlett.
Hetty E. Bramlett, child of Emeline A. Herrin/g and Alfred J. Bramlet, was born circa 1865 in Saline Co., Ill.
Charles Alfred Bramlett, child of Emeline A. Herrin/g and Alfred J. Bramlet, was born Feb. 3, 1868, in Saline Co., Ill. He died Nov. 17, 1933, and was buried at Wesley Chapel Cemetery. He married Sarah Cordelia Pickens.

Tombstone of Henry “Harry” Bramlett and second wife, Malinda Easley
Henry “Harry” Bramlett, second child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born circa 1787 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died June 21, 1865, in Saline Co., Ill., and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Henry signed receipts for his share of his father’s estate and a receipt for a payment he received from his younger brother Coleman Brown Bramlet, administrator, for “John Bramlet the sum of fifteen dollars for trouble and guarding” their mentally disabled brother. The receipts prove Henry was the son of Reuben Bramlett and brother of Coleman Brown Bramlet.

Henry Bramlett’s receipt in his father’s estate records
Henry first married Liddy Stephens on Jan. 2, 1812, in Christian Co., Ky. The marriage was recorded in both Christian and Caldwell County. Liddy was born circa 1788 in Kentucky or North Carolina. She died in the Illinois Territory circa 1814-1816 and was the first person buried in Brown Graveyard, now known as Wolf Creek Cemetery. Liddy and Henry did not have children who survived. Henry, in the area to assist with security and building his maternal uncle Coleman Brown’s Blockhouse, returned to Kentucky and second married Malinda Easley on Dec. 30, 1817, in Christian County. Henry and Malinda settled in 1818 in Gallatin Co., Ill., and participated in the establishment of Bramlett Settlement by farming with his father and brothers. Malinda, born in 1798 in Stokes Co., N.C., is the daughter of Lucy and Warham Easley and sister of Joseph Easley, husband of Henry’s sister Margaret “Peggy” Bramlett. Malinda died Jan. 15, 1855, in Saline County and was buried there at Bramlet Cemetery. “Henry Bramlet,” 62, born South Carolina, farmer, $650 real estate, and wife, Malinda, 52, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill., with five grown and minor children born Illinois: Reuben, 21, laborer; Benjamin, 18, laborer; Joseph, 16, laborer; William, 14; Warham, 12 (NARA Film M432:127:53A). “Henry Bramlet,” 70, born South Carolina, $1,000 real estate, $200 personal estate, widowed, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Twp. 8 Range 6 East, Saline Co., Ill., living with son Allen, 35, farmer, $225 personal estate, and wife, Melinda, 25, domestic, and children: John H., 12, and Harriet E., 1, all born Illinois (NARA Film M653:223:912).
Henry and Malinda’s descendants lived in, worked and participated as active members of the Bramlet Community. Some signed the petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association in 1918 and served as trustees. Some of Henry and Malinda’s descendants are contemporary members of Union Grove Baptist Church. In recent years they refurbished the church and added beautiful, brightly colored stained glass to the sanctuary windows. Henry and Malinda’s children include Jemima, Emaline (“Emily”), Nancy Jane, Henry Allen, Reuben Henry, Benjamin, Joseph, William Henry and Warham Bramlett.
Jemima Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry “Harry” Bramlett, was born in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She married Martin Gillett.
Emaline “Emily” Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry “Harry” Bramlett, was born in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She married George Burnett.
Nancy Jane Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry “Harry” Bramlett, was born in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She married Robert Boyd on Jan. 4. 1847, in Gallatin Co., Ill.
Henry Allen Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry “Harry” Bramlett, was born in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill.

Reuben Henry Bramlet, child of Malinda Easley and Henry “Harry” Bramlett, was born Aug. 10, 1829, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died at age 62 years, 10 months, 17 days, on June 27, 1892, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery near Eldorado, Ill. His tombstone is inscribed “The Lord is in His holy Temple. Prepare to meet Him in Peace.” He married Mary Read McCoy on Nov. 10, 1853, in Saline County. She was born Feb. 13, 1836, in Ohio, the daughter of Nolene Hulda McFarland and Daniel John McCoy. She died Nov. 9, 1922, in Evansville, Ind. Mary and Reuben’s children are Huldah M. and Rufus Henry Bramlet.

Huldah M. Bramlet, child of Reuben Henry and Mary Read McCoy Bramlet, was born Jan. 22, 1855, in Saline Co., Ill. She died there Feb. 19, 1897, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Her tombstone is inscribed “Remember Me For I Am At Rest.” Huldah married Willis W. Kilgore on March 31, 1881, in Eldorado, Ill. Willis, son of Naomi Tison and J. L. Kilgore, was born in Saline County. He died Nov. 9, 1924, in Harrisburg, Ill. Two of their children are buried at Bramlet: Mary and Margaret Emily Kilgore.

Rufus Henry Bramlet, child of Reuben Henry and Mary Read McCoy Bramlet, was born Oct. 13, 1858, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there Dec. 13, 1940, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Henry married Laura Lucy Glascock on May 28, 1891, at her parents’ home in Saline County. Laura was born Feb. 11, 1863, in Galatia, Ill., the daughter of Lucy Haines or Harris and George W. Glascock. Laura died June 26, 1949, in Wasson, Ill., and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Henry signed a petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association and served as a trustee in 1918. Three of their infants, a daughter and two sons, are buried there with a shared tombstone inscribed “Children of Henry & Laura L. Bramlet” with birth and death dates.

Benjamin Bramlett, 1832-1900
Benjamin Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry “Harry” Bramlett, was born circa 1831 in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died after 1900 in Auburn, Sangamon Co., Ill.

Joseph Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry “Harry” Bramlett, was born circa 1834 in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died Oct. 27, 1863, at Vicksburg General Hospital #2, Vicksburg, Miss., while serving as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He rests at Vicksburg National Cemetery. He enlisted as a private in Company E, Twenty-Ninth Regiment, Illinois Infantry, and was promoted to corporal. His father, Henry, was still living when Joseph perished in 1863, but his mother had died in 1855.

Eight children of Martha and William Henry Bramlett and families, courtesy Kenneth R. and Richard Bramlett
William Henry Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry “Harry” Bramlett, was born Feb. 11, 1836, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died there Aug. 31, 1887. He married Martha Mathilda A. Gregg on Jan. 18, 1858. She was born Jan. 29, 1839. She died March 18, 1889. Their children are Sarah Malinda, Henry F., Francis Gregg, Mary Jane, Emily C., Thomas Wilson, Joseph A., Lucy E., Benjamin, George R., Charles G. Bramlett.
Sarah Malinda Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born circa 1858-59 in Saline Co., Ill. She died in 1942. She married William C. “Billy” Neel.
Henry F. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born May 23, 1860. He died Nov. 1, 1864.
Francis Gregg “Frank” Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born April 9, 1862. He died May 31, 1898. He never married.
Mary Jane Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born Nov. 18, 1863. She died Feb. 17, 1941. She married John I. McGhee.
Emily C. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born May 26, 1864. She died Nov. 6, 1865.
Thomas Wilson Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born Nov. 23, 1866. He died Aug. 4, 1947.
Joseph A. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born circa 1868-70. He died June 2, 1942.
Lucy E. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born circa 1873. She died in 1904. She married James Wiley Beasley.
Benjamin Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett and twin of George R., was born May 25, 1875. He died Aug. 2, 1945.
George R. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett and twin of Benjamin, was born May 25, 1875. He died Dec. 29, 1959.
Charles G. Bramlett, child of William Henry and Martha M. A. Gregg Bramlett, was born Dec. 8, 1877. He died Nov. 22, 1962.

Warham Bramlet served as a Soldier in the Union Army during the Civil War

Warham Bramlett, child of Malinda Easley and Henry “Harry” Bramlett, was born July 27, 1837, near Equality in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He is the namesake of his maternal grandfather Warham Easley. He died July 13, 1913, in Harrisburg, Ill., and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery, Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. Warham served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private in Company E, Twenty-Ninth Regiment, Illinois Infantry. After the war he returned home and resumed farming. He married Martha Ann Thomas on Nov. 12, 1873, in Saline County. She was born in 1847, the daughter of Sarah H. Johnson and John G. Thomas. She died Jan. 29, 1912, in Eldorado and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. She shares a companion tombstone with Warham. She was a member of Union Grove Baptist Church. Warham and Martha Ann’s children are John Nelson Thomas, Harry Allen Bramlet and Horace G. Bramlet.

John Bramlett, third child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born circa 1788 in Laurens Co., S.C. He died in Saline Co., Ill., circa 1847-1850 and most likely was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. His grave is no longer marked; however, he may be buried in the central part of the graveyard with a tombstone inscription that has eroded by weather and worn away. John witnessed the marriage license of his sister Margaret Bramlett in 1818 in Christian Co., Ky., when she married Joseph Easley. His signature, John, without his surname, written above his father’s full name, resulted in some confusion in subsequent years. Reuben signed the document to provide his permission/consent for his minor daughter’s wedding, and John signed as the witness. Some researchers misread John’s abbreviated signature to be part of his father’s name: “Reuben John Bramlet.” However, Reuben himself did not have the middle name John. He had a son named John, witness on the document, and a brother named John, resident of Greenville Co., S.C.; but Reuben did not have a middle name John. John suffered some kind of mental and/or physical disability in later years. One source indicated John “went insane” and never married. He lived with his father and then with his brother Coleman Brown Bramlet and briefly with brother Henry “Harry” Bramlett. Henry signed a receipt of payment for “care and guarding of John” when Coleman settled his father’s estate in 1844-1847.
Nathan Bramlet, fourth child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born Feb. 3, 1799, in Laurens Co., S.C. He wrote his will Nov. 28, 1858, in Saline Co., Ill. He died Dec. 8, 1858, in Pope Co., Ill., and was buried in a local cemetery there. Witnesses to Nathan’s will, Alexander Jenkins and Henderson Rude, presented the will in Saline County Probate Court on Jan. 3, 1859. His stated heirs are wife Mary and nine living children. Nathan married a cousin, Mary “Polly” Upchurch. They applied for their marriage license on April 5, 1820, in Gallatin Co., Ill.
Last Will and Testament of Nathan Bramlet
I Nathan Bramlet in the County of Saline and State of Illinois do hereby make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following (to wit) First it is my will that my funeral expenses and all my just debts be fully paid. Second After the payments of such funeral expenses and debts I give devise and bequeath until my beloved wife Mary Bramlet the farm on which we now reside situated in the County of Pope and known and described as the west Half of the North East quarter of Section (1) one in Township No. (11) Eleven South of Range (5) Five East of the third principal meridian during her natural life and all the live stock horses cattle sheep hogs &tc. by me now owned and kept there also all the household furniture and other articles of personal property not herein enumerated or otherwise described of in this will during her natural life after having disposed of a sufficient amount to pay and discharge the expenses or so much thereof as may remain unexpended. Third I want Nancy Jane Bramlet and Samuel Bramlet to have one bed and bedding to each one and one cow & calf to each one and Samuel Bramlet to have one horse with Forty Dollars when he becomes of age. Fourth And after the deaths of Mary Bramlet my wife I want every thing that may be left to be sold Land and personal property all sold and equal division made between Benjamin B. Bramlet John D. Bramlet Mary Pinnell Elizabeth F. Pinnell Thomas C. Bramlet Susannah Carrier Nancy Jane Bramlet Samuel Bramlet and Matilda V. Bramlet my kin at Law. And lastly I hereby constitute and appoint my said wife Mary Bramlet executrix of this my last will and testament revoking & annulling all former wills and testaments. In witness whereof I Nathan Bramlet have hereunto set my hand and seal this 24th day of November 1858 Nathan Bramlet Signed Sealed published and delivered by the said Nathan Bramlet as and for his last will and testament in presence of us who in his presence and in the presence of each other and at his request have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto Alexander Jenkins Hndson [Henderson] Rude} Witnesses State of Illinois} Saline County} January term 1859 Probate Court Now on this day appeared in open Court Alexander Jenkins and Henderson Rude two subscribing witnesses to the last will and testament of Nathan Bramlet deceased and after being duly sworn depose and say that they were present at the signing and sealing of the foregoing will that they believed and still believe that the testator Nathan Bramlet was of sound mind and disposing memory at the signing and sealing of said will that they signed said will at the request of said testator in his presence and in the presence of each other and that the will presented to the Court on the 3rd day of January 1859 is the identical will signed by the said Nathan Bramlet as his last will and testament and subscribed by them at his request. Alexander Jenkins Henderson Rude Subscribed and sworn to before me on this 3rd day of January A.D. 1859 R. N. Warfield C. Clk S. Co. (Will Record Vol. 1-3, 1847-1922, pp. 56-57)

Nathan and Mary “Polly” Brown Bramlet’s children are Benjamin Brown Bramlet, John Daniel Bramlet, Mary Bramlet Pinnell, Elizabeth F. Bramlet Pinnell, Thomas C. Bramlet, Susannah Bramlet Carrier, Nancy Jane Bramlet, Samuel Bramlet, Matilda Vance Bramlet.
Benjamin Brown Bramlet, child of Nathan and Mary “Polly” Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died in Pope Co., Ill. Benjamin and second wife, Mary Enceneth Vaughn, lived in Saline County and Pope County. One son is Joseph Henry Bramlet.

Joseph Henry Bramlet, child of Benjamin Brown Bramlet and second wife, Enceneth Vaughn Bramlet, was born Nov. 19, 1859, in Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill. He died there Dec. 26, 1934, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Joseph married Roena Belle Shepherd on Dec. 25, 1887, at her parents’ home in Saline County. Belle, daughter of Mary Greenfield and Edward Shepherd, was born March 6, 1862, in Illinois. She died in Saline County on Feb. 26, 1940, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Joseph signed the petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association in 1918 and served as the group’s first president.

Tombstone of John Daniel Bramlet and Sarena Gates

John Daniel Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Upchurch and Nathan Bramlet, was born April 8, 1824, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died Feb. 9, 1915, at home and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Daniel first married Elizabeth Dooley in 1845. He filed for and received a divorce in Saline County after she eloped with another man to Kentucky. Elizabeth and John Daniel did not have children. Daniel second married Sarena Gates on May 12, 1850. She was born Dec. 1, 1835. She died July 24, 1906, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Daniel served as a soldier during the Mexican War. He enlisted in Company H, First Illinois Volunteers and was honorably discharged. He served on the board of Bramlet School in 1865-1867. He was a member of Raleigh Baptist Church in 1843 and Union Grove Baptist Church in 1884 until his death. He was well known in the area as the developer of an animal park on his home farm, adjacent on the east boundary of Bramlet Cemetery and Union Grove Baptist Church, the original homestead of his grandparents Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett. Community residents drove their buggies and wagons and rode horses to the park to picnic and view the deer, goats, squirrels, peacocks, geese, ducks, chickens enclosed in the fenced area. Daniel’s son Meeks Haley Bramlet included an illustration of the park, made from a photograph of a large folk art painting, in his 1924 history A Pioneer Family – Bramlet (36).
“Farm Home Park of J. D. Bramlet 4 miles west of Eldorado Ill’s”

Daniel and Sarena’s children are Sarah Ann, Francis Marion (“Frank”), Elizabeth B., Anna Eliza, Meeks Haley, Rosa E., Nancy Jane, Mollie Bramlet.
Sarah Ann Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born in 1851 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died at age 40 years, 4 months, 2 days, in 1891, in Saline Co., Ill. She married Edmond Cummins there on Jan. 14, 1870. He was born circa 1847 in Kentucky and died sometime after 1876.

Francis Marion “Frank” Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born March 2, 1854, in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. He died Oct. 14, 1940, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. He married Josephine Priscilla Shepherd on Nov. 22, 1877, in Eldorado, Ill. She was born Oct. 10, 1859, in Saline County, the daughter of Sarah Greenfield and Edward Shepherd. She died Feb. 23, 1922, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Their children include Calvin Alexander and Herman Reuben Bramlet.
Elizabeth B. Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born 1858 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died there in 1880 shortly after the birth of her daughter Belle and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Elizabeth married Reuben Stephen Peebles on July 29, 1878, in Saline County. He was born in 1852 in Tennessee, the son of Annie Hutrell and Edward Peebles. Reuben had been previously married. Belle Peebles married John Swansey. Their child is Tillie Swansey, who is buried in Bramlet.
Anna Eliza Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born Sept. 24, 1862, in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died June 11, 1947, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Anna married Harrison D. Wise on Jan. 27, 1881, at her parents’ home. He was born in 1857 in Indiana, the son of Ann Maria Barrett and Abraham Wise who rest in Wolf Creek Cemetery. Harrison died April 4, 1931, in Saline County and was buried in Bramlet. Their children include Delman Abraham and Nora Ethel Wise.

Meeks Haley Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born April 6, 1864, in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. He died Sept. 26, 1929, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Meeks is author of A Pioneer Family – Bramlet, published in 1924. He was a local merchant, at one time owning and operating a candy store in Eldorado. Meeks first married Frances L. Vineyard, daughter of David T. Vineyard, on Aug. 19, 1884. Meeks second married Emeretta “Retta” Alderson, daughter of Mary A. Howell and Isaac C. Alderson, on Sept. 29, 1895. Retta, born in 1866 in Indiana, died July 10, 1925, and was buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery. Meeks third married Verna B. Anderson in Hot Springs, Ark. She was born March 24, 1878, in Missouri, the daughter of Sarah Fundolph and Ira Green of Missouri. Verna died July 17, 1941, and was buried beside Meeks at Bramlet Cemetery.

Rosa E. Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born in August 1866 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died June 21, 1957, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery.

Nancy JaneBramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born in 1871 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died in 1956 in Eldorado, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. She married Will Dunn on Nov. 1, 1898, at her parents’ home. He was born in 1869, the son of Mary Brandon and John C. Dunn of Stonefort. Will died in 1946 and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Their daughter Thelma Dunn, born Sept. 4, 1899, and died Nov. 17, 1914, rest at Bramlet Cemetery with an inscribed marker: “Budded on Earth to Bloom in Heaven.” Will signed a petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association in 1918 and served as one of the first trustees.

Mollie Bramlet, child of Sarena Gates and John Daniel Bramlet, was born 1872 in Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill. She died 1944 and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Mollie married Robert Willis Joiner Oct. 4, 1898, at her parents’ home. He was born in 1865 in Missouri, the son of Jane Trammell and Lucas Joiner. Robert died 1949 in Saline County and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Beulah Opal Joiner, child of Mollie Bramlet and Robert Willis Joiner, married Goodman Lee Lewis and Thurman Daniel Gibson. Her children buried in Bramlet: Charles Lewis, Nancy E. Lewis, Daniel Gibson. Sylvia Jane Joiner, child of Mollie Bramlet and Robert Willis Joiner, married Omer Lincoln Owens. Sylvia rests at Bramlet Cemetery.
Mary Bramlet Pinnell, child of Nathan and Mary “Polly” Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill.
Elizabeth F. Bramlet Pinnell, child of Nathan and Mary “Polly” Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill.
Thomas C. Bramlet, child of Nathan and Mary “Polly” Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill.
Susannah Bramlet Carrier, child of Nathan and Mary “Polly” Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill.
Nancy Jane Bramlet, child of Nathan and Mary “Polly” Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill.

Samuel Bramlet served as a Soldier in the Union Army during the Civil War
Samuel Bramlet, child of Nathan and Mary “Polly” Brown Bramlet, was born circa 1840 in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died March 19, 1885, at Tip Top, Yavipai Co., Ariz., and was buried there. Samuel served as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted as a private and was promoted to sergeant in Company H, Thirty-First Regiment, Illinois Infantry. He married Susan Simpson Shockley on Oct. 23, 1866, in Saline Co., Ill. She was born circa 1838 in Gallatin Co., Ill., the daughter of Rachel Crider and Isaac Simpson. Susan died June 8, 1906, in Galena, Cherokee Co., Kans. Susan first married Curtis M. Shockley on Dec. 3, 1856, in Saline County. He was born Jan. 1, 1828, in South Carolina, the son of Rosina Jane McQuay and David Shockley. Curtis died Dec. 11, 1862, while serving as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted in Company K, Thirteenth Regiment, Illinois Infantry. Susan applied for a widow’s and survivor’s pensions based on his war service. Curtis and Susan’s children are William D. C., Thomas A. and Mariah Clementine Shockley. (Curtis was previously married June 13, 1850, to Barbara Elizabeth Tucker. She was born circa 1829 in Saline Co., Ill. She died there Oct. 16, 1855. Barbara and Curtis had children Warren T. and David H. M. Shockley.) Susan and Samuel’s children are Franklin Lumsford “Lum” Bramlet, 1868-post 1930; Mary E., 1870-post 1905; and Martha Ann Bramlet, 1872-1957, who married Alexander Davis.

Susan Simpson Shockley Bramlet, left, circa 1880s, Joplin, Mo.; tintype of Martha Ann Bramlet, circa 1877, Eldorado, Saline Co., Ill.; and right, Franklin Lumsford “Lum” Bramlet, circa 1885, Galena, Ill., courtesy descendant Samuel Bramlett Bartee of Oklahoma.
Matilda Vance Bramlet, youngest child of Nathan and Mary “Polly” Brown Bramlet, was born in Gallatin Co., Ill.

Survey of Bramlet Cemetery, Raleigh Township, Saline County, Illinois
All Cemetery Images Copyright, Courtesy Deborah G. Dennis

Coleman Brown Bramlet established Bramlet Cemetery at the death of a daughter in 1837.

Bramlet Cemetery is situated in Section 26 of Raleigh Township, Saline Co., Ill., and located about two miles north of Muddy, Ill., three miles south of Raleigh, Ill., and about three and a half miles southwest of Eldorado, Ill. Bramlet Cemetery was established in the Bramlett Settlement of Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill., circa 1838, according to the late Wanda I. Thomas and Fred H. Bramlet. However, the rural graveyard, located on land then owned by Coleman Brown Bramlet, probably was established at the death of his young daughter Manerva on Sept. 5, 1837. Although her grave is no longer marked with an inscribed tombstone, there are four very old and worn stone grave markers in the cemetery. (The oldest grave with an intact inscribed marker is that of Malinda Easley, who died in 1855. She is second wife of Coleman’s older brother Henry “Harry” Bramlett.) Before 1837-38, most or all Bramlet family members were buried in Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery near Eldorado. Wolf Creek Cemetery, first known as Brown Family Graveyard, is situated on land originally purchased by one of Coleman Brown Bramlet’s maternal uncles, Coleman Brown, on Jan. 1, 1816. Both of Coleman Brown Bramlet’s parents, Elizabeth Brown, who died circa 1830, sister of Coleman Brown, and Revolutionary War veteran Reuben Bramlett, who died in 1844, are buried there. Coleman first farmed with his father and homesteaded his own farm, which was adjacent to Reuben’s land. Bramlet Cemetery, comprising about two acres, is located in a small grove of trees just southwest of the site of Coleman’s log cabin on what he later named Union Grove Farm. The cemetery is surrounded by land that was farmed by Bramlets and their descendants for more than 180 years. Coleman’s Union Grove Farm was passed down to Hezekiah Bramlet, who officially donated land to the cemetery. His grandson Fred Hezekiah Bramlet later inherited the farm and was actively involved in the care and maintenance of the cemetery until his death in 1987.
Bramlet Cemetery Association, formally organized circa 1918 by a group of family members to manage, administer and maintain the site. The State of Illinois granted the association charter on Feb. 27, 1918. The petition for organization was signed by Coleman Brown Bramlet’s son Hezekiah Bramlet and by John N. Bramlet, Q. (Quincy) A. Bramlet, Joseph H. Bramlet, W. R. Joiner, Will Dunn, J. Nelson Thomas, R. H. Bramlet and Robert Moore. In March 1918 Hezekiah Bramlet donated land through his father’s original homestead for the first cemetery road. John N. Bramlet later donated some land west of the cemetery to the association for the current road. John P. Upchurch surveyed the cemetery on March 11, 1918. Hezekiah Bramlet then deeded the cemetery land to Bramlet Cemetery Association on March 14, 1918. In 1920 the association erected a woven wire fence to keep livestock out of the cemetery. Later wild and cultivated roses were planted along the fence to enhance the natural beauty of the small rural cemetery. The roses grew on the fence for many years until it was removed in the 1970s after it deteriorated and became entangled with brush. Several large old shade and cedar trees grow in and around the perimeter of the cemetery. Maintenance and administration, funded mainly by memorial gifts and donations, is still managed by Bramlet Cemetery Association. Deborah G. Dennis and Gary M. Dennis surveyed the cemetery to document tombstones and inscriptions in August 1978, August 1993, and October 16-17, 1998. Bramlet Cemetery Survey was shared to the Saline County Genealogical Society and published online, then linked to Rootsweb and Ancestry.com. For more information and later burials at Bramlet not referenced in this text, please visit the survey web site.
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Coleman Brown Bramlet and Susannah Upchurch
Direct Ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis

Tombstone of Coleman Brown Bramlet and Susannah Upchurch at Bramlet
Images by Deborah G. Dennis. The companion tombstone has a long worn epitaph at the bottom which begins “Behold the pilgrims…” Inscription: “C. B. Bramlet Born Feb. 15, 1802 Died Feb. 28, 1889 Aged 87 Y. & 13 D.” and “Susannah Wife of C. B. Bramlet Born Nov. 26, 1804 Died Sept. 10, 1889 Aged 84 Y. 9 M. & 14 D.”
Coleman Brown Bramlett, fifth child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born Feb, 15, 1802 in Kentucky. A family Bible entry lists his birthplace as Caldwell Co., Ky., which is adjacent to Christian Co., Ky., where his parents lived and farmed several years before moving to Illinois. (Coleman is named after his maternal uncle Coleman Brown, brother of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett and an early 1814 settler of present-day Saline County.) Coleman married Susannah “Sooky” “Susan” Upchurch on July 17, 1823, in Gallatin Co., Ill. She was born Nov. 26, 1804, in Lebanon, Wilson Co., Tenn., the daughter of Mary Ellen Simmons and Samuel Upchurch. Susannah died Sept. 10, 1889, and was buried beside Coleman at Bramlet Cemetery with an elaborate inscribed companion tombstone. A devoted religious leader, Coleman was one of the core group organizers of Union Grove Primitive Baptist Church, which was established in 1881 and constructed after a large religious meeting held in the grove of trees that stood by his residence on part of his property, renamed Union Grove Farm. The church, now known as Union Grove Baptist Church, still stands and holds services today. Church membership records and histories indicate Coleman and Susannah were previous members of three other local houses of worship: Bethel Creek Primitive Baptist Church in 1826, Wolf Creek Primitive Baptist Church in 1830, and Raleigh Missionary Baptist Church in 1843-1881. Coleman died Feb. 28, 1889, in Saline Co., Ill., and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery, which he established circa 1837 on his farm following the death of his young daughter Manervia. Some years before Coleman’s death when Dr. Frederick F. Johnson amputated one of his legs due to an infection from a rusty nail, Coleman selected his gravesite at Bramlet Cemetery and had the leg buried in it. Tradition holds that he was the only one-legged man in his community. He walked with a crutch and a cane. Coleman and Susannah’s son Thomas Brown Bramlet is the direct ancestor of Deborah G. Dennis. Coleman and Susannah’s children are Burrell, Thomas Brown, John, Nathaniel, Bluford, William H., Manervia, George B., Reuben Henderson, Martha, Hezekiah Bramlet.
Land Record with Full Name of Coleman Brown Bramlet
Shawneetown Land Office, Gallatin County, Illinois: Certificate 2747 Coleman Brown Bramlet of Gallatin County, Illinois, purchased 80 acres–the SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 and the NW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 26 in Twp. 8 South Range 5 East, in Gallatin County July 28, 1838.

Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet Bible Records
Transcribed Especially for Deborah G. Dennis by the late Fred H. and Wanda I. Bramlet, Saline Co., Ill., 1979

C. B. Bramlet born Feb. 15, 1802
Susannah Upchurch Bramlet born Nov. 26, 1804

Married 1823
Children:

Burrell Bramlet born May 1, 1824

Thomas B. Bramlet born Dec. 21, 1826

John Bramlet born Aug. 17, 1828

Nathaniel Bramlet born May 14, 1830

Bluford Bramlet born Feb. 22, 1832

William H. Bramlet born May 12, 1834

[died while serving in the Civil War]

Manervia Bramlet born Dec. 25, 1836

[died 1837, not mentioned in father’s will]

George B. Bramlet born July 12, 1839

[died before 1860, not mentioned in father’s will]

Ruben H. Bramlet born Feb. 7, 1842

Martha Bramlet born June 20, 1844

Hezekiah Bramlet born Jan. 14, 1848

(End of page 1)

M. Jane Bramlet born July 22, 1832
[Mary Jane Elder, wife of Bluford Bramlet]

W. C. Bramlet born Oct. 28, 1855
[W. E., Warner Ewing, 1st child of Bluford and Mary Jane]

Elizabeth Bramlet born March 22, 1857
[Elizabeth “Eliza” Ann, 2nd child of Bluford and Mary Jane]

M. C. Bramlet born May 18, 1858
[M. E., Martha Elizabeth, 3rd child of Bluford and Mary Jane]

[End of page 2]

Elizabeth Dunn

[End of page 3] [End of Bible Transcript]

Burrell Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born May 1, 1824, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died at age 74 years, 7 months, 13 days, on Dec. 14, 1898, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. He married a cousin, Mary “Polly” Brown, on Sept. 17, 1846. She was born circa 1830 in Gallatin Co., Ill., the daughter of Paletire Ellis Cox and Marvel Brown and granddaughter of Nancy Hiott/Hyatt and Coleman Brown. Mary died after the 1880 census, perhaps in Polo, Carroll Co., Ark., or in Missouri or Illinois. “Burrill Bramlet,” 56, farmer, and wife, Mary, 50, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Polo, Carroll Co., Ark., with four grown and minor children: Thomas C., 26; Fredric, 19; Martha E., 14; Charles, 12 (NARA Film T9:39:209C). Mary and Burrell’s children include Louisa J., James Monroe, Susan E., Thomas Coleman, Rufus Hiram, George Frederick, Martha Emily, Charles Bramlet.

Burrell Bramlet’s tombstone at Bramlet Cemetery
Louisa J. Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1847 in Saline Co., Ill. She died in 1895. She married William Jackson “Jack” Crafford on March 22, 1868. He was born in 1840 in Indiana or Illinois and died after 1900. “Louisa J. Crafford,” 23, and husband, Wm. J., 26, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Twp. 8 Range 6, Saline Co., Ill., with four children: Jno. M., 6; Clementine, 4; Rebecca E., 2; Rosa J., 4/12 (NARA Film M593:274:450A). Their children include John M., Clementine, Rebecca E., Rosa J., James Harrison, Julia Ellen Crafford.
James Harrison Crafford, born Feb. 14, 1873, Illinois, and died Nov. 27, 1952, Ash Hill, Butler Co., Mo., married Pearl Burton.
Julia Ellen Crafford, born Aug. 7, 1874, Missouri, and died Jan. 28, 1953, Fisk, Butler Co., Mo., married James Daniel Sisco.
James Monroe Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1848 in Saline Co., Ill. He died Jan, 1864, during a revolt at Camp Butler, Springfield, Sangamon Co., Ill., and was buried there.
Susan E. Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1853 in Saline Co., Ill. She died Nov. 28, 1886, in Saline County and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery beside her husband. She married James L. Haley on Feb. 28, 1867. He was born June 12, 1845, the son of Rose A. Gregg and Meeks Haley, natives of Georgia. James died Nov. 26, 1886, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery with an inscribed tombstone. Their Infants, born between 1868 and 1882, are buried in Bramlet with inscribed but now illegible grave markers: Mary E., Rosa E., May, Grace C. Haley.
Thomas Coleman Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1854 in Saline Co., Ill. He died after the 1880 census, perhaps in Carroll Co., Ark.
Rufus Hiram Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1858 in Saline Co., Ill.
George Frederick Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1861 in Saline Co., Ill. He died after the 1880 census, perhaps in Carroll Co., Ark.
Martha Emily Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born July 21, 1866, in Missouri. She died in 1941 in Portales, Roosevelt Co., New Mex.
Charles Bramlet, child of Mary “Polly” Brown and Burrell Bramlet, was born circa 1868 in Missouri. He died after the 1880 census, perhaps in Carroll Co., Ark.
Direct Ancestors of Deborah G. Dennis
Thomas Brown Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Dec. 21, 1826, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died Feb. 6, 1901, in Texas Co., Mo., He first married Rebecca Jane Hanley on Jan. 21, 1847, in Saline Co., Ill. She was born circa 1828 in Tennessee. She died circa 1889 in Texas Co., Mo. They moved their family from Saline Co., Ill., circa 1876-1878 to Texas Co., Mo., where they settled on homesteaded land. He grew corn, wheat, potatoes, tobacco, apples and peaches. His property today is a large cattle ranch worth more than $250,000. The land has a large creek running through lined with several caves that house many copperheads and other poisonous reptilian inhabitants. The owner still refers to them as “Bramlet Caves” and has a sign there with the name on a tree by the creek. A woodshed near the house may have been built and used by Thomas.
Thomas signed his name as “T. B. Bramlet” in letters written to his parents in 1885 and 1888:
Texas County March the 8, 1885 Dear father & mother & all that may se this letter we ar all well eccept Rebecca she has had the pneumony fever she is able to set up part of the time & i hope thease lines may find you well we have had the hardist winter that we hav had since i hav been in this state the ground has been covered in snow the bigest part of the time & it snowed last night 6 inches. It is clear this morning times is hard and money is ver hard to get hold of corn is 40 cents per bushel oats 30 wheat 65 salted meat 8 cents per pound cows & calvs 25 to 40 work cattle from 40 t0 90 year ling calvs 10 to 14 & leaf to bacco is 10 cents per pound i had 700 plants and I hav sold all i hav to spair i sold 12 bushel of apples in january at 65 and 80 i hav 8 bushel of the litle roman ite apples i think i will get $1 a bushel for them now very soon well i hav nothing more to write of impor tance only that we hav had some of the bigest fires in the grass that you ever saw it would rise ten feet hi & then the wind would dash & it would go as fast as a man could run well i will close for this time T. B. Bramlet To Father & mother
Summerville Texas County August the 20 1888 Dear father & mother & all in quire ing frends i am in good helth & hope this will find you all well it has been a long time since i hered from you & i want to here from [you] very bad reny is not well george is at winona on the current river rail rode he wont work on the farm we hav tolerable good corn but no wheat hardly in the county the wheat is 50 cents a bushel potatoes ar good & worth 30 cents times is hard & no pros pect of being better i am at home a gain & a dry ing peaches & hav not time to write any more at this time write soon yours T B Bramlet
–copies of both letters, handwritten with pencil, courtesy the late Fred H. and Wanda I. (Thomas) Bramlet.
“Reny” mentioned in the letter must be his second wife, Sarena Smith. His daughter Sarena married Sampson Benjamin Bell in 1883 and lived elsewhere in 1888. George is one of his sons.
Thomas and Rebecca’s children are Henry Coleman, John Milton (“Mit”), Susan Amanda, Mary Ann Elisabeth (“Betsy”), Hannah Elvira, George William, Sarena C. Bramlet.
Thomas second married Sirena Smith on Feb. 17, 1889, in Texas County. She survived him. Their child is Clarence A. Bramlett, 1892-1960, who lived in Missouri, Oklahoma and Kansas. After Thomas died, Sirena married W. S. Harvill Jr. She died in 1910 in Columbus, Kans.
Direct Ancestors of Deborah G. Dennis
Henry Coleman Bramlett, child of Rebecca Jane Hanley and Thomas Brown Bramlet, was born in 1848 in Saline Co., Ill. He died a suicide by drowning himself in the Mississippi River circa 1876-1878, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery, according to Meeks Haley Bramlet in A Pioneer Family – Bramlet. His grave may be among three others with markers or field stones that have worn inscriptions in the central part of the cemetery under tall cedar trees. According to grandson Claude Ted Bramlett and granddaughter Lora Geneva Bramlett, both now deceased, Henry was distraught about the family’s move from Saline County into Missouri. He apparently did not want to leave his small farm. His body reportedly was recovered and taken back to Saline County for burial.
Henry had married in Saline County a cousin, Mary Matilda Miner, the daughter of Susan Brown and Montgomery Miner. (Montgomery Miner is son of Elilzabeth Briley and Daniel Looney Miner.) Henry Coleman and Mary Matilda are parents of three children: Matthew Montgomery, James Thomas and Tiny Jane Bramlet. His wife and two surviving children continued on to Missouri with his parents. Mary Matilda later settled in Carter Co., Mo. Claude Ted Bramlett referred to his grandmother as “Matildy.” She was born April 5, 1843, in Gallatin Co., Ill., the granddaughter of Paletire Ellis Cox and Marvel Brown and the great-granddaughter of Nancy Hiott/Hyatt? and Coleman Brown. The Browns are well known as early settlers of Saline County in 1814-1816 before Illinois became a state. Coleman Brown is the brother of Elizabeth Brown Bramlett, wife of Reuben Bramlett (1757-1844).
Mary Matilda Miner Bramlett second married James W. Graham in Missouri. Their child is Warner Graham. Not much is known about James and Warner.

May be James W. Graham, father of Warner Graham, courtesy Evelyn Acord
After James died, Mary Matilda third married Andrew Jackson Freeman, a farmer, in Missouri. He was born July 22, 1829, in North Carolina, the son of Mary Elizabeth Ball and Thomas Freeman, according to his Missouri Death Certificate 20575. “Matilda Freeman” of Fremont, Mo., signed her named on the document as informant. Matthew Montgomery Bramlett, listed as “M. M. Bramlett” of Fremont, is named as undertaker. Andrew died June 25, 1911, in Pike Township, Carter County, and was buried in Freeman Cemetery, Fremont, Carter Co., Mo. His grave was later marked with a soldier’s headstone indicating he had served in Company H, Twenty-Second Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate States Army. He reportedly also served as a Union soldier in North Carolina during the Civil War/War Between the States. Mary Matilda applied for and received a pension based on his war service in Company C, Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry, Union Army, on Aug. 1, 1911, in Missouri. Andrew had applied for a pension on Aug. 10, 1891. Mary Matilda, who died June 23, 1916, in Pike Twp., Carter Co., Mo., is buried beside Andrew in a grave marked with a fieldstone. (The graveyard was once known as Big Barren, Pine Grove and Abrams Cemetery. Directions: from Fremont, Highway 60 East about 1 mile to J Highway. Right turn (south) and 6.4 miles to County Road 174, right turn and 0.6 miles to cemetery on the right.)

Andrew Jackson Freeman’s Confederate Marker, courtesy Heather Powell-Hobson

Matthew Montgomery Bramlett, sitting left with son Claude Ted, about age 2, and wife, Birdie Mae Shomaker Bramlett, standing left behind them; daughter Maude Mae, age 3, sitting right with her grandfather William Albert Shomaker Sr., her grandmother Mary Elizabeth West Shomaker standing behind; middle: Birdie’s sister Alcie Evaline Shomaker Reynolds and brother-in-law James Benjamin Reynolds, middle. Photo dated about 1902, Carter Co., Mo.
Direct Ancestors of Deborah G. Dennis
Matthew Mongtomery Bramlett, child of Mary Matilda Miner and Henry Coleman Bramlett, was born Dec. 16, 1875, in Harrisburg, Saline Co., Ill. He died Nov. 14, 1958, in Knox Co., Ill., and was buried in Oak Lawn Memorial Gardens Cemetery. He married Birdie Mae Shomaker in 1897 in Missouri. She was born June 26, 1881, in Fremont, Carter Co., Mo., the daughter of Mary Elizabeth West and William Albert Shomaker. Birdie died Feb. 25, 1968, in Knox Co., Ill., and was buried beside Matthew. They had fourteen children: Maude Mae, Claude Ted, Mary Belle, Jettie Pearl, Grace Ella, Lora Geneva, Beulah Leona, Coleman William, Alma Elizabeth, Edna Alpha, Clyde Harding, Cecil Carl, John Lloyd and Infant Son Bramlett.
Claude Ted Bramlett 1900-1990 and Margaret Knight 1905-1979, grandparents of Deborah G. Dennis

Claude Ted Bramlett married Margaret Knight in Arkansas. They moved to Knox Co., Ill., circa 1933. They rest in Oak Lawn Memorial Gardens, Galesburg, Ill. They had three children.
James Thomas Bramlett, child of Mary Matilda Miner and Henry Coleman Bramlett, was born Dec. 23, 1871, in Harrisburg, Saline Co., Ill. He died Dec. 24, 1947, in Missouri and was buried in Freeman Cemetery, Fremont, Carter Co., Mo. He married Lucy Lee Huddleston. She was born in 1889. She died in Missouri and was buried in Freeman Cemetery. They had three children born in Missouri: Benjamin Franklin Thomas, 1918-post-1940, who lived in a state mental hospital; Dorothy, 1920-1929; and Dora Matilda Violet Bramlett, 1923-1925. Tiny Jane Bramlett, child of Mary Matilda Miner and Henry Coleman Bramlett, was born circa 1873 in Saline Co., Ill. She died of scarlet fever circa 1875-76, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Her grave is no longer marked with a legible tombstone. It may be with three or four others in the central part of the graveyard under large cedar trees.
John B. Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Aug. 17, 1828 in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died Dec. 13, 1860, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. John married Emily Harriett Stricklin on Oct. 1, 1850. She was born Dec. 19, 1824. She died Nov. 22, 1877, and was buried beside John. Their children are Quincy Ambrose, Martha Jane, Sarah Elizabeth, Willis A., Mary Catherine, John N. Bramlet.
Quincy Ambrose Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born Oct. 23, 1851, in Saline Co., Ill. He died Feb. 16, 1924, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. He married Nancy Ann “Nannie” Shepherd on April 24, 1873, in Saline County. She was born there June 10, 1849, the daughter of Sarah Greenfield and Edward Shepherd. Nancy died there April 28, 1936, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Their child is Emily U. Bramlet who died young.
Martha Jane Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born Dec. 12, 1852, in Saline County. She died Oct. 16, 1861, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery.
Sarah Elizabeth Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born Oct. 29, 1854, in Saline Co., Ill. She died there Feb. 20, 1870, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery.
Willis A. Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born May 29, 1857, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there July 1, 1858. The tombstone, shown above, is inscribed “Gone too soon.”
Mary Catherine Bramlet, child of Emily Harriett Stricklin and John B. Bramlet, was born May 6, 1859. She died Dec. 6, 1868, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery.

Nathaniel Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born May 14, 1830, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill.
Bluford Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Feb. 22, 1832, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill.

William Henry Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born May 12, 1834, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died while serving as a Union soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
Manervia Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Dec. 25, 1836, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. She died in 1837 and was the first person buried at Bramlet Cemetery.
George B. Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born July 12, 1839, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died before 1860 and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery.
Reuben Henderson Bramlet and Euphemia Ellen Wren

Reuben Henderson Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Feb. 7, 1842, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. He died in 1925 at home near Selma, Fresno Co., Calif., and was buried in Mountain View Cemetery. He went west in 1867 and attended University of the Pacific. He began teaching at Selma and later became county superintendent, auditor and assessor. At retirement, he moved to his ranch near Selma where he farmed. He also was a stockholder in several cooperative fruit grower associations. He married Euphemia Ellen Wren, also a native of Illinois. They had four children, of whom two daughters survived childhood and married.
Martha Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born June 20, 1844, in Gallatin Co., Ill. She married John Stricklin.

Hezekiah Bramlet, child of Susannah Upchurch and Coleman Brown Bramlet, was born Jan. 14, 1848, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there on Jan. 19, 1919, from an infection caused by a rusty nail and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. He married Elizabeth Annie Jones on Aug. 1, 1869, in Saline County. She was born Sept. 15, 1848, in Illinois, the daughter of Nancy C. Slaton and John W. Jones. Annie died Aug. 21, 1934, in Saline County and was buried beside Hezekiah at Bramlet Cemetery. Their children are Nancy S., Warner Reuben, Catharine, Edward Joseph, Walter Everett Bramlet.

Margaret “Peggy” Bramlett, sixth child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born Dec. 20, 1804, in Christian Co., Ky. She died April 8, 1855, in Saline Co., Ill., and was buried in Wolf Creek Cemetery. She was a minor when she married Joseph Easley on Nov. 26, 1818, with her father Reuben’s written consent in Christian Co., Ky. Her brother John Bramlett witnessed the marriage record by only signing his given name, John, above his father’s full signature, leading some researchers to come to the mistaken conclusion that Reuben Bramlett had the middle name “John.” However, Reuben did not have a middle name: He had a son named John and a brother named John; but his middle name was not John. He did not have a middle name. Joseph was born Dec. 15 1795, in Stokes Co., N.C. He died March 15, 1868, in Saline County and was buried at Wolf Creek. Joseph Easly, 63, born in North Carolina, widowed, retired farmer, $1,300 real estate, $200 personal estate, is listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Eldorado P.O., Twp. 8 Range 7 East, Saline Co., Ill., living with Joseph Read, 60, born Georgia, farmer, $1,300 real estate, $400 personal estate, and wife, Mina, 68, born North Carolina (NARA Film M653:223:881). Margaret and Joseph’s child is Elvira Easley.

Elvira Easley, child of Margaret “Peggy” Bramlett and Joseph Easley, was born Sept. 27, 1824, in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died Nov. 21, 1907, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. She married Fuel Moore on March 25, 1842. Fuel was born Oct. 2, 1810, in Tennessee, the son of Joab Moore Sr. Fuel died Jan. 17, 1883, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Their children are Joab, Robert, and John Henry Moore.

Joab Moore, child of Elvira Easley and Fuel Moore, was born Dec. 12, 1846, near Ralieigh, Ill. He died at age 64 years, 11 months, 2 days, on Nov. 14, 1911, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Joab married Martha Ann Smith on Dec. 19, 1871, in Saline County. Martha was born July 29, 1847, in Illinois. She died Aug. 21, 1918, at Muddy, Saline Co., Ill., and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Their child is W. Elbert Moore who moved to Arkansas. Two of his infant children are buried at Bramlet. Another child is George Melvin Moore who married Daisy Mae Barton and Clara Agnes Dunn.

 John Henry Moore, child of Elvira Easley and Fuel Moore, was born Oct. 24, 1848, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there June 27, 1908, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. John first married Louisa C. Bishop on Feb. 22, 1866, in Raleigh, Ill. She was born 1851, the daughter of Ona L. Johnson and Robert Jeremiah Bishop. Louisa died in 1875. She rests at Bramlet Cemetery with an inscribed tombstone. John second married Mary Josephine Ann “Josie” Jones on Jan. 1, 1879. Josie was born April 5, 1851. She is buried beside John. The inscription on their tombstone is worn away: “The golden gates…home….” Some of John and Louisa’s young children and some of John and Josie’s young children are buried at Bramlet Cemetery with inscribed markers. John and Louisa’s daughter Sarah Catherine Moore, born Dec. 19, 1873, and died Dec. 14, 1954, is buried at Bramlet. She married Alexander A. Groves and Charles McAllister.

Robert Moore, child of Elvira Easley and Fuel Moore, was born Aug. 2, 1862, in Saline Co., Ill. He died there May 17, 1851, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Robert signed the petition to organize Bramlet Cemetery Association and served as one of the first trustees. He married Ella Barker, daughter of Lydia McFarland and Abe Barker. She was born May 1, 1870. She died Oct. 14, 1855, and was buried at Bramlet Cemetery. Their child is Freda Mary Moore who married Clyde E. Gates.
Elizabeth Bramlett, seventh child of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, was born circa 1806 in Christian Co., Ky. She probably died circa 1847-1850 in Saline Co., Ill. Her burial place is unknown. She married Elijah Baker on Dec. 24, 1829, in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill. Elijah was born circa 1800-1805 in Kentucky. He died after 1860. “Elijah Baker,” 45, born Kentucky, farmer, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Raleigh Twp., Saline Co., Ill., with seven grown and minor children born Illinois: Elizabeth, 19; Elvira, 17; Ellender, 6; Emily, 12; Edmond, 8; Reuben, 8; Lucinda, 3 (NARA Film M432:127:53A). Elizabeth and Elijah’s children include Elizabeth, Elvira C., Emily, Edmond, Reuben, Ellender, Lucinda Mariah Baker.
Elizabeth Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1831 in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died after 1860 and before 1902. She married James Slaten on Feb. 2, 1854, in Saline County. He died after 1860.
Elvira C. Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born April 8, 1833, in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died Feb. 27, 1899, at Big Ridge, Saline Co., Ill. She married Elijah Johnson on Aug. 6, 1853, in Saline County. He was born circa 1834. He died in 1907.
Emily Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1838 in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died before 1902. She married William Pankey on Dec. 17, 1854, in Saline County.
Edmond Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1842 in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died April 9, 1904, in Saline County. He married his wife, Frances, circa 1860.
Reuben Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1842 in Gallatin Co., Ill. He died July 11, 1884. He married Araminta J. Thomas on July 25, 1861, in Saline County. She was born circa 1840 in Illinois. She died circa 1880.
Ellender Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1844 in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died before 1902.

Lucinda Mariah Baker, child of Elizabeth Bramlett and Elijah Baker, was born circa 1847 in Gallatin Co., Ill. She died after 1904. She married Felix Rude on Aug. 23, 1868, in Saline County. He was born circa 1847 and died after 1880.

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
William Bramlett and Unknown Hendricks/Hendrix
William Bramlett, perhaps child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born circa 1763 in Fauquier Co., Va. He died in Lawrence Co., Tenn., circa 1830. William married a woman named Hendricks/Hendrix before 1790 in South Carolina. They lived in Laurens County in 1790 and in Spartanburg County in 1800 before moving to Kentucky and Tennessee. He may be the young William Bramlett who purchased a state land grant of 387 acres in Laurens County in 1787. The tract, surveyed by Andrew Thomson for William Bramlet on Jan. 29, 1787, is situated on branches of Warrior and Beaver Dam Creek on Enoree River in Ninety-Six Dist., S.C. (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S213190, vol. 12, p. 86). (William Bramblett who owned the 1773 royal land grant there died in or before that year; and no other men named William Bramlet/Bramlett/Bramblett have been found in the early families who lived in Laurens County in/by 1787-1790 or in extant records. This William’s neighbors in February that year, 1787, are listed as Richard Richardson, Robert Henry Hughes, John Higgins (S213190, vol. 12, p. 110). The William Bramlett who lived in Laurens in 1790 and Spartanburg in 1800 farmed a few years in Christian Co., Ky., near Henry Jr.’s son Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, most likely his brother, around 1810-1815 before moving on before 1818 to Lawrence Co., Tenn. Census data indicate one son of William–Henry–was born in 1800 in South Carolina, and another–Joel–was born in Kentucky in 1810. Four of William’s sons–James, Henry, Joel and Larkin–left Tennessee before 1820, perhaps stopping first in Arkansas, to buy land/settle in White Co., Ill., which is adjacent to Gallatin/Saline County where Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, and Elizabeth Brown and family settled in 1818.
(Note: This William is sometimes confused with William Bramlett III, son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramblett Jr., who settled in Darlington Co., S.C., circa 1800-1801 and lived there and in Sumter Co., S.C., until he died in 1840. This William III married a woman named Jane, but not Hendrix; and had several children, some named after his Bedford Co., Va., siblings, parents and extended family members: Callaway, Ballard, etc.)

William Bramlett of Tennessee married Unknown Hendrix in South Carolina and had a large family there and in Kentucky and Tennessee, and lived until about 1830 in Lawrence Co., Tenn. He is listed with wife and thirteen children/younger others enumerated with him in the 1820 Lawrence Co., Tenn., census. Some of his children may have lived in Lawrence, Hickman and Obion counties. James, Henry, Joel and Larkin are some of the younger sons; and another son is named Sandford. The names of these sons and the fact that William and Sandford Bramlett, son of Elizabeth (Gist/Gest?) and William Bramblett, both left South Carolina about the same time and both eventually settled in Tennessee, suggest that William may be the son of Elizabeth and William. (Their son Enoch Sr. had sons James, Henry, Joel; and their son Newton had a son named Larkin.) However, William of Laurens and Spartanburg also lived for some time near Henry Jr.’s son Reuben in Kentucky and later this William’s younger sons (James, Henry, Joel and Larkin) settled in White Co., Ill., which is adjacent to Gallatin Co., Ill., where Reuben settled in 1818 and still lived in 1830-1844. Records have not yet been discovered to conclusively document the connection between William and parents.

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
John Bramlett and Mary Peak
(Children: William, Margaret, Nathan, Nancy, Reuben, Alcey, John Wesley, Mildred, Rosa, Mary, Henry, Susannah, Elias)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants
Father John Bramlett, child of Margaret “Peggy” Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born May 15, 1764, in Fauquier Co., Va. His full birth and death dates are inscribed in a Bramlett Bible owned by one of his descendants and on his tombstone. The monument indicates he was born in Virginia. He died at age 91 on July 28, 1855, at home on his farm south of Greenville, S.C., close to his church and was buried beside his wife, Mary Peak, there, at Bethel Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church Cemetery, near Simpsonville, S.C. One side of John’s tombstone is inscribed “John Bramlett Born Virginia May 15, 1764. Died July 28, 1855. Mary Peak May 16, 1763 June 23, 1853.” The other side of the monument memorializes “Susan His Daughter” and praises “John Bramlett For 73 Years A Leader in Christian Work” and “The founder Of Bethel Church. He Had The Witness That He Pleased God.” The church honors John each year by laying a wreath on his grave during its Founder’s Day celebrations. Co-founders Solomon Holland and Devereaux Yeargin with family members also played important roles in the establishment and early development of the church. John also co-founded with his mother and siblings Bethel’s mother church, Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church, near Gray Court, Laurens Co., S.C., in 1780-1781. John, who joined the Methodist Church at age 16 in 1780 at his widowed mother Margaret’s home in Virginia, was a revered lay minister deeply devoted to God, church and family.

John and Mary’s tombstone in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville, S.C.

John’s Life in Virginia

Henry Bramlett III’s plat map of his father’s former Bramlett Plantation on Elk Marsh Run

Map of Hamilton Parish where John and siblings grew up on Bramlett Plantation in Fauquier Co., Va.
John and his brother Reuben are named together in another separate Fauquier County land record in 1780. “John Bramblett” and “Ruben Bramblett” served as chain carriers for a Nov. 1, 1780, survey of wasteland or ungranted land which was requested by Robert Henson of Fauquier County:
By Virtue of a warrant from the Proprietor’s office, to me directed I have Surveyed for Robert Hinson of Fauquier County, a Tract of Waste Land adjoining the Lands of Jennings, Bramblett, & Dodd near the head of Ratcliff’s Branch, in the said County, Bounded as followeth viz. Beginning at A a white Oak & Black Oak by a glade corner to Bramblett, thence along the said Bramblett’s Line S 49 E 132 Poles to B two small hicories in Jennings’s line, thence along the said Line–S 61 W 20 Poles to C a hicory sapling, thence N 30 W 3 Poles to D a hicory & fallen Red Oak Corner to Dodd, thence binding along the said Dodd’s lines N 47 W 66 Poles to E a Large Hicory stump & small white Oak by the road, thence N 42 W 59 1/2 Poles to F a box Oak by the said Road, thence N 37 E 9 Poles to the Beginning, Containing 12 1/2 acres. Reuben Bramblett & John Bramblett Chain Carriers J. Moffett 1st Nov.r 1780.
Robert Henson may be a relative by marriage, or Reuben and John were designated chain carriers because they were qualified and neighbors living right next to the Henson land according to the plat map.
John is identified as the brother of Reuben Bramlett, 1757-1844, of Illinois by Meeks Haley Bramlet in his 1924 history A Pioneer Family – Bramlet while providing information about J. Mims Bramlett, a descendant of John:
J. Mims Bramlet resides at 2013 Portner Place, N. W., in Washington, D.C. He has lived in Washington about twenty-five years….His father was Robert H. Bramlet, whose brothers were Turner, Joe and Nathaniel. Their father was Reuben Bramlet, whose brothers were Elias and Nathaniel. Their father was John Bramlet, who went to Greenville County, South Carolina, from Fauquier County, Virginia….Most of his relatives live in South Carolina. John was a brother to Reuben Bramlet, who was head of the Illinois branch of the family….” (96)
John and Mary’s Marriage in Virginia
John married Mary Peak in Fauquier Co., Va., circa 1783. No marriage record has been found for them since their parish records are lost and marriages were not routinely recorded until after the American Revolution; however, John’s 1855 obituary in The Southern Christian Advocate indicates John and Mary had been married seventy years when Mary died in 1853. Their Bramlett Bible, once owned by John’s son Reuben, lists Mary as the “wife of John Bramlett” and records her birth date as May 16, 1763. Her grave marker in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, which she shares with John and daughter Susan, identifies her as “Mary Peak,” wife of John Bramlett, and is inscribed with her full birth and death dates. Peak/e researchers determined that Mary’s parents probably are Barbara Thorne or Carter who died in 1816 and William Peak/e, born in 1725 and died in 1816. Mary was born in Fauquier Co., Va., where one William Peak/e bought land on June 3, 1767 (DB-2:669). Mary died at age 90 on June 25, 1853, according to the inscription on the grave marker and in her son’s Bible, most likely at home in Greenville County.
John and Mary’s Life in South Carolina
After moving from Virginia, John and Mary first lived in Laurens County in South Carolina. Their first child, William, was born in South Carolina in 1786; and William and family are enumerated in the 1790 Laurens County census. “John Bramlett,” free white male 16 years and over, is listed in 1790 U.S. Census for Laurens Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes two free white males under age 16 (sons William and Nathan) and three free white females (wife, Mary, and two daughters: Margaret and Nancy) (NARA Film M637:11:446). (Several other family members, including John’s mother, Margaret, and brother Nathan lived nearby.) Laurens County deeds also place John Bramlett in the area in 1791. John and his brother Nathan signed as witnesses on a deed in May that year when their widowed mother, Margaret, of Laurens County bought fifty acres of land on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River from Ezekiel Griffith (DB-D:5). John and Nathan also witnessed a deed on May 10, 1791, when Griffith sold some land on Beaverdam Creek to William Stone (DB-F:220).
By 1799 John and Mary were living in Greenville County where he became a prosperous farmer and prominent religious and community leader. Although members of the core group of John and Mary’s church–Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church–including Devereaux Yeargin and Solomon Holland and others, were holding religious meetings in their homes in Greenville District by 1799, the church was formally organized on Monday, Oct. 19, 1801. The organizational meeting and a quarterly meeting were held at John Bramlett’s house, ten miles southeast of Greenville. Dr. W. L. M. Austin in John’s obituary named John as “the founder of the church at Bethel,—the class for many years meeting at his house for worship. Bishop Asbury and the preachers of the olden times, who passed through this part of the State, preached and rested under his roof.” After the church was established in 1799, a house of worship was then constructed by 1801, and land was transferred to secure the existing church building. John in 1811 donated four acres of land “beginning on a Maple in a branch turning 212 yards South to a black Jack thence 91 yards East to a black Jack thence N215 yards to a White Oak thence 110 to the Maple where we started” to the trustees of Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church. “John Bramlet of the District of Greenville, S. C.,” transferred the property to “Solomon Holland, John Bramlet [himself], William Bramlet, Nathan Bramlet & Derix Yeargin, trustees,” for the use of the church on Sept. 18,1811. The deed was later recorded in Greenville District on March 28, 1836 (DB-S:104). The trustees William Bramlet and Nathan Bramlet are John’s sons, at that time aged 25 and 22 respectively. William later became a local Methodist Minister in 1820 and served a congregation at Jackson Grove, S.C. Nathan in the late 1830s was involved in the founding and development of Hopewell Methodist Episcopal Church after he and his family had settled near Murrayville, Hall Co., Ga. (Nathan and William are not to be confused with their Uncle Nathan Bramlett and Great-Uncle William Bramblett. Uncle Nathan, brother of John Bramlett, did not live in Greenville District in 1811–he lived in Laurens District and was a founding member of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church. Great-Uncle William Bramblett, John’s uncle, the brother of Henry Bramlett Jr., was not living in 1811. He had been a resident of Laurens District until he died in or before 1787; and, according to Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt’s Diary, William and his family also were early members of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church there.) The first Bethel Church building was a log structure built on poles.
John and Mary in Census Data
John is included as head of a family in the 1800 U.S. Census for Greenville District but perhaps not in 1810 (the census taker may have missed them). John and Mary and family also are listed or enumerated in 1820-1850 census records. “John Bramblet,” 26-44, is listed in the 1800 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., as head of family 1404 which includes a female 26-44 (wife, Mary), and ten children: one female 10-16, born 1784-1790 (Margaret); two males 10-16, born 1784-1790 (William, Nathan); five females under 10, born 1790-1800 (Nancy, Alcey, Milley, Rosanah/Rosa/Rosey, Mary) and two males under 10, born 1790-1800 (Reuben, John Wesley) (NARA Film M32:47:280A). “John Bramlet,” white male 45 and over, born before 1775, engaged in agriculture, is listed in the 1820 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 45 and over, born before 1775 (wife, Mary) and another female 45 and over (sister? sister-in-law?), six children and perhaps two daughters-in-law and three grandchildren: two females 26-44, born between 1776 and 1794 (daughters-in-law Sarah Dacus and Elizabeth Griffith? or daughter Milley?); one female 16-25, born between 1795 and 1804 (daughter Rosa? or Mary?); two females 10-15, born 1804-1810 (daughter Susan and a granddaughter Mary?); two males 26-44, born between 1766 and 1794 (Reuben and John Wesley); two males 16-25, born between 1795 and 1804 (Henry); one male 10-15, born between 1805 and 1810 (Elias); and two males under 10, born between 1811 and 1820 (grandsons Thomas W. and Josiah?) (NARA Film M33:120:160).
“John Bramlet,” 60-69, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 60-69 (wife, Mary), four children and perhaps some grandchildren: one female 40-49, born between 1781 and 1790 (daughter Margaret?); two females 15-19, born between 1811 and 1815, mismarked? (daughter Susan, who never married, and daughter Mary?); one male 20-29, born between 1801 and 1810 (Elias); and four younger people who could be grandchildren: one female 10-14, born between 1816 and 1820; one female 5-9, born between 1821 and 1825; one male 15-19, born between 1811 and 1815 (Nathan, son of William?); and one male 10-14, born between 1816 and 1820 (Abner G., son of William?) (NARA Film M19:172:284). Some or all of these younger people may be children of Nancy S. Dacus and William Bramlett, John and Mary’s daughter-in-law and son, who lived near them. The grandchildren may have been helping their grandfather–then age 66–farm his land. “John Bramblett,” 70-80, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Greenville Dist., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 70-80 (wife, Mary), and one female 30-40, born between 1800 and 1810 (daughter Susan who did not marry) (NARA Film M704:512:200). “John Bramblett,” 86, blind, and wife, Mary, 87, both born in Virginia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with one grown child: daughter Susana, 45, born in South Carolina (NARA Film M432:853:458B). “John Bramblett” also is listed in the Nov. 30, 1850, Agricultural Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with fifty improved acres and fifty unimproved acres worth $1,000 and $246 worth of livestock (SCDAH Film M2:1:781-782).
John’s Obituary
John’s obituary, written by Dr. W. L. M. Austin, a member of Bethel Methodist Church, appears in the Oct. 25, 1855, edition of the Southern Christian Advocate:
Died, at his residence, “on the hill,” near the Bethel Camp ground, Greenville Dist., S.C., July 27th, John Bramlett, aged 91 years. The venerable patriarch has gone to his reward. The old christian who for more than 73 years “had the witness that he pleased God”—who was always ready to join the worshippers in the house of prayer, the very pictuaged saint, now mingles with angels and adores the Redeemer in Heaven. Father Bramlett was born in Fauquier co., Va., May 13th, 1764. [His grave marker and the Bible record say May 15.] In his 18th year, [1782] he joined the Methodists, and one year afterwards, while conducting family devotion at the house of his widowed mother, he was powerfully converted. From the hour of regeneration until the angels escorted him to heaven, during a very long life of temptation and trial, he maintained his confidence in Christ, and to use his own words “never lost the witness.” All who knew John Bramlett believed in him. A more heavenly minded man, the writer never knew. Shortly after his conversion, he married and removed to S.C. where he passed 70 years of his life, universally respected. A generous, whole-souled and devoted follower of the Saviour, he never disgraced the church by the exhibition of an unworthy spirit. Full of faith, he gave glory to God,—full of love, he cared for his neighbor. God was his Father, heaven his home,—he knew that, and was happy. What Methodist minister ever visited Greenville circuit, and did not admire and love Father Bramlett? Always at his place in church, until his infirmities made it impossible, how hearty and sincere was his worship! O! it was refreshing to see the dear old man, in church. He entered into the services with his whole heart—tears of love and joy flowing from his dimmed eyes, and expressions of gratitude and rapture falling from his lips. To see that white haired disciple, blind, and trembling with the weight of 90 years, so hopeful and so happy, was a privilege and a benefit. He was the founder of the church at Bethel,—the class for many years meeting at his house for worship. Bishop Asbury and the preachers of the olden times, who passed through this part of the State, preached and rested under his roof. Father Bramlett brought up a family of 13 children, all of whom lived to become parents, [except one – Susan never married] and all joined the church of their father and mother. One year before Father Bramlett’s death, his aged consort was taken from his side. She too was 91 at the time of her death, having been for 70 years, his faithful and pious companion. Permit me, to tell you of the old patriarch’s “bower of prayer” before concluding this imperfect sketch. He had a place, a sheltered and retired spot, where he used to pray. When he was blind and extremely feeble, it was most affecting to see him groping his way to his loved retreat. There, he prayed and sang and rejoiced, communing with his God every day. He waited for death as for the coming of his best friend, and passed away, at the very time he would have chosen to go, when the Camp ground, a few hundred yards from his house, was filled with his neighbors and acquaintances, praising God. W. L. M. Austin. (SCA, Vol. 19, No. 21, p. 84, col. 2)
Camp meetings became an annual tradition during the early 1800s when outdoor religious services were held in a large brush arbor constructed on four acres of land beside Bethel Church. The arbor itself was constructed of hand-hewn logs and benches. It was first covered with brush and branches and much later covered with shingles. Church trustees and members petitioned the South Carolina General Assembly to incorporate Bethel Church and Arbor and Camp Ground. Among the many who signed the undated petition are Jesse Burdett, R. H. (Robert Hugh/Hulet) Bramlett, Reuben F. Burditt, J. W. Burdett, James Bramlett, Wm. L. M. Austin (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S165015).
William’s tombstone: “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the course, I have kept the faith. Henceforth There is laid up for me The crown of righteousness which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day.”
William and Nancy’s Life
William was appointed trustee of Jackson Grove Methodist Church in 1835. He previously was a charter member and trustee of Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church near Simpsonville, S.C. J. C. Crisp identifies William as a Methodist minister in an obituary published in the Sept. 23, 1870, issue of The Southern Christian Advocate:
Rev. William Bramlett, a local minister of the M. E. Church, South, departed this life at his own residence, in Greenville co., S.C., on the 29th July, 1870. Brother Bramlett was born July 2d, 1786. For 70 years, lacking 6 months, he had been a most consistent member of the M. E. Church, and a local preacher about 50 years. Sometimes employed by P. Elder to supply pastoral charge; always abundant in labors. The church he truly loved, and for the promotion of the Redeemer’s kingdom, he most faithfully labored for three score and ten years, till called from the church militant “to the general assembly and church of the first-born, which are written in heaven.” His last words were: “I am happy! happy! happy!” [signed] J. C. Crisp. The Christian Neighbor will please copy. (vol. 33, p. 152, col. 4)
Bramlett descendant Julien Potter Wooten in his 1886 brief family history named William as a son of John and Mary. Julien described William as “a Methodist preacher” who “lived and died in Greenville, S.C.”
Methodist Church historian Samuel M. Green in An Historical Outline of Greenville Circuit writes about William Bramlett who lived in the upper part of Greenville County near Batesville and preached at Ebenezer Methodist Church. He indicates William assisted the Rev. Thomas Hutchings, “a Methodist local preacher…who was the original proprietor of the Batesville cotton factory. Through their efforts, church meetings were held for workers and proprietors of the Batesville and Pelham cotton factories” (10). (Batesville and Pelham originally were known as Buena Vista.) Buried in the cemetery at Ebenezer Methodist Church, where William H. Bramlett preached, are Arthur Bramlett (1), and Lilla Mae Bramlett (2), according to Beverly T. Whitmire in Presence of The Past. Their graves apparently are not marked or the markers have no dates. Their connection to William is unknown.
William married Nancy S. Dacus in 1803 in Greenville County, according to descendant Louise (Hutchings) Galway. She reported Nancy was born May 16, 1788, in Virginia. Nancy most likely is the daughter of Nathaniel Dacus and his first wife, Martha Dupree, who married in Lunenburg Co., Va. Nancy died in Jackson Grove, S.C., on March 13, 1874. Her grave marker in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery identifies her as the wife of Rev. William Bramlett.
Census Data
“William Bramblet,” 26-44, is listed in the 1810 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 26-44 (wife, Nancy) and two children: a female under 10, born 1800-10 (Mary?), and a male under 10, born 1800-10 (Nathan Robert/Josiah?) (NARA Film M252:62:118). “Wm. Bramlet,” white male 26-44, born between 1776 and 1794, employed in agriculture, is listed in the 1820 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with a female 26-44 (wife, Nancy) and six children: one female 10-16, born between 1804 and 1810 (Mary); two males under 10, born between 1810 and 1820 (Nathan Robert/Josiah? and/or Abner G., Tolliver Robert); and three females under 10, born between 1810 and 1820 (Margaret/Anna? and Elizabeth and Melanie “Mellie” “Milly”?) (NARA Film M33:120:169). One of the sons may have been missed by the census taker or may have been living with other relatives. Four young children, probably grandchildren–children of William and Nancy–are enumerated with William’s parents, John and Mary, in the 1820 census. Another son of William and Nancy, Elbert S., had died in 1819. William lived near his parents, John and Mary (Peak/e) Bramlett, in Greenville County in 1830. “William Bramlet,” 40-50, is listed in the 1830 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 40-50 (wife, Nancy) and nine children: a female 20-30, born 800-10 (Mary); two females 15-20, born 1811-15 (Elizabeth “Betsy” and Melanie “Mellie” “Milly”?); one female 10-15, born 1815-20 (Margaret/Anna?); one male 10-15, born 1815-20 (Tolliver Robert); one female 5-10, born 1820-25 (Martha); one male 5-10, born 1820-25 (William H.); one female under 5, born 1825-30 (Eliza W.); and one male under 5, born between 1825 and 1830 (John Wesley Ervin) (NARA Film M19:172:284). Sons Nathan Robert/Josiah and Abner G. may have been living with relatives: their grandparents John and Mary (Peak) Bramlett have one male 15-20, born between 1810 and 1815 (Nathan?); and one male 10-15, born between 1815 and 1820 (Abner G.?) in their house in the 1830 census.
Nathan Bramlett married Mary Margaret Miles by 1835, and Abner G. Bramlett married Elizabeth Rosa Hawkins in 1843. Two of Nancy and William’s three older daughters (Mary and/or Margaret/Anna and Melanie “Mellie” “Milly”?) married before 1840. William and Nancy’s son Tolliver Robert Bramlett married before 1840 and lived next to them.
“Rev. Wm. Bramblett,” 50-60, born 1780-90, is listed in the 1840 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes a female 50-60 (wife, Nancy) and eight children: one male 20-30, born 1810-20 (Abner G.); two females 20-30, born 1810-20 (Margaret/Anna? or Melanie “Mellie” “Milly”? and Elizabeth “Betsy”); one female 15-20, born 1820-25 (Martha); one male 15-20, born 1820-25 (William H.); one female 10-15, born 1825-30 (Eliza W.); one male 10-15, born 1825-30 (John Wesley Ervin); and one female 5-10, born 1830-35 (Malinda Caroline) (NARA Film M704:512:205). (Nathan does not appear with his parents and siblings in 1840 because he married by 1835 and lived elsewhere. Abner did not marry until 1843.) “William Bramblett,” 64, born in South Carolina, farmer, $300 real estate, and wife, Nancy, 62, born in Virginia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with six grown children: Elizabeth (“Betsy”), 30; Martha, 28; William (H.), 25, laborer; Eliza (W.), 23; John (Wesley Ervin), 21, laborer; and (Malinda) Caroline, 18 (NARA Film M432:853:367A). “Wm. Bramblett” is listed in the Sept. 6, 1850, Agricultural Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with fifty improved acres and fifty-five unimproved acres worth $300 and $200 worth of livestock (SCDAH Film M2:1:734-735). William Bramlett circa 1855 signed a petition to erect a gate on the road from Greenville Courthouse (SCDAH Series S165015, Item 31). Other signers include William H. Bramlett Jr., John W. Bramlett, William Few. “William Bramlett,” 74, born in South Carolina, Methodist clergyman, $1,000 real estate, $200 personal estate, and wife, Nancy, 72, born in Virginia, housekeeper, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Mush Creek P.O., Head of Tyger Div., Greenville Co., S.C., with three grown children born in South Carolina: Elizabeth Bramlett, 48, seamstress; Martha Bramlett, 41, seamstress; and Eliza Miles, 32, housekeeper, $1,600 personal estate (NARA Film M653:1220:506). Also listed is Eliza’s son John T. Miles, 5. “W. [William] Bramlett,” 84, and wife, Nancy, 82, keeping house, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Mush Creek P.O., Highland Twp., Greenville Co., S.C. (NARA Film M593:1498:675B).
William and Nancy’s children are Mary, Nathan Robert (Josiah?), Abner G., Elizabeth (“Betsy”), Melanie (“Mellie” “Milly”), Margaret Anna, Elbert S. (Sevier?), Tolliver Robert, Martha, William H. (Henry?), Eliza W., John Wesley Ervin and Malinda Caroline Bramlett.
Few and Bramlett Family
At least two of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William Bramlett’s daughters married Fews who descend from immigrant ancestors from England to America in the late 17th century. Mary Bramlett married Benjamin Few, and Elizabeth Bramlett married Ephraim L. Few of Greenville Co., S.C. The Few family of America is documented by Florence Knight Fruth in her 1977 history Some Descendants of Richard Few of Chester County, Pennsylvania and Allied Lines, 1692-1976 (Parsons, W. Va.: McClain Printing, 1977). Fruth named the immigrant ancestors of the Greenville County, S.C., Fews as Richard Few (1625-1688), a Quaker shoemaker, and his second wife, Julian, and children, all born England. They settled on 225 acres and owned a Philadelphia city lot in William Penn’s Colony, now in Chester Co., Pa. Richard Few wrote his will on June 12, 1686, and died Sept. 13, 1688. The will was proved March 26, 1688 (WB-1A-59:134-135). Fruth names Richard Few’s first wife and mother of some of his children as Jane Whitfield Few, who was born in England and died there. Fruth also features in her history James Few, one of the most well-known and venerated American Few family members and the direct ancestor of the husbands of the Bramlett daughters. James Few, born circa 1746 at Three Sisters Plantation, Baltimore Co., Md., is a son of Mary Wheeler and William Few and grandson of the immigrant Richard Few.
James Few is venerated by family members and local historians as an American hero and martyr who died May 16, 1771, at the Battle of Alamance Creek, Orange (now Alamance) Co., N.C., which preceded our Revolutionary War in 1776. Departing from a longtime historical Quaker tradition of peaceful but persistent resistance, James Few decided to fight, joined the rising revolt against British political and social control–lack of representation and increasing demands for high taxes. James Few became known to local British troops and the Crown in England as an “outlaw Regulator” due to his outspoken, visible leadership of the group, which first comprised small farmers from several counties. After James and forty others were charged in England as traitors for opposition to the Crown, North Carolina Governor William Tryon targeted the Regulators by leading troops toward their Alamance Creek camp. Tryon’s report and historians documented the events of the ensuing battle. Tryon attacked during ongoing negotiations, killing a Regulator negotiator, and ordered his troops to move in and fire upon and massacre the other members of the group. He hanged James Few in front of his cheering army. Thus the struggle for liberty and freedom began at the Battle of Alamance Creek, near present-day Burlington, N.C., and James Few became a martyr of the cause of American Independence. After his death, James’s family–wife, Sarah Wood Few, and twin children–moved to St. Paul Parish, Ga., with James’s father to escape further British attacks. Sarah Wood Few later moved to Greenville Co., S.C., with her son. She died there in 1804 and rests in Old Few Chapel Cemetery. James and Sarah’s daughter, Sarah Few, born Feb. 9, 1771, in Orange Co., N.C., married John Garvin and died about July 30, 1855, near Augusta, Ga., where she is buried in Magnolia Cemetery. James and Sarah’s son, William Few, born Feb. 9, 1771, in Orange Co., N.C., settled in Greenville Co., S.C., and died there June 12, 1856. He first married Susannah Tubbs. He and his children and second wife, Nancy Chastain, established and founded Few Chapel and Few Family Cemetery, Greer, S.C., where they and descendants sleep in eternal rest. Both Benjamin Few and Ephraim Lawrence Few are buried there.

Few Family Cemetery, Greer, Greenville Co., S.C., courtesy Robin Farley Dixson
Descendant James T. Hammond of Greenville and Columbia, S.C., who provides genealogical information about the Greenville County Few family and others, descends from Fews and a long line of distinguished American antecedents, including Chastains, Bramblettes, Callaways, Dacuses, Wilsons, Barnettes and Hammonds to name only a…few.

Tombstone of Mary Bramlett Few, Few Family Cemetery, courtesy Robin Farley Dixson
Mary Bramlett, first child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born Dec. 28, 1806, in Greenville Co., S.C. She died there Sept. 25, 1856. She married Benjamin Few, son of Susannah Tubbs and William Few. He was born June 17, 1805, in O’Neal, Greenville Co., S.C. He died Nov. 11, 1888, in Greenville Co., S.C. Benjamin and Mary’s children are Susanna, James A., Rosana and Columbus Few.
Susanna Few, child of Mary Bramlett and Benjamin Few, was born 1839. She died 1856.
James A. Few, child of Mary Bramlett and Benjamin Few, was born 1843. He died 1856.
Rosana Few, child of Mary Bramlett and Benjamin Few, was born 1844. She died 1920.
Columbus Few, child of Mary Bramlett and Benjamin Few, was born 1848. He died 1923.

Descendant Cornelia K. Hudson of Tulsa, Okla., provided some of the following about Rev. Nathan
Rev. Nathan Robert (Josiah?) Bramlett, second child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born circa 1808 in Greenville Co., S.C. He died of yellow fever at Memphis, Tenn., and was buried in a cemetery in West Memphis, Ark., reportedly with an inscribed tombstone. A Methodist minister, Nathan was in Memphis on business during a yellow fever epidemic. He stayed to help and contracted the disease, which killed him. He married Mary Margaret Miles before 1835. She was born circa 1816 in North Carolina. Nathan and Margaret lived in Newberry Co., S.C., in 1850 before moving to Georgia and then Mississippi by 1860. “Nathaniel R. Bramlet,” 38, born South Carolina, overseer, $1,500 real estate, and wife, Margaret F., 38, born North Carolina, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Newberry Co., S.C., with seven children born South Carolina: Nancy A., 17; Mary L., 13; Henrietta E., 9; Martha L., 7; Susanna, 4; Permelia, 3; and Virginia C., 1 (NARA Film M432:856:253A-B). “Nathan R. Bramlett,” 52, born South Carolina, farmer, $2,000 real estate, $500 personal estate, and wife, Margaret, 44, are listed in the 1860 U, S, Census for Div. 1, Houstton P.O., Chickasaw Co., Miss., with five grown and minor children born Georgia: Elizabeth, 18; Louisa, 16; Rosana, 14; Sarah, 13; Ella, 12, and three others born Alabama: R. C. Finly, 27; W. W. Finly, 14; and Virginia Finly, 9 (NARA Film M653:579:172). Nathan and Margaret’s children include Nancy Caroline, Mary L., Henrietta Elizabeth (“Lizzie”), Martha Louisa, Rosana F. (“Rosa”), Sarah Susanna (“Anna”), Permelia Ella, Virginia C. (“Jennie”) and Lula Lydia Bramlett.
Nancy Caroline Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born Sept. 23, 1835, in South Carolina. She died May 7, 1904, in Mississippi and was buried in Wesley Chapel Cemetery near Houston. She married George Washington Boyd on March 6, 1851, in South Carolina. Their children are Judge John P., Mary, John Jessie, Robert and Dr. Wesley Boyd.
Judge John P. Boyd was born at French Camp, Miss. His children include Pearl Daniel, Mary Lee and a Daughter who was the wife of Polk Herndon.
Mary L. Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born July 7, 1837, in South Carolina. She died April 24, 1891, in Van Vleet, Chickasaw Co., Miss., and was buried in Wesley Chapel Cemetery near Houston, Miss. She married Josiah Allen McDaniel at Houston, Miss. (Family research hints: The McDaniel family at one time used the surname McDonald. The family home was on the road to Pittsboro, Calhoun Co.. Miss. Josiah’s sister and Rainwater Barnett had a child named Rita Shearer who lived at Houston, Miss.) Josiah Allen McDaniel served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He enlisted in Company D, Fifth Alabama and Mississippi Infantry, and was present with Gen. Robert E. Lee on April 9, 1865, at the surrender to Gen. Ullyses S. Grant at Appomattox. Mary and Josiah lived near Van Vleet. Their children include Nannie Elizabeth, Margaret (“Maggie”), Willie and Lula McDaniel.
Nannie Elizabeth McDaniel, child of Mary L. Bramlett and Josiah Allen McDaniel, was born near Tampa, Fla., and died at age 1.
Margaret “Maggie” McDaniel, child of Mary L. Bramlett and Josiah Allen McDaniel, was born in Mississippi. She died in 1892 and may have been buried at Asbury Chapel. She married Tom Downing and had five children: Van Hill, Ted, Mac, Muldrow and Molly Kay Downing.
Willie McDaniel, child of Mary L. Bramlett and Josiah Allen McDaniel, was born in Mississippi. He died at age 1 year.
Lula McDaniel, child of Mary L. Bramlett and Josiah Allen McDaniel, was born in Mississippi. She died at age 14 and was buried at Friendship Cemetery, Chickasaw Co., Miss.
Henrietta Elizabeth “Lizzie” Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. She may be buried at Friendship Cemetery in Mississippi. She married a man named Smotherman.
Martha Louisa Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born circa 1843 in South Carolina.
Rosana F. “Rosa” Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born circa 1846 in South Carolina or Chickasaw Co., Miss. She died in Mississippi and was buried at Asbury Chapel near West Point, Miss. She married Walter Howard Brame and had seven children.
Sarah Susanna “Anna” Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
Permelia Ella Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
Virginia C. “Jennie” Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. She died at the home of Emma Barnett on Thornton Hill, nine miles west of Okolona, Miss., and was buried at Wesley Chapel Cemetery near Houston, Miss. She married John Clark. Their child is Jennie Lee Clark. They lived in Louisville, Ky., at one time.
Lula Lydia Bramlett, child of Nathan R. and Margaret Miles Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. She married someone named Young. They lived near Houlka, Miss.

Descendant Wanda Lewis provides the following about Abner G. Bramlett and family.
Abner G. Bramlett, third child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born circa 1817 in Greenville Co., S.C. He wrote his will Dec. 18, 1872, and died two days later on Dec. 20, 1872, in Lafayette Co., Miss. He married Elizabeth Rosa Hawkins in December 1843 in Greenville County. She was born March 22, 1814, in South Carolina, the, daughter of Mary “Polly” McCay and Ezekiel Hawkins of Greenville County. Rosa died Jan. 4, 1880, in Boyd, Wise Co., Tex. “Abner Bramblet,” 34, laborer, and wife, Rosa, 34, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with two children: Emily, 6, and Josephine, 3, all born South Carolina (NARA Film ). They lived next to Rev. William and Nancy S. Dacus Bramlett. Rosa Bramlet, 71, born South Carolina to parents born there, mother-in-law, at home, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Boyd, Wise Co., Tex., living with her son-in-law James B. Nunley, 29, born Mississippi to parents born South Carolina, farmer, and daughter, Nannie R., 26, born South Carolina to parents born there, keeping house, and their two children born Mississippi: Charles, 5, and Erin, 1 (NARA Film ). Rosa is buried near her daughter Nancy R. “Nannie” Bramlett Nunnelly. Rosa and Abner’s other children are Emily Dacus, Louisa Josephine and Mary E. Bramlett.
Will Transcript courtesy Wanda Lewis, a second-great-granddaughter of Abner and Rosa.
A. G. Bramlet’s Last Will, Dec. 18, 1872, Lafayette Co., Miss.
I, A. G. Bramblette of the county of Lafayette and State of Mississippi make this my last will and testament revocing all others will made by me. 1st I wish my just debts paid from the personal property and the remainder to be held by my wife, Elizabeth R. Bramblette all of my Real Estate during her lifetime and at her death to desend to my three daughters, Louisa T. Bramblette, Nancy R. Bramblette, Mary E. Bramblette and to remain in the hands of the three daughters until the marriage of last one. Also those three daughters will pay Emily D. Dacus the sum of three hundred dollars as her share or interest in my Estate real and personal and I Bequeath this sum to the said E. D. Dacus and her bodily heirs I appoint Elizabeth R. Bramblette my execetorix to carry out during her life and that neither Bond or security be required of her In witness whereof I have signed sealed and published and declared this Instrument as my last will This 18th day of December A D 1872 A. G. his X mark Bramlette seal Attests H. H. Ferrell
This said A. G. Bramblette on said day signed and sealed this Instrument and published and declared the same as and for his last will and we at this request and in his presents and in the presents of each other have hereunto written our names as subscribing witnesses Jas. A Christian {seal} G. W. Bramlett {seal} W. J. Carson {seal}
Abner died Dec. 20, 1872, and Rosa appeared in court to enter the estate for probate on Jan. 26, 1873:
To the Hon. Dewitte Stearns Chancellor of Lafayette County Your petitioner E. R. Bramlette a citizen of Lafayette County of Miss. respectfully Represents that A. G. Bramlette who last dwelt in Lafayette County Died on 20th day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand Eight hundred Seventy two possessed of a small estate which he disposed of by his last will and testament leaving a widow and four children of full age and his only heirs at law and next of kin. Your petitioner represents that the said deceased left will herewith presented wherein your petitioner is named as Executorix wherefore your petitioner pray that said will may be proved and allowed an execution This 26th day January 1873 [signed] E. R. Bramlett
The undersigned being all the heirs at law and next of kin and the only parties interested in foregoing petition request that the prayer thereof be granted without further notice [signed] L. J. Bramlett N. R. Bramlett M. E. Bramlett Emily D. Dacus
State of Mississippi} Lafayette County} Chancery Court January 27, 1873
This day personally appeared before me R. M. Black clerk of said court James A. Christian and W. D. Carson subscribing witnesses to certain instrument of __ perporting to be the last will and testament of A. G. Bramlet late of said county deceased bearing date 18th day of December 1872 who after being first sworn deposed and said that said A. G. Bramlet signed sealed H. H. Ferrell and G. W. Bramlett on the day of the date thereof that the said testutes was then of sound disposing mind and memory and more that twenty one years of age and that these repenents subscribed said instrument as witnesses thereto at the instance and the request and on the presences of said testator and also in the presence of each other and in the presence of H. H. Ferrell and G. W. Bramlett the other witnesses on the day and year aforesaid
Sworn to and subscribed before me this the 27th day of Jany 1873 R. M. Black clerk W. J. Carson Jas. A. Christian
Packet #1404 Filed Jan. 27, 1873, Recorded Will Book page 127 by R. M. Black, Lafayette Co., Miss., Clerk
Elizabeth R. Bramlett made a motion to the chancellor through her solicitor to admit the will to probate, which was granted, and was named Executrix on Jan. 29, 1873.
Abner named his wife, Elizabeth R., and four daughters as his only heirs: Emily Dacus (Bramlett) Dacus, Louisa Josephine Bramlett, Nancy R. Bramlett and Mary E. Bramlett.
Emily Dacus Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Rosa Hawkins and Abner G. Bramlett, was born circa 1844 in Greenville Co., S.C. She died in Lafayette Co., Miss. She married before Dec. 18, 1872, when her father wrote his will and named her as Emily D. Dacus. She married William Benjamin Paul Dacus on Feb. 26, 1866, in Caswell, Lafayette Co., Miss.
Louisa Josephine Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Rosa Hawkins and Abner G. Bramlett, was born circa 1848 in Greenville Co., S.C. She married Christopher Christian.
Nancy R. (Rosa?) “Nannie” Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Rosa Hawkins and Abner G. Bramlett, was born Jan. 26, 1850, in Greenville Co., S.C. She died June 30, 1892, in Boyd, Wise Co., Tex. She married James B. Nunnally. He was born circa 1851 in Mississippi.
Mary E. Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Rosa Hawkins and Abner G. Bramlett, was born circa 1851-1853 in Greenville Co., S.C.

Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlett, fourth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born circa 1812 in Greenville Co., S.C. She died there in 1897. She married Ephraim Lawrence Few before 1838 in Greenville County. He was born in 1810 and died 1885. Their children are William Manning, Matilda Emaline, Laurence and Thomas Sidney Few.

William Manning Few, child of Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlett and Ephraim Lawrence Few, was born in 1838. He died in 1900 and was buried in Few Chapel United Methodist Church Cemetery. He served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He first married Eliza Elizabeth Bates on Jan. 1, 1859. Their child is Luella Florence Few. William second married Sarah A. Lucas Caldwell on Dec. 1, 1868. She was born in 1842. She died in 1914 and was buried in Few Chapel Cemetery. Their children are Charles B., John, Millie Emma, Amanda Louise and Willie Alma Few.
Matilda Emaline Few, child of Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlett and Ephraim Lawrence Few, was born in 1844. She died in 1915. She married Robert Thomason.
Thomas Sidney Few, child of Elizabeth “Betsy” Bramlett and Lawrence Few, was born in 1864. He died in 1885.
Melanie “Mellie” “Milly” Bramlett, fifth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S.C.
Margaret Anna Bramlett, sixth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S.C.
Elbert S. (Sevier) Bramlett, seventh child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S.C.
Tolliver Robert Bramlett, eighth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S.C. He died in battle at Wilderness while serving as a soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. He married Lauriet Neves.
Martha Bramlett, ninth child of Nancy S. Dacus and Rev. William H. Bramlett, was born May 7, 1819, in Greenville Co., S.C. She died there Jan. 6, 1893, and was buried in Jackson Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery. She married William Lynch. He was born July 27, 1797. He died Oct. 10, 1873, and was buried in Jackson Grove.

Descendant James T. Hammond provides much of the following about William H. Bramlett and wife, Rebecca, and family.

William H. (Henry?) Bramlett, tenth child of Rev. William and Nancy S. (Dacus) Bramlett, was born April 19, 1824, in Greenville Co., S.C. An entry in his Bramlett Bible, once in the possession of descendant Boyce Bramlett, indicates “W. H. Bramlett Departed this life Oct. 6th 1863 at 1/2 past 6 o’clock in the evening at the Ropers hospital in Charleston, S.C.” He died while serving as a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States, reportedly of typhoid fever. A soldier in his unit indicated in a letter the captain sent William back to Greenville County to be buried in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery where a grave is marked for him. (Victims of typhoid and other communicable diseases usually were buried right away in their uniforms at the place of death; however, there is no inscribed tombstone or burial record for him at Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston where deceased soldiers were interred.) A neighbor, James Irvin Willis, who served in William’s unit, Company H, Third Palmetto Battalion, South Carolina Light Artillery, mentions William in two letters he wrote to his father, Daniel Willis, and to his father and mother in 1863. The first letter, written March 6, 1863, from Camp James Island, S.C., contains a brief reference: “…Wm. Bramlett has come to our Co….” William had enlisted in February. Willis identifies their company at the bottom of the letter. He tells his father, “You directed your letter to Co. A. That was a mistake. Ours is Co. H.” An earlier reference near the top of the letter indicates the company had four artillery guns. William subsequently became ill and was hospitalized June 12, 1863. A second Willis letter, written Oct. 19, 1863, also from James Island, S.C., contains the news of William’s death: “There was one of my mess died of typhoid…his name was Wm. Bramlett…a neighbor of mine. Left a wife and five little children. He said before he died he was prepared…” and Captain McKendrick sent him home. The letters were preserved by Willis descendant Rev. J. Earnest Willis and published. The excerpts here are shared by Bramblette-Burdette-Willis descendant Franklin Donald Burdette of Florida.

William H. Bramlett served in the Confederacy during the War Between the States
Private William H. Bramlett

Gone too soon…perished serving as a Confederate soldier in the Civil War
Portrait courtesy descendant James T. Hammond

Tombstone of William H. Bramlett and Rebecca Arvine Roe in Jackson Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery
William married Rebecca Arvine Roe on Dec. 8, 1853, according to the Bramlett Bible. Rebecca was born Dec. 6, 1830, in Greenville District, the daughter of Ann Wheeler (1795-1846) and Thomas Roe (1791-1847). Rebecca died March 28, 1907, in Greenville County and was buried in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery. Her maternal grandparents are Phillis Biden and William Wheeler and her paternal grandparents are Elizabeth Daish (1769-1848) and James Roe Jr. (1766-1826). Rebecca Bramlett of Locust Hill, S.C., in 1901 is listed by Mann Batson in Upper Part of Greenville County, South Carolina, as one of the “Widows Of Soldiers Who Lost Their Lives In Service Of The Confederate States” (453).
William wrote his last will and testament on Nov. 22, 1862, in Greenville District:
In the name of God Amen. I William H. Bramlett of the State of South Carolina, Greenville dist, being of sound and disposing mind and memory but knowing that it is appointed once for man to die and being desirous to dispose of the worldy goods wherewith it has pleased God to bless me do make and ordain this to be my last will in manner following–To wit–after the payment of my Just debts I will & bequeath unto my beloved wife Rebecca Bramlett all my estate both real and personal let it consist of whatsoever it may during her natural life or widowhood in case my wife shall marry I desire my estate divid[ed] between my wife & children that is to say I give to my wife one third part of my whole estate both real & personal to her & her heirs forever & the other two thirds I wish equally divided between my five children–Elbert Bramlett, John Bramlett, Nancy Bramlett, Charles Bramlett & William Bramlett all share & share alike to them & their heirs forever. I also desire that if my wife shall give birth to any other child or children by me I desire that such child or children shall share equally in my estate with my five children above named. I do hereby nominate & appoint my beloved wife Rebecca Bramlett Executrix of this my last will & testament in testimony whereof I do hereunto set my hand & affix my seal the 22nd day of November 1862–signed sealed published & declared as the last will & testament of the above named William Bramlett the day & date above written in the presence of J. L. Westmoreland, James W. Green, Martha V. Westmoreland. W. H. Bramlett.
The witnesses and Rebecca (Roe) Bramlett appeared in court to prove the will on Nov. 16, 1863 (Apt. 22, File 26). Rebecca made a request to finalize a settlement of the estate on Feb. 2, 1870. The inventory of William’s estate, signed by his brothers-in-law Ignatius Few and Benjamin Few, indicates William had property valued at $1,833 and $67.74 in cash with $1,600.84 worth of “notes” at the time of his death. The county court was involved in settling the estate for about eight years after William died. Rebecca did not have any other children after William died: the five children named in his will–Elbert, John, Nancy, Charles and William–also are named as his heirs in Rebecca’s final report. The court set a date for a final hearing on the estate on March 3, 1870. At that time, the court appointed P. B. Benson guardian of the children.
William H. and Rebecca are mentioned in Lou Alice F. Turner’s 1981 book Jackson Grove Methodist Church History as members of the church in 1835 (72).
William is enumerated in his parents’ house in the 1830-1840 U.S. Census records for Greenville County. “William Bramblett,” 25, born in South Carolina, is listed there in the 1850 U.S. Census with his parents, William, 64, born South Carolina, and Nancy, 62, born in Virginia, and siblings (NARA Film M432:853:367B). William H. Bramlett was appointed guardian of his nephew, John Thomas Miles, son of Eliza Miles and minor heir of Thomas Miles, deceased, on Jan. 2, 1860, in Greenville District. Eliza Miles petitioned the court to appoint William guardian of her son. William lived near his parents close to Mush Creek in 1860: “William Bramlett Jr.,” 37, farmer, and wife, Rebecca (Arvine Roe), 28, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Tyger Division, Mush Creek P.O., Greenville Co., S.C., with four children born in South Carolina: Elbert (Sevier), 5; John (James), 4; Nancy (Arvine), 1/12; and Infant (Charles Proctor), 1/12 (NARA Film M653:1220:507A). Also listed is Samuel Singleton, 21, born in South Carolina, farmer. Another child, William H., was born in 1862 after the census.
William enlisted as a private in Company H, 3rd (Palmetto) (White’s) Battalion, South Carolina Light Artillery, later known as Capt. William E. Earle’s Company, Horse Artillery, Butler’s Cavalry Division, on Feb. 13, 1863, in Greenville, S.C. The May-June company muster roll lists him as absent and in the hospital since June 12, 1863; and the September-October roll indicates he died at Roper Hospital, Charleston, S.C., on Oct. 6, 1863. “Wm. H. Bramlett, Pvt. Co. H. P.B.L.A. Vols. S.C.” who died in a Charleston, S.C., hospital “appears on a Register of Claims of Deceased Officers and Soldiers from South Carolina which were filed for settlement in the Office of the Confederate States Auditor for the War Department.” The claim was presented by Rebecca Bramlett, widow, on Jan. 23, 1864 (Confederate Archives, Chap. 10, File No. 33, p. 11). Rebecca claimed William’s personal effects and $55.50 in back pay on that day.
Rebecca took courage and cared for her children, no doubt struggling to keep the farm and feed the family on her own in an economically and spiritually sstruggling war-torn region for the next 44 years. Rebecca Bramlett, 48, born in South Carolina to parents born in England, widowed, keeping house, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Bates Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with two grown children born in South Carolina: Charles P. (Proctor), 20, farmer, and William H., 18, works on farm (NARA Film T9:1231:381B). Rebecca Bramlett, 69, born in December 1830 in South Carolina to parents born in England, widowed, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Bates Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., living with her son, W. H. Bramlett, 38, born in March 1862, widowed, farmer, and his son, Walter, 8, born in August 1891, both born in South Carolina to parents born there (NARA Film T623:1529:55A).
William’s will names his five children: Elbert Sevier, John James, Nancy Arvine, Charles Proctor and William Henry Bramlett. Birth dates for all five children are inscribed in William Bramlett’s Bible.

Elbert Sevier “E. S.” Bramlett, first child of William H. and Rebecca Arvin (Roe) Bramlett, was born Sept. 1, 1854, in Greenville Co., S.C. He is a namesake of his Uncle Elbert S. Bramlett (1816-1819). Elbert died in Greenville County on May 12, 1918, and was buried in Lima Baptist Church Cemetery, north of Greenville, S.C. Elbert’s probate records indicate his son Willie C. Bramlett served as executor of his estate in 1918. Elbert was a farmer. He married Mary Elizabeth Trammell circa 1878. She was born July 22, 1846. She died April 18, 1907, and was buried in Lima Baptist Church Cemetery. “Elbert Bramlett,” 26, farmer, and wife, Lizzie, 34, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Saluda Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with one child: William, 1 (NARA Film T9:1231:352A). All were born in South Carolina. “Elbert S. Bramlett,” 45, born in September 1854 in South Carolina, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, married 22 years, and wife, Elizziebeath, 42, born in July 1847 in South Carolina, mother of five living children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Saluda Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with five children born in South Carolina: William C., 20, born in July 1879, farm laborer; Mary E., 19, April 1881; Charley H., 16, July 1883, farm laborer; Emma E., 14, September 1885; and Lewis E., 12, October 1887, farm laborer (NARA Film T623:1530:267A). “Elbert S. Bramlett,” 56, salesman, general merchandise, widowed, and four children are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Saluda Twp., Greenville Co., S.C.: William C., 30, farmer, general farm; Mary E., 28; Emer E., 24, daughter; and Louis E., 22, farmer, general farm (NARA Film T624:1461:148A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. Elbert and Elizabeth’s children are William Claybourne (“Willie”), Mary Elizabeth, Charles Henry, Emmie Estill and Lewis Ervin Bramlett.

John James Bramlette, second child of William H. and Rebecca (Roe) Bramlett, was born Aug. 28, 1856, in Greenville Co., S.C. He died there June 29, 1928, after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage, and was buried the next day in Jackson Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery, Traveler’s Rest.
John married Lucinda Gilreath, daughter of Martha Few (1823-1878) and William Henry Gilreath (1823-1881), on Nov. 9, 1876, in Greenville County. Her maternal grandparents are Nancy Chastain (1789-1850) and William Few (1771-1856) and her paternal grandparents are Nancy Harriet Green (1795-1867) and Hardy Jones Gilreath (1788-1868). Lucinda was born Nov. 20, 1856, in Greenville District. She died in Jackson Grove, S.C., on May 20, 1900, and was buried in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery.

John James Bramlette and Lucinda Gilreath Bramlette and baby Clara Bell, courtesy James T. Hammond
John was a farmer and worked in or owned a cotton mill in O’Neal Township. He was a member of Mountain View United Methodist Church. “John J. Bramlett,” 24, farmer, and wife, Lucindy, 24, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for O’Neal Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with two children: Nancy, 4, and Elizabeth, 2/12 (NARA Film T9:1231:286A). All were born in South Carolina. “John J. Bramlet,” 43, born in August 1856, cotton mill, widowed, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Piedmont, Grove Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family with five children born in South Carolina: Nannie, 22, born in August 1878, cotton mill; Clarence, 16, July 1884; Walter, 13, July 1886, cotton mill; Clara Belle, 4, February 1896; and Bettie (Bramlett) Gillespie, 20, April 1880, mother of one child, none living (NARA Film T623:1530:149A). Also listed: Bettie’s husband, William Gillespie, 31, born in June 1868, cotton mill, married two years. “John J. Bramlett,” 63, father, widowed, farmer, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Highland Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., living with his son James C. (Clarence) Bramlett, 35, farmer, general farm, head of the family, and his wife, Allie, 20, and their two children (NARA Film T625:1698:297A). Also listed: John’s daughter Clara B. Bramlett, 24, sister.
John and Lucinda’s children include Nancy (“Nannie”), Elizabeth (“Bettie”), James Clarence, George Walter and Clara Bell Bramlette.

Clara Bell Bramlette and husband, Claude Tandy Barnette, courtesy grandson James T. Hammond
Nancy Arvine Bramlett, third child of William H. and Rebecca Arvine (Roe) Bramlett, was born Sept. 13, 1858, in Greenville Co., S.C. She died May 28, 1925, in Greenville County and was buried in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery. Her grave marker lists her birth and death dates and identifies her as Nancy Bramlett, wife of G. Walker Gilreath.

Nancy Arvine Bramlette and unidentified cohild in or before 1925, courtesy James T. Hammond
The Rev. John Dill performed the marriage ceremony for Nancy and G. Walker Gilreath on Jan. 17, 1878, in Travelers Rest, S.C. Walker was born April 20, 1857, the son of Martha Few and William Henry Gilreath. He died Dec. 17, 1925, and was buried beside Nancy in Mountain View Cemetery. “Nancy Gilreath,” 21, and husband, Walker, 23, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for O’Neal Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with one child: Nora, 10/12, born in August (NARA Film T9:1231:281B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Nancy E. Gilreath,” 41, born in September 1858, mother of six living children, married 22 years, and husband, George W., 43, born in April 1857, farmer, owner of a mortgaged farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for O’Neal Twp,, Greenville Co., S.C., with six children: Norah R., 20, August 1879; William H., 18, September 1881; Ida M., 16, September 1883; Brannard, 14, April 1886; Brinnie, 14, April 1886; and Lula B., 2, June 1897 (NARA Film T623:1530:219A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Nancy A. Gilreath,” 51, married 32 years, and husband, George W., 56, farmer, general farm, head of the family, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for O’Neal Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: Brinnie, 24; Lula B., 12; and Fannie/Thannie V., 8 (NARA Film T624:1461:103B). Their son William H. and wife, Lura Nora, lived next door. All were born in South Carolina. Walker and Nancy’s children include Nora Rebecca, William Henry, Ida Mae, twins Brannard and Brinnie, Lula Beatrice and Thannie/Fannie Vannoy Gilreath.
Charles Proctor Bramlett, fourth child of William H. and Rebecca (Roe) Bramlett, was born May 6, 1860, in Jackson Grove, S.C. He died Oct. 2, 1912, in Locust Hill, Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried in Mush Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. Charles was a farmer, carpenter, deacon and church historian. He built Mush Creek Baptist Church before his marriage and constructed several houses in upper Greenville County, including one for his own family circa 1900. He worked at Shumate’s Cabinet shop in Greenville in the early 1900s and later operated a sawmill at the foot of Paris Mountain, according to his granddaughter Elizabeth E. Nicholl. Charles married Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” Neves on Dec. 26, 1889, in Mush Creek community. She was born there Feb. 28, 1871, the daughter of Frances E. Boswell and William Perry Zachariah Franklin Neves. Lizzie died March 24, 1967, in Greenville and was buried in Mush Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. She worked as a supervisor for Nuckasee Manufacturing in Greenville. “Charlie Bramlett,” 40, born in May 1860, married ten years, and wife, Lizzie, 28, born in February 1872, mother of two living children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for O’Neal Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with two children: Alice, 9, born September 1890, and Cora, 7, born April 1893 (NARA Film T623:1530:225A). “Charles P. Bramlette,” 49, first marriage, married 20 years, farmer, rents farm, and wife, Mary E., 38, born in February 1872, mother of two living children, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for O’Neal Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with two grown children: Alice, 19, and Cora, 17 (NARA Film T624:1461:104B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Lizzie Bramlett,” 48, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for San Soucie Village, Greenville, Greenville Co., S.C., with daughter Cora Nicoll, 28, and son-in-law Earnest E., 33, and their two children (NARA Film T625:1698:162B). All were born in South Carolina. Charles and Elizabeth’s children are Alice Irene and Cora Pauline Bramlett.
William Henry Bramlett, fifth child of William H. and Rebecca (Roe) Bramlett, was born March 31, 1862, in Jackson Grove, S.C. He died May 24, 1930, and was buried in Roby Cemetery, Roby, Fisher Co., Tex. William was a farmer. He married Ida Estelle Neves/Neaves, daughter of Nancy Jane Chastain and Washington Neves, on Nov. 2, 1890, in Greenville County. Ida was born March 19, 1865, in Greenville County. She died Feb. 6, 1892, and was buried in Few’s Chapel Methodist Church Cemetery. “W. H. Bramlett,” 38, born in November 1862 in South Carolina to parents born there, widowed, farmer, owner of a mortgaged farm, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Bates Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., as head of a family that includes his son, Walter (Wheeler) Bramlett, 8, born in August 1891 in South Carolina to parents born there, and his mother, Rebecca, 69, born in December 1830 in South Carolina to parents born in England, mother of five living children (NARA Film T623:1529:55A). “William H. Bramlett,” 47, widowed, farmer, owner of a mortgage-free farm, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Bates Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with one grown child: Walter (Wheeler) Bramlett, 18 (NARA Film T624:1460:69B). Both were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “William H. Bramlett,” 56, farmer, general farm, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Bates Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with one grown child: Walter (Wheeler) Bramlett, 28, and his wife, Evie, 24, and their child: Boyce, 2 2/12 (NARA Film T625:1697:68A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
Eliza W. Bramlett, eleventh child of Rev. William and Nancy S. (Dacus) Bramlett, was born circa 1827 in Greenville Co., S.C. She died sometime after Jan. 20, 1860, in Texas. Eliza is enumerated in her parents’ household in the 1830-1840 U.S. Census records for Greenville District. “Eliza Bramlett,” 23, born in South Carolina, is listed there with her parents in the 1850 U.S. Census. The Southern Patriot newspaper on Jan. 20, 1853, reported that Eliza W. Bramlett, daughter of the Rev. William Bramlett of Greenville District, married T. P. C. Miles of Spartanburg District on Jan. 11, 1853. Rev. Barnett Smith performed their marriage ceremony. Thomas P. C. Miles died before Jan. 2, 1860. His wife, Eliza, petitioned the court to appoint William H. Bramlett (her brother) guardian of her son, John Thomas Miles, the minor heir of Thomas Miles, deceased, on Jan. 2, 1860, in Greenville District. John Thomas Miles was “over four years old” at that time. William H. Bramlett “filed his Bond for Three Thousand Dollars.” William and J. L. Westmoreland signed as securities with J. M. Westmoreland as witness. “Eliza Miles,” 32, born in South Carolina, house keeper, $1,600 personal estate, and son, John T. Miles, 5, born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Mush Creek P.O., Tyger Div., Greenville Co., S.C., living with her parents, William Bramlett, 74, born in South Carolina, Methodist clergy, and Nancy, 72, born in Virginia, housekeeper, and two sisters: Elizabeth, 48, and Martha, 41, both seamstresses and both born in South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1220:506B).

Tombstones of John Wesley Ervin Bramlett and wife, Sarah Wilson, courtesy Robin Farley Dixson
Descendants James Thomas Hammond of Greenville, S.C., and Ellen (Bramlett) Clarke of Columbia, S.C., and the late Louise (Hutchings) Galway provided most of the following about John Wesley Ervin Bramlett and wife, Sarah Wilson, and her family.
John Wesley Ervin Bramlett, twelfth child of Rev. William and Nancy S. (Dacus) Bramlett, was born Aug. 24, 1829, in Greenville Dist., S.C. He died May 16, 1915, in Liberty, Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried the next day in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery, Taylors, S.C. His grave marker identifies him as Capt. John W. Bramlett. John’s obituary in the May 18, 1915, Greenville News is headlined: “Major Bramlette Died on Sunday; Funeral at Greer”:
Greer, May 17. — (Special) — Major John W. Bramlette, of the 18th South Carolina regiment, Confederate States of America, died at his home in Liberty, on Sunday, aged 86 years. Before becoming a major, he was captain of Company D of the same regiment. Death came to Major Bramlette at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John [Eliza C.] Hutchings, who Mrs. Ben [daughter Mary Anna] Neves, Campobello; Mrs. J. [John] J. [daughter Tallulah “Lula”] McMakin and Mrs. W. S. [Waddie Spartan] [niece by marriage] Corrie Wilson] Barnett, of O’Neal, survive him. The body of major Bramlette was brought to Greer this morning on train No. 42, and this afternoon at one o’clock the interment was held at the Mountain View Methodist church. The services were conducted by his pastor, the Rev. L. E. Wiggins, and by Rev. A. Q. Rice. The floral offerings were very beautiful, and among them were tributes from the Keowee Chapter and the Hampton-Lee Chapter Daughters of the Confederacy. Major Bramlette was preceded to the grave by his wife, who, before marriage, was Miss Sarah Wilson.
Mrs. Waddy Spartan Barnett mentioned in the obituary is Corrie “Carrie” Wilson, the niece of Sarah Wilson Bramlett. She was considered a daughter since Sarah reared her from infancy after her biological mother died a week after Corrie was born. (James Thomas Hammond, son of Callie Ruth Barnette and Thomas D. Hammond, is a direct descendant of Corrie “Carrie” Wilson and Waddy Spartan Barnette and their son Claude Tandy Barnette and wife, Clarabelle Bramlette, and descends from Corrie’s parents, Jasper Wilson and Cornelia Townsend and Corrie’s paternal grandparents Sarah Clark and the Hon. John Wilson.)

Waddy Spartan Barnette and Corrie Wilson Barnette
John Wesley Ervin Bramlett first married Sarah Wilson in 1853, according to descendant Louise (Hutchings) Galway. Louise said her grandfather John Bramlett met his wife Sarah Wilson when she was a student and he was teaching school near Wilson’s Ferry, now Pelzer, near Sarah’s home, Golden Grove Plantation in Anderson County. Sarah was born there April 24, 1825, the daughter of Sarah Clark and the Honorable John Wilson Jr., a planter, ferry owner and member of the South Carolina House of Representatives in 1812-1817 and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives 7th District in 1821-1823. and the 6th District in 1823-1827. Sarah is included as an heir in her father’s estate. He died in 1828. Both of Sarah’s parents rest in the family cemetery which was once part of Golden Grove Plantation, now located in Pelzer, S.C. Sarah reportedly died of typhoid fever on Aug. 19, 1893, and was buried in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery, Taylors, S.C. Her obituary appears on page 3 in the Aug. 23, 1893, issue of Greenville Mountaineer:
On last Saturday night Mrs. Sarah Bramlett, wife of Capt. J. W. Bramlett, of Sandy Flat, died of typhoid fever. She was about 68 years of age, the daughter of Hon. John Wilson, who represented this congressional district during Jackson’s time, and was the mother of a large family of children, five of whom survive her. She was a member of Mountain View Methodist Church, and her funeral services were held there on last Sunday afternoon and were conducted by Rev. Mr. Earle. Drs. W. J. and J. W. Bramlett, of this county, are sons of the deceased.
Sarah’s husband, John, a native of Greenville County, was a teacher and a farmer in Anderson County. He was a member and trustee of Jackson Grove Methodist Episcopal Church in nearby Greenville County in 1896. John is enumerated in his parents’ household in the 1830 and 1840 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C. “John Bramlett,” 21, born in South Carolina, is listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with his parents, William, 64, born in South Carolina, farmer, $300 real estate, and Nancy, 62, born (illegible–Virginia?), and five siblings born in South Carolina (Elizabeth, 30; Martha, 28; William, 25, laborer; Eliza, 23; Caroline, 18) (NARA Film M432:853:367). “J. W. Bramlett,” 35, C. S. (country school) teacher, $1,000 real estate and $2,000 personal estate, and (first) wife, Sarah, 30, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Brushy Creek, 42nd Regiment Militia Dist., Anderson Co., S.C., with three children: William (Jasper), 6, who had attended school within the year; Francis (Martha), 4, female; and John (Wilson), 6/12. Also listed: James Kelly, 14. The record indicates all were born in South Carolina (NARA Film M653:1212:323A). J. W. Bramlett on Dec. 20, 1860, served on the South Carolina Legislative Committee on Privileges and Elections, which gave a report and appointed poll and election managers for Abbeville, Ninety-Six, Cedar Springs, Bordeaux, All Saints Parish, White Plains, Williamston, Five Forks and Anderson districts (SCDAH Series S165005, Item 260, p. 1).
John served as a Confederate officer during the Civil War/War Between the States. He raised a company, Capt. John W. Bramlett’s Company, later Company D, Eighteenth Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, and enlisted himself on Dec. 4, 1861, for12 months at Mountain Spring, Anderson Co., S.C. One roster states the regiment, attached to Evans’ Brigade, was organized for state service Jan. 2, 1862, and mustered into Confederate service Jan. 5, 1862. The regiment was organized for 12 months but re-organized May 5, 1862, under the conscript act for three years of service from enlistment. The captain’s NARA compiled military service records indicate he was age 32 and a resident of Anderson County when he joined and that Col. Martin also enlisted him (Film M267 Roll 297). He was elected captain of his company Dec. 4, 1861, and appointed captain on Dec. 20, 1861, at Camp Hampton, S.C., and was mustered in Dec. 30, 1861. Pay accounts indicate his monthly pay as captain amounted to $130. His re-enlistment, dated April 9, 1862, at Charleston, S.C., describes him as 6 feet tall with a fair complexion, black hair and blue eyes. He received a bounty payment of $50 for enlisting three years the following day. He served two years, eight months unofficially as major from April 1, 1863, until honorably discharged in December. He was recommended for promotion to major Dec. 6, 1863; but his military records do not clearly indicate he actually was promoted. He apparently resigned before the recommendation was made. He requested a 15-day leave of absence on Nov. 1, 1863, to take care of “business of great importance that requires my presence at home” in Anderson, S.C. His request indicates he had not been home in eight months. He returned and tendered his resignation Nov. 26, 1863, from Camp at Christ Church Parish, S.C., and was discharged Dec. 8, 1863. After the war John was a member of Camp Manning Austin of Confederate Veterans, which was organized Nov. 18, 1893, in Greenville County.

Capt. John Wesley Ervin Bramlett’s re-enlistment letter
Capt. Bramlett’s request for leave and resignation letter

“John Bramlett,” 40, farmer, $300 real estate, $200 personal estate, and (first) wife, Sarah, 40, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Mush Creek P.O., Highland Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with six children: Wm. (Jasper) 15; (Frances) Martha, 13; John (Wilson), 10; Mary A. (Anna), 8; Talula, 5; and Eliza (C.), 3 (NARA Film M593:1498:675B). All were born in South Carolina. “John Bramlette,” 50, farmer, and (first) wife, Sarah, 50, keeping house, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Highland Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with six grown and minor children: William (Jasper), 24, physician; Mattie (Frances Martha), 21; John W. (Wilson), 20, farm laborer; Mary (Anna), 17; Loula, 15, at school; Eliza (C.), 13 (NARA Film T9:1231:304A). Also listed is Sarah’s niece Carrie (Corrie) Wilson, 6, boarder. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. John and Sarah’s children are William Jasper, Frances Martha (“Mattie”), John Wilson, Mary Anna, Tallulah (“Lula”) and Eliza C. Bramlett. Sarah and John also reared Sarah’s niece, Corrie Wilson, daughter of Sarah’s brother Jasper Wilson after Corrie’s mother, Cornelia Townsend Wilson, died about a week after her birth in 1874. James T. Hammond suggests his grandmother Corrie may have been formally named Cornelia after her mother and affectionately called “Corrie” and/or “Carrie.”
After Sarah died, John second married Susan J. Chastain circa 1898. “John W. Bramlett,” 70, born in August 1829 in South Carolina to a mother born in Virginia, father born in South Carolina, farmer, owner of a mortgaged farm, married 47 years, and (second) wife, Susan J. (Chastain), 37, born in June or January 1862 in South Carolina to parents born there, married two years, no children, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Highland Twp., Greenville Co., S.C. (NARA Film T623:1530:184A). After John died Susan lived with relatives. “Susan Bramlett,” 51, born in South Carolina, widowed, sister, seamstress, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Ward 4, Greenville, Greenville Co., S.C., living with H. T. Chastine, 48, studio photographer, head of the family, which also includes their sister Lizzie Chastine, 52, single, and three boarders (NARA Film T625:1698:146B).
William Jasper Bramlett, first child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born Nov. 10, 1854, in Greenville Co., S.C. He died Sept. 8, 1909, at home in Campobello, S.C., and was buried two days later in Campobello Methodist Church Cemetery. William’s obituary appears in the Spartanburg Herald dated Friday, Sept. 10, 1909:
Campobello, S.C., Sept. 9. — Our town and community has been saddened by the death of Dr. W. J. Bramlett, who died at his home last night at ten o’clock. Dr. Bramlett had been sick only a week, and his death has caused much sorrow over the entire community. Dr. Bramlett was liked by all who knew him, and his place will be hard to fill. He leaves a wife and four children, a father and three sisters. He will be buried beside his brother, Dr. John W. Bramlett, who died two years ago, tomorrow at the Methodist Church at eleven o’clock. Rev. E. Z. James will conduct the funeral services.
William married Elizabeth C. “Eliza” Howell in or shortly before 1880. She was born Feb. 17, 1860, in Greenville County, the daughter of Mary A. Gilreath and John H. Howell. Eliza died May 20, 1945, in Asheville, N.C., and was buried two days later in Jackson Grove Methodist Church Cemetery. Her grave marker identifies her as Eliza C. Bramlett. Her obituary appears in the May 21, 1945, edition of the Greenville News:
Mrs. Eliza Howell Bramlett, widow of Dr. W. J. Bramlett of Greenville, S.C., died at an Asheville Hospital today following a brief illness. She was born in Greenville County, SC., February 16, 1860, the daughter of John H. and Mary G. Howell. She moved here [Asheville] from Greenville in 1922 where she has resided with her children. Surviving are three sons and one daughter, John H. [Pat], George H. [W.?], W. Arthur, and Miss Bertha Bramlett, all of Asheville. Funeral services will be conducted from Jackson Grove Methodist church near Greenville, S.C. Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. by Rev. Lee F. Tuttle, pastor of Central Methodist church of which she was a member, and Rev. Peden Gene Curry. The following nephews will serve as pallbearers: Associate Justice G. Dewey Oxner of Greenville, Lawrence G. Vannoy, C. G. Washington, J. Carlisle and Vannoy C. Oxner, Jr., Spart J. McKinney and Hovey Smith.
“William W. Bramlett,” 26, physician, and wife, Eliza, 20, keeping house, both born in South Carolina, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for O’Neal Twp., Greenville Co., S.C. (NARA Film T9:1231:281A). “William Bramlett,” 24, also is listed with his father in 1880 in Highland Township: He must have married that year after the census was taken for Highland Township and before the census was taken in O’Neal Township where he lived after his marriage. William was a physician who practiced medicine in Greenville and Spartanburg counties. He attended medical school in Kentucky and in 1894 studied at the New York Post-Graduate School and Hospital in New York City (Bellevue). The People’s Paper reported that Dr. W. J. Bramlette moved his family to Charleston in November 1895. They moved to Campobello circa 1904. At the time of his death, he had a medical practice there. “Dr. William J. Bramlett,” 40, born in November 1860, physician, married 18 years, and wife, Eliza, 38, born February 1862, mother of nine children, four living, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Greenville Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with four children: George, 16, born February 1884; Bertha, 13, born June 1890; Arthur, 7, born August 1892; and John H., 4, born February 1896 (NARA Film T623:1529:22). Also listed with the family: Emily C. Gilreath, 82, born in January 1818, aunt, widowed, and N. Harriet Anderson, 68, born January 1832, aunt, single. “Eliza Bramlett,” 50, rents home, is listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Campobello Twp., Spartanburg Co., S.C., with four children: George, 26, undertaker; Bertha, 22; Arthur, 18, street railway conductor; and John, 14 (NARA Film T624:1472:195A). Harriet Anderson, 78, aunt, widowed ten years, no children, also is listed with the family. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Eliza C. Bramlett,” 59, is listed in the 1920 U.S. Census for Greenville Twp., Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: Bertha, 29; William A., 26, law office; and John H., 23, salesman (NARA Film T625:1698:125B). All were born in South Carolina. Eliza and William’s children are George Washington, Bertha Mae, William Arthur and John H. Bramlett.
Martha “Mattie” Bramlett, second child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born circa 1857-58 in Greenville District. Martha lived with her parents in Greenville County in 1870 and 1880.
Descendant Ellen (Bramlett) Clarke of Columbia, S.C., provides the following.
Dr. John Wilson Bramlett, third child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born Nov. 17, 1859, in Anderson Co., S.C. He died April 3, 1907, at home in Campobello, Spartanburg Co., S.C., and was buried the next day in Campobello Methodist Church Cemetery. In mid-March 1907, he became ill with influenza and subsequently developed pneumonia which caused his death. He died seven months before his 48th birthday. John’s obituary appears in the Chester Lantern dated Friday, April 12, 1907:
Dr. John W. Bramlett died Wednesday, April 3, after an illness of about three and a half weeks. He was buried on Thursday following at the M. E. church, of which he had long been a faithful and zealous member. The funeral services were conducted by his pastor, Rev. E. Z. James, assisted by Rev. J. T. Fowler of Spartanburg, and Rev. W. W. Jones of this place. About 1,000 people came to pay the last tribute of respect to this worthy man, who had been friend and physician for the past 25 years. He had the largest practice of any physician, perhaps, in the county, on account of which he had been over-worked for a long while. He was 47 years old. He leaves a wife, who was Miss Eva Wilkes, of Chester, and two children.
John graduated from Atlanta Medical College, a Methodist school which later became part of Emory University. He may have also attended medical school in Kentucky. He practiced medicine in 1883 at Sandy Flats and Grove Station. He practiced at various times in Pickens, Greenville and Spartanburg counties. He owned a drugstore and practiced medicine in Campobello, S.C., from the early 1890s until he died in 1907. Descendant Ellen Bramlett Clarke describes John as a “popular resident of the area and widely respected as a doctor who responded willingly to calls at all hours of day or night. He had a telephone in his office in 1904. His steadfastly loyal horse, purchased in Kentucky, could be depended on to bring the sleeping doctor directly home late at night.” However, Ellen points out a publicized incident that indicates the horse may have fallen asleep as well one late night in 1903. A local newspaper correspondent related the following story involving Dr. Bramlett and his horse: “One night last week, Dr. J. W. Bramlett had a serious accident while returning home from a professional visit. The doctor went to sleep as he was riding along in his buggy and his horse stepped into an excavation 15 feet deep on the side of the road. The doctor was painfully injured in the back, leg and ankle. It was some time before he was able to get out of the hole into which he had fallen. The horse escaped injury and the buggy was not badly damaged.” John’s 1894 voter registration certificate indicates he was a resident of Campobello living at W. R. Ballard’s home. “John . Bramlett,” 35, born in November 1864 in South Carolina to parents born there, boarder, physician, is listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for Campobello Township, Spartanburg Co., S.C., living with John E. Darby, 46, born in May 1854, farmer, head of the family, married twenty-one years, and wife, Mary L., 39, born in March 1861, mother of three children, one living, and their child Eula L., 13, May 1887 (NARA Film T623:1541:89B). Six other boarders also were listed in the household. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “John Wilson was an ardent Methodist, an active participant in community affairs and a major force in construction of the Campobello Methodist Church,” according to Ellen Bramlett Clarke. “He was also active in politics–in 1902, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for the South Carolina Legislature. That same year, he met and began a courtship of Eva Florence Wilkes who was teaching in the elementary school at Campobello.
John was 43 years old when he married Eva, 25, on Jan. 25, 1903, at the residence of Bishop W. W. Duncan, Spartanburg, S C. Their marriage was reported by the Spartanburg Journal on Monday, Jan., 26, 1903: “A Sunday Marriage”:
Dr. Bramlett of Campobello Married to Miss Wilkes of Chester Here. An interesting marriage took place in this city yesterday, the contracting parties being prominent people of this section of the state. The groom is Dr. J. W. Bramlett, a leading physician of Campobello, and the bride, Miss Wilkes, a well known and popular young lady of Chester. The bridal party arrived here Sunday morning and stopped at the Spartan Inn. At once a flurry was created in the hotel and everybody was asking, “Who’s going to be married?” The party was accompanied by Dr. W. J. Bramlett and Geo. H. [W.?] Bramlett of Greenville, relatives of the groom. At 12 o’clock, the party went to the residence of Bishop W. W. Duncan on North Church street, where the marriage ceremony was performed by Bishop Duncan. After the ceremony they returned to the hotel, remaining until their train arrived. They departed Sunday afternoon. The bride is an attractive young woman of Chester, who is teaching at Campobello. It was the desire of the young couple that Bishop Duncan unite them in marriage. The bride was stylishly attired in a blue broadcloth suit, tailor-made with a becoming hat to match.
Eva was born July 1, 1878, in Chester Co., S.C., the daughter of Eliza Walker and John Wesley Wilkes. Eva died Oct. 22, 1952, in Chester. Her obituary, which appears in the Oct. 23, 1952, edition of The State in Columbia, is headlined “Mrs. Bramlett, Chester Civic Leader, Dies”:
Mrs. Eva Wilkes Bramlett, 74, widow of Dr. John Wilson Bramlett of the Baton Rouge community of western Chester county, died at 12:30 this morning at the Chester County Hospital [Pryor Hospital] of heart trouble. She was a former postmistress of Leeds for 20 years and a widely known former public school teacher. She was an outstanding civic leader of Chester county and a charter member of the Chester County Council of Farm Women. As a member of that council, along with another member, Mrs. J. C. Shannon of Blackstock, she was instrumental in the organization of the Chester County home demonstration department which has been such a great asset to the county since that day. She was graduated from the Chester county schools and from Asheville (N.C.) College and Columbia College. Following graduation she taught school for approximately 20 years at Conway, Baton Rouge and Campobello. She married Doctor Bramlett, prominent physician of Campobello who died in 1906 [1907]. Mrs. Bramlett was a member of New Hope Methodist Church where she took a great interest in all departments. She was president of its missionary society for a quarter of a century. Then she was made honorary president. Mrs. Bramlett was a daughter of the late Capt. John Wesley [Wilkes], an officer of the Confederate army, and the late Mrs. Eliza Walker Wilkes. After having retired as postmistress at Leeds following 20 years service, she had made her home for the past two years with her son, John Wesley Bramlett at Baton Rouge. Mrs. Bramlett is survived by her son, John Wesley Bramlett of Baton Rouge; a daughter, Mrs. Thomas [Sarah] Lake of Silverstreet; seven grandchildren, one great-grandchild; two brothers, B. Frank Wilkes of Chester and Robert W. Wilkes of Baton Rouge, and two sisters, Mrs. W. M. Harley [Blanche] of Jamison, Orangeburg County, and Miss Nelle Wilkes of Baton Rouge. Funeral services will be conducted at 3 o’clock Thursday afternoon from Calvary Baptist Church, Chester county, by the Rev. Francis V. Robertson of Armenia, the Rev. E. W. Buckner of Chester and the Rev. S. B. White of Union. Interment will follow in the family plot in the historic church cemetery.
Eva was “the eldest and favorite child of her father, Captain John Wesley Wilkes (also known as Judge Wilkes since he was a longtime local magistrate), and his wife, Eliza Walker Harden,” according to Ellen Bramlett Clarke. Eva “attended Columbia Female College in Columbia, S.C., for two years and received teacher training at Asheville Normal School, Asheville, N.C. She was awarded a First Grade Teacher’s Certificate the highest level. At age 18, she was teaching grades one through eight in a one-room school in the Baton Rouge Section of Chester Co., S.C. She taught at Campobello Graded School during the spring term of 1901 and in Conway in 1901-1902 at the Burroughs Graded School. In the fall of 1902, Eva returned to teach at Campobello. She met Dr. John Wilson Bramlett, a local druggist and physician, and they were married in January 1903.” When her husband died from complications of pneumonia, Eva “was left with the burdens of two very young children to rear and heavy debts left by her husband, a hard-working doctor who had not pressed patients to pay,” Ellen Bramlett Clarke explains. “A note circa March 1908 penned on a copy of the statement of one former patient’s account reveals the widow’s desperate financial straits: ‘I do need this money so much. I would be more than thankful if you will kindly hand it to Mr. Walter Jackson [at the bank] for me. I have two little helpless babies to raise, surely you can arrange to pay me this amount [25.00]. Mrs. J. W. Bramlett.’” Dr. Bramlett’s ledger book for 1901-1903 lists payments in both cash and goods, including one dog $4.00; one turkey $1.00; one gallon of syrup $0.40; fodder $10.00; two pigs $5.00; one bushel of potatoes $0.60; three hens $0.75; 10 bushels of corn $8.50; one ham $2.50; and firewood $5.00. Ellen Bramblett Clarke indicates that “Of the almost 300 patient accounts in this ledger, less than half had paid their bills when Dr. Bramlett died in 1907 and indeed, never paid them.” Eva was forced to sell the drug store and their house and land in Campobello. Subsequently, “After two years of trying to settle her husband’s business affairs, Eva found it necessary to move back to her family’s home in Chester County. In Baton Rouge Township again, in the fall of 1909, Eva returned to teaching and her parents took care of the children. She taught school for the next 20 years and in 1933, became postmistress of the post office at Leeds, S.C. Eva was widely known in Chester county for her work in church and community affairs and for her extensive knowledge of family history.” “Eva W. Bramlett,” 31, widowed, public school teacher, mother of two living children, and two children–John W. (Wesley), 5, and Sarah W., 3–are listed with Eva’s parents, John W. Wilkes, 69, farmer, general farm, owner of a mortgaged farm, married 33 years, and Eliza W., 57, mother of five living children, in the 1910 U.S. Census for Baton Rouge Twp., Chester Co., S.C. (NARA Film T624:1455:2B). Other Wilkes family members listed: Robert W., 26, farm manager, home farm; Nellie H., 27, teacher, public school; and Benjamin F., 14. All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Eva W. Bramlett,” 41, high school teacher, and children, John Wesley, 15, farmer, general farm, and Sarah (Cynthia), 13, are listed with her father, John Wesley Wilks, 78, farmer, and three siblings (Nellie H., 36, high school teacher; Robert W., 35, farmer; and B. Frank, 23, farmer) in the 1920 U.S. Census for Baton Rouge Twp., Calhoun Co., S.C. (NARA Film T625:1689:206B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
Mary Anna Bramlett, fourth child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born April 4, 1866, in Greenville County. She died at age 90 on July 29, 1956, at home in Campobello and was buried two days later in Campobello United Methodist Church Cemetery. Anna’s obituary in the Monday, July 30, 1956, edition of the Spartanburg Herald indicates she was born and reared in Greenville County:
Campobello — Mrs. Anna Bramlett Neves, 90, died Sunday at 7:15 a.m. at her home here, after three days’ serious illness. She was the widow of Benjamin F. Neves. She was born and reared in Greenville County, daughter of the late J. W. and Sarah Wilson Bramlett. She was a member of the Campobello Methodist Church. Surviving are: two daughters, Mrs. Flora Collins Hill and Mrs R. P. [Mamie] Barnett of Campobello; five grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Monday at 4 p.m. at Campobello Methodist Church. The Revs. T. L. Chapman, J. G. Stroud and Leon Gambrell will officiate. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Pallbearers will be Gordon and Ernest Neves, J. W. Barnett, Sam McMakin, Hubert Lindsey and Leon Few. The body will be at the home after 10 a.m. Monday and will be taken to the church at 3 p.m. Petty Funeral Home of Landrum is in charge of arrangements.
Anna married Benjamin Franklin Neves, one of twelve children born to Nancy Jane Chastain and George Washington Neves. Benjamin was born April 27, 1870, in Greenville County where he grew up. He died Jan. 23, 1942, at home in Campobello, S.C., and was buried two days later in Campobello United Methodist Church Cemetery. His obituary in the Jan. 24, 1942, edition of the Spartanburg Herald indicates he was born in upper Greenville County:
Campobello — Benjamin Franklin Neves, 71, died this afternoon at 6:15 o’clock at his home after one year of declining health and a serious illness of 12 weeks. He was a native of upper Greenville county, the son of the late Washington and Nancy Chastain Neves. He was a member of Campobello Methodist Church and the Campobello W. O. W. Camp. He had lived here for over 25 years. Surviving are his widow, the former Miss Ana Bramlett; two daughters, Mrs. Flora Collins and Mrs. R. P. [Mamie] Barnett; three brothers, Albert, Thornton and C. R. Neves; four sisters, Mrs. Rosa Taylor, Mrs. Lydia Lindsey, Mrs. Tessie Few, and Mrs. Fannie Bishop and five grandchildren. Funeral services will be conducted Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock from Campobello Methodist church. Further announcements will be made from Petty Funeral home.
Ben sawed the timber and built a house on farmland in Spartanburg County in 1896. He was a farmer who grew cotton, cane and peaches. For years he budded peach trees and sold them at the farm. His grandson, Maurice Collins, remembers Ben as a jack-of-all-trades: a carpenter, handyman and farmer. He and Anna lived on their farm until they moved to Campobello in 1928. Ben served as mayor of Campobello in 1930-34. Ben and Anna were members of Campobello Methodist Church. Their children are Mamie and Flora Neves. At the time of her death, Anna had five Grandchildren and eight Great-Grandchildren.
Tallulah “Lula” Bramlett, fifth child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born Dec. 10, 1864, in Greenville County. She died June 14, 1927, at home in Greenville, S.C., and was buried the next day in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery, Tigerville, S.C. Lula’s obituary in the Wednesday, June 15, 1927, edition of the Greenville News indicates she was a life-long resident of Greenville County:
Mrs. Lula Bramlett McMakin, 62, died at her home, 25 Seyles Street, Duncan Mill, yesterday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock. She had been ill for several weeks, although her death comes as a shock to her many friends here. Mrs. McMakin was a life-long resident of this county, having come to Greenville a short time ago. She was a faithful member of Concord Methodist Church at Greer. She is survived by her husband, J. J. McMakin; one daughter, Mrs. J. R. [Bess] Freeman of Charlotte, N.C.; and four sons, W. F., J. E. and J. C. [William F., John E., James C.] McMakin, all of Greenville; and S. A. [Samuel A.] McMakin of Greer. Three sisters also survive, as follows, Mrs. B. F. [Mary Anna] Neeves of Campobello; Mrs. W. S. [Corrie Wilson] Barnett, of Taylors; and Mrs. J. T. [Eliza C.] Hutchins, of this city. Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 4 o’clock from Mountain View Church. Rev. H. B. Koone officiating, assisted by Rev. J. B. Connelley. Interment will be made in the church cemetery. The following will serve as pallbearers: W. F. Freeman, J. M. Wilson, E. W. Barnett, C. H. Holland, T. C. Barnett, and Mr. Heath.
Lula married John James McMakin, the son of Elizabeth Zimmerman and Peter C. McMakin. John was born Dec. 11, 1852, in Greenville County. His obituary in the Monday, Nov. 6, 1933, edition of the Greenville News indicates he died Nov. 5, 1933, in Charlotte, N.C.:
John James McMakin, 80, died at 11 o’clock this morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. R. [Bess] Freeman, in Charlotte after an illness of two weeks. He was a former resident of Greer but had been living in Charlotte for three years. He was a son of the late P. C. and Elizabeth Zimmerman McMakin. Mr. McMakin is survived by one daughter, Mrs. [Bess] Freeman, of Charlotte; and four sons, William, John and James McMakin, all of Greenville, and Samuel McMakin, of Greer; two brothers, Samuel McMakin and Arthur McMakin, of Fairforest. Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 4 o’clock at the Mountain View Methodist church near Tigerville, conducted by the Rev. A. H. Bauknight and the Rev. James Bruce. Interment will follow in the church cemetery. The body was brought to Greer today and until the hour for the funeral will remain at the Wood mortuary.
John and Lula lived in Greer where they attended Concord Methodist Church, before moving to Greenville. “Lula McMakin,” 32, born in December 1867, mother of four living children, married nine years, and husband, John J., 46, born in December 1853, laborer, cotton mill, rents home, head of the family, are listed in the 1900 U.S. Census for O’Neal Township, Greenville Co., S.C., with four children: Hugh L., 7, July 1892; Bessie, 4, September 1895; Willie, 5, February 1899; and Samuel A., 10/12, born in July 1899 (NARA Film T623:1529:102A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. “Tallulah T. McMakin,” 40, mother of six children, five living, first marriage, married 20 years, and husband, John J., 56, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1910 U.S. Census for Chick Springs Township, Greenville Co., S.C., with five children: Bessie, 14, farm laborer, home farm; William F., 13, farm laborer, home farm; Samuel A., 10; John C., 6; and James E., 1 9/12 (NARA Film T624:1461:100A). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there. After Lula died John lived with a daughter in Charlotte, N.C. John and Lula’s children are Bess, William F., John E., James C., Samuel A. and Hugh L. McMakin.
The late Louise (Hutchings) Galway provided some of the following information about Eliza C. (Bramlett) Hutchings and family.
Eliza C. “Lydie” Bramlett, sixth child of John Wesley Ervin and Sarah (Wilson) Bramlett, was born March 19, 1871, in Greenville County. She died there Oct. 18, 1950, and was buried two days later in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery. Her grave marker identifies her as the wife of “John T. Hutchins.” Eliza’s obituary appears in the Greenville News dated Oct. 19, 1950:
Mrs. Eliza (Lydie) Bramlett Hutchings, wife of the late John T. Hutchings, died Wednesday morning at 5:10 o’clock, at te home of her daughter, Mrs. Alex W. [Louise] Galway of 16 East Mountain View Avenue, following an illness of one day. Mrs. Hutchings was a native of Greenville County, where she had spent her entire life. She was born March 19, 1871, a daughter of the late Captain J. W. [John Wesley Ervin] Bramlett and Sara (Wilson) Bramlett. Mrs. Hutchings was a member of St. Mark’s Methodist Church. Mr. Hutchings died December 17, 1948. In addition to Mrs. Galway, Mrs. Hutchings is survived by another daughter, Mrs. M. D. [Grace] Chastain of Easley, two sons, J. M. Hutchings of Cincinnati, O., and Paul T. Hutchings of Charleston; one sister, Mrs. B. F. Neves of Campobello, seven grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Services will be conducted at 11 o’clock Friday morning at the Mackey Mortuary. The body will remain at the mortuary. The family will be at the home of Mrs. Alex W. Galway, 16 East Mountain View Avenue.
Eliza married John Thomas Hutchings on Jan. 19, 1892. He was born Sept. 9, 1871, in Greenville County, the son of Nan Snow and J. Dexter Hutchings of Batesville. John died Dec. 17, 1948, and was buried the next day in Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery. His obituary was published in the Greenville News on Friday, Dec. 18, 1948:
Funeral services for John T. Hutchings, retired mechanic, occurred at a local hospital yesterday morning at 2:20 o’clock following one week of illness, will be held at St. Marks Methodist Church Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Services will be conducted by the Rev. R. W. Sammeth and Dr. R. W. Turnipseed and interment will be in the family plot in the Mountain View Methodist Church Cemetery. The following will serve as pallbearers and meet at the church at 1:30 o’clock: Tom Morgan, James Shedd, G. C. Cloninger, S. J. Bailey, M. A. Duncan and C. A. Tucker. The members of the building committee and the board of stewards of the church, with W. H. Ferguson, J. T. Hays, E. L. Johns, I. H. Ambrose, Paul Knight, Toy Duncan, J. L. Freeman, W. F. West, Dr. Fred Robertson and H. M. Rogers, will compose the escort of honor and also meet at the church at 1:30. Mr. Hutchings was the son of the late J. Dexter Hutchings and Mrs. Nan (Snow) Hutchings, residents of the Batesville community of Greenville county and was 77 years. For some years before moving to this city 30 years ago, he had lived in Pickens. Mr. Hutchings was a member of St. Marks Methodist church and had held offices as steward, superintendent of the Sunday School and trustee, and was serving as a member of the building committee of the church at the time of his death. His wife, Mrs. Eliza Bramlett Hutchings, survives at the home being at 129 Bailey Street, Sans Souci, with two sons, J. Marvin Hutchings of Cincinnati and Paul T. Hutchings of Charleston and two daughters, Mrs. A. W. [Louise] Galway of this city and Mrs. M. D. [Grace] Chastain of Easley. One brother, S. B. Hutchings of Greer, and three sisters, Miss Florence Hutchings, Mrs. Edgar Wright and Mrs. R. D. Dobson, all of Greer, also survive. In addition, he is survived by seven grandchildren and by five great-grandchildren. The body will remain at the Mackey Mortuary until 1 o’clock Saturday afternoon, when it will be placed in the church to lie in state until the hour of the service.
John Hutchings’s grandfather, Rev. John Thomas Hutchings who preached in upper Greenville County and died in Georgia in 1869, was a local Methodist minister and the original proprietor of the Batesville cotton factory.) John Hutchings was a mechanic and machinist at Monagan Mill in Greenville. His father operated a store on the road to Ceaser’s Head in the mountains of Northern Greenville County. Eliza expressed her grief for John in a letter written to her sister-in-law Eva Bramlett nine months after his death: “It seems to me I can’t ever live without John. He was such a good man and was so good to me; we were so happy together. This winter will be so lonesome for me.” She died the following year. John and Eliza lived in Greenville in 1927. Their children are Triplets Infant Son (died at birth), Grace and Louis Hutchings; John Marvin; and Paul Thomas Hutchings. Eliza and John had seven Grandchildren and seven Great-grandchildren at the time of Eliza’s death.
Descendant Herbert Rogers and wife, Sonia, of Greenville, S.C., contribute some of the following information about Malinda Caroline (Bramlett) Rogers and family.

Willis R. Rogers served in the Confederacy during the War Between the States
Malinda Caroline Bramlett, thirteenth child of Rev. William and Nancy S. (Dacus) Bramlett, was born circa 1832 in Greenville Co., S.C. She died after 1880 and was buried in Salem Methodist Church Cemetery, White Horse Road, Greenville, S.C. Malinda Caroline is enumerated in Greenville County with her parents in the 1840 U.S. Census. “Caroline Bramlett,” 18, born in South Carolina, is listed there with her parents in the 1850 U.S. Census. She married Willis R. Rogers/Rodgers in 1854. Willis was born July 25, 1827, in Spartanburg, S.C., the son of Elizabeth Bailey and Darling Rogers. Willis died July 17, 1898, and was buried in Salem Methodist Church Cemetery. His grave is marked with a Confederate Iron Cross. Willis, a Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States, enlisted as a private in Company H, “Hatch’s Regiment of Coast Rangers,” 23rd Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, on Nov. 10, 1861, at James Island, S.C. He was captured July 10 or 16, 1863, at Jackson, Miss., during the Battle of Vicksburg and was held as a prisoner of war at Camp Morton, Ind., and Point Lookout, Md. He was transferred for exchange March 15, 1865. Before the war Willis and Caroline lived in the Reidville community of Spartanburg County near his family. “Caroline Rodgers,” 27, born in South Carolina, and husband, Willis, 33, tenant farmer and head of the family, $400 personal estate, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Cashville P.O./Twp., Southern Div., Spartanburg Co., S.C., with three children: Cornelia, 4; Catharine, 3; and Mary, 1 (NARA Film M653:1226:388A). All were born in South Carolina. The family moved across the county line into Greenville County by 1870 and settled in Gantt Township where they farmed. “Caroline Rodgers,” 38, keeping house, and husband, Willis, 42, laborer, head of the family, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Greenville Court House Township, Greenville Co., S.C., with five children: Cornelia, 14; Catharine, 12; Adaline, 8; Ella, 5; Franklin, 3; Bramlett, 1 (NARA Film M593:1498:592B). All were born in South Carolina. “Melinda Rodgers,” 40, keeping house, and husband, Willis, 53, farmer, head of the family, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Gantt Township, Greenville Co., S.C., with five children: Ella, 15; Frank, 11; Bramlet, 9; Eliza, 6; Eber, 3 (NARA Film T9:1230:105B). All were born in South Carolina. Willis and Malinda Caroline’s children are Cornelia, Catherine (“Kate”), Mary, Adeline, Ella, Franklin, Bramlett, Eliza and Eber Columbus Rogers.
Cornelia Rogers, first child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1856 in Greenville or Spartanburg Co., S.C. She married a man named Ross circa 1880.
Catherine “Kate” Rogers, second child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1857 in Greenville or Spartanburg Co., S.C. Her grave marker in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery in Gantt, Greenville Co., S.C., indicates she died in 1935. She married Pinkney D. Pollard. He was born circa 1848-50. He died in 1889 and was buried in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery. “Kate Pollard,” 25, keeping house, and husband, Pink, 30, laborer, are listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Gantt Township, Greenville Co., S.C., with three children: William, 6; John, 3; and Mary, 1 (NARA Film T9:1230:107B). All were born in South Carolina to parents born there.
Adaline Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1872 in Greenville Co., S.C. She married a Rhodes.
Mary Rogers, child of Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1859 in Greenville Co., S.C.
Ella Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1865 in Greenville Co., S.C. She married a Westmoreland.
Franklin Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1867-1869 in Greenville Co., S.C.
Bramlett Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born April 29, 1870, in Greenville Co., S .C. He died March 20, 1927, and was buried in Rehobeth Baptist Church Cemetery, Old Pelzer Road, near Piedmont, Anderson Co., S.C. Bramlett first married a woman named Wilson. She died and was buried in Rehobeth Baptist Church Cemetery. Their children are Annie, Jack and Samuel “Pete” Rogers. Bramlett second married Pearl Whitt. She died and was buried in Rehobeth Baptist Church Cemetery. Their child is Walter Herbert Rogers. Bramlett third married Hassie Jordan. She died and was buried in Rehobeth Baptist Church Cemetery. They did not have children, but Hassie raised Bramlett’s children from his other marriages.
Eliza Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born circa 1874 in Greenville Co., S.C. She married William Wilson.
Eber Columbus Rogers, child of Malinda Caroline Bramlett and Willis R. Rogers, was born April 20, 1877, in Greenville Co., S.C.
Margaret Bramlett, second child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Nov. 27, 1787, in Laurens Co., S.C. Margaret’s birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She married a Dacus, and her family settled in Mississippi.
Nathaniel “Nathan” Bramlett, third child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born May 30, 1789, in Laurens Co., S.C. His birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by his brother Reuben. He and his family settled in Hall Co., Ga. He was a founder of a Methodist Church there.
Nancy Bramlett, fourth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Sept. 20, 1790, in Laurens Co., S.C. She married Lemuel Dacus on Dec. 15, 1814, and she and her family moved to Mississippi. Her son Thomas W. Dacus was born Jan. 14, 1836.
Rev. Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett rest in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery

Rev. Reuben Bramlett, fifh child of John and Mary (Peak) Bramlett, was born Oct. 30, 1791, according to his Bramlett Bible, in Laurens Co., S.C. He died Nov. 30, 1884, in Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried there near his parents in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville. His grave marker is inscribed with his birth and death dates. His obituary was published in the Southern Christian Advocate on March 25, 1885:

Bramlett.—Died, Nov. 30, 1884, Father Reuben Bramlett, at the residence of his son, Robert, who had removed his father to his house some weeks before his death. Not that Father Bramlett had not a comfortable and abundant home of his own, where he resided with a most affectionate daughter, but that affection prompted to do all that might be done—by varying the scene around him—to prolong his life. He was 93 years old, Oct. 30, one month before his death. He enjoyed the greatest Christian serenity I have have ever known one to possess. For years before his death, meet him where you would, in reply to the usual salutation, “How do you do?” he would answer “Feeble in body, but as happy as a man can be.” He united with the church after he attained to manhood and was married. He was ever much devoted to Sabbath-schools, and gave, as a teacher, constant attention until 1880, when he became so deaf he could no longer teach a class. He then sat as a scholar in a class until within a few weeks of his death. His wife preceded him to the grave about 11 years ago, full of faith and hope. His residence was near Bethel Church, Greenville Ct. He was a son of sainted Father John Bramlett, of precious memory to Bethel Church. A very large concourse attended the burial at Bethel. (Vol. 48, No. 12, p. 7, col. 2)
Reuben’s tombstone indicates “He joined M. E. Church in his youth.” He was a Methodist preacher and the first mail carrier in the county. Sunday School records at Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church indicate Reuben and some of his family were still members in 1882. He married Sarah D. Dacus on Dec. 15, 1814. Sarah was born Nov. 15, 1796, in Virginia, the sister of Nathaniel G. Dacus and daughter of Elizabeth Glenn Thackston and Nathaniel Dacus, born 1759 and died 1935. Sarah died July 8, 1873, according to the Bible record. Her grave marker in Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery lists her birth and death dates and indicates “She joined M. E. Church 1821.” She died in Greenville County. Sarah’s obituary was published in the Southern Christian Advocate in 1873:
…Died, on the 8th of June, 1873, Mrs. Sarah D. Bramlett, wife of Rev. Reuben Bramlett, in the 77th year of her age. The deceased was a native of Virginia, and came with her parents to South Carolina in her childhood, and settled and married in Greenville County; where she has lived for over 70 years, and raised a large family—having at her death some 68 grandchildren, 11 children—9 sons and 2 daughters—and the majority of them have large families living in this county. At one time during the late war, 20 of her sons and grandsons were in the army, fighting for the principles they believed to be right. The Indians had scarcely left their hunting grounds in our county, and the echo of their war songs had barely ceased, when she adopted it as her home. The people of her generation have nearly all passed away. Her husband, Rev. Reuben Bramlett, still survives her, at the advanced age of 83 years, having lived together for over a half century in the enjoyment of a domestic felicity and contentment that few of the present or past generation have ever experienced. Mrs. Bramlett was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for over 50 years, and her influence was like that of a true mother’s love—like the silent dews of heaven, it was ever cheering and refreshing around the family circle, and will transmit its religious power to her latest posterity; for one of the grand aims of her life was to teach her household in the faith that “There is a land of pure delight, / Where saints immortal reign; / Infinite day excludes the night, / And pleasures banish pain.” For months before her death, she daily and hourly expected the dread summons, and although suffering the most excruciating agony from Cancer, she was resigned to her fate, and could say, with the patriarch Job, “All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come.” And thus has she left to her numerous friends and relatives a consolation that is sweeter than life and stronger than death; for above the bloom of the grave will arise the light of a pure and honest life.
Six of Sarah and Reuben’s sons who served as Confederate soldiers during the Civil War/War Between the States–Josiah, William D., Nathaniel D., James W., Elias Andrew, Robert Hugh/Hulett–are referenced by their sister Margaret J. Bramlett Hyde, in a 1909 letter to her nephew Decatur L. Bramlett, Greenville Co., S C.:
Mauldin SC Sept 28 / 09 Dear Nephew, Your note received and also the record. I will try to answer your questions. Yes, I guess you know pretty much where they all lived and when they died. Josiah died at his old home place Feb 19, 1884. William also died at his old home May the 29, 1875. Nat died in Indiana. I don’t know the date of his death. James was wounded at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee and lived ten days afterward and died in the hospital sometime about the first of December in 1864. Andy died at his home near Gadsden, Ala. Feb 27, 1901. They all went to the war. Joe didn’t stay but two or three months down on the coast about Port Royal. William was in service about two years. Andy went through the war and never carried a gun, drove a comissary wagon and had a good time. Bob went at the beginning of the war and stayed till the ending and never was wounded. he belonged to the Butler Guards. I went down the grave yard last Sunday and drove up an iron pin at the foot of Grandfathers grave, yes his feet is right at the old stump. This leaves us all very well at present. Hope you are all well. Write and come to see us when you can. Loving your aunt, Margaret Hyde
“Reubin Bramblett,” 58, born in South Carolina, farmer, $800 real estate, and wife, Sarah, 54, born in Virginia, are listed in the 1850 U.S. Census for Greenville Co., S.C., with five grown children born in South Carolina: Margaret, 19; James, 17, laborer; Andrew, 15; Elizabeth, 13; and Robert, 12 (NARA Film M432:853:458A-B). “Reuben Bramblett” is listed in the 1850 Agricultural Census for Greenville Co., S.C., dated November 25 with 50 improved acres and 150 unimproved acres worth $800 and $300 worth of livestock (SCDAH Film 2:1:779-780). Reuben was the first stage coach driver and mail carrier on the “Old Stage Road” route from Greenville to Laurens. He is listed as a mail carrier in the 1860 census. Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-1865, indicate Reuben Bramblett of Greenville Court House, S.C., was a “Bidder” to carry the Confederate Mail during the war (NARA Film Roll M346 Document 217). “Reuben Bramblet,” 69, born in South Carolina, mail carrier, $1,000 real estate, $322 personal estate, and wife, Sarah P., 63, born in Virginia, house keeper, are listed in the 1860 U.S. Census for Buena Vista P.O., Rocky Creek Div., Greenville Co., S.C., with one grown child: daughter Mary A. (Elizabeth), 23, born in South Carolina, weaver (NARA Film M653:1220:485B). “Reubin Bramlett,” 78, farmer, $500 real estate and $163 personal estate, and wife, Sarah, 73, keeping house, are listed in the 1870 U.S. Census for Austin Township, Greenville Co., S.C., with one daughter: Elizabeth, 33, born in South Carolina (NARA Film M593:1498:459B-460A). “R. Bramlett,” 89, born in South Carolina to parents both born in Virginia, is listed in the 1880 U.S. Census for Austin Township, Greenville Co., S.C., as had of a family that includes his daughter Elizabeth, 40, born in South Carolina, single.
Reuben and Sarah’s children are Thomas W., Josiah (“Joe”), William D., Nathaniel D., John, Allen Turner, Margaret J., James W., Elias Andrew, Mary A. Elizabeth and Robert Hugh/Hulett Bramlett.
Thomas W. Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina
Josiah “Joe” Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States. Josiah “Joe” Bramlett married Lucinda Garrett and Lucy Bray. Children of Josiah and Lucy Bray Bramlett include Mary Jane “Molly” and John Thomas Bramlett.

Mary Ann “Molly” Bramlett and Elisha Simpson Smith, and Elisha in Confederate uniform, courtesy Nancy Evelyn Smith Jones

Mary Ann “Molly” Bramlett, child of Lucy Bray and Josiah Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S.C. She died Aug. 17, 1927. She married Elisha Simpson “E. S.” Smith. He was born Oct. 23, 1840. He died Feb. 28, 1917. He served as a Confederate soldier in the Butler Guards during the Civil War/War Between the States.
John Thomas Bramlett, child of Lucy Bray and Josiah Bramlett, was born Feb. 3, 1843, in Greenville Co., S.C. He died in December 1925 in Greenville Co., S.C., and was buried in Springwood Cemetery. He married Nancy J. “Nannie” Howell.
Judge John Thomas Bramlett
A name which has long been eminently associated with the legal profession in Greenville is that of Judge Jno. T. Bramlett. This gentleman was born in the county on February 3rd, 1843. His parents were Josiah and Lucy Bray Bramlett. The Judge received his early education in the old field schools of the county, and when he was eighteen years of age, he entered the Confederate army. He served with the forces until September 1862, when he was wounded and released. Upon his return home after this he first worked at odd jobs and paid his way through twelve months more of school. After that he went into the farming profession, which he has made his chief interest through life. He was elected to the legislature in 1884, and re-elected in 1894 and 1896. He was elected Probate Judge in 1902 and is now serving his third term in that capacity. Judge Bramlett is a member of the Methodist Church, and is one of the most highly respected men both in his profession and in his church. In 1866 he married Miss Nannie J. Howell. –Special Business Section, The Greenville News, 1911.
Representative J. T. Bramlett of the South Carolina General Assembly was present at a reception at the South Carolina Confederate Home in Columbia, S.C., in 1922: “About three hundred guests enjoyed a beautiful reception at the South Carolina Confederate Home given by the three Chapters of Columbia and the ‘Girls of the 60’s’ in compliment to the members of the General Assembly. The affair was an expression of appreciation to the legislators for the appropriation made last year for improving the Home and as an opportunity of allowing them to see the result of their expenditures. The whole institution was thrown open to the visitors, who inspected all the departments, including the model infirmary. Confederate flags and pine tops, jars of red poinsettias, and white narcissi were decorations used to give Southern colors. In the dining room there was a frieze of flags entirely around the wall, in addition to red and white flowers. The veterans of the Home, some of them wearing their gray uniforms, were cordial and gracious hosts of the occasion. In the receiving line were Gov. R. A. Cooper, with Mrs. Cooper…and three Confederate veterans, who are members of the General Assembly–Senator Jeremiah Smith, and Representatives J. T. Bramlett and J. G. Greer.” –Confederate Veteran, April 1922, 154.

William D. Bramlett

William D. Bramlett, child of Sarah D. Dacus and Reuben Bramlett, was born in Greenville Co., S.C. He died and was buried in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
Nathaniel D. “Nat” Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
John Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
Allen Turner Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
Margaret J. Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
James W. Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
Elias Andrew “Andy” Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina. He served as Confederate soldier during the Civil War/War Between the States.
Mary A. Elizabeth Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
Robert Hugh/Hulett “Bob” Bramlett, child of Reuben and Sarah D. Dacus Bramlett, was born in South Carolina.
Alcey Bramlett, sixth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Dec. 5, 1792, in Laurens Co., S.C. Alcey’s birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She married and her family settled in Mississippi.
John Wesley Bramlett, seventh child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born June 4, 1795, in Laurens Co., S.C. John’s birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by his brother Reuben. He settled in Gilmer Co., Ga.
Mildred “Milley” Bramlett, eighth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Jan. 14, 1797, at Bethel Camp Ground, Greenville Co., S.C., according to grandson Julien Potter Wooten. Milley’s birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. Milley married Ira Lucius Potter. He was a Methodist minister.

Julien Potter Wooten, a resident of Washington, D. C., where he worked as a government employee, made a trip to Greenville County to visit his grandmother’s birthplace. His four-page unpublished history dated Greenville, S.C., Feb. 10, 1886, contains some valuable information. His reference to John’s brothers Henry III and Reuben (author’s direct ancestor) is priceless since Bible records have not been found for their parents and siblings. However, some material needs clarification due to mistaken memory, noted below in brackets:
I have been today in the midst of the Bramlettes, the relations of my grandmother Potter, whose maiden name was Mildred Bramlettte. I have been down to Bethel Campground about 10 miles south of Greenville, and have seen the places of her birth, childhood, and early womanhood, and have the following of my family history from my great uncle Elias Bramlette and my great-aunt Susan Bramlet, the latter of whom has never married. My great-grandfather, John Bramlet, and his wife, Mary Peake, were born and married in Farqua [Fauquier] County, Virginia, and moved to Bethel Campground, Greenville County, S.C. in 178-. [John’s obituary indicates he and Mary moved to South Carolina after their marriage circa 1784-1785 in Fauquier Co., Va. They are in the 1790 census for Laurens Co., S.C., and moved into Greenville County circa 1797, before 1799.] His brothers, Henry and Reuben, moved from Virginia about the same time to Elbert County, Georgia, and Indiana [sic: Illinois] respectively. A grandson of Reuben was afterwards governor of that state. [Henry Bramlett III, 1755-1830, moved into Laurens Co., S.C., by 1775-1776; and Reuben, 1757-1844 (direct ancestor of author) was in South Carolina serving on the Indian Line as a soldier during the American Revolution in 1778 or 1779 and returned to Virginia. He and his wife, Elizabeth Brown, and first child, Benjamin, moved to Laurens Co., S.C., by 1787, when their second child, Henry “Harry” Bramlett was born there. Reuben and family moved to Christian Co., Ky., by 1801 and later settled in Gallatin (now Saline) Co., Ill., in 1818. Reuben did not live in adjacent Indiana, and no Bramlett served as governor of that state. However, Thomas Elliott Bramlette, son of Ambrose Shrewsbury Bramlette and grandson of Revolutionary War veteran James Bramlette Sr. and great-grandson of Rev. William Bramblett Jr., did serve as governor of Kentucky in 1863-1867. See his history below. (Rev. William Bramblett Jr. is believed to be brother of Henry Bramlett Sr. who is direct ancestor of John, Henry III, Reuben and others. Gov. Bramlette’s father Ambrose Shrewsbury Bramlette is a cousin of John, Henry III and Reuben.)] John Bramlet was born May 17, 1764, and died August, 1855, at his home in South Carolina. He was a patriarch of the Methodist Church, South, and much beloved and honored by the community as a sturdy farmer and gentleman of the olden times. He raised thirteen children: William, who was a Methodist preacher, lived and died in Greenville, S.C.; Margaret, who was married to Mr. Gamblen and moved to Hall County, Georgia; Nathan, also to Hall County, Ga.; Nancy, who married Mr. Dacus and moved to Octibika County, Miss.; Reuben, who lived and died in Greenville, S.C.; Alcy, who married Mr.. Hall and moved to Gwinnet County, Miss. [Ga.]; John W. moved to Gilmore [Gilmer] County, Ga.; Mildred, my grandmother; Rosa, who married a Mr. Franks and lived and died in Laurens County, S.C.; Mary, also in Laurens County, S.C.; Henry, who moved to Franklin County, Ga., and thence to Chickisaw County, Miss.; Susan, unmarried, still living here; and Elias also. I have spent a day with each of them: both of excellent memory and good health, each some eighty odd years of age. My grandmother, Mildred Bramlett, was born at Bethel Campground, South Carolina, in 1797; became a member of the Methodist Church when about 16 years of age, the most prominent characteristic of her youth and maidenhood was her all pervading piety. As Uncle Elias told me very proudly, she was the most beautiful shouter he ever heard….
End of page 1…
Julien served as a soldier during World War I, survived, and returned to his work in D. C. He apparently did not marry.

Rosanah “Rosey” “Rosa” Bramlett, ninth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born March 9, 1798, in Greenville Co., S.C. Rosey’s birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She married and lived in Laurens Co., S.C.
Mary Bramlett, tenth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Nov. 15, 1799, in Greenville Co., S.C. Mary’s birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She married and lived in Laurens Co., S.C.
Henry Bramlett, eleventh child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Aug. 3, 1801, in Greenville Co., S.C. Henry’s birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by his brother Reuben. Henry settled in Mississippi. He died June 7, 1879, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried at Old Free Will, now William Springs Church of God Cemetery. He married Martha “Patsy” Gober on Feb. 21, 1822. She was born June 1, 1801, in Franklin Co., Ga., the daughter of Elizabeth Burns and William Gober. She died Aug. 29, 1861, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried in Old Free Will/William Springs Church of God Cemetery. Their children include Elizabeth, John Wesley, Martha, Thomas Franklin, Mildred Bramlett.
Elizabeth Bramlett, child of Martha “Patsy” Gober and Henry Bramlett, was born July 22, 1823, in Georgia. She died Oct. 18, 1898, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried in William Springs Church of God Cemetery. She married Andrew Jackson Morgan. He was born in 1818. He died in 1889 in Choctaw County and was buried in William Springs Church of God Cemetery. Their children include Georgia Ann, Andrew Jackson “Jack” and Belle Morgan.
John Wesley Bramlett, child of Martha “Patsy” Gober and Henry Bramlett, was born March 5, 1826, in Franklin Co., Ga. He died Aug. 15, 1915, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried there in Old Antioch Cemetery. He married Malinda Isha. She was born Aug. 11, 1827. She died in/after 1853 in Mississippi. Their children include William H. and Mary Eliza Bramlett.
William H. Bramlett, child of John Wesley and Malinda Isha Bramlett, was born May 11, 1847, in Choctaw Co., Miss. He died Aug. 23, 1906, in Mississippi and was buried in William Springs Church of God Cemetery. He married Calpernia Fredonia Henderson. She was born Dec. 4, 1848, the daughter of George Milton Henderson. Calpernia died Feb. 6, 1939, at the Confederate Veterans Home near Biloxi, Harrison Co., Miss., where she lived with her second husband, Jeptha Spruill Eiland, whom she married circa 1909. He was born in 1843 and died in 1934. Calpernia and William’s children are Laura Bramlett Burton, 1870-1918, and James A. Bramlett, 1883-1962.

Mary Eliza Bramlett and William Harrison Jeffcoat tombstone in Dacus Cemetery,
courtesy Dacus-Bramlett descendant Patricia Dacus of Baldwin Co., Ala.
Mary Eliza Bramlett, child of John Wesley and Malinda Isha Bramlett, was born Jan. 30, 1853. She died June 9, 1939, in Choctaw Co., Miss., and was buried there at Dacus Cemetery. She married William Harrison Jeffcoat Sr. He was born June 30, 1843, in Alabama, the son of Nancy Clair Dendy and Henry John Jeffcoat. William died Dec. 20, 1911, and was buried at Dacus Cemetery. Their children include William Harrison Jr., Beulah, Mary Ella, Emma Donie, Mattie C. Jeffcoat.

Susannah “Susan” Bramlett, twelfth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born Jan. 11,1804, in Greenville Co., S.C. Susan’s birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by her brother Reuben. She did not marry. She died Dec. 21, 1892, and was buried in the same plot with her parents and shares the above inscribed tombstone with them in Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery, Simpsonville, Greenville Co., S.C.

Elias Bramlett, thirteenth child of Mary Peak and John Bramlett, was born June 4, 1807, in Greenville Co., S.C. His birthdate is inscribed in a Bramlett Bible probably originally owned by his brother Reuben. He died Dec. 4, 1888, in Greenville County and was buried in Bramlett Family Cemetery on Kitty Hawk Road in the Donaldson Air Force Base Center. He married Adaline Ashmore. She was born Nov. 14, 1816, the daughter of Martha E. Durant and Walter Ashmore. Adaline died Feb. 5, 1885, and was buried in Bramlett Cemetery. Elias and Adaline’s children are John Walter Olin and Olivia Bramlett.
John Walter Olin Bramlett was born Sept. 11, 1842, in Greenville Co., S.C. He died Dec. 15, 1875, and was buried in Bramlett Cemetery.

Graves of Olivia Bramlett and William P. Hutchings marked by large tombstone above and
below in closeup, Elias Bramlett Cemetery, Greenville Co., S.C., courtesy Robin Farley Dixson

Olivia Bramlett was born July 12, 1844, in Greenville Co., S.C. She died Sept. 10, 1910, and was buried in Bramlett Cemetery. She married William P. Hutchings. He was born Oct. 13, 1840. He died April 24, 1881, and was buried in Bramlett Cemetery. Their child, Infant Daughter Hutchings, born May 11, 1868, and died May 22, 1868, also is buried there and shares the marker with them.

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Nathan Bramlett and Elizabeth Gray

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants
Father Nathan Bramlett, child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett Jr., was born July 20, 1766, in Fauquier Co., Va. He died at age 74 on March 19, 1841, in Laurens Co., S.C., and was buried in the old section of Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery near Gray Court. He married Elizabeth Gray circa 1789 in South Carolina. Elizabeth was born in January 1765, the daughter of Ailsa Hiatt and John Gray Sr. Elizabeth and her sister Ailsey, who married Reuben Bramlett, son of Henry Bramlett III, are named as heirs in their father John’s estate records in Union Co., S.C. Their brother Jesse Gray administered the estate and other siblings were named as heirs as well. Elizabeth died July 17, 1844, and was buried beside Nathan in Bramlett Church Cemetery. Elizabeth and Nathan each have an inscribed tombstone. Nathan’s inscription indicates “at the early age of 16 he attached himself to the Church” (in 1781 or 1782, the approximate date of the founding of Bramlett Church, according to information sent to Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette by Nathan’s brother Father John Bramlett Greenville County.)

Nathan Bramlett’s tombstone in the old section of Bramlett Church Cemetery, courtesy Robin Farley Dixson. Since Nathan and Elizabeth did not have children, the stone and inscription was provided by Nathan’s heirs–his wife and the South Carolina Conference of the M. E. Church South.

Nathan Bramlett’s tombstone before cleaning at Bramlett, courtesy Deborah G. Dennis
SACRED to the memory of NATHAN BRAMLETT who was born on the 20th day of July, 1766, and died on the 19th day of March, 1841, leaving an affectionate wife and many relations and friends to bemourn their irreparable loss. At the early age of sixteen he attached himself to the Church and lived an humble follower of Jesus Christ. For fifty years he was a pious Class Leader of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a kind & affectionate husband, a sincere friend and a devoted Christian. He attained in society an enviable station, as a neighbour he was kind & obliging, as a Christian meek and humble, as a husband he was tender and affectionate through all the various changes in life. He maintained a high dignified and spotless character. He dedicated his whole estate to the support of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and finally died in the triumph of that Christian faith which he so eminently possessed.

Detail above from Elizabeth Gray Bramlett’s tombstone in the old section of Bramlett United Methodist Church Cemetery features a chrysalis and butterfly, symbolic of religious and spiritual development from youth to adulthood as a beautiful metamorphosis. Inscription: “It is sown a natural body. It is raised a spiritual body. Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Bramlett. Born January 1765 Died July 17th 1844. She Was a Member of the Methodist Church Fifty Five Years And After Adorning Her Character With a Christian Life She Died in the Faith. This Stone Is Erected By Order Of The So. Ca. Conference Of The M. E. Church South And let her own good works praise her in the gate.” Image by Deborah G. Dennis

Nathan and Elizabeth apparently did not have children who survived. No children are enumerated with them in any census data between 1790 and 1840 or named or mentioned in Nathan’s estate or will, in which he names two slaves who are not identified as heirs: James and Billy (Will Papers, 495; Estate Papers, Packets 89-91, 92-111). The two slaves and four others are named in the inventory and appraisal of Nathan’s estate, below.
Nathan’s March 11, 1839, will bequeathed his entire personal and real estate to his wife and at her death to the Methodist Episcopal Church South, prompting a lawsuit by some of his sister Marianne Bramlett Burdette’s surviving grown children after Nathan died in 1841 in Laurens County. The following persons were cited to appear in court March 9, 1842, to participate in the lawsuit: Elizabeth Bramlett (wife of Nathan) and the Burdett “Heirs at Law”: John Burdett, Molly Burdett, Elsey (Ailsey) Burdett, William Burdett and Elizabeth [Burdett] Hand (wife of) Robert Hand as well as witnesses David Higgins, James French and James B. Higgins, who represented the church. (The Burdetts are documented in Bible records as children of Marianne and Frederick.) The initial Burdett court filing, titled “In the Matter of N. Bramblett’s Will} Protest & Grounds,” was presented by the law firm Irby & Young:
…one of the Heirs at Law of Nathan Bramblett decd protests against the paper presented for probate bearing date the 11 March 1839 being established according to law as the will of the said Nathan Bramblett upon the following grounds: — 1st Because the said paper is not the last will and Testament of the said Nathan Bramblett — 2nd Because the said Nathan Bramblett became of old age and imbecility of mind was incompetent at the time of Executing said paper to make a will — 3rd Because the Execution of said paper was procured by improper and undue influence — 4th Because the said Will is void for uncertainty….
Since Marianne’s five grown children were identified by attorneys Irby & Young as Nathan’s legal “Heirs at Law,” they therefore were close biological relatives–nieces and nephews. The Burdett heirs may have helped their Uncle Nathan farm in his later years and apparently believed he would leave his estate to them. However, they lost their lawsuit, and the church inherited the entire estate when Elizabeth died in 1844. An Inventory of the Estate of Nathan Bramblett, deceased, which was appraised on June 16, 1842, was filed in Laurens County Court on June 21, 1842, by James B. Higgins, David Higgins and James French. The inventory and appraisal included Nathan’s shotgun 15.00, a waggon and kind gear 35.00, a gig and harness 20.00 and the following:
Land: 64 acres of land $1640.00 Slaves: 1 negro man James 125.00 – 1 Do William 200.00 – 1 Boy Harrison 500.00 – 1 Do William 300.00 – 1 Do Robert 275.00 – 1 negro woman Sarah 400.00 Livestock: 4 horses 195.00 – 31 hogs appraised at $46.50 cts – 8 head cattle 36.00 – 8 head of sheep 10.00 Farm Equipment: 1 set blacksmith’s tools 15.00 – 2 scythes & ? 3.00 – 4 augers, foot adz, handsaw, 3 drawing shives, pr steelyards, square fork, 2 chisels, 5 harrow teeth 3.00 – 6 axes 11 hoes 11.37 1/2 – 3 pr. gears 2.00 – 1 fan & 1 cutting knife 12.00 – 1/2 cross cut saw 1.50 – 2 shovels and log chains 2.50 – 4 hogs heads & barrel 2.50 Household Items: 3 spinning wheels 5.00 – 1 loom 1.00 – 1 walnut chest 10.00 – 1 Do bureau 15.00 – 1 candle stand 2.00 – 1 folding leaf table 8.00 – 9 chairs 4.00 – 1 cupboard & contents 25.50 – 4 beds & steads and furniture 50.00 – kitchen furniture 15.00 – 1 pr andirons, shovel & tongs 2.00 – 1 clock 15.00 – 1 lot books 5.00
The church’s “Petition & Order of Sale on the Estate of Nathan Bramblett, Deceased” was filed July 29, 1844, ten days after Elizabeth’s death (South Carolina Wills and Probate Records, p. 516). Hopefully some of his Burdette relatives were there to purchase the items and possibly the slaves: James Bramlett, William Bramlett, Harrison Bramlett, William Bramlettt, Robert Bramlett, Sarah Bramlett.
Nathan’s Devotion to the Methodist Church
Nathan, who gave his entire estate to the church, was devoted to his religion. Nathan and his brother John officially joined the Methodist Church in 1780-1782 in Virginia or South Carolina. Recorded deeds indicate Margaret and sons Reuben and John were in Virginia in 1780 when or shortly after Henry II/Jr. died and their eldest son, Henry III, inherited the family plantation. She may have been in South Carolina and returned to Virginia after her husband died to help deal with legalities involving her home and Henry II/Jr.’s estate. John’s obituary says he joined at age 16 (1780) and experienced a “powerful conversion” at age 18 (1782) at the home of their widowed mother (Margaret) in (Fauquier County) Virginia. Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt’s Diary states Nathan with brothers Henry III and John and their mother, Margaret, founded Bramlett Methodist Church in 1780 or 1781. That is when Henry Bramlett III and his sister Marianne Bramlett Burdette were living in South Carolina. Margaret and her younger children were in Virginia in 1780, but she may have been in South Carolina earlier in the same year visiting grown children when Bramlett Church was founded there. Nathan is considered by some today to be the founder of the church since he and George Sims on June 2, 1807, sold to the trustees for $5 two acres of land to secure the church meeting house already in existence on the property. The building was situated on property owned by Nathan or once owned by Margaret after she relocated from Virginia in 1790 and bought a small farm adjacent to Nathan’s property, which he had settled on in or before 1789. Methodist Episcopal Bishop Francis Asbury in his Journal referred to the church in 1801 as “widow Bramblet’s meeting-house” and in 1802 as “Bramblet’s Chapel.” Nathan’s original church land deed, recorded June 6, 1807, in Laurens County, documents the transfer of two acres on Zak’s Creek near Enoree River and the existing church building from trustees Nathan Bramlett and George Sims to Nathan’s brother-in-law and trustee Frederick Burditt/Burdette and other church trustees.
State of South Carolina Know all men by these presents, That we Nathan Bramlett and George Sims — both of the state aforesaid and District of Laurence, for an in consideration of the Sum of five Dollars, to us paid, by Frederick Burditt – Joel Fowler – Raughley Stone, Trustees, have granted, bargained, sold and Released, and by these presents do bargain, sell and Release, unto the sd Frederick Burditt, Joel Fowler, and Raughley Stone, Trustees, Two acres of Land Situate in the District of Laurence, and near the Enoree River and on a Creek called Zak’s Creek, beginning on a Turkey Oak, from thence to a White Oak, and from thence to a Spanish Oak, from thence to a White Oak, from thence to a Sassafas, the same being two Acres more or less, Together with all and Singular, the Rights, members, herediterments, and appurtenances to said premises, before mentioned, belonging or in any wise incident as appertaining, to have and to hold all and singular, the premises before mentioned, unto the Said Frederick Burditt, Joel Fowler, and Raughley Stone Trustees; and their successors in office for ever, for the purpose of Secureing a Meeting house, thereon Standing and to Remain for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
And we do hereby bind ourselves our heirs Executors and Administrators, to warrant and ever defend the title thereof – in fee simple, and the said Frederick Burditt Joel Fowler and Raughley Stone, Trustees, and their Successors in office for the use within mentioned, Witness our hands and Seals, this Second day of June, In the year of our Lord one thousand Eight hundred and Seven, and the thirty first and Second of the Independency of America – Signed and sealed …Nathan Bramlett {Seal} George Sims {Seal} And delivered in Presents of us [Witnesses] Benjn Tradewell and John Burditt.
Nathan’s brother-in-law and church trustee Frederick Burditt is the husband of Marianne Bramlett, and John Burditt is their son, the nephew of Nathan. The deed was recorded in Deed Book 26 on page 235 of Laurens County:
State of South Carolina} Laurens District} Personaly appeared John Burditt before me and made oath in due form of law and saith that he was personaly present and Saw the within named Nathan Bramlett and George Sims sign and as … and deliver the within conveyance to the within named Frederick Burditt Raughley Stone and Joel Fowler for the use within mentioned and that the Reverend Benjamin Tradewell signed his name as witness to the same with himself Sworn to before me this 16th day of June 1807 John Burditt Sterling Tucker South Carolina} Laurens District} Registers Office I do hereby certify that the within Deed is duly recorded in Book 26 Page 235 as the law directs Examined & Certified this 6th day of June 1807 -- John Garlington... A copy of the original June 2, 1807, deed, which was donated to the South Carolina Methodist Archives in 1912, includes a note at the bottom, which indicates the bishop visited Bramlett Church in 1799: “A Quarterly Conference was held at Bramlett’s by Bishop Asbury Nov. 9th and 10th, 1799 -- 113 years ago. Rev. Benj. Blanton was also present. This document by the consent of the trustees of Bramlett’s Church is tendered the Historical Society of the S.C. Conference. Nov. 26th 1912: J. M. Fridy” Note: Not much other information yet on George Sims, trustee who co-signed the deed with Nathan Bramlett to sell land to the church. The 1962 Church Journal identifies him as a “friend” of Nathan. George Sims witnessed a deed on Nov. 12, 1811, when “Henry Burdett” bought 100 acres of land for $300 from Joel and Sarah Fowler. The deed, recorded Dec. 22, 1820, indicates the land, originally granted to John Fowler, was located on Durbin Creek next to property owned by Henry Burdett’s brother-in-law Hezekiah Gray and bounded by other property owned by Mary Fowler, Daniel Bragg and Joseph Downey. Mary Patterson also witnessed the document (DB-K:309) Raughley Stone, trustee of Bramlett Church, and his Stone relatives who probably were early members of Bramlett Methodist Church came from Prince William/Fauquier Co., Va., circa 1773 to settle on land situated on the north side of Beaverdam Creek of Enoree River in present day Laurens County. Their relationship to the Bramlett family is unknown. The Laurens County Stone family was headed by Mildredge “Mildred” “Millie” Corder (1730--1822) and John Stone (1727--1800). (Researchers believe John is the son of Nancy Bronaugh and Thomas Stone of Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va.) Johnand Millie purchased 200 acres adjacent to William Bramblett’s 1773 land grant from William and Barbara Vaughn in 1775. As a Revolutionary War veteran, John Stone later also purchased 442 acres on a Branch of Beaver Dam Creek on Enoree River in Ninety-Six District on June 6, 1791 (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S213190, vol. 27, p. 157). John and Millie had several children named in his Jan. 26, 1797, will, proved March 17, 1800, in Laurens County: Nancy, William, Reuben, Raughley, Elias, Lewis Stone (Will Book A-a: 233).
Following are names of Bramlett and Burdett relatives listed as members in Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church Class Books, saved by Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette in his church and family papers, courtesy of Martha Anne Curry Duke. (Key: Member Number, State in Grace (Baptised or Joined), Name of Member, State in life [Married/Single/Deceased, etc.], Remarks.) Note: in some cases the numbers are missing or not sequential.
1842 Female Bramlett/Burdett Members
1 B Elizth Bramlett M deceased
Deceased July 19th, 1844
2 B Ailsy Burditt S
3 B Molly Rhodes M
4 B Elibth Hand M
5 B Frances Burditt M John M. Zimmerman
7 B Elisth Burditt M
10 B Perchis B. Gray M
11 B Frances Burditt S
12 B Ailscy Barnett M
17 Elisa A. Burditt S joined July 31st
23 B Milly Burditt S
24 B Nicey Ba[r]ker M
1842 Male Bramlett/Burdett Members
1 B John Burditt M
2 B Hezekiah Gray M
3 S Nathan B. Burditt S removed
6 B Reuben Burditt M joined Sep. 29
7 S Joseph T. Burditt S joined April 24th
8 S John F. Burditt S joined April 24th
9 S Reuben T. Burditt S joined April 24th
11 B John R. Ba[r]ker M
Nov. 21, 1844, Female Bramlett/Burdett Members
1 B Ailsey Burditt S
2 B Molly Rhodes M
3 B Elizt. Hand M
4 B Frances Burditt M
5 B Elizt Burditt M
9 B Frances P. Burditt S
10 B Ailsey Barnett M
15 S Eliza A. Burditt S
19 B Milley Burditt S
20 B Nicey Barker M
Nov. 21, 1844, Male Bramlett/Burdett Members
1 B John Burditt, C. L. M
4 B Isekiah Gray M
5 B Reuben Burditt M
6 B Nathan Burditt M
7 S Joseph T. Burditt S
8 S John F. Burditt S
9 S Reuben T. Burditt S
11 B John R. Ba[r]ker M
Nov. 4, 1845, Female Bramlett/Burdett Members
2 B Ailsey Burdett S
3 B Molly Rhodes M
4 B Elizabeth Hand M
5 B Frances Burdett M
6 B Elizabeth Burdett M
9 B Frances T. Burdett S
10 B Aisley Barnett M
13 S Eliza An Burdett S
15 B Milley Burdett S
Nov. 4, 1845, Male Bramlett/Burdett Members
1 John Burditt, L. C. M
3 B Isekiah Gray M
5 B Reuben Burdett M
6 B Nathan Burdett M
7 S Joseph T. Burdett S
8 S John F. Burdett S
9 S Reuben T. Burdett S
1847 Bramlett/Burdett Members
[1] Elizabeth Burdett Aug. 1847
[2] Elizabeth A. Wells Nov. 14, 1847
[3] Frederic H. Burdett Nov. 1847
May 13, 1848, Female Bramlett/Burdett Members
1 Frances Burdett M
3 Aisly Burdett S
4 Molly Rhodes M
5 Elizabeth Hann M
6 Frances T. Burdett S
7 Elizabeth Burdett M
11 Elizabeth Burditt S
12 Elisa Curry M
15 Elisa Ann Wills removed
19 Aelsy Barnett M
May 13, 1848, Male Bramlett/Burdett Members
1 John Burditt, C. L. M
2 Isekiah Gray, C. L. & Stewart M
5 Reuben Burdett M
6 Joseph T. Burdett S
7 John F. Burdett S
8 Reuben T. Burdett S
10 Frederick H. Burdett
1850 Female Bramlett/Burdett Members
1 B Frances Burdett M
3 B Molly Rhodes M
4 B Elizbth. Hands M
5 B Elizbth Burdett M
10 B Alcy Barnett M
12 B Alcy Burdett S
13 B Frances P. Burdett S
14 B Elizabeth Burdett
1850 Male Bramlett/Burdett Members
1 B John Burditt, C. L. M
2 B Isekiah Gray M dead
5 B Reuben Burdett M
6 B Joseph T. Burdett S
7 B John F. Burdett S
8 B Reuben T. Burditt S
10 B F. H. Burdett S

Other Gray church members: Patty Gray, married, 1842; Jesse Gray, single, removed 1842, attended 1844, removed again 1844; Caroline Gray, single, 1842-50; Margaret Gray, married, 1842-44; Martha Gray, married, 1844-47, died Feb. 16, 1847; Ann C. Gray, married, 1848-76; Emily F. Gray, 1848-50; “Richardson Gray joined July 28th, 1847, and died the next day in the faith”; Hugh H. E. Gray, married, 1861-75, Asst. Class Teacher and Committee Member; Walter S. Gray “Joined August 8, 1864” and was a member 1866-75, withdrew 1877; Arena Gray, 1861-67; Susan Gray, 1861-76; Martha Gray, 1861; Mattie A. Gray, 1875-76; Sarah Gray, 1861; Nancy Gray, 1861-66, “Infirm Died July 14, 1866”; Mary F. Gray, 1864-66, “Removed and took no letter” 1866 and “Removed by letter” 1867; Madora Gray, 1864-76, paid quarterage 1864 and 1872.

Garrett – Bramlett Connections in South Carolina
From the Garrett Day Book and the Elrod Note Book
COURTESY LAWRENCE C. HOLCOMBE
Following is a transcript of four pagesfrom a Note Book kept by the late Agness Elrod, including introductory genealogical material about the Catletts and Garretts and Garrett Bible inscriptions.
The Garrett Day Book Bible inscriptions mention two Garretts who married Bramletts: William Garrett married Nancy Bramlett and Nicholas Ware Garrett married Sarah Bramlett. Both Garretts are sons of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett II, and both Bramletts are believed to be daughters of Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr.
Back Story — Edward Garrett II first copied information from his mother’s Garrett Bible into his own Garrett Bible. (Edward Garrett II, son of Edward Garrett I and Elizabeth Catlett, married Anne West Owsley, and they settled in Laurens County. Two of their children married Bramletts.) Before he died, Edward Garrett II inscribed the Bible information in a Day Book. Someone else, most likely his wife, Anne West Owsley Garrett, added names of spouses in different handwriting. The Garrett Day Book was passed down through several generations. (Current location is unknown.) Agness Elrod copied inscriptions from the Garrett Day Book onto numbered pages of her Note Book many years ago, most likely in the 1950s.
Lawrence C. Holcombe of Liberty, S.C., shared a copy of Agness Elrod’s notes and her transcription of Edward Garrett II and Anna West (Owsley) Garrett’s Day Book. The material was posted the Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center.
An exact transcript, verbatim, of what Agness Elrod wrote in her Note Book (four pages) is provided below (with a few brackets containing page numbers, bold face type to mark the Bramlett references, and one ellipsis to mark an undecipherable word written under “Edgefield”).
Garrett 13
The compiler has made no attempt to trace the Catlett line but by 1790 one of the Catletts (John Catlett) had settled in Cheraw Dist., S.C. In the early days of Anderson Co SC one of the well known merchants was Pinckney Catlett.
Elizabeth (Catlett) Garrett was probably the daughter of Thomas Catlett of Caroline Co., Va. We find him as a witness to a deed in 1730 of John Garretts grandfather Richard Buchner. Thomas Catlett died in Caroline Co Va in 1739. Two other early Catlett estates there were John Catlett d 1742 & another Thomas Catlett, d 1744.
Edward Garrett I then Sr., died in 1751 between Feb. 1, 1751, and Dec. 20, 1751, when his estate was filed. He left a large family, several sons were under age. By 1757 the son Edward was 24 yrs of age & o ld enough to administer on the estate. Young Edwards mother Elizabeth (Catlett) Garrett (the widow of Edward Garrett I) married 2nd in Fairfax Co Va before 1755 to Richard Nelson & became the sister-in-law of of Gov. Wm. Nelson of Va. The administration papers of the estate of Edward Garrett I (called then Sr.) show the inventory was taken by Thomas Triplett, John Adams & Edward House.
When the estate of Edward Garrett I was about settled in 1757 Edward II decided to make a home of his own so he courted and married on Feb. 6 1759 Anna West Owsley called Ann the daughter of Thomas Owsley & his wife Ann West, Ann being the daughter of John West of Virginia.
On April 14, 1766 in Loudon Co Va Edward & Ann Garrett sold their land on Goose Creek to Thomas Middleton Jr. The land originally granted to Edward’s father Edward on Dec. 27, 1742. (See deed bk E, page 7). The early part of 1766 Edward Garrett with his wife Anna & their five children and with two of Edwards brothers, Thomas & John left Virginia & migrated to 96 District, South Carolina the part that later became Laurens & Abbeville County & Edgefield cos [….] To preserve the history of the family in a new country, Edward transcribed from his mothers Bible in Virginia the dates
Garrett [14]
and names of his brothers and sisters. These he he copied in his own Bible, and before he died he copied this data in an old day book which has been handed down from generation to generation in the Edward Garrett family. In addition to the records Edward copied from his mothers Bible, he added the names and birth dates of each of his 16 children. In a different handwriting, supposedly by Edwards wife Anna called Ann, was added the names of those whom the 16 children married.
Bible Records
Edward Garrett, born 31 August 1733 [died 24 Aug 1794 Laurens]
Anna West Owsley born 3 June 1744 [died 1823]
Edward Garrett and Anna West Owsley married 2 June 1759
Sister — Margaret Garrett, born 4 June, 1735
Sister — Frances Garrett, born 30 July, 1737
Brother — Stephen Garrett, born 1 August, 1740
Brother — Thomas Garrett, born 11 November 1744
Brother — John Garrett, born 18 January 1747
Garrett 15
Our Children: (marriages added by Anna)
I Elizabeth Garrett, born 2 [20?] October 1760 married John Ashley [b 25 Jan 1759 NC – 13 Dec 1830 Laurens, Warrior Creek, Rev War vet SC Pack Horseman, Col. Roebucks’ Regt, enlisted 8 Sep 1782 discharged 25 Oct 1782 [d 10 Nov 1826 bur Warrior Creek]
II. John Garrett, born 7 January 1762 married Sallie Mauldin [died 1844]
III Capt. William Garrett, born 9 September 1763 married Nancy Bramlett
IV Nicholas Ware Garrett, born 11 March 1765 married Sarah Bramlett [died 1846]
V Jesse Garrett, born 2 February, 1766 married Elizabeth illegible Henderson) [died 29 Sep 1853] [grave says b 9 Sep 1766]
VI Frances Garrett, born 11 May 1768 married Pleasant Sullivan
VII Rhoda Garrett, born 24 November 1769 married George Hughes
VIII James Garrett, born 24 August 1771 married Nancy Wright (copy & erase some desc called her Dorcas)
[On back of page 15]
IX Dorcas Garrett, born 12 April, 1773 married Stephen Mullins [died 25 Jul 1842 Blount Co, AL]
X Stephen Garrett, born 16 April 1775 married 1st Sarah Smith, 2nd (Drucilla) Elizabeth Putnam [d 5 Jan 1845 Chattooga Co, GA]
XI Mary Garrett, born 12 April 1777 married 1st Austin Moore, 2nd Lodowick Doolin [died 14 Jun 1853 Christian Co, KY]
XII Martha Garrett, born 28 November 1778 married William Nelson Kelly [d 17 Dec 1827 Bedford Co, TN
XIII Ann Garrett, born 23 August 1780 married John Harris [d 25 Aug 1839 Perry Co, IL]
XIV Hosea Garrett, born 18 October 1782

[d 17 Dec 1827 Bedford Co, TN bur Keller Cem]

XV Irene Kiziah Garrett, born 8 March 1785 married Robertson Moore [d: 12 Oct 1866 Laurens Co, SC]
XVI Edward Garrett, Jr., born 13 September 1787 married Eleanor Higgins [dau of Wm Higgins] [died 3 Apr 1864 bur Warrior Creek Bapt Ch Cem]

End of Bible Records

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Sarah Bramlett and Nicholas Ware Garrett

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

Sarah Bramlett, most likely child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born April 1, 1769, in Fauquier Co., Va. She died Dec. 30, 1851, in Laurens Co., S.C., and was buried in Warrior Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. She married Nicholas Ware Garrett, son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett II/Jr. Sarah is listed as the wife of Nicholas in “The Garrett Day Book,” a record of Garrett Genealogy and Bible inscriptions of Edward and Ann and children. Researcher Agness Elrod transcribed the text into a notebook in the early 1950s. Nicholas was born March 11, 1765, in Virginia. He died Jan. 2, 1846, and was buried in Warrior Creek Cemetery. Nicholas purchased 252 acres of land on branches of Warrior Creek on Enoree River in Ninety-Six Dist., S.C., on Feb. 23, 1792 (South Carolina Dept. of Archives & History, S213190, vol. 28, p. 124). Neighbors included William Bramlet, James Higgins, John Vaughn.

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Nancy Bramlett and William Garrett

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants
Nancy Bramlett, most likely child of Margaret Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. She married Capt. William Garrett, son of Anne West Owsley and Edward Garrett II/Jr. He was born Sept. 9, 1763, in Virginia. Nancy is listed as the wife of William in “The Garrett Day Book,” a record of Garrett Genealogy and Bible inscriptions of Edward and Ann and children. Researcher Agness Elrod transcribed the text into a notebook in the early 1950s.

Chapter 4:
Generation 3
REV. WILLIAM BRAMBLETT JR. and ANNA BALLARD
(Children: James, William III, Mary, Reuben, Mildred, Lydia, Lucy, Matilda, Elkanah)

Rev. William Bramblett Jr. served as a Soldier during the French & Indian War from Bedford Co., Va., in 1758 and in 1779 served as a Soldier and Patriot during the American Revolution in Kentucky with Col. Daniel Boone

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants
Rev. William Bramblett Jr., child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and Unknown First Wife, was born circa 1719 in Colonial Virginia. William Jr. was a member of the Virginia Militia ordered into service in 1758 during the French and Indian War. Hening’s Statutes indicates he was paid 5 pounds, 19 shillings in September 1758 for his service (Hening 209). He was a planter who established Cedar Hill Plantation in 1760 in Bedford Co., Va., a surveyor and a registered Baptist Minister in Bedford County. His name appears Sept. 22, 1777, on a list of ministers of the gospel authorized by the court to perform marriages and preach. He was reportedly the first white minister to preach in Kentucky. He died before Aug. 23, 1779, in present day Knox Co., Ky., and was buried there near Flat Lick, Ky., in an unknown grave location marked with one or more large boulders. He was accidentally shot and killed or purposely killed by traveling companion Aquilla White during a real or perceived Indian attack while a hunting excursion from camp. The group had stopped to eat and rest near Cumberland Gap on the journey back to Virginia. Rev. William Jr. went on the trip with Daniel Boone and Company to defend and deliver supplies to forts and claim land. He had just established Bramblett’s Station in Fayette (now Bourbon) Co., Ky. The Land Court in Kentucky issued a certificate referring to Bramblett’s Station “on a branch of Stoner’s Fork, a branch of Licking.” The first term of the Land Court was held Oct. 13, 1779, shortly after Rev. William Jr.’s death. His Nenney descendants who lived near Cumberland Gap in Tennessee were convinced he was killed on purpose for his Kentucky land. An eyewitness described the incident as an accident.
William Jr. wrote his will Feb. 26, 1779, in Bedford Co., Va. (WB-1:351). It names his wife, Anna, and son James and mentions “my other children” as heirs. It was probated Aug. 23, 1779. An inventory/appraisement dated Oct. 25, 1779, includes “one negro fellow.” Friends and relatives William Callaway and William Buford were named and served as executors. Anna inherited the estate to use until she married again or died, and James inherited a young horse named Ranter. William’s estate was inventoried by Augustine Leftwich, D. Beard and George Dooley in Bedford County in October 1779:
Bramblett’s Inventory} In Obedience to an Order of Bedford Court to us directed have appraised the Estate of Wm. Bramblett Decd as follows Viz One Negro Fellow £1, 200.00, 1 Young Bay Horse £250, 1 Brown Mare £200, 1 Black do. £160, 1 Gray Horse £200, 1 Bay Mare Colt £100, 1 do. £80, 1 Bay Horse £150, 1 Large Do. £250, 17 Head of Sheep £130, 13 Head of Cattle £350, 3 head of do. £130, 1 Bell & Collar £3, 4 Bedsteads Beds & furniture £400, 1 Rifle Gun £80, 1 old Smothe do £10, 3 Chests £30, 2 Tables £6, 1 Great Wheel & 3 Small Do £32.10, 1 Box of Shew Tools £5, Sundries of Carpenter’s Tools £30, Sundries of Tools £12, 5 Sickles £4, 1 Barr Shear & Lumber £25, 3 Pare old Cards £10, 2 Old Sithes & hangings £8, 1 Crosscut saw £30, a Man’s Saddle £30, a Woman’s Do. £15, 1 pare Steelyards £12, 4 Sides of Lether £40, 13 deer Skins £70, 1 Elk Skin & 2 Pieces Taned Lether 15£, 1 Old Hackle 25, 5 axes & a Tomahawk £30, 3 Hoes Lg. 2 Small plows & hangings £15, 1 Pare Iron Wedges £5, 1 Matlock £7, Old pewter £25, 2 Cream pots £5, 2 pots & a duch Oven £20, a parcel Lumber £20, 1 Loom £15, Sundries of Geers £10, Sundries of Slays £12, 16 Head of Hogs £160, 6 head do. 7.10, 1 Truck Wagon £10, a Cutting Box £10, 4 Bells & Collars £13, a quantity of Books £21, 1 hive Bees £8; 1 Box Iron & heaters £3, 1 Candlestick 18, a Small Trunk 40, 2 Razors & Brass £5, 1 Tin Coffeepot 20.
A memo at the bottom of the document indicates “We the appraisors do hereby certify that we appraised the Estate of William Bramblett at Twenty prices more than it would have been sold for Ye Year 1774. Augustine Leftwich, D. Beard and George Dooley.” They returned the inventory and appraisement to the court to be recorded by J. Steptoe, Clerk, on Oct. 25, 1779 (WB-1:357).
William Jr. and Anna’s Marriage
William Jr. married Anna Ballard circa 1761 in Bedford County. No official record of the union has been found, but her given name is provided in his 1779 will and his name is connected with her father’s estate, providing enough evidence for an implied marriage. Anna was born before 1745 in Colonial Virginia, the daughter of Elizabeth Orrick and Richard Ballard Sr. Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages of America reported in 1940 that “William Bramlette married, in 1761 or 1762, in Virginia, Ann, whose surname is not known” (209). Ann probably was born before 1745 in Virginia. Her father, Richard Ballard Sr., conveyed his entire estate to his children in the form of deeds: Anna Bramblett, wife of William; Elizabeth Orrick, deceased; Daughter Preston, Daughter Stone, Thomas Ballard, Micajah Ballard and Richard Ballard Jr. Several of his 1765-1770 Bedford County deeds indicate Anna’s siblings are a sister Elizabeth who married a man named Orrick and died by 1770; a sister who married Thomas Preston and lived in Bedford County; a sister who married Eusabeous Stone and lived in adjacent Pittsylvania Co., Va.; Thomas Ballard, who lived in Roan Co., N.C.; Micajah Ballard, of Bedford County; and Richard Ballard Jr., who lived in Bedford Co., Va. William Bramblett and Thomas Preston were appointed managers of the large estate and arrange its sale on Nov. 22, 1770, (DB-C-3:507-508). Anna may have died after 1796 in Virginia. (It also is possible that she was still living in Virginia in 1798 and married Thomas Lumpkin there. However, that Ann Bramblett may be a different person, a niece of Anna.) She definitely died or remarried before 1803-1805. Anna died sometime after giving consent to her daughter Lucy’s marriage to Patrick Nenney in 1796. She may have died circa 1803-1805 in Bedford County when her children inherited Cedar Hill Plantation and began selling the manor house and property to James Callaway Steptoe. Her burial place most likely is the Bramblett Graveyard, now lost, at Cedar Hill Plantation.
Anna Ballard Bramblett was a Patriot in the American Revolution. She made public claims on Nov. 13, 1780, and March 25, 1782, in Bedford County for provisions she gave to the military during the war. She was reimbursed 12 pounds, five shillings, four pence, on March 25 for “provisions for men & horses.”
Anna and William Jr.’s Kentucky land are mentioned in court records regarding a land dispute involving her brother-in-law James Buford and her sons James and Reuben who were being sued by Charles Shores in Fayette Co., Ky., in 1783 and 1789. James owned 716 acres of land there and agreed to sell some or all of it to James Buford, husband of Elizabeth Bramblett; but his brother Reuben, who was in Kentucky at the time, also agreed to sell part of it–100 acres–to Charles Shores. The long court case was settled in Shores’s favor in 1803. Anna gave consent for her daughter Milley to marry John Hancock in 1789 in Bedford County. Anna’s son James Sr. signed the marriage bond as surety/witness. Anna gave consent for her daughter Lydda to marry John Quinn in 1790. As mentioned above, Anna also gave consent for her daughter Lucy to marry Patrick Nenney in 1796.
Rev. William Jr. and Anna’s Life in Virginia
William Jr. first appears in an official record with his father, William I/Sr., on a 1752 tithe list in a portion of Lunenburg Co., Va., that later became Bedford County in 1754. The list was created by John Phelps, who later is mentioned in Bedford records. (William Jr.’s brother Ambrose is listed with Richard Callaway on the same tithe list.) William Jr. witnessed a deed in Bedford Co., Va., on Oct. 25, 1760, which was later recorded for William and Elizabeth Boid/Boyd in Halifax Co., Va., on March 19, 1761. The Boyds, of Bedford County, sold 95 acres on both sides of Widow Ridges Creek “beg. at a pine thence new lines south…all houses, woods, etc.” to William Jr.’s brother-in-law James Callaway, husband of Sarah “Sallie” Bramblett. Other witnesses: John Tinklear and John Callaway. William Bramblett Jr. bought 312 acres of land on Little Otter River adjoining John Callaway in Bedford County from George Walton. The deed was recorded Sept. 28, 1762 (DB-B2:79). The land may have been used to establish or add to Cedar Hill Plantation.
Cedar Hill Plantation where Rev. William Bramblett Jr.’s family lived in Bedford in 1761-1805

The oldest part of Cedar Hill Plantation’s manor house, top left, was constructed by Rev. William Bramblett Jr. circa 1760 in Bedford, Va. His heirs sold the house and 700 acres in 1803-1805 to James Callaway Steptoe, the county clerk. Steptoe constructed a separate brick office on the property to contain his court records and enlarged the original house with additions. A Virginia W. P. A. Historical Inventory documents a separate brick kitchen west of the house, connected to the manor with a flagstone walk. Unfortunately, the Bramblett family graveyard, located west of the kitchen, and the ice house, meat house and slave cabins were not preserved when land surrounding the house was sold for redevelopment. The residence in the early 1980s was considered by the State of Virginia and National Registers of Historic Places for designation as an historic landmark worthy of preservation; however, no designation occurred. Its significance involves its age, architectural qualities and past associations to prominent Bedford families, including Brambletts and Steptoes as well as other owners named Gray, Richie, Jordan, Crenshaw and Cauthorn. The 18th century Bramblett section is an example of early Piedmont Vernacular architecture featuring an unusual two-room floor plan and center chimney. It is a raised cottage with brick foundation and beaded weatherboards. A rare style in Bedford County, its general classic form was more commonly found around the Williamsburg, Va., area. The larger front section of the house, added by Steptoe, is especially significant for its sophisticated late Federal domestic architectural style and rare interior features. In particular, one room has plaster cornices and a central wreath, and exceptionally rare if not unique, distinctive, museum quality wallpaper survives in the hall. Other rooms in the 19th century addition also feature exceptional wallpaper designs that have survived and are rarely found anywhere today in America. The wall designs in and of themselves are artifacts that document the period and local interior decoration. But the oldest house in Bedford no longer stands among majestic cedars on Bramblett Road with a view of Twin Peaks of Otter Mountains: economic progress dictated and allowed its removal; so, instead of being razed, it was sold, dismantled and moved into storage at Forest, Va., years ago. The plan of the new owner, Jack Tibbs: reassemble the residence at a different location. Preferably a lot on a hill with a view, surrounded by ancient oaks and a grove of fragrant tall shady cedars.

William Jr. signed a deed as a witness when John Fuqua sold land on the west side of Otter River to Moses Pullen. The deed was recorded in Bedford County on Feb. 25, 1764 (DB-B2:300). William Jr. was appointed to survey a road from Bramblett’s (Road or Cedar Hill Plantation) to Augusta Road on April 26, 1768. “Bramblett’s Road,” is now known as Main Street in Bedford, Va.William Jr. witnessed the will of John Stovall on April 6, 1778, in Bedford County (WB-1:29).

Bramblett’s Station, established in the summer of 1779 on a branch of Licking River in Fayette Co., Ky., by Rev. William Bramblett Jr., is located generally on a map of the area in the upper right quadrant, under Blue Licks, south of the Ohio River and northeast of Boonesboro on the above map. The station was near present-day Paris, Bourbon Co., Ky. The general location of Rev. William Jr.’s death is at the lower right corner close to the trail (broken lines) near the Cumberland River and Cumberland Gap.
Anna and William Jr.’s nine children, named in his probate records and 1803-1805 recorded deeds, are James Sr., William III, Mary (“Molly”), Reuben, Mildred (“Milley”), Lydda, Lucy, Matilda and Elkanah Bramblett.


Chapter 5:
Generation 3
SARAH “SALLY” BRAMLETT and COL. JAMES CALLAWAY
(Children: )

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

Col. James Callaway served as an Officer during the Revolution

Chapter 6:
Generation 3
JAMES BRAMLETT and WINEFRED UNKNOWN PAGE
(Children: Lucy Bramlett?)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

JAMES BRAMLETT & WINEFRED UNKNOWN PAGE TEXT

Chapter 7:
Generation 3
NANCY “ANN” BRAMLETT and THOMAS LUMPKIN?
(Children: )

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

NANCY “ANN” BRAMLETT & THOMAS LUMPKIN? TEXT

Chapter 8:
Generation 3
AMBROSE BRAMLETTE and JEAN “JANE” “JANNY” WOODSON
(Children: Theodosia, Lydia, Jesse H., William, Sarah, Lunsford M., John, Elizabeth, Stephen H. Mary Ann)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

Ambrose served as an Officer during the French & Indian War and the American Revolution
COL. AMBROSE BRAMLETTE, child of Elizabeth Callaway and William Bramlett I/Sr., was born after 1732, perhaps in or by 1736, in Essex or Caroline Co., Va. He died in Wilkes Co., Ga., in late February/early March 1804. He wrote his will on Nov. 13, 1803, and it was proved March 5, 1804, in Wilkes County. He married Jane “Jean” “Janny” Woodson on Nov. 28, 1768, in Pittsylvania Co., Va. Janny was born circa 1745 in Cumberland or Henrico Co., Va., the daughter of Elizabeth Hughes and Sanburne Woodson. Adam Loving provided surety and John Burch and Charity Burch witnessed the marriage bond. Janny is stepdaughter of Charity Childress, second wife of Sanburne Woodson, and John Burch, second husband of Charity Childress. (The Burches married in 1756 in Cumberland Co., Va.) Janny died after 1818, most likely after 1818 in Days Bend, Autauga Co., Ala. Janny and Ambrose moved to Surry Co., N.C., and later settled in Wilkes Co., Ga. After Ambrose died, Janny married Jesse White circa 1809, probably Wilkes Co., Ga., and moved to Autauga Co., Ala. Jesse was probably born in the 1740s or 1750s. He died after 1809-1810 in Putnam Co., Ala., or after 1817 in Autauga Co., Ala. He may be buried there with Janny.
Ambrose Bramlette’s Will and Estate
Ambrose’s Life in Colonial Virginia
William Waller Hening’s Statutes at Large, which notes September 1758 payments “To the Militia of the County of Bedford, and provisions furnished by sundry inhabitants of the said county” during the French & Indian War, indicates “Ambrose Bramlett, Serjeant” received £2, 17 shillings, 4 pence; and “Ambrose Bramlett, Ensign” received £7, 18 shillings. Also “Amhus Bramlett” received 8 shillings, perhaps for provisions given as a “sundry inhabitant” since no military rank is attached to his name. All three entries may be for the same Ambrose. The name “Amhus” is most likely merely a variant spelling or an abbreviated or quickly written form of Ambrose. No other record of an “Amhus” has surfaced. “William Bramlitt” (most likely Jr. and less likely William I/ Sr. because of the latter’s advanced age, 60s in 1758) and “James Bromlet” (died in 1758) also received payments for military service in the Bedford Militia during the French & Indian War. Ambrose also served as a colonel in the North Carolina Militia during the American Revolution. His daughter Theodosia’s obituary indicates the family was held by Lord Cornwallis and troops who used their plantation as headquarters during the war.
Ambrose and Janny’s children are Theodosia, Lydia, Jesse Hughes, William, Sarah (“Sally”), Lunsford Meredith, John, Elizabeth (“Eliza”), Stephen Hughes and Mary Ann Bramlette.

Chapter 9:
Generation 3
AGATHA “AGGY” BRAMLETT and STEPHEN WHITE
(Children: Ambrose, Sarah, William, James, Thomas, Stephen Jr., Susannah, Jesse, Tabia)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

Stephen White and Sons served as Soldiers during the American Revolution
Heartfelt Thanks to Descendants Mary L. Mortimeyer and Frances H. Revesz for providing much of the following about Agatha and Stephen White.
Agatha “Aggy” Bramlett, child of Elizabeth Callaway and William Bramlett I/Sr., probably was born after 1732 in Caroline Co., Va. She died circa 1812-1820 in Adair Co., Ky., and was buried there in White Cemetery. Her tombstone was missing in 1981. She is variously named in different Virginia and Kentucky records as Agatha, Agness, Agge and Aggy. She married Stephen White circa 1752 in Caroline Co., Va. He was born in 1728, possibly in Caroline Co., Va., the son of Susannah Quarles and Thomas White Sr. His parents owned and operated an ordinary in Caroline County. Thomas White (father of Stephen) and “William Bramlit” (father of Agatha) and others served on a jury in Caroline Co., Va., on Nov. 8, 1733, when “John Taliaferro Gent., late Sheriff of this county,” sued Roger Quarles, Thomas Carr Jr., and Richard Maulden for “an action of debt” (OB-1732-1740:108). After Stephen’s father died, his mother applied to the county court for the ordinary license so she could operate the business. After their marriage, Stephen and Agatha lived in Bedford Co., Va., perhaps moving there circa 1752 when the area was still Lunenburg. They definitely were living in Bedford County before 1759 when Agatha’s father, William Bramlett I/Sr., transferred some property to Stephen in a recorded deed of gift. Thirty years later, circa 1791, the Whites relocated to Fayette Co., Ky., and settled in what is now Adair Co., Ky. Stephen died there at the distinctive age of 102 on Oct. 30, 1830, at the home of his son Thomas White, and was buried there beside Agatha in White Cemetery.

Stephen White’s tombstone: “Born in Virginia & died Oct. 30th 1830, Aged 102 years.”

Rubbing of Stephen White’s tombstone shows the wheat/grain design in greater detail, courtesy Mortimeyer and Revesz
The owner of the White farm in 1860, Oscar Pile, donated the cemetery to the White family in a deed recorded in Adair Co., Ky.:
Whereas there is Situated on my farm a Grave Yard & burying ground and whereas it is desired that said grave yard should be held & used only as a burying ground Now for good and valuable consideration I hereby donate & forever set apart said burying ground to be used alone for burying purposes and hereby donate the following parcel of land for that purpose (viz) Beginning at the north corner of said Grave Yard running thence South 110 feet Thence West 40 feet Thence N 110 feet Thence East 40 feet to the beginning. I hereby donate to said White family said Grave Yard for burying purposes & to all other persons to be used & occupied only as a burying ground. Witness my hand this 25th day of April 1860 – Oscar Pile. (DB-R:411)
Mortimeyer and Revesz, authors in 1992 of White Families – John and Stephen of Virginia and Kentucky, who visited the cemetery in 1981, reported cattle roaming free through the pasture where the burial ground is located. Stephen’s tombstone was in good condition at that time, they write; but Agatha’s had disappeared and many others were broken (207). The residence was known as the Estil Ballou farm.
Agatha and Stephen’s Life in Virginia
Stephen “Might have been apprenticed to a blacksmith as a youth,” according to historian William S. Simpson Jr. in Virginia Baptist Ministers 1760-1790: A Biographical Survey (1999, Vol. III:141). When grown Stephen was a planter and slaveowner, surveyor and Separate Baptist lay minister. Simpson did not find evidence of ordination.
Agatha and Stephen’s Life in Kentucky

Agatha and Stephen’s children are Ambrose, Sarah, William, James, Thomas, Stephen Jr., Susannah, Jesse and Tabia White.
End Notes For Agatha and Stephen
1 Thomas White Sr., father of Stephen, was born circa 1700-1710, perhaps the son of Elizabeth and Samuel White and grandson of Jane and Robert White, all of England. Thomas Sr. is named in several records in Caroline County during 1725-1740s. He died in or before 1750 when his wife applied for the renewal of his ordinary’s license. She was licensed to operate White’s (Burk’s) Shop until at least 1759. Mortimeyer and Revesz list several possible siblings of Stephen in their 1992 history: Jane, Ursula, Ann, William, James, Thomas White Jr., who all were born between circa 1724 and 1738.

2 In past years, family tradition held that Stephen descends from or is related to Pilgrim William White, a laborer who came to America from England or Ireland on the Mayflower, landing at Plymouth Rock, Mass., in 1620 with wife, Susanna, and son Peregrine, born aboard ship in the Harbor. Some believe Stephen may be related to John White, the first governor of Virginia. There appear to be separate White families in different areas of colonial America who may not be fully researched and may or may not be closely or distantly related to each other. One is the family of Henry White of Buckingham and Bedford counties in Virginia, whose descendant Jacob White married one of Elizabeth Bramlett Buford’s granddaughters, mentioned below. Also, Stephen may or may not be related to Aquilla White who was involved in the unfortunate shooting death of Agatha’s brother Rev. William Bramblett Jr. and perhaps one or two others in 1779 on the Kentucky frontier. Aquilla, born circa 1745 in Maryland, reportedly descends from Elizabeth and John White and ancestors from England. After the shooting incident in Kentucky, Aquilla returned to his home in Pennsylvania for his family. They were in Fayette County in 1780-1781 and settled on nearly 3,000 acres in present-day Montgomery Co., Ky. Aquilla married Susannah Noland. He was a constable and planter who applied for his Revolutionary War pension in 1811. He died in 1823 at Red River, Montgomery Co., Ky.

Chapter 10:
Generation 3
ELIZABETH “BETTY” BRAMLETT and CAPT. JAMES BUFORD
(Children: John, William, James Jr., Simeon K., Abraham, Ambrose, Henry, Judith, Elizabeth, Frances)

Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants

Capt. James Buford served as an Officer during the American Revolution
Elizabeth Bramlett, child of William Bramlett I/Sr. and Elizabeth Callaway, was born circa 1745 in Colonial Virginia. She died in 1798 in Scott Co., Ky. She married James Buford Sr., son of Judith Early and John Buford, on July 14, 1761, in Bedford Co., Va. James was born in 1740 in Bromfield Parish, Culpeper Co., Va. He died in 1792-1799 in Scott Co., Ky. Both James and Elizabeth were early residents of Liberty, now Bedford, Bedford Co., Va. Elizabeth moved there with her family in 1752. James was living there by 1761. He helped lay out the town of Liberty and served as a presiding magistrate. He recorded a deed as a trustee of Bedford in 1786. James Sr. served as captain of a company in the Virginia State Militia. On March 22, 1777, “Captain James Buford was allowed pay, rations, &tc., for his company to the 15th instant, £997 1s. 9d.” James Sr. appointed his son James Jr. as his attorney for business in Virginia, and moved with the rest of his family to Kentucky, according to Mortimeyer and Revesz (331). They cite Mildred Buford Minter’s 1924 history Buford Family in America for names of the children. James Sr. and Elizabeth’s children, born in Bedford, Va., include John, William, James Jr., Simeon K., Abraham, Ambrose, Henry, Judith, Elizabeth and Frances Buford.

Cousins and Co-authors of Our Kin: Lula Eastman Jeter Parker and Mary Denham Ackerly Field

A descendant of Elizabeth Bramlett Buford: the late Lula Eastman Jeter Parker (1873-1954), a native and resident of Bedford Co., Va., historian, genealogist and author who was active in documenting local, state, regional, national and family history. She researched Bramblettes in Bedford County to document William Bramlett I/Sr. and family. She is co-author, with Mary Denham Ackerly Field, of Our Kin: The Genealogies of Some of the Early Families Who Made History in the Founding and Development of Bedford County, Virginia (Lynchburg, Va.: J. P. Bell, 1930) and co-author with Peter Viemeister of Parker’s History of Bedford County, Virginia (Bedford: Parker, Bedford: 1938; Bedford: Bedford Democrat, 1954). The late Mary Denham Ackerly Field (1885-1970), a cousin of Lula and a native and resident of Bedford Co., Va., also was an historian, genealogist, author. She married George Harris Field (1868-1937). Mary is daughter of Mary Conna Blount White (1862-1968) and John Paul Glascow Ackerly Sr. (1850-1927). Her White ancestors descend from Capt. Jacob White, of Buckingham and Bedford counties, who married Hannah Spiers and Nancy Oglesby, and Henry White. (Information is not yet available about the relationship of Henry White or Capt. Jacob White to Stephen White, husband of Agatha Bramblett, and his father, Thomas White of Essex/Caroline Co., Va.)

American Folk Art Print Cotton Plantation in the Old South, Currier & Ives


African-American Civil War Soldiers Honored at the Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Former Bramblette and Burdettet slaves enlisted in the Union Army in 1863-1865 to fight for freedom.

“America,” a hand-colored lithograph on wove paper by Edward Williams Clay, a Northern apologist for slavery, showing an idealized portrait of the American institution, part of a two-panel print titled “Black and White Slavery,” portraying Britain’s abused “white slaves” (factory workers) and America’s “contented” black slaves (unpaid, forced labor). Printed 1841 in New York by Arthur Donnelly, published in Weitenkampf. Courtesy Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Online Catalog, Washington, D.C.

Tallship Approaching Charles Towne, South Carolina

WORKS CITED
Bramlett, William. Holy Bible Records. Edinburgh: Mark and Charles Keern, His Majesty’s Printers, MDCCXCVIII, 1798. Names, birth and death dates of children of William and Sarah Jane Bramlett of Darlington and Sumter Co., S.C.
Bramlette, James Sr. Pension Application S.14996 Certificate 7650. Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Application Files. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration Film M804 Roll 322, 1974. At http://interactive.ancestry.com/.
Walker, Harriet J. Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Illinois. Los Angeles, 1917. Biographical Sketch of Reuben “Bromlet” buried in “Bromlet graveyard” [sic Brown Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery], Gallatin, now Saline County. At http://interactive.ancestry.com/, accessed 18 August 2016.
Name:
Reuben Bromlet
Burial Place:
Saline County, Illinois, USA
Comments:
Reuben Bromlet served in the war from Virginia. He came to what was then Gallatin county, but now is in Saline county, settled in Raleigh township, coming in 1819 [sic 1818]. He died there and is buried in the Bromlet graveyard [sic Brown Graveyard, now Wolf Creek Cemetery]. He was a very aged man. He was pensioned.

At http://interactive.ancestry.com/48613/RevSoldierBurialsIL-001373-130?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fsearch%2fdb.aspx%3fdbid%3d48613%26path%3d&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnBrowsing

Revolutionary War Veteran Burials, 1775-1850, Illinois http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=48613&path=
Other veteran pensioners named in the Walker book are Thomas Hamilton, native of New Jersey, born 24 December 1762, served from North Carolina 1780-1782, moved to Gallatin, now Saline County, died 14 February 1841; Lewis Howell, served in Virginia, moved to Kentucky and then Gallatin (now Saline) County, probably died there; William Roark, born New Jersey June 1760, served eight months until 1782, POW taken to Detroit and Canada, paroled 1783, moved to Gallatin (now Saline) County, died there 4 March 1841. (Soldiers lived in a portion of Gallatin County that became Saline County in 1847.)

Buford, John R. In Photo of “Confederate Ex-patriots in South America.” Confederate Veteran. Vol. 21: 169. At https://books.google.com/book.
Burditt, John. “Middlesex, England, Convict Transportation Contracts, 1682-1787.” Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. This collection indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project. Original data: Middlesex Transportation Orders London Metropolitan Archives. Reference: MJ/SP/T/02/037. At http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?h=2396&db=EngTransportContracts&indiv=tr.
Caldwell, Joshua William. “Lunsford M. Bramlett.” Sketches of the Bench and Bar of Tennessee. Knoxville, Tenn.: Ogden Brothers & Company, 1898.
Callaway Biographies: Ambrose Callaway, Clint Callaway, J. L. Callaway, John Q. Callaway, Stephen Callaway. History of Howard and Cooper Counties Missouri. St. Louis: National Historical Co., 1883. 274-278.

Callaway, Roy E. “The Descendants of James Callaway From Bedford County, Virginia.” Unpublished manuscript. Indianapolis, Ind.: 6 July 1995.
Dennis, Deborah G. “Mystery Solved: ‘Mrs. J. W.’ — Josephine (Lindsay) O’Neal Wigginton.” Callaway Family Association CFANET e-Newsletter. February 2013. Vol. XIV No. 2. At http://www.callawayfamily.org/cfanet/cfanet0213.htm. Identification and documentation of Josephine Wigginton and her connection to the Callaway-Bramblette family. Her 1896 query published in a Louisville, Ky., newspaper, signed only as Mrs. J. W., is the only source yet found for the family surname–Bramlet–of her great-grandmother Sarah, daughter of the patriarch William I/Sr., who married Col. James Callaway. Both early settlers of Bedford County, Virginia, in 1754, Sarah and James were members of prominent, distinguished, colonial and patriotic revolutionary families.
Imani, Patti. Photographs of Mary J. Waggener and Stephen White and son Frank White and wife, Nancy, and Susie and Jessie W. Martin. 30 September 2000. 2837 28th Ave. NW, Olympia, WA 98502.
Molina, Dale. “Bible Records” of Sarah Jane Unknown and William Bramlett III of Bedford Co., Va., and Darlington and Sumter Co., S.C., in the possession of Lucille Bradham and cousin, Marion Beasley. Same records provided to author via email. Dale Molina posted a transcript of the Bible record inscriptions on Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center (BBIC): http://www.bramblett.com/document/bible2.htm.
Mortimeyer, Mary L. and Frances H. Revesz. White Families – John and Stephen of Virginia and Kentucky Claypoole, Gum and Allied Families. Cameron, Mo.: Mortimeyer and Revesz, 1992. Permission in 1996 to quote all material obtained from the late Mary L. Mortimeyer. 189-268, 268-332. Address: Mary L. Mortimeyer, P.O. Box 327, Cameron, MO 64229 (deceased 1999).
Ordway, Charles N. and Anna B. Bramlett. “Lunsford M. Bramlett Court Case 1872.” Tennessee Wills and Probate Records, Giles County Wills, Inventories, Settlements. Vol. B-C, 1869-1917, pp. 180-183.
Simpson, William S. Jr. “Stephen White.” Virginia Baptist Ministers 1760-1790: A Biographical Survey. Richmond, Va.: Simpson, 1999. 3:141.

Angel Oak, John’s Island, South Carolina

The End

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https://www.bramblett.com/document/garrett.htm

From the Garrett Daybook

The following four pages are from a notebook kept by the late Agness Elrod. 1 1/2 pages have introductory genealogical material about the Catletts and Garretts and the rest of the pages have Garrett Bible inscriptions from the Garrett Daybook by Ann West Owsley and Edward Garrett II

Some background — Edward Garrett II first copied information from his mother’s Garrett Bible into his own Garrett Bible. (Edward Garrett II is the son of Edward Garrett I and Elizabeth Catlett. Edward Garrett II married Ann West Owsley.) Before he died, Edward Garrett II put all the Bible information in a daybook. His wife, Anna West (Owsley) Garrett, added names of spouses to the daybook. The Garrett Daybook was passed down through several generations. (Current location of the Daybook is unknown.) Agness Elrod copied inscriptions from the Garrett Daybook onto numbered pages of her notebook sixty or more years ago, probably in the 1930s.

The Garrett Daybook inscriptions mention two Garretts who married Bramlett women: William Garrett married Nancy Bramlett and Nicholas Ware Garrett married Sarah Bramlett.

Lawrence C. Holcombe of Liberty, S.C., found and sent Deb Dennis a copy of Agness Elrod’s notes and her transcription of Edward Garrett II and Anna West (Owsley) Garrett’s Daybook. Deb, in turn, provided it to the Bramblett/Bramlett Information Center. Many thanks to Mr. Holcombe.

An exact transcript, verbatim, of what Agness Elrod wrote in her notebook (four pages) is given below (the only things added by the BLOGGER, Deb Dennis, are a few brackets with some page numbers, the bold face type to mark the Bramlett references, and one ellipsis to mark an undecipherable word written under “Edgefield”). Spelling and punctuation is from Agness Elrod’s notebook exactly as she wrote it….
Garrett 13

The compiler has made no attempt to trace the Catlett line but by 1790 one of the Catletts (John Catlett) had settled in Cheraw Dist., S.C. In the early days of Anderson Co SC one of the well known merchants was Pinckney Catlett.

Elizabeth (Catlett) Garrett was probably the daughter of Thomas Catlett of Caroline Co., Va. We find him as a witness to a deed in 1730 of John Garretts grandfather Richard Buchner. Thomas Catlett died in Caroline Co Va in 1739. Two other early Catlett estates there were John Catlett d 1742 & another Thomas Catlett, d 1744.

Edward Garrett I then Sr., died in 1751 between Feb. 1, 1751, and Dec. 20, 1751, when his estate was filed. He left a large family, several sons were under age. By 1757 the son Edward was 24 yrs of age & old enough to administer on the estate. Young Edwards mother Elizabeth (Catlett) Garrett (the widow of Edward Garrett I) married 2nd in Fairfax Co Va before 1755 to Richard Nelson & became the sister-in-law of of Gov. Wm. Nelson of Va. The administration papers of the estate of Edward Garrett I (called then Sr.) show the inventory was taken by Thomas Triplett, John Adams & Edward House.

When the estate of Edward Garrett I was about settled in 1757 Edward II decided to make a home of his own so he courted and married on Feb. 6 1759 Anna West Owsley called Ann the daughter of Thomas Owsley & his wife Ann West, Ann being the daughter of John West of Virginia.

On April 14, 1766 in Loudon Co Va Edward & Ann Garrett sold their land on Goose Creek to Thomas Middleton Jr. The land originally granted to Edward’s father Edward on Dec. 27, 1742. (See deed bk E, page 7). The early part of 1766 Edward Garrett with his wife Anna & their five children and with two of Edwards brothers, Thomas & John, left Virginia & migrated to 96 District, South Carolina – the part that later became Laurens & Abbeville County & Edgefield cos…. To preserve the history of the family in a new country, Edward transcribed from his mothers Bible in Virginia the dates

Garrett [14]

and names of his brothers and sisters. These he he copied in his own Bible, and before he died he copied this data in an old day book which has been handed down from generation to generation in the Edward Garrett family. In addition to the records Edward copied from his mothers Bible, he added the names and birth dates of each of his 16 children. In a different handwriting, supposedly by Edwards wife Anna called Ann, was added the names of those whom the 16 children married.

Bible Records
Edward Garrett, born 31 August 1733
Anna West Owsley born 3 June 1744
Edward Garrett and Anna West Owsley married 2 June 1759

Sister — Margaret Garrett, born 4 June, 1735

Sister — Frances Garrett, born 30 July, 1737

Brother — Stephen Garrett, born 1 August, 1740

Brother — Thomas Garrett, born 11 November 1744

Brother — John Garrett, born 18 January 1747

Garrett 15

Our Children: (marriages added by Anna) [Edward Garrett and Anna West Owsley]

I Elizabeth Garrett, born 2 October 1760 married John Ashley

II. John Garrett, born 7 January 1762 married Sallie Mauldin

III William Garrett, born 9 September 1763 married Nancy Bramlett

IV Nicholas Ware Garrett, born 11 March 1765 married Sarah Bramlett

V Jesse Garrett, born 2 February, 1766 married Elizabeth (illegible)

VI Frances Garrett, born 11 May 1768 married Pleasant Sullivan

VII Rhoda Garrett, born 24 November 1769 married George Hughes

VIII James Garrett, born 24 August 1771 married Nancy Wright (copy & erase some desc called her Dorcas)

[On back of page 15]

IX Dorcas Garrett, born 12 April, 1773 married Stephen Mullins

X Stephen Garrett, born 16 April 1775 married 1st Sarah Smith, 2nd Elizabeth Putnam

XI Mary Garrett, born 12 April 1777 married 1st Austin Moore, 2nd Lodowick Doolin

XII Martha Garrett, born 28 November 1778 married William Nelson Kelly

XIII Ann Garrett, born 23 August 1780 married John Harris

XIV Hosea Garrett, born 18 October 1782

XV Irene Kiziah Garrett, born 8 March 1785 married Robertson Moore

XVI Edward Garrett, Jr., born 13 September 1787 married Eleanor Higgins

End of Bible Record

bramblettefamilyinamerica

July 10, 2018

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1: New Kent County – Ambrose Bamblet I/Sr. & Unknown Wife/Wives
Chapter 2: Essex,  Caroline, Bedford Counties – William Bramlett I/Sr. & Unknown 1st Wife & 2nd Wife Elizabeth Callaway
Chapter 3: King George,  Prince  William, Fauquier Counties – Henry Bramlett I/Sr. & Unknown Wife (Three  Sons: Henry Jr., William, Reuben Sr.)
Chapter 4: Bedford  County  Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. & Anna Ballard
Chapter 5: Sarah “Sally” Bramlett & Col. James Callaway I/Sr.
Chapter 6: James Bramlett I & Winefred Unknown Page
Chapter 7: Nancy “Ann” Bramlett & Thomas Lumpkin?
Chapter 8: Ambrose Bramlette & Jean Jane “Janny” Woodson
Chapter 9: Agatha “Aggy” Bramlett  &  Stephen White
Chapter 10: Elizabeth “Betty” Bramlett & Capt. James Buford
Afterword
Works Cited
Angel Oak
William I USE
Researched and Written with your invaluable assistance and text, image, photo donations, by your Blogger Deborah G. Dennis, pictured below in 1987, after graduating 1983, earning a  coveted Associate in NBachelor’s Degree in English — Creative Writing with award- and prize-winning academic work and after working two years as an Editorial Assistant and Feature Writer in the Office of Public Relations at Knox College, a private Liberal Arts school nationally known for academic and creative excellence, in her hometown, Galesburg, Knox Co., Ill. — Land of Lincoln, Clinton, & Obama.
Deb is a direct descendant of Elizabeth Brown and Reuben Bramlett, Revolutionary War Patriots, Members of the East Coast Ruling Planter Society. Reuben, a Veteran and Pensioner, is the third son of Margaret Peggy Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr. Reuben was born March 15, 1757, in a portion of Prince William, now Fauquier, Co., Va. He died at age 87 on Sept. 11, 1844, in Gallatin, now Saline, Co., Ill., following his wife, Elizabeth Brown, and their eldest son, Benjamin, and his wife, Polly Brown, to the grave, leaving behind six children to create many future generations of proud descendants to help popu-late a newly minted state and carry on their names.
Deborah Gail Dennis 1987 Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois Portrait for
Bramblette Family America:
Descendants of Ambrose Bamblet/ Bramblet and/or William Bramlett I/Sr.
Copyright 2016–2019 Deborah G. Dennis,  Charleston, S.C. All Rights Reserved, including the Right of Re- production in Whole or Part in any Form. Permissions: Email debdenn@gmail.com before copying.
Caravel Sailing Ships
Charleston, S.C.: Home of Bramblette Blog
Charleston You are beautiful
“Charleston, You Are Beautiful!” Original Image courtesy Chad Matthew Chad Wick” Dennis, One View of Charleston, S.C., at Christmastime…
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A few notes about our surname and its variations  from Meeks Haley Bramlet in A Pioneer Family – Bramlet…
“Just here I wish to mention the name as it had been spelled in earlier years. The old English way of spelling the name was Bramblette, but in later days the letter “b,” being silent, was left out [Bramlette]. Then later on the “e” at the last was dropped, because of no sound, spelling it Bramlett. And for convenience in the present age of systematic spelling, the one “t” is used, as only one is given any sound. In shortening the name by leaving out all silent letters, there is no change in [the sound of] the name or the accent, but it gives the real name in its shortest form [Bramlet]. Many words are being shortened by leaving out silent letters, yet spelling the word correctly. Hence, the spelling as used by our family today and in this writeup. Governor Thomas E. of Kentucky spelled his name Bramlette, that being more than 40 years ago. In later years of shorter methods of spelling words, the name is correctly shortened by spelling it “Bramlet.”
Meeks, who did not know about the immigrant Ambrose Bamblet or Henry Bramlett Sr., tells us that “One brother of Reuben Bramlet, son of Pilgrim William Bramlet, [sic son of Henry Jr.] fought in the Revolution on the English side, being known as a Torey. After the war closed he emigrated westward, proposing to land in the Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. His given name was not learned, and no trace of him is found” (95-96). [No trace of a source for this information is yet found, either.]
Bramblette Family in America: Some Descendants of Ambrose “Bamblet” or Bramblet I/Sr.? and his son? William Bramlett I/Sr. (generally, from 1690 to the 1861-1865 Civil War) including our Allied Families: Ballard, Boone, Brown, Browning, Bryan, Buford, Burdette, Callaway, Gray, Miner, Moss, Peak, Riley, Shrewsberry, Woodson, and including a substantial, treasured collection of vintage and modern photographs, illustrations, and images.
The Bramblette family in America appears to have originated with William Bramlett I/Sr., born in/before 1694, most likely in Colonial Virginia, and perhaps with his father, Ambrose “Bamblet” or Bramblet, probably born in western Europe, who reportedly immigrated to America from Great Britain in 1690. Unfortunately, our family history is woefully incomplete: the maiden names of Ambrose I/Sr.’s wife and William I/Sr.’s first wife and Henry I/Sr.’s  wife are unknown, and the maiden name of  Henry II/Jr.’s wife is unknown. With few Bibles, wills and probate records to fully document the early Bramblette generations, we find only thin trails and hints of trials of historical existence in military records and life struggles, tragedies, and triumphs in a few Virginia deeds, plat maps, tax records and other court documents. We piece together what we can and conclude, while the nuggets of information are interesting and valuable to us alone, the ancestors’ true legacies live on in the DNA of thousands of descendants with the name Bramblette, Bramblett, Bramblet, Bramlet, Bramlett, Bramlette and other variations as well as different allied surnames. [Note from Blogger: My close family members, back to great-grandfather Matthew Mont- gomery Bramlett, chose Bramlett, while many other older and contemporary Illinois family members chose Bramlet. It is unknown how Matthew’s father, Henry Coleman, spelled his surname; but Matthew’s paternal grandfather, Thomas Brown Bramlet, signed his surname  with one “t” in letters handwritten in pencil from Missouri to his parents, Coleman Brown Bramlet and Rebecca Upchurch Bramlet, who were living in Saline County, Illinois, in the early 1880’s.
Hopefully, DNA comparisons, while helpful in genealogy, will someday be replaced or enhanced by a better mechanism of linking our paper trails with computer matches and measuring the connections of relatives. Our familial multitude of thousands in the past and today populate the records of many areas of the country from the original Thirteen Atlantic Colonies to California and states between. Many of us honor the early ancestors with respect and gratitude after realizing how fortunate we are to have been born into such a courageous, adventurous, prosperous family with distinctive allied connections, let alone to have been born at all and survived in a dangerous world to adulthood. From fighting tyranny before and during the American Revolutionary War in 1775 – 1783 and fighting World Wars to fighting evil enemies in the Cold War and Vietnam Conflict, to stopping Terrorists from attacking Western Civilization in general and Americans in particular today, our history has been and is often defined by war. Our current world seems even more dangerous than ever, with internal strife and struggles between opposite extremist political, social, religious ideologies and innocents trapped in or fleeing war-torn regions and terror attacks spreading in and beyond overseas borders. We must choose courage and encourage others, work for peace and avoid unnecessary wars at all costs. Love Wins. Because the alternative — extreme hatred, division, and collective death — exemplified in the atomic explosion below — a real threat and fear we have lived with since the 1940’s and 1950’s, is untenable.
1946 Atomic Bomb Test
Explosions like this, although far away, struck a life time of fear in the hearts and minds of children and adults alike in the 1950-60’s.
An American Family Tree Researched 1985 — 2018, Created Pre-June 2016 — December 2018, etcetera: featuring Some Descendants of Ambrose “Bamblet” or “Bramblet,” our probable American Immigrant Ancestor who was transported from England in 1690 to farm land and help populate New Kent County, Virginia. He may have been born overseas, perhaps in Western Europe circa 1660-1670. Ambrose died after 1694, perhaps in New Kent County, in Pre- Revolutionary, Colonial America. Nothing else, fact or speculation or fiction, is known about him or a wife or extended family since New Kent is a burned county with few extant records. Ambrose is the only known candidate for the father of one probable son, William Bramlett I/Sr. The latter first appears in 1715-1716 as a witness on a deed in Essex Co., Va., at that time only one narrow county away from New Kent where Ambrose established the first American family plantation. William was born circa 1694, probably in New Kent or Essex Co., Va., and died at age 65-69 circa 1759-1763 in British-Controlled Colonial America, i.e., “England.” William Bramlett I/Sr. and his family later lived in Caroline County between 1735-1747. By 1752 they were residents of a portion of Lunenburg County that later became Bedford when county boundary lines were  redrawn to accommodate a larger population. William I/Sr. was a Founding, Early Settler of Bedford Co., Va., in 1752-1754 with his second wife, Elizabeth Callaway, if still living, and all of his children, who were then adults. They were co-creators of Early America and the American Dream as they redefined themselves in the New World where possibilities were endless, the skyline and ocean was the limit — to make their marks first as soldiers in the French & Indian Wars, in the American Revolution, & as landowners, lawmakers, roadbuilders, to create a new, upper class of wealthy gentleman planters and heads of families to represent and increase a growing, distinctly different local and neo-national population reaching toward freedom and independence in the colonies. William I/Sr. was twice married, to 1: Unknown First Wife, mother of his elder children, and to 2: Second Wife, Elizabeth Callaway, whose marriage is implied by her sister Ann Callaway’s guardianship choice–William Bramlett (I/Sr.)–which choice was recorded in 1735 in Caroline County Court, and implied by William Bramlett I/Sr. and his family’s close geographical proximity and association with Joseph Callaway Jr.’s grown children in court, land and tax records and other documents shared between Bramblette and Callaway family members in Essex-Caroline Co., Va., in 1715-1747, and in Lunenburg-Bedford Co., Va., in 1752-1759, and beyond. The alliance linked two amazing families forever in a brand new emerging and growing America.
STATUE BATTERY

Charleston Confederate Defenders – A Memorial in White Point Garden above & an Artist’s Iconic Peninsula, the  Battery, A Harbor View:
Small 1853 Charleston print

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Dedications to Contributing Partners:
Descendants of Marianne Bramlett & Frederick Burdette
I worked extensively and most recently in the past two years with my two beloved but query-weary cousins, dedicated Burdette family historians for many years and paragons of patience and virtue, Martha Anne Curry Duke, of Denton, Texas, and Franklin Donald Burdette, a native of South Carolina and resident of Florida. Their important documentary contributions were the keys to unlocking pieces of evidence that connect Marianne Bramlett Burdette to her siblings Henry III, John, Nathan and Reuben Bramlett and then connecting them to their parents, Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr. (I can only hope my research con- tributions to Martha and Franklin equal all of the answers they have shared with me over the years.) Thank you, Dear Cousins, for listening to my theories, evidence, proof, and for your help, patience, assis- tance, encouragement, confidence, love.
Martha Anne Curry Duke: Darling Cousin, Such a Pretty in Pink Light of Our Family Lives, Keeper of our Methodist Faith, Wife of Tim, Mother of three, adoring Grandmother.
martha A Curry Duke
Mulkey-Bowles-Montgomery Funeral Home
Rest in Peace, Cindy
Cynthia Joyce Duke

June 06, 1957 – November 02, 2016  Cynthia Joyce Duke, 59, of The Colony, died peacefully Wednesday, November 2, 2016, at her parents’ home in Denton, Tex., from end stage metastatic breast cancer. Cindy was born on June 6, 1957, in Dallas and grew up there and in Paris and Denton.  She graduated Denton High School and from Texas A & M with a degree in Parks and Recreation in 1979. After graduation she took additional classes in accounting at North Texas State University and was employed for a number of years as Assistant Controller, Property Accountant, at Bradford Realty in Dallas. Cindy never married. She was actively involved in the lives of her family and many friends. She enjoyed traveling and took several trips to Europe with her family and friends.  She was a kind and loving soul who had a special place in her heart for disad- vantaged children.  She was a longtime supporter of the children’s advocacy  organization Compassion International. Cindy is survived by her parents, Wallace B. “Tim” and Martha Anne Curry Duke of Den- ton, Tex.; her brother Kenneth and his wife, Brenda Watkins Duke, of Garland; Kenneth and Brenda’s children, April Duke of The Colony, Kyle Duke and his wife, Jill, and two children of Little Elm, and Adam Duke and his wife, Stephanie, and their two children of Frisco; her brother Dennis and his wife, Lorna Watkins Duke, of Mart; Dennis’s children Patricia Duke of Aledo and Derrick Duke of Plano; as well as a host of extended family and friends. Services will be held Saturday, November 5, 2016, at Highland Baptist Church in Denton at 2:00 P.M. with Brandon McCarroll officiating. The family will receive visitors at the church prior to the service between 1:00 P.M. and 2:00 P.M. A private family graveside will be held at a later date at Kirk Cemetery, Limestone County. Mulkey-Mason Funeral Home is in charge of the funeral arrangements. The family is especially grateful to the doctors and staff at Texas Oncology and Cindy’s caregivers at Kindred Hospice. Memorial donations may be made to Compassion International, Colorado Springs, CO  80997.

Eloise and Franklin Donald Burdette, U.S. Navy-Ret. Keepers of Our Family Flame:  Such a Lovely Couple.

Eloise and Franklin Burdette

More Dedications to Contrib- uting Partners: Descendants of Mary Peak & John Bramlett

Jean Holley Day Grave

Sammie Jean Holley DayRest in Eternal Peace

I was fortunate  to work exten-sively in the late 1980s and 1990s with Descendants of Mary Peak and John Bramlett — the late Sammie Jean Holley Day of Indiana, and the late Patty Hendrix Eckhoff of Washington State, and the late Robert Sidney Bramlett of Texas, Bless their enormous sweet hearts. They gave freely, without hesitation.

Robert Sidney and Beth Carson Bramlett Family Plot

I was was also fortunate to work for more than twenty years with James Thomas “Jim” Hammond of South Carolina. All of the documentary contributions and family trees are invaluable in documenting the family of Mary Peak and John Bramlett and then in connecting with official records John and his brother Reuben to their brothers Nathan and Henry III and then connecting with recorded documents the four brothers to their parents, Margaret and Henry Bramlett Jr. (Sammie Jean was the  first of our  research  group to use official records to connect these four brothers to their father, Henry Bramlett II/Jr., and to connect him to his father — the elder progenitor of the Prince William/Fauquier County, Virginia, branch of the family tree — Henry  Bramlett Sr., believed to be the son of William Bramlett I/Sr., whose other grown children comprised the Bedford County, Virginia, branch. Sammie Jean made these connections by finding and diligently studying available Virginia tax, land and court records to base information on documents and facts. She concluded that Henry Bramlett I/Sr. is the father of three sons who farmed and paid taxes in Fauquier County in 1759: Henry Bramlett Jr., William Bramblett, and Reuben Bramblett Sr. I, your Blogger, do take credit for finding the genealogical key to separating and reconnecting the families of these three sons: They each had a son named Reuben, three first cousins from the same generation who were each involved with, or named in records of the American Revolution or other military eras.

The first Reuben first cousin, My Revolutionary War Ancestor, Reuben Bramlett, born March 15, 1757, in Fauquier Co., Va., and died  Sept. 11, 1844, in Gallatin Co., Ill., according to his 1832 Pension Application, is named with his brother John  as chain carriers in a 1780 Virginia resurvey with his mother, Margaret, named as the occupant of Henry Bram- lett’s Plantation, and brother Henry III became the owner when their father Henry II/Jr. died without a will and their eldest brother Benjamin died. Then Henry Bramblett III became the heir, inherited the family plantation through primogeniture. Margaret and sons Henry III, John, and Nathan joined the Methodist Church in Virginia and co-founded Bramlett Methodist Episco- pal Church in Laurens Co., S.C., in 1780 or 1781. My ancestor Reuben named some of his children after four brothers (Benjamin, Henry, John, Nathan) and after his mother, Margaret. These five children’s names and two others (Coleman Brown, Elizabeth) are documented in Reuben’s 1832 Revolutionary War Pension Papers, filed in Illinois. The second Reuben first cousin belongs to Henry Jr.’s brother William who moved with wife, Elizabeth Gist/Gest, and four or five children from Fauquier Co., Va., to Ninety Six District, Laurens Co., S.C., in/by 1773 to claim a Royal Land Grant of 300 acres from Gov. William Bull and Britain’s King George III. His son Reuben later settled in Gwinnett Co., Ga., where he is listed as a military pensioner in the 1840 census. The third brother, Reuben Sr., had the third first cousin named  Reuben, a son named Reuben Jr., born circa 1758 in Fauquier Co., Va., who served from there as a Revolutionary soldier and wagoner, and who moved to Laurens Co., S.C., with two married sisters and spouses in 1794. He applied for a Revolutionary War Pension there in 1832, which most of us believe was unfairly rejected because of his paid reimbursements as a teamster for the Fauquier County Commissioners. So, Thank you, Dear Cousins, in Heaven and still on Earth, for your years of selfless, constant help, assistance, confidence, love.)
James T. Hammond’s new book, Tom’s War
To'ms war

James Thomas “Jim” Hammond

Hmmond

I also worked for more than twenty years with James Thomas Hammond, a direct descendant of John and Mary Peak Bramlett and native of Greenville County, S.C. Jim is a notable novelist, genealogist, retired journalist and editor, respected historian and author of Tom’s War, shown above, an epic tribute and historical memoir of his father Thomas D. Hammond’s military service as a World War II combat pilot, now available wherever we buy books.

James is a Retired Editor, Columbia Regional Busi- ness Report, Columbia, S.C.; Writer, SC BIZ maga- zine, Columbia, S.C.; Journalist for 40 years who began his career at the Greenville News in South Carolina, and worked for Wilmington (N.C.) Star-News, The (Columbia, S.C.) State, The Asian Wall Street Journal and Wall Street Journal/Europe.
Book Reviews
“Simultaneously exhilarating and terrifying, Tom’s War: Flying with the U.S. Eighth Army Air Force in Europe, 1944 portrays the training and combat experiences of Thomas D. Hammond. Hammond, a child of the Great Depression, braved the flak-filled skies of Europe in 1944 as copilot of a B-17 Flying Fortress for the U.S. Army.”
Hammond represents tens of thousands of young Ameri- cans who were proud to risk their lives in the skies over Germany. Although Hammond came home, many did not, including two of his close friends. Hammond’s son, author James T. Hammond, brilliantly immortalizes his father’s wartime memories in Tom’s War.”
Tom’s War is an excellent read. It is [a] comprehensive, well researched, and insightful documentation of the lives of several 8th Air Force flight crews, bringing home the hopes and despair of the airmen as they strive to destroy enemy targets and survive to finish a tour of combat and be the lucky ones to return to family and friends.” –Eugene Fletcher, former 95th Bomb Group combat pilot and author.]
James, who describes himself humorously on social media as “an ink stained wretch,” and his lovely wife, Elizabeth George Hammond, are parents of two grown, talented, successful, wonderful children, pictured  below: Thomas Hart Hammond, musician and award-winning photojournalist in South Carolina, and Sarah Hammond, graduate of Iowa Writer’s Workshop, who wasted no time achieving her amazing dream of becoming an award-winning playwright in the Big Apple.
Hammond Fam
Hammond's bookng
Hammond's fathers

Much appreciation is dedicated to the core group of researchers I worked with in the 1980s-1990s to investigate the lives of William Bramlett I/Sr. and his son Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and his grandson Henry Bramlett Jr.: three direct descendants of Mary Peak and John Bramlett who now rest in perpetual peace — 1. Robert Sidney Bramlett of Texas, 2. Patti Hendrix Eckhoff of Washington State, and 3. Sammie Jean Holley Day of Indiana, the latter being the first active researcher to connect some of us as direct descendants to our ancestor Henry Bramlett I/Sr. Sammie Jean shared the Fauquier County Bramlett information with me first, directly on the  telephone. A devoted researcher who carefully based her factual family information on official records, she later connected a computer to the internet and surfed the net almost nonstop to find increasingly available genealogical information and had a professional tech administrator create a family history web site for her. I, your blogger, do take credit for then finding the key to open the mystery of separating and connecting the many generations of Henry Bramlett I/Sr.’s family: starting with a group of three first cousins in the same generation named Reuben, including my direct ancestor, born March 15, 1757, in Fauquier Co., Va., who all have to be and are grandsons of Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and thus sons, respectively, of three brothers: Henry Bramlett Jr., William Bramblett, and Reuben Bramblett Sr. The search for connections of these three first cousins named Reuben led us to family in many states, first Virginia, then the Carolinas and Georgia, Kentucky and Illinois, and finally, west-ward ho! across the nation to California, Washington, and Oregon as adventurous family members in later generations began to populate parts of the entire country, “from sea to shining sea.”

Micheal Theron Bramblett and his Precious Grand Boy Gavin

Hi, Sweetie!

Mike Bramblett and Grandson Gavin

We can only estimate the ongoing positive influence of Michael Theron “Mike” Bramblett of Florida, a direct descendant of Elizabeth Moss and Henry Bramblett III, and a major promoter for the family brand. His generous contributions to our collective genealogy, in the form of bibliographical references, news clips, census data, marriages, deaths,  photos and other memorabilia posted for years on Bramblett/Bramlett InformationCenter, including possible English family members, are immeasurable. To access information about Brambletts/Bromletts in England, click on the red link above and make a menu selection. No one has yet connected them to our likely immigrant ancestor Ambrose “Bamblet” I/Sr. who came to America from England in 1690, or to our native born ancestor William Bramlett I/Sr. whose name first appears on recorded documents as an adult when he witnessed a land transaction in Essex County, Virginia, in 1715-1716. Visit Mike’s free web site to enjoy his vastcollection and support his dedication. He loves to receive and share family histories, records, documents, photos, and financial support to fund his web site.

Our main intent here in this blog is to ask about found, official records and information “What does it mean?” and to put into context what is known about several generations of Bramblette family members based on information found/provided in official records and documents.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1: AMBROSE BAMBLET/BRAMBLET I/SR.
CHAPTER 2: WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR. & UNKNOWN & ELIZABETH CALLAWAY
CHAPTER 3: HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR. & UNKNOWN
CHAPTER 4: REV. WILLIAM BRAMBLETT II/Jr. & ANNA BALLARD
CHAPTER 5: SARAH “SALLY” BRAMLETT & COL. JAMES CALLAWAY
CHAPTER 6: JAMES BRAMLETT & WINEFRED UNKNOWN PAGE
CHAPTER 7: NANCY “ANN” BRAMLETT & THOMAS LUMPKIN?
CHAPTER 8: AMBROSE BRAMLETT & JA
NE WOODSON
CHAPTER 9: AGATHA “AGGIE” BRAMLETT & STEPHEN WHITE
CHAPTER 10: ELIZABETH “BETTY” BRAMLETT & CAPT. JAMES BUFORD


AFTERWORD
WORKS CITED

 (not yet fully uploaded)

Chapter 1: Ambrose Bamblet/Bramblet I/Sr. & Unknown Wife

Chapter 2: William Bramlett I/Sr.  & Unknown First Wife & Second Wife, Elizabeth Callaway

Chapter 3: Henry Bramlett I/Sr. & Unknown Wife (Ch: Henry II/Jr., William m , Reuben I/Sr., Mary?)

Chapter 4: Henry Bramlett II/Jr. & Margaret ? Children: Benjamin, Marianne, Jalilah, Henry III, Reuben, John, Nathan, William? Sarah? Nancy? Lucy?

Sarah Bramlett, child of Margaret Peggy Unknown and Henry Bramlett II/Jr., was born in Fauquier Co., Va. She died in Laurens Co., S.C. She married Nicholas Ware Garrett.

Sarah Sallie Bramlett, child of First Wife Name Unknown and William Bramlett  I/Sr., was born before 1732 in Virginia. She lived in Bedford Co., Va., in 1754-1776. She first married Col. James Callaway Sr., son of Catherine and Joseph Callaway II. She  second married Leonard Leo Linus  Brown.

The only source of Sarah’s maiden name –Sallie Bramlet– is a published letter written in 1896 by her granddaughter Josephine Wigginton, then of Louisville, Ky. Josephine’s identity is easily located and documented in Kentucky Census data, which was  forwarded  my research to the Callaway Family web site.

“Calloway — My grandmother was Mary Calloway, a daughter of James Calloway and Sallie Bramlet. Their sons were Flanders, Dudley, Chelsey, James, Micajah, Edmund and William. The daughters were Elizabeth, Susan and Mary, my grandmother. Flanders Calloway married Jemima Boone, daughter of Daniel. Elizabeth was in the skiff with Frances Calloway and Jemima Boone when captured that fatal Sunday afternoon. They were rescued on Tuesday. Have heard my grandmother tell of their wonderful fortitude and presence of mind. Micajah and James Calloway were taken prisoners by the Indians at Blue Lick. Micajah remained a prisoner five years and was but seventeen when he reached home. Don’t know of any other connection between the Boone and Calloway families. Mrs. J. W.”

Correspondent Bramlett-Callaway Descendant Josephine Wigginton. Source: Genealogical and Historical Column, The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Ky., Sunday Morning, March 15, 1896.

Other references mention James Callaway Jr.’s capture by Indians at Boonesbor- ough. He was held for three years in a Quebec prison (Spraker, 1921). An 1884 Goodspeed reference does say, “Micajah Callaway, whose name is familiar to school children as a celebrated Indian fighter and frontiersman, was a close companion of Daniel Boone in Kentucky….” Micajah lived in Bourbon Co., Ky., before moving circa 1810 to Indiana. The story of the Indian capture of Jemima Boone and the two Callaway girls in July 1776 has been documented in other sources. In these accounts, Elizabeth and Frances Callaway, the girls in the skiff with Jemima Boone, are correctly identified as the daughters of Col. Richard Callaway. Elizabeth was not the daughter of Sarah Bramlett and Col. James Callaway Sr., as  Josephine Wigginton suggests in her letter. The names of James and Sarah’s children are fairly  accurate in the letter…although a son John, who died in 1821, also should be included.

Chapter 4: William Bramblett & Elizabeth Gist/Gest?

Chapter 5: Reuben Bramblett I/Sr. & Margaret Darnall?

Chapter 6: Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. & Anna Ballard

Chapter 5: Sarah Bramlett & James C. Callaway Sr. & Leonard Brown

Chapter 6: James Bramlett I/Sr. & Winnefred Unknown Page

Chapter 7: Nancy “Ann” Bramblett & Thomas Lumpkin Sr.

Chapter 8: Ambrose Bramblett II/Jr. & “Jane” “Janny” Woodson White

Chapter 9: Agatha “Aggie” Bramlett & Stephen White

Chapter 10: Elizabeth “Betty” Bramlett & Col. James Buford

Afterword
Your Blog Text Begins Here
Chapter 1: 
Generation 1
AMBROSE BAMBLET/BRAMBLET I/SENIOR
(Possible Immigrant 1690; Possible Patriarch of Bramblettes in America)
(Children: William I/Sr.? Others?)
bronze-virginia-seal
Virginia Commonwealth Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants
Probable Direct Ancestor, American Immigrant

AMBROSE BAMBLET (BRAMBLET) I/SR., parents unknown, was born before 1690 when he apparently immigrated to America. Assuming he was an adult at the time, he was born circa 1669-1672 or earlier. One immigration document recorded in Virginia Land Patents suggests Ambrose was transported from England in 1689 or 1690, most likely as an indentured servant, apparently alone without wife or other close relatives, to help populate New Kent Co., Va. It is not known if he actually boarded the ship, survived the journey and arrived on American soil. His missspelled name on the document dated April 21, 1690, is the only evidence yet found of his existence. In the land patent record, the scribe may have just misspelled his surname by omitting the “R” from Bramblet, a common variant spelling. Ambrose reportedly was one of forty-five persons named in the record who were transported to America by Capt. John Lyddal, who received 648 acres of land in St. John’s Parish, New Kent Co., Va., for bringing in the new settlers. St. John’s Parish was created in 1680. The original handwritten patent, difficult to decipher, contains a description of the land and indicates it may have been part of more than 2,200 acres previously granted to Capt. Geo. Lyddal and others.

A Partial Transcript

“To all &tc. whereas & Now Know ye that … lying and being in New Kent County in St. John’s Parish … 1690 beginning on south side of Black Creek at mouth of the south branch about 35 two pole chains below the new mill adjacent to … &tc now or late, of Mr. Napier &tc … acres granted to Capt. Geo. Lydal … & deserted & granted to Mr. John Langston … March 1672/3 but never present & deserted & granted to sd. John Lyddal by order &tc court 648 acres bering date of 17th of October 1689 by and for the importation of forty-five persons into the Collony, whose names…to have and to hold…the 21st of April anno dom 1690….Ambrose Bamblet….” (Virginia Land Patent Book 8, p. 45)

AMBROSE

Digital Record of John Lyddal’s April 21, 1690, Virginia Land Grant, courtesy Library of Virginia. The Ambrose Bamblet name is located at the bottom, left, last line, above slash marks

The patent identifies 44 other immigrants with different surnames; no wife or children are listed as transported with Ambrose. Without later records with the same names, we have no way of connecting the other persons to Ambrose. The other immigrants and Ambrose were most likely indentured servants who planned to work as farmers for a specific amount of years without pay in exchange for transportation to the new land. Ambrose apparently came to America to be free and become a farmer in Virginia. No record of the exact plot of land he planned to farm or actually farmed in St. John’s Parish has been found. No marriage record or other public or official or private record of him has been yet located in existing documents: New Kent is a burned county with few surviving early records. No other details of his life are known. The cause of his death, his death date and place and burial place are unknown. The name of his wife, if he married, is unknown. The names of his children, if he had any, are undocumented. However, he may be father of William Bramlett I/Sr., most likely born as an English/British citizen before 1694 in Colonial Virginia, then ruled by Great Britain, before the American Revolution unfurled England’s long, iron grip on the  colonies of the emerging new country. Ambrose I/Sr. and William I/Sr. do have geographical proximity in common: New Kent County, created 1634, where Ambrose reportedly lived, is very close–only two narrow counties away–from Essex County, created 1692, where William I/Sr. lived in 1715-1716.  No definitive record of immigration has been found for William. (One of William’s sons is named Ambrose Bramlette, perhaps a namesake of this paternal grandfather, and one of Reuben Bramblett Sr. and Henry Bramlett Sr.’s descendants is named Ambrose, perhaps another namesake of the probable immigrant.) If Ambrose I/Sr. had other children, in addition to William I/Sr., they are not yet known.

Chapter 2:
Generation 2
WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR. and UNKNOWN FIRST WIFE and ELIZABETH CALLAWAY
(Patriarch of Essex, Caroline, Lunenburg, Bedford, King George, Prince William, Fauquier Bramblettes)
(Children: Henry Sr., William II/Jr., Sarah, James, Nancy, Ambrose, Agatha, Elizabeth)
bronze-virginia-seal
Virginia Commonwealth Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants
Most Likely Direct Ancestor

WILLIAM BRAMLETT I/SR., perhaps child of Ambrose “Bamblet” /Bramblet I/Sr., was born in 1694-1695, most likely in Colonial Virginia. He witnessed a deed there in 1715-1716, which indicates he may have been at least age 21 and born in/by 1694-1695. Much later he successfully petitioned the Bedford County Court for an exemption from levies at about age 60 on Nov. 25, 1755, which suggests he indeed was born in 1694-1695. With a tax exemption, he was no longer required to pay taxes or work on roads or participate as an active member of the county and state militias. Although William I/Sr. has long been identified as our “immigrant ancestor,” no clear evidence of immigration has been found for him: He most likely was born here, in Colonial Virginia, to Ambrose “Bamblet” or Bramblet who reportedly arrived here in 1690 to help populate land in New Kent Co., Va. The name of William I/Sr.’s mother and first wife are unknown. William I/Sr. died between 1759 and 1762 in Bedford Co., Va. He probably died shortly before Nov. 26, 1759, the recording date for a deed he wrote six months earlier on May 3 that year. His burial place is unknown. He may be buried in the lost family graveyard on Bramblett land that later became Cedar Hill in Bedford, Va., the plantation established by his son Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. in 1760-1762. Or he may be buried in one of the church cemeteries nearby or in Callaway-Steptoe Cemetery. William Bramlett I/Sr. and his daughters and sons are all early settlers of Bedford since they already were living there in 1754 when the county was founded and created from Lunenburg. At some point, between 1747 and 1768, Bramblett Road was surveyed and cleared by William I/Sr. and/or some of his sons, perhaps including Ambrose and Rev. William Jr., to facilitate travel along or through an area now known as the former Cedar Hill Plantation in present day Bedford, Va. William Bramlett I/Sr., a surveyor living in Caroline County at least until late 1747 and living by 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg that became Bedford County in 1754, no doubt was involved in building his own road on his land or wherever he lived there. He did not “retire” until 1755, and Bramblett Road ran right past or through his son Rev. William Jr.’s Cedar Hill property: today it is known as West Main Street. The road existed on or before April 26, 1868, when son Rev. William Jr. was appointed surveyor for a road “from Bramblett’s [Road or house] to Augusta Road” (CB-3:424). Celebrated historian Lula Eastman Jeter Parker describes the thoroughfare but offers no date for its origin in Parker’s History of Bedford County, Virginia:

“’Bramblett’s Road’ is the first road of importance mentioned in Bedford County records. This was an east-to-west thoroughfare passing through New London, and what was later the town of Liberty, and on to the Botetourt County line. It was probably the same route as that followed by the Lynchburg and Salem Turnpike, built in the early 1830s, and practically the same, from Bedford to Roanoke, as State Highway 460 of today [1954].” (85)

Bedford County Family Sleuths – Jeter Parker & Ackerly Field:

  Cousins & Co-Authors of “Mystery of the Long Lost Bramblettes”

Ackerly Parker
Lula Eastman Jeter

A descendant of Elizabeth Bramlett Buford: the late Lula Eastman Jeter Parker (1873-1954), is a native and resident of Bedford Co., Va., historian, genealogist and author who was active in documenting local, state, regional, national and family history. She is co-author, with Mary Denham Ackerly Field, of Our Kin: The Genealogies of Some of the Early Families Who Made History in the Founding and Development of Bedford County, Virginia (Lynchburg, Va.: J. P. Bell, 1930) and co-author with Peter Viemeister of Parker’s History of Bedford County, Virginia (Bedford: Parker, Bedford: 1938; Bedford: Bedford Democrat, 1954).

Lula also contributed to a compilation naming Bedford County World War II veterans and was involved in many civic projects in her lifetime. She was an active member of Peaks of Otter D.A.R., a graduate of Belmont Seminary and Hollins Institute. She married George Pleasant Parker, and both rest at Oakwood Cemetery, Bedford, Va. They are parents of four children. Lula directly descends from parents, Laurie Cornelia Mays and Thomas Alexander Jeter, who also had another daughter, Laura E. M. Jeter Davidson. Thomas Alexander Jeter (1841-1885) is son of Virginia Ann White (1820-1877) and Fielding Harris Jeter (1810-1894), and Laurie Cornelia Mays Jeter (1851-1876) is daughter of Malinda Wright and Joseph W. Mays. Virginia Ann White Jeter is daughter of Matilda Buford (1793-1876) and Jacob Washington White (1792-1829). Matilda Buford, daughter of Martha Hill Logwood Hubbard and William Buford, is listed as under guardianship of Thomas Logwood (grandfather) when she married Jacob Washington White in 1812 in Bedford County. She second married William Thaxton. William Buford (1760s-1794) of Crab Orchard, Ky., is son of Elizabeth Bramblett and Capt. James Buford and grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr. (See their history above.) Jacob Washington White descends from Capt. Jacob White, son of Henry White, the former of Buckingham and Bedford counties and a Revolutionary War veteran who married Hannah Spiers and Nancy Oglesby. (No information about how or if Capt. Jacob White is related to Stephen White, husband of Agatha Bramblett, and his father, Thomas White of Essex/Caroline Co., Va.)

   A Bramlett-White cousin of Lula Eastman Jeter Parker is the late Mary Denham Ackerly Field (1885-1970), a native and resident of Bedford Co., Va., also historian, genealogist, author, who is co-author with Lula of Our Kin. Mary Denham Ackerly Field, who married George Harris Field (1868-1937), is daughter of Mary Conna Blount White (1862-1968) and John Paul Glascow Ackerly Sr. (1850-1927). Mary Conna Blount White Ackerly is daughter of Mary Virginia White (1836-1916) and John Milton White (1831-1920). Mary Virginia White is daughter of Mary Ann Gwatkin (1810-1846) and Henry Milton White (1805-1867). Henry Milton White is son of Hannah Spiers (1700-1780) and Capt. Jacob White (1763-1832), Virginia Militia, Revolutionary War. John Milton White (1831-1920) is son of Caroline Poindexter (1809-1837) and Col. William Allen White(1804-1844) who also is son of Hannah Spiers and Capt. Jacob White.

   Capt. Jacob White, of Buckingham and Bedford counties, who married Hannah Spiers and Nancy Oglesby, reportedly is the son of Henry White. (As noted above, no information yet about how or if Henry White or Capt. Jacob White is related to Stephen White, husband of Agatha Bramblett, and his father, Thomas White of Essex/Caroline and Bedford Co., Va.)

Lula Jeter Parker is a direct descendant of William Bramlett I/Sr. through his daughter Elizabeth Bramlett, an early settler of Bedford in 1754, who married Col. James Buford. Able-bodied landowners and non-exempt residents were asked/required to clear and construct roads for their and public use by county courts in colonial and early America. County orders to “view a road” (meaning to suggest a location and/or survey the site) are common in early records.

William’s Marriages

 William I/Sr. married at least twice and had seven or eight children. He probably married his first wife, name unknown, circa 1710. She most likely is mother of Henry I/Sr., Rev. William II/Jr., Sarah, Elizabeth, James and Nancy. William I/Sr. married his second wife, Elizabeth Callaway, circa 1732 in Essex or Caroline Co., Va. She most likely is mother of Ambrose, Agatha “Aggie” and Elizabeth “Bettie” Bramlett. Elizabeth Callaway, daughter of unproven mother (Catherine Brown/ Browning?) and Joseph Callaway II/Jr., was born circa 1710 in Virginia, according to the late Bobbie Callaway, former Callaway Association Historian. (Elizabeth cannot be mother of William I/Sr.’s eldest son Henry I/Sr. since Henry I/Sr. and his stepmother Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett share the same birth year–1710.) Elizabeth died before 1759, probably in Caroline, Lunenburg or Bedford County, since she is not mentioned in the deed of gift dated that year which William I/Sr. wrote to transfer property to his son-in-law Stephen White, husband of Agatha “Aggie” Bramblett, to make plans for room and board and care during the last years of his life. He would have made legal, written living arrangements for Elizabeth as well if she were still alive at that time. The 1759 deed indicates William I/Sr. wrote a will in 1758 that names heirs and legacies; however, unfortunately, its location is unknown and it apparently was not recorded. The Whites may have had the will and kept it after he died and when they moved to  Kentucky. A reference to William Bramlett Senr., as a payee who is owed a small amount of money from an estate, is included in Bedford County Probates for 1762. The administrator or scribe did not refer to “the estate” of William Bramlett, who probably died in 1759-1762, because William did not leave an estate. He bequeathed what he owned to legatees in his missing will and transferred farm tools, land and livestock, and other items to his son-in-law Stephen White in a deed of gift. A small debt was acknowledged in the 1762 estate record; who was paid is not provided, known; whether or not William Bramlett I/Sr. was still alive or deceased in 1762 is not known. The scribe had local knowledge; he apparently did not feel the need to write “William Bramlett Senr. deceased” on the list of debts since all involved would have known if William were alive or dead and to whom to pay the debt.

William’s Life in Colonial Virginia

   William I/Sr. is the oldest definite Bramblette family member found so far in existing records, not counting Ambrose I/Sr. William I/Sr. first appears as an adult, most likely at least age 21, as a witness on a Feb. 16-17, 1715-1716, deed recorded in Essex County (DB-11:62). “William Bramlit” signed the deed, which records the lease or sale of 53 acres of land in St. Mary’s Parish, Essex Co, Va., by Matthew Collins to John Morgan, both of Essex County. George Robinson and John Smith also witnessed the document, which was recorded March 20, 1715-1716. The land, adjacent to a corner of John Ellitt’s land and the south fork of Peumansend Creek Swamp called the Beaverdam Branch, was formerly granted/patented April 17, 1667, to Henry Peters who later died. The land was located in an area of St. Mary’s Parish that later became Caroline County. Essex County, created 1692, is near New Kent where Ambrose I/Sr. reportedly settled in 1690. Since William I/Sr. may have been at least age 21 to legally witness the 1715-1716 record, the signature allows us to calculate his birth year as in/before 1694-1695. Essex also is adjacent to King George County, created 1721, where planter Henry Bramlett I/Sr., believed to be son of William I/Sr., was living in 1735. The early found and documented Bramblettes in 1690-1715-1735–Ambrose I/Sr., William I/Sr., Henry I/Sr.–lived in relatively close geographical proximity to each other, within the same small region in three counties of eastern Colonial Virginia. William I/Sr. is mentioned in several Essex and Caroline County records, a few times as a witness to land transactions and a few times as the plaintiff and defendant in court cases. He and John Sanders witnessed a deed on Feb. 18-19, 1716, when Thomas Griffin leased or sold 100 acres of land in Essex County to George Robinson (DB-11:64). He also witnessed a deed on July 13-14, 1722, when Allin Frazier of Essex County sold land to William Blanton of the same county (DB-11:84). Thomas Smith, George Robinson and Joan Frazier also witnessed (made their marks on) the document. William I/Sr. also served on several Caroline County juries between 1733-1736. He most likely lived in a portion of Essex that became Caroline in 1728, a legal boundary change based on a legislative act of 1727. It is not known if William Bramlett I/Sr. owned land in Essex and/or Caroline County. Exactly which land he owned in Lunenburg/Bedford County is not known, but the items in his personal possession in 1759, including livestock and household goods, suggest he owned a home and land and his occupation was planter and farmer. He may have first owned the land his son Rev. William II/Jr. acquired or inherited from the mysterious missing will, near Callaway family land, with a majestic view of the Peaks of Otter, perhaps part of more than 700 acres of land used to establish Cedar Hill Plantation circa 1760-1761.
An important court record: William Bramlett I/Sr. and the Callaway family: 
   Ann Callaway, sister of Thomas Callaway, petitioned the Caroline County Court to choose “Wm. Bramblitt” as her guardian on Oct. 12, 1732. (Ann would have been at least age 12 and under age 18, thus born between 1715-1720, in order to legally choose a guardian in Virginia in 1732.) Thomas Callaway, eldest son of the surviving siblings, who had administered his father’s estate, was summoned to answer the petition (OB-1732-1740:43). Both Thomas and Ann are children of Joseph Callaway II/Jr. of Essex County, the latter who reportedly died of a fever in 1732, according to family tradition and a Bible reference. His other children include Elizabeth Callaway, born in 1710, second wife of William Bramlett I/Sr. and Richard Callaway, a resident of Essex/Caroline County who moved to Lunenburg County by 1752. “Rich. Callaway” is included in the Tithe List that year living near William Bramlett I/Sr. and with the latter’s son “Amb. [Ambrose] Bramlet” as a tithable, a white male over 16, in his Callaway house. Richard paid three tithes. Thomas Mosely created the tithe list for John Phelps. (Richard Callaway and brother William Callaway were among the first justices appointed in Bedford County in 1754. Their brother is Col. James C. Callaway Sr. who married Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett, daughter of William Bramlett I/Sr., most likely in Lunenburg County by 1752. James Callaway and brothers served as soldiers in  the French & Indian Wars. James died in Bedford Co., Va., in 1767 before the American Revolution. Col. Richard Callaway later moved with Col. Daniel Boone to Fort Boonesborough, Ky., where he served as an officer during the American Revolution and was killed, scalped and mutilated by Indians near the fort but on his claim at his ferry in 1779.) “Wm. Bramlet Jr.” is listed as a tithable with his father, William I/Sr., on John Phelps’ list of residents whose names were collected by Matthew Talbot for Lunenburg County in 1752. William and Richard also may be on other tithe lists for earlier and later years. (This Ambrose later married Jean “Jane” “Janny” Woodson and moved to North Carolina and Georgia; he is not the elder Ambrose “Bamblet, possible immigrant, who would have been at least 80-85 in 1755 if still alive, and exempt, thus not of tithable age.) Ann Callaway is the youngest sister of Elizabeth Callaway Bramlett, and her relationship is the reason Ann selected her brother-in-law William Bramlett I/Sr. as her guardian in 1732. There is no other documentation for the implied marriage of Elizabeth and William I/Sr., but he and sons are named with Callaways in several other Virginia records as well.
   William I/Sr. and Elizabeth, if she were still living, resided in Caroline County until at least 1747 before moving south to Lunenburg County. On Nov. 13, 1747, “The Court proceed to lay the County levy” and paid William Bramlett 300 pounds of tobacco, perhaps for surveying. The court had appointed William Bramlett surveyor “in the room of” (to replace) John Ralls on April 10, 1741.
   William I/Sr. moved his family by 1752 to a portion of Lunenburg Co., Va., that became Bedford County in 1754. He was considered an early settler of Bedford County since he was living in the area when land boundaries changed to create Bedford. He was still living in Bedford a few years later when the county court on Nov. 25, 1755, gave him the above mentioned tax exemption due to his age: 60 years or older.

 “Wm. Bromlet Senr.”–either William I/Sr. in 1762 or his son Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. in 1766 — is referenced as a creditor who was due 5 shillings in the Bedford Co., Va., estate of William Boyd, dated between 1762 and Sept. 23, 1766. (WB-1:21-24). By the latter date, Rev. William Bramblett Jr. may have been the senior William “Bromlet” in Bedford. The scribe/clerk would not have referenced William Bromlet Senr.’s estate as the creditor because there was no estate: William Bramlett I/Sr. had deeded his property to son-in-law Stephen White in 1759 and bequeathed other legacies to heirs named in his mysterious, lost 1758 will, which was not recorded. The deed of gift to his son-in-law was not a probate record and does not name the heirs of those legacies or the items bequeathed in the 1758 will.
    “William Bramblet Sr.” signed the bill of sale for livestock and other property to son-in-law Stephen White on May 3, 1759, and it was recorded as a deed of gift in Bedford County in 1759:

“Bramlet to White Bill of Sale: Know All Men by these Presents that I William Bramlet Senr. of the County of Bedford & Parish of Russel, do Bargain, Contract & Deliver unto Stephen White for a Valuable Consideration, that is to say for my maintainanse in a Decent and Wholesom manner with Clothing agreeable to my age, diet, washing & Lodging in a good & Wholesom & becoming Manner During Life, all & singular my Stock of Cattle & Hoggs & Household goods & all other appertenance to me Belonging of what Nature or Kind soever after the Legacies mentioned in my Will bearing date 6th of February 1758 are paid as I give this Bill of Sail only to Stringthen the Right & … Impower the said Stephen White in his Part and do warrant the same from myself and from any Person or Persons Whatsoever given under my Hand this third day of May 1759 William Bramlett” (DB-A-1:238)

John Robinson and William and Anester Young or Going witnessed the document, which was recorded Nov. 26, 1759, in Bedford Co., Va. Mortimeyer and Revesz read the Young surname as “Gowing” and note the Gowing family name has evolved to Gowan, that some of William and Anester’s descendants may have moved to Bedford Co., Tenn. (201). 
   William I/Sr.’s children are listed in an unpublished manuscript titled “Bramblett” written by Bedford County historian and Bramblette-Buford descendant Lula Eastman Jeter Parker in Bedford County on Sept. 28, 1933. Parker and the late Mrs. Mary A. Bell Buford (second wife of Rowland Dabney “R. D.” Buford, who was then in 1933 deceased), “both searched the records of Bedford County, Va., for data of the Bramblett family, and often talked over our findings.” Parker deposited her brief history with the Bedford County clerk. She writes, 

“We concluded that William Bramblett, Sr., settled in Brunswick County in the early 1700’s, perhaps in territory that was cut off into Lunenburg in 1748, and into Bedford in 1754; and that, since we found no other Bramblett who could have been his contemporary, he must have been the progenitor of the family in Virginia, and that he was the father of all of the older Brambletts in this section. He died after November 26, 1759, when he made a Bill of Sale to Stephen White, and perhaps before 1761, when his daughter, Elizabeth, (my [Lula’s] ancestress) married James Buford, for she signed her own marriage bond.”

William I/Sr.’s 1759 deed was written in May and recorded Nov. 26, so he may have died before or on the later date. These two family sleuths focused mainly on their beloved Bedford records for Bramblettes and did not check other Virginia counties, which would have introduced them to a whole new world of family members and activities in Essex, Caroline, King George, Prince William and Fauquier. They would have discovered in Caroline County Court records that William Bramlett I/Sr.’s residence was not Lunenburg County when it still was Brunswick County–before May 1, 1746; recorded documents at that time prove he was living in Essex and then Caroline County until at least November 1747. However, he did live in 1752 in a portion of Lunenburg, formerly Brunswick, that became Bedford in 1754. Historians in the 1930s did not have the easy access to the large amount of information that genealogical researchers enjoy today, but Parker and Mrs. (Mary A. Bell) Buford did have easy access to Bedford paper records because Mrs. Buford was the wife of the county clerk. Rowland Dabney “R. D.” Buford, 1827-1921, served 32 years in that capacity. (Mary A. Bell Buford was born in 1838 and died in 1930. She and Rowland are buried in Longwood Cemetery.)
   Parker lists the following children for William Bramlett I/Sr. in her brief history:
1) Rev. William Bramblett Jr., who married Anna Ballard 1760-1761 and died in Kentucky Wilderness 1779; 2) Ambrose, who married Jane Woodson, lived in North Carolina in 1779, and died 1804 Wilkes Co., Ga.; 3) James who married a woman named Winifred and died in 1758; 4) Elizabeth who married James Buford in 1761; and 5) Nancy, mentioned in her brother James Bramlett’s will. [Parker also lists as possible children of William I/Sr.:] 6) Lucy who married Thomas Lumpkin on March 4, 1778; 7) Molly who married Stephen Dooley on July 24, 1781; and 8) Aggy, wife of Stephen White. 
However, Lucy and Molly were born and married much later, between seventeen and twenty years, respectively, than Elizabeth Bramlett Buford. Molly (Bramlett) Dooley is a grandchild of William Bramlett I–the daughter of Rev. William II/Jr. and Anna, according to their estate records. Lucy (Bramlett) Lumpkin also is probably a grandchild of William Bramlett I: Theory: She may be the only child of James Bramlett who died after he was paid for service during the French & Indian Wars in Bedford County in 1758, and his wife, Winefred. Through a process of elimination, Lucy is not the daughter of Ambrose Bramlette: He names all of his children in his 1804 will. Nor is she the daughter of Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr. and Anna: Their daughter Lucy married Patrick Nenney in 1796 in Bedford County and moved to Tennessee. No daughters have yet surfaced for Henry I/Sr. of Prince William/Fauquier unless Mary Bramlett Darnall is his daughter.
   Other children of William Bramlett I/Sr. not mentioned by Parker are Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett who first married Col. James C. Callaway Sr., son of Joseph Callaway II/Jr., and then second married Leonard “Linus” “Lynah” “Liner” “Leo” Brown, and Henry Bramlett Sr., a planter living in King George County, Va., in 1735 when he bought land in a portion of Prince William County that later became Fauquier County, whose wife is unknown. (King George County in 1735 was adjacent to a portion of Essex County that later became Caroline County where William Bramlett I/Sr. lived from 1715-1716 to 1747.)
   (Note: Lula Eastman Jeter Parker’s 1930s history books, although out of print, are still in high demand and treasured today. She and her White cousin Mary Denham Ackerly co-authored a wonderful book, Our Kin, which includes Boones, Callaways, Bufords, Whites and other allied relatives.)

Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages of America: A Collection of Genealogical Studies, Completely Documented and Appropriately Illustrated, Bearing Upon Notable Early American Lines and Their Collateral Connections (New York: American Historical Company, 1939) contains the following information about the sons of William Bramlett I/Sr. in a section entry titled “Bramlette”:

William, Ambross and Amhus Bramlette or Bramlett were early bearers of the name in Bedford County, Virginia. It is possible that they were brothers….In the militia rosters contained in Hening’s “Statutes at Large” is found a Bedford County list of September, 1758, in which appear the names of Ambrose Bramlett, sergeant; Amhus Bramlett, and William Bramlett. [Note: Their brother James, died 1758, also is listed in the Hening record as a paid soldier.] 
A William Bramlett was “one of the oldest settlers in Bedford County, and a sergeant in the Colonial Army.” He was father of Elizabeth, who married, July 4, 1761, in Bedford County, James Buford, son of John and Judith Beauford, of Culpeper County, Virginia. After carefully considering the land transactions… between Ann Bramlette (widow), her sons, James and Reuben Bramlette, and James Buford, it seems highly probable that William Bramlette, the sergeant, was also the father of William Bramlette [Yes, Rev. Jr., husband of Anna Ballard]….” (209-210)

Actually, the cited Hening’s Statutes does not designate William I/Sr. or II/Jr. as sergeant, and since William I/Sr. was age 60 in 1755, it seems unlikely he would have served as a sergeant in the military at age 63 in 1758; but perhaps a record may surface indicating he served as a sergeant during an earlier time and his rank is noted in other records, or that his son William II/Jr. served with that rank. In either case, William I/Sr. was an early settler of Bedford, as were his children, when it was created in 1754, and he was the father of William II/Jr. who died 1779, James I who died 1758, Ambrose II/Jr. who died 1804, Elizabeth Bramlett Buford, and Sarah Bramlett Callaway. “Amhus” cited by Hening most likely is a misspelling of Ambrose (Ambus/Ambos/Ambros); no other reference to “Amhus” has yet been found. Hening also refers to a “Francis” Bramlett, who is a complete mystery.
Since Bible and probate records have not surfaced for some of the early generations, especially for William Bramlett I/Sr., extensive research in official Virginia and South Carolina records has been used to reconstruct William Bramlett I/Sr.’s family: Henry Bramlett I/Sr., Rev. William Bramblett II/Jr., Sarah “Sallie” Bramlett Callaway Brown, James Bramlett I, Nancy (Ann?) Bramlett Lumpkin, Ambrose Bramlette, Elizabeth Bramlett Buford, and Agatha “Aggie” Bramlett White.

End Note
   In addition, in the interest of reducing confusion, note the Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages biography quoted above, in a footnote that incorrectly identifies Reuben, brother of James and son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr., as Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky.: but the two Reubens come from different generations, had different fathers and lived in different areas in Virginia, i.e., Bedford and Fauquier, and definitely are not one and the same. The biography quotes an abstract from Reuben Sr.’s will: “Reuben; his will, dated December 10, 1806, and proved in January, 1807, in Bourbon County, Kentucky (WB-C-198), mentions wife Peggy; son-in-law, John Grinstead; son Hugh; three children in South Carolina, Reuben, Jr., Milly Robertson and Polly Robertson; son William; son Lewis; land I claim from heirs of Martin Pickett, deceased; son Henry. Executors, John Grinstead, Henry and Hugh Bramblett. Witnesses, Will Mitchell, Edward Riley, Reubin Bramblett, Jr.” (209-10). The following portion of the footnote, citing marriages from two different Reubens as the marriages of one Reuben, is incorrect: “Reuben Bramlette married (first) December 10, 1789, Sally Ashton [Abston]; probably (second) Margaret (‘Peggy’).” Reuben, son of Anna Ballard and William Bramlett Jr., returned to Bedford Co., Va., from Fayette Co., Ky., and married Sally Abston; they remained in Virginia, appearing in Bedford census records in 1810-1820 and court records there in 1830. The other Reuben Bramblett Sr. of Bourbon Co., Ky., is the son of Henry Bramlett I/Sr. of Prince William (later Fauquier) Co., Va., and grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr.; Reuben Sr. never lived in Bedford County and never married Sally Abston. Reuben Bramblett Sr. married a woman named Margaret “Peggy,” surname unknown, perhaps Darnall but not proven, and went to Bourbon Co., Ky., from Fauquier County in 1794-95 after trading his Virginia land to Martin Pickett, as documented in Fauquier County deeds and the 1796 tax list for Bourbon Co., Ky. (DB-12:145; DB-12:324). A completely different man, not Reuben Sr. of Bourbon, the Reuben who married Sally Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, in Bedford, may have first applied for a marriage license to wed Lucy Abston, also a daughter of Jesse Abston and sister of Sally Abston, whom Reuben married in 1790. (Jesse Abston signed as surety.) Or Bedford County may have made a mistake, wrote Lucy instead of Sally, when they entered the following record: “Dec. __, 1790, Reuben Bramblett and Lucy Abston Married by Joseph Drury.” If Reuben and Lucy did marry, their marriage was later annulled: Lucy Abston, daughter of Jesse Abston, later married Joel Callaway in Bedford County on Dec. 27, 1793. Alderson Weeks performed their marriage ceremony. Lucy and Joel applied for their marriage license on Dec. 24, 1793. Thomas Pullen signed as surety, and Lucy is named as the daughter of Jesse Abston. So, Reuben Sr. of Bourbon County is not the son of Anna Ballard and Rev. William Bramlett II/Jr.; however, as a son of Henry Bramlett I/Sr., Reuben Sr. is considered a grandson of William Bramlett I/Sr., as is Reuben, son of Rev. William II/Jr., who married Sally Abston in Bedford County. (No son named Reuben has yet been found for William Bramlett I/Sr.; but an ancestor named Reuben seems entirely plausible given the repeated  given name in the family.)

Note: I recall a vague reference to one Henry Bramlett, surname spelling unknown, who came to America as a soldier in a foreign legion, perhaps on a Spanish or French Ship, landed on the East Coast. No other information. Please contact the blogger if you know the source and any other information or theories about this Henry. Could he be Henry Bramlett I/Sr. below? Thank you.

 

Henry Bramlett I/Sr.

(Known Children: Henry “Harry” Bramlett Jr., William Bramblett, Reuben Bramblett Sr.)
Virginia Seal
Virginia State Seal and Motto Sic Semper Tyrannis: Thus Ever To Tyrants

Henry Bramlett I/Sr., a planter living in King George County, Va., in 1735, bought land in a portion of Prince William County that later became Fauquier County. The name of his wife is unknown. (King George County in 1735 was adjacent to a portion of Essex County that later became Caroline County where William Bramlett I lived from 1715-1716 to 1747. William settled in Bedford, and Henry in Fauquier.)

HENRY BRAMLETT I/SR., believed to be child of Unknown First Wife and William Bramlett I/Sr., was born in or before 1710, most likely in Essex County, Colonial Virginia. No documentary evidence has been found to connect Henry I/Sr. and William I/Sr. as father and son; however, they lived near each other and William I/Sr., excepting Ambrose I/Sr., is the only known documented “Bramblette” who was old enough to have been Henry I/Sr.’s father. Henry I/Sr. probably died intestate between 1752 and 1758, in Prince William (later Fauquier) Co., Va., after he was replaced as constable there in 1752, and before his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture and began paying taxes on it for 1758 in 1759. (Land and tax records show Henry I/Sr. is the father of Henry II/Jr. Two other adult males living nearby in Prince William/Fauquier are considered sons of Henry I/Sr. as well, based on geographical proximity and a process of elimination for other possibilities. No will, probate or Bible records have surfaced for Henry I/Sr. His exact death date and place, cause of death and burial place is unknown. The name of his wife, unfortunately, is unknown.

Henry Bramlett Sr.’s Life in Virginia

   Henry I/Sr. was a planter living in Brunswick Parish in King George Co., Va., in 1735 when he purchased half of a contiguous tract of 500 acres of land–250 acres more or less–in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., from a man named John Ambrose. The recorded “lease” or first deed of their transaction indicates “John Ambrose of Brunswick Parish King George, planter” sold 250 acres on Elk Marsh Run adjacent to Jonas William’s line to “Henry Bramblet of same, planter” for twenty-five pounds sterling. John Ambrose owned about 500 acres of land in Prince William County, which he may have inherited or purchased or received though a gift or grant, patent. John Ambrose then acknowledged the sale to “Henry Bramblet” in a “release” or second deed for the land, which was recorded in Prince William Co., Va., Court on Sept. 17, 1735 (DB-B:482). The transaction was witnessed by George Harrison, John James and Hugh West. (In Virginia in the early 1700s, one deed, known as a bargain and sale–and/or two deeds–a lease and release–could be prepared and recorded to transfer a full title when land or other property was sold or traded.) Available land at that point was scarce in Virginia and generally sold or transferred in the family when possible, so it is conceivable to logically consider a familial relationship by blood or marriage between Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and/or William Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose and/or a first wife. (His spouse in 1747, Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington, was about twenty-five years younger than John and may have been a second wife.) John Ambrose was born in Rappahannock Co., Va., circa 1684, according to a 1747 deposition stating his age as 63, (making him a contemporary of William Bramlett I/Sr.) and died at about age 72 in 1756. Elizabeth Ambrose states her age as 36 in her 1747 deposition, which means she was born circa 1711-1712 (DB-L:12-13). They were deposed witnesses in a case regarding a land title dispute between neighbors. Planter Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and planter and church warden John Ambrose both moved their families from King George County and farmed adjoining tracts of land on Elk Marsh Run, Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, beginning in 1735.
   John Ambrose and John Champe, relationship unknown, both Church Wardens of the Parish of Brunswick, King George Co., Va., bought 200 acres of land there for 100 pounds sterling money of Great Britain from Hugh French, Gentleman, of Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., Va., on May 31, and June 1, 1733 (DB-1729-1735:260-262/DB-1A:260-262). Deeds of lease and release with receipt of money were recorded June 1, 1733. Hugh French’s wife on May 4, 1733, appointed a representative for her dower release: “Know all men I Mary French, wife of Hugh French appoint Thomas Turner my lawfull Attorney” in the “sale of 200 acres conveyed by my husband to John Champe & John Ambris [sic Ambrose] Church Wardens for a Glebe for the said Parish of Brunswick” in order to “relinquish my right of dower.” The power of attorney was recorded June 1, 1733. Mary Browne Triplett French, daughter of Original and Jane (Brooks) Browne, and wife of first husband, Francis Triplett, died after the above record and before Oct. 5, 1736, when Hugh French wrote his will in Stafford County and named children but no wife (WB-M:247).
   “Henry Brimlett” is included on a 1738 Rent Roll for Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., which indicates he was at least age 21 and thus born in or before 1717. He paid five shillings on 250 acres of land for one year from Michaelmass 1738 to Michaelmass 1739. (Source: “Rent Roll from Michaelmass 1738 to Michaelmass 1739.” Prince William County, Virginia, manuscripts in the Huntington Library, 1 microfilm reel [366 frames]; RELIC Microfilm 975.527 Pri. page 2.) This land is the property Henry bought from John Ambrose in 1735.
   Henry Bramlett I/Sr. and John Ambrose’s residences are mentioned as landmarks in several recorded deeds, and Henry I/Sr. witnessed a few documents in Hamilton Parish, Prince William Co., Va., during various years up to 1750-51. They lived near Tinpot Run and Elk Marsh Run and Licking Run and Welches Rolling Road. Henry Bramlett I/Sr.’s property is mentioned as a landmark on a deed written March 16, 1744, when James Genn bought some land for his neighbor Catesby Cock/e of Fairfax County. The land, situated on Elk Marsh Run and Tinpot Run and Welches Rolling Road, was adjacent to property already owned by Catesby Cock/e and adjacent to property then owned by Henry Bramblet, Jonas Williams, Morgan Darnall, Nathaniel Dodd, John Bush and someone named Garner, Gardner or Gardiner. James Genn surveyed the property. Daniel Marr, Nathaniel Dodd and William Cairn witnessed the deed, which was recorded in Prince William County on Aug. 30, 1745 (DB-1745/46). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on Aug. 21-22, 1746, when James Genn of Prince William County sold to John Higgins some property in Hamilton Parish on the branches of Elk Marsh and Tinpot runs. The property “bounded…along the land of Morgan Darnall to a Hickory and one red and 1 box Oak corner of said Darnall & Jonas Williams then with Williams line N. E. to a black Oak & Hickory in the said line Corner of Henry Bramblets land thence with Bramblets line N.W. to a large marked Hickory another of Bramblets corners thence No. W. to a box Oak by Welches Roling Road Corner of said Bramblet thence with another of his lines No. E. to a Spanish Oak on the side of a stony Ridge thence N. Wt. to a large live Oak in a Pond…” (DB-1745/46:173-77; GB-F:244). Henry I/Sr.’s property also is mentioned as a landmark in a deed on March 11, 1745, when Augustine Jennings, planter of Prince William, bought property next to him from Honer and planter Jonas T. Williams: a “parcel of land containing One hundred and eight acres being in the Parish of Hamilton and County of Prince William adjoyning to a tract of land one part whereof in possession of John Ambros the other part whereof in possession of Henry Bramlet….” The acreage was granted to Jonas Williams on March 6, 1718, and was currently in possession of Augustine Jennings as a result of a one-year indenture. The cost was 3,000 pounds of lawfull Tobacco Current money of Virginia. Jno. Crump and John Bohanan witnessed the deed on March 24, 1745 (DB-1745/56:36-40). Henry Bramlett later witnessed Augustine Jennings’s will on Dec. 13, 1776, in Hamilton Parish, Fauquier County, and it was probated there Aug. 24, 1778 (WB-1:348). (Peter Barker and Lucretia Russell also witnessed the document. Heirs include wife Hannah, daughter Betty, daughter Hannah, daughter Sally, daughter Jemima Hudnall, daughter Nancy Weathers, son William, son Benjamin, son Baylor, son George, son Berryman, son Lewis, son Augustin Jennings. One Jennings daughter, Fanny, married circa 1767 Thomas Obannon, son of Samuel Obannon, nephew of Elizabeth Obannon Ambrose Etherington. One of Thomas Obannon’s sons is named John Ambrose Obannon.) Henry I/Sr.’s property is again mentioned as a landmark in a deed written March 30, 1748, when William Kernes bought some Prince William County land nearby. The land, situated on Licking Run, adjoined property then owned by someone named Page, Major Catesby Cocke, Thomas Stone, Henry Bramblet and John Ambrose who farmed adjoining tracts of land, and Colonel Carter. The deed was recorded April 2, 1748, in Prince William County (DB-1745/56:42). Henry I/Sr. also is listed on the 1751 Prince William Co., Va., tithable list, which records taxes for certain tithables and particular items of personal property. Henry I/Sr. witnessed a deed on Feb. 5, 1750/51, which records a transaction between John Darnall and Morgan Darnall regarding the dividing line of property left to them by the Darnall’s deceased father, Morgan Darnall Sr., in Hamilton Parish of Prince William County. The bond later was recorded Feb. 28, 1760 (DB-1759/78:59-60).
   One recorded reference to Henry I/Sr. in Prince William County Court documents indicates that, in addition to being a planter, he also was the constable there in 1752 when he was replaced. No reason was given. An entry in Prince William County Court Minute Book on Nov. 27, 1752, indicates Thomas Gardner was appointed constable “in the Room of Henry Bramlet.” Gardner was ordered that day to “go before some Justice of the peace and be sworn accordingly” there (MB-1:77). Although no reason is given in the court record, the act of replacement suggests Henry I/Sr. may have been seriously ill or already dead. At about age 42-50, he probably was not ready to retire due to old age. No other existing court, land or tax records have been found that refer to him as being alive or dead in Prince William or Fauquier County or any other place in Virginia after 1752. It appears his eldest son, Henry II/Jr., inherited his plantation through primogeniture by 1758. Tax records indicate Henry I/Sr.’s other two sons–William and Reuben Sr.–had their own separate land in 1759. Henry I/Sr.’s three sons also owned their own land in Fauquier Co., Va., in 1770, according to the Rent Roll, which lists Henry Bramlett (Jr.) with 250 acres, his father’s former land, Reuben Bramlett with 150 acres and William Bramlett with 123 acres. Henry II/Jr. apparently did not farm the plantation while living next to John Ambrose since the latter died circa 1756. The latter’s wife, Elizabeth Obannon, married again to John Etherington (a.k.a. Edrington) circa 1762, and he also died before October 1769, before Nov. 29, 1776, when she wrote her will as Elizabeth Etherington in Fauquier County (WB-1:323). Henry “Harry” Bramlett II/Jr. witnessed her will, which was probated March 23, 1778. (Elizabeth’s heirs include Catherine Nelson, Betty Allen, Catherine Duncan, Benjamin Russell, nephew Thomas Obannon son of her brother Samuel and wife, Stelle Obannon, Capt. John Wright. Elias Edmonds Sr. and Jeremiah Darnall were named executors; other witnesses: Berryman Jennings, James Wright.) Elizabeth Obannon was born circa 1716-1720, the daughter of Bryant Boru Obannon, as he named himself in his will, reportedly an immigrant from Ireland, and, according to family tradition, first wife, Zena Sarah Isham. (Daughter Elizabeth Ambrose is named as an heir of 60 pounds current money and horses in Bryant Boru Obannon’s 1760 will [WB-1:41].) Henry I/Sr. and unknown wife/wives had three known sons: Henry II/Jr., William and Reuben Sr. If he had daughters, unfortunately, their names are not yet known, unless one is Mary who married a Darnall and is named in a deed with Reuben Sr. and her husband in a Fauquier Co., Va., recorded deed.

HENRY BRAMLETT II/JR., child of Unknown Mother and Henry Bramlett I/Sr., was born circa 1730, most likely in King George County, Colonial Virginia. He became profoundly despondent after the death of his eldest son, Benjamin. Family tradition, backed up with documents, hold that Ben died on a British Prison Ship during the American Revolution. Henry  Jr. died a suicide, most likely in Fauquier County circa 1779-1780. His burial place is unknown. His manner of death is documented in recorded deeds when the ownership of his land was addressed. The occupant of his plantation at the time of his death is his wife, widow, named in the deeds as Margaret Bramlett. They married before 1750, probably in Virginia, and she is the mother of his children and the strength they found in religion and their new church to carry on there in their home state and in their new home state, South Carolina.

Margaret and Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church

A precious deed recorded in Laurens County, South Carolina, indicates Margaret’s son Nathan Bramlett and mystery man George Sims, probably a neighbor but possibly a relative, donated Margaret’s land and the “meeting house thereon standing” to the trustees of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church in 1807. However, one other valued, INVALUABLE record indicates the church was co-founded much, much earlier, in 1780 or 1781, by Nathan, his mother, Margaret, and his brothers John and Henry Bramlett III. Yet another valued source, also close to Bramlett UMC, suggests the church was founded about the time of the Declaration of Independence.

1962

Margaret and her sons are natives of Virginia who eventually all moved from there into Laurens County before and after the Revolutionary War, when the Declaration was conceived and created, during 1775-1776, and in 1790. They represent the family of Henry Bramlett II/Jr., who unceremoniously left this world circa 1780, most likely in Virginia after a devastating personal loss. It was a loss that most certainly resulted in an entire family finding solace in a religious haven called Methodism and the formation of a new church. Their newfound religion provided them the will to go on and thrive albeit without their husband and father, Henry Jr.,  and eldest son and brother, Benjamin. Henry Bramlett II/Jr. is at the center of a sad and poignant family tradition involving his eldest son, Benjamin, and the story of his untimely death on a British prison ship during the American Revolution. It was an unwilling, devastating sacrifice that stunned Henry into leaving his wife, children, and other, extended family members behind by taking his own life. Although the exact reason, time, and place are not literally given, one or two recorded deeds involving his plantation do document his unfortunate death as a “suicide.” The occasion was called for when the land was resurveyed for his Real Heir, Henry III, who needed a clear title to claim the property. Because there was no heir actually living on, claiming, and farming the property at the time of Henry Jr.’s death; and suicide was against the laws of Man and God, the plantation was considered “escheat” or subject to be reclaimed by the British Crown. Great Britain was in control of the country before the end of the American Revolution. No consideration was given to the many tribes of Native American residents who had inhabited and claimed the land for generations. Henry III soon returned briefly to Virginia from South Carolina and petitioned the local court for ownership. The property was resurveyed, with two of Henry III’s brothers, Reuben and John, named as chain carriers, and secured the land for the family, including his mother, Margaret, who is named as occupant of the plantation, and other siblings. Henry III later sold the plantation in 1786 when it became clear the rest  of  the entire family would be relocating to South Carolina.

Researchers have been unable to document the family tradition, the death of Benjamin or his military and patriotic service and his father’s subsequent death, in existing official records. However, the time period, his residence, and the nature of his captors as a main enemy of  Americans, indicate he was most likely an American patriot and/or soldier. He was born in the early to mid-1750s and died too soon as a young man during the monumental conflict.  His father, Henry II/Jr., had inherited his father Henry I/Sr.’s Fauquier Co., Va., plantation, 250 acres, which ownership  was established with the recorded sale by another mystery man named John Ambrose to Henry I/Sr. in King George Co., Va., in 1735. Tax records indicate Henry II/Jr. had possession of the plantation, thus proving provenance, inheritance, in 1759 until he died and the land was transferred inheritance/ and later by resurvey to Henry III in 1780. Henry I/Sr.’s other two sons, William and Reuben Sr., were farming their own land in Fauquier County at that time, 1759–1779-1783–1794. William had moved his family to Ninety-Six Dist., now Laurens Co., S.C., by or in 1773 to claim a royal land grant of 300 acres from Governor William Bull and King George III of Great Britain. Reuben Sr. stayed in Virginia until circa 1794 when he moved his family to Bourbon Co., Ky., and did not protest the transfer of his brother’s land in 1759 by primogeniture or in 1780 by resurvey and deed  or its sale to the Dobeys in 1786. However,  three of Reuben Sr.’s  grown children moved to Laurens Co., S.C., as well, to live near the widow and children of their Uncle William and the widow and children of their Uncle Henry Jr. without issue or conflict.

Henry Bramlett Jr: Deed

A deed reproduced below mentions Henry Bramlett Jr.’s land on Elk Marsh Run, Fauquier County, next to property owned by Augustine Jennings in 1776.

Henry Bramlett
Henry Brimlett tax 1738
Henry Bromlet Voter 1741
Henry Bromlet Voter's List 1741

The handsome World War I soldier pictured below has a handsome historic name: Henry Bramlett, the first, mentioned in Virginia land records in 1735, who as constable in 1752 served like a type of local soldier. We wonder if this young Henry also inherited Henry Bramlett I/Sr.’s physical appearance and facial features?

Patriotic and  Military service of Bramlett Church members in

Our American Revolutionary War

bronze-virginia-seal
Virginia Commonwealth Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis – Thus Ever To Tyrants

Margaret (unknown maiden name) Bramlett, wife, widow, of Henry Bramlett Jr., and mother of several children, including their three sons who served as Revolutionary War Soldiers in Virginia and South Carolina: Benjamin, Henry III, and Reuben (Blogger’s direct ancestor).  The eldest, Benjamin, died in the war on a British Prison Ship, according to direct descendants of Henry III. The latter served as a soldier from Laurens County, S.C. My ancestor Reuben, who served in Virginia and South Carolina, and wife, Elizabeth Brown, had seven children who are all named in his Revolutionary War pension papers: all personally named at birth after Reuben’s close family members: his sons Benjamin, Henry, John, Nathan are named after Reuben’s four brothers; and his son Coleman Brown Bramlet is named after Coleman Brown, a brother of Reuben’s wife, Elizabeth Brown; his daughter Margaret is named after his mother, Margaret Bramlett; and his daughter Elizabeth is named after his wife, Elizabeth Brown Bramlett). Margaret Bramlett is the the mother of three sons who, with her, are Co-founders of Bramlett Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church–“Nathan, John, and or Henry” (III)–in 1780 or 1781 when they were living in Fauquier Co., Va. And she is documented as a Patriot of the American Revolution in Virginia for her support and donating provisions to the military, as referenced with other relatives below: Ann, widow of Rev. William Bramblett Jr., of Bedford County, and of Fauquier County, — Peggy (Margaret), widow of Henry Jr.; and his brother Reuben Bramblett Sr.;  and the latter’s son Reuben Bramblett Jr., who served as a soldier and moved supplies by wagon for Commissioners from Fauquier County to the American troops. The names of persons listed below are Patriots who after the Revolutionary War were reimbursed after previously giving provisions of food and providing support  and supplies to the troops.

Tax List Fauquier 1782 Bramlett Names

(Note from Blogger: I have not found any connection for her sons Benjamin  and Reuben and/or for her daughters to the Methodist Church in Virginia or to Bramlett Methodist Episcopal in Laurens Co., S.C.)

Margaret and Henry Jr.’s son Henry III served as a soldier during the Revolution in South Carolina. The  following online and/or published  information may refer to  him. The only other  source that documents his military service is  Georgia Land Lottery records, which describes him as a Revolutionary Soldier and then describes his wife, Elizabeth, as widow of a Revolutionary Soldier.

Henry Bromlet Voter's List 1741
Salley Source
Salley--William Burdett
Tax List Fauquier 1782 Bramlett Names
Henry Bramlett Rev War Johnson List

Saline County Seal

Reuben’s wife and sons joined, established, and supported Baptist Churches after they settled in Illinois in 1818. They constructed Union Grove Primitive Baptist Church opposite the northwest corner of Reuben Bramlett’s  farm, adjacent to his son Coleman Brown Bramlet’s farm, in the Settlement. The family still attends and supports Union Grove Church, which also still holds regular services some two hundred years after it was established. Donors provided new heating equipment, carpet, pews and a new piano about twenty years ago. Descendants of Reuben and son Henry who live near the church recently donated beautiful stained glass windows for the Sanctuary. A photo of the church is reproduced below.

Benjamin reportedly died in the war, according to a descendant of Henry III who lived on the West Coast and when requested declined to provide the related documentation due to her fear that the recipients would update/change her history, which, apparently was published especially for her descendants/limited relatives only. Henry III and son Nathan were  both ministers, she said, and Henry III did serve in the Revolution, according to her, and she did have Henry III’s military discharge papers. They were too fragile for her to  copy and or transcribe or photograph. That was not necessary, however, since Henry III is documented as a Revolutionary Soldier in Land Lottery Records and an official Georgia History, but in South Carolina, while he was living there in 1775-1800, according to census and a recorded deed. We are grateful that family historian Meeks Haley Bramlet provided the name of Reuben’s wife, Elizabeth Brown, the only source of her name, in his 1924 book A Pioneer Family – Bramlet. She died by 1830 of measles, according to family tradition and history, was not named or enumerated in the 1830 Census; and her son Benjamin and his wife, cousin Mary “Polly” Brown, too, were dead by 1830, according to the 1830 Census, Saline Co., Ill., tradition and family history, and Brown Family probate records.

Margaret Bramlett is highly regarded today by her descendants as a devoted mother and as a Patriot of the Revolution who supplied provisions, beef and brandy, to Gen. George Washington’s American troops and as an individual with deep religious convictions.

Margaret Bramlett is a Patriot…

   Recorded  deeds and tax records document Margaret as the wife of Henry Bramlett Jr. She  is listed as a resident, occupant, of Henry Bramlett Jr.’s Plantation in  Fauquier Co., Va., in 1780 after Henry Jr. committeddied intestate, suicide. His eldest son at that time, Henry Bramblett III, inherited the plantation through  primogeniture. Henry  Jr.’s eldest son before 1780 is Benjamin, who died on a British Prison Ship during the Revolutionary War, prompting Henry Jr.’s suicide. At least three of Margaret’s sons—Benjamin, Henry III, Reuben—served as Soldier-patriots, and  sons  John and Nathan no doubt served as resident-patriots of the Revolution. They would have supported their mother and brothers who were loyal to America. Margaret, named as “Peggy Bramlett” and “Margaret Bramlett,” is documented in Library of Virginia as a Revolutionary War Patriot in Fauquier County “Publick Claims” with certificates she filed in 1782 and 1785 for providing supplies–beef and brandy–earlier to the forces led by Gen. George Washington and the Continental Army, which forces included her son Reuben (my ancestor). “Peggy Bramlett” first presented a certificate and applied for compensation for the listed provisions…

“At a court held for Fauquier County 24 March 1782 and continued by several adjournments till 3 May following. The court pursuant to the act of Assembly entitled ‘an act for adjusting claims for property impressed or taken for public services’ [by the military] examined the…claims and valued each article in specie viz Beef at the rate of 3p [pence] per pound…. Peggy Bramlett” 225 (1).

Tax List Fauquier 1782 Bramlett Names

The Publick Claims lists indicate “Margt. Bramlett” also presented on Nov. 25, 1785, a certificate granted by Col. William Edmonds for compensation by the county for earlier providing 3 1/2 gallons of brandy to the American troops (13).

Margaret’s Religious Devotion

   Margaret and some or all of her children joined the Methodist Church in Virginia before or in 1780-1781. Recorded deeds prove her son Henry Bramblett III, husband of Elizabeth Moss, and his elder sister, Marianne Bramlett Burdette, wife of Frederick, were residents of Laurens Co., S.C., by 1775; Margaret’s sons—Reuben, John, Nathan—moved there circa 1785; Reuben married Elizabeth Brown, Nathan married Elizabeth Gray, John married Mary Peak, respectively. Henry returned to Virginia to claim his father’s plantation in 1780. Margaret and sons Nathan, John and/or Henry  III—are named circa 1875 by Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette in his precious Diary as Co-founders of Bramlett Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church in 1780-1781.

Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette with a valued History of the World.

Frederick Henry Burdette

Diary of Rev. Frederick Henry Burditt /Burdette, Family and Church Historian, Cover Date 1875, reproduced below, is preserved, copyrighted, owned by, and provided courtesy of his descendant Great Granddaughter Martha Anne Curry Duke of Denton, Tex.

Precious Invaluable Diary of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette

Diary of Frederick H. Burdette

Precious Invaluable Diary of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette

Exerpt #3 from the diary of Frederick H. Burdette's diary.
Exerpt #4 from the diary of Frederick H. Burdette's diary

Precious Invaluable Diary of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette

Exerpt from Frederick H. Burdette's diary. #1

Precious Invaluable Diary of Rev. Frederick Henry Burdette

Bramlett United Methodist Church was co-founded in 1780 or 1781, according to information sent by Father John Bramlett, by him, his mother, Margaret Bramlett, and one or two of her other sons, “Nathan and or Henry” (III). The beautiful little church still holds services in 2019 on the property deeded by Nathan Bramlett and George Sims and sold to the trustees, including Frederick Burdette, for $5 in 1807.

Bramlett UM CHURCH
Bramlett Church Stained Glass
Bramlett Meth Church Sign
Bramlett Meth Ch Cem Sign
1871 Bramlett Church plat

An original plat map drawn for a Sept. 29, 1871, survey of Bramlett Methodist Chappel and Church, represented below, contains a written description of the three-acre-tract and a drawing of the Meeting House, courtesy Judy Riddle

Margaret was recognized as leader of Bramlett Church in Laurens County in November 1801 by Methodist Episcopal Bishop Francis Asbury in his published Journal: “Wednesday [November] 1. We rode sixteen miles to the widow Bramblet’s meeting-house.” Two days earlier the Bishop visited Margaret’s son John Bramlett at Bethel Methodist Church in Greenville County: “Monday [November] 20. At John Bramblet’s, Greensville. After meeting, we rode to …Reedy River” (p. 40). This may have been the visit during which the Bishop formally organized Bethel Church. In his 1802 Journal, the Bishop recognized Margaret’s son Nathan Bramlett as leader of Bramlett Church, which he called “Bramblet’s chapel”: “Wednesday 22….Next day I went to Nathan Bramblet’s….Sunday 27. At Bramblet’s chapel I spoke on Acts ii. 37-39.”

Bishop's Journal
Bishop's Journal 2

HENRY “BROMLET,” Son of Margaret and  Henry Bramlett II/Jr., is listed in the 1790 CENSUS FOR LAURENS CO., S.C., with three other males and four females enumerated in his household.

 Henry III 1790

  Margaret bought her 50-acre South Carolina farm next to her son Nathan’s farm in Laurens County on May 10, 1791, from Ezekiel Griffith for 20 pounds:

 “This indenture made the Tenth day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand seven hundred & ninety one, and in the Sixteenth year of American Independency, Between Ezekiel Griffeth of Laurens county in the state of South Carolina on the one part, and Margaret Bramlett of the county & State aforesaid of the other part. Witnesseth that the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for & in consideration of the sum of Twenty pounds to him in hand well & Truly paid by the sd. Margaret Bramlett the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged Have Bargained, granted, sold, aliened Embossed & confirmed, and by these presents doth Grant, Bargain & Sell, alien emboss [sealed with a ribbon?] Riban & confirm unto the said Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns forever part of a Tract of land Situate & Lying on Beaverdam Creek water of Enoree River, to begin on the north side of sd. creek on a Red Oak on a stoney nole, Thence to the corner in Nathan Bramlett’s field, Thence along the sd. Nathan Bramlett’s to the corner, Thence to the creek & up the creek to the mouth of the spring branch & up the branch to the head, Thence to the Begining to contain Fifty acres more or less, & hath such shape, form & marks as are represented by a plat thereof to the Original grant annexed, which was granted to the said Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs & assigns forever on the Twenty fourth day of January, one Thousand seven hundred & seventy by the … William Bull Then Governor and Recorded in … office in Book EEE page 68 and also the Reversion and Reversions, Remainder & Remainders, Rents, … & Profits thereof & all the Estate, Right, Title, Interest Claim & demand whatsoever of him the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth his heirs or assigns to have and to hold the sd. Tract of fifty acres of land more or less with every appurtenance thereunto belonging to the only proper use & behoof of her the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs or assigns forever  &tc the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth for him his heirs & assigns doth covenant with the sd. Margaret Bramlett her heirs & assigns that he the sd. Ezekiel Griffeth now is & untill the execution of these presents shall stand seized in his right of a good sure perfect, absolute indefeasible Estate of Inheritance in fee simple of & in all & singular the tract of land & every part & parcel hereof without any manner of condition…” (DB-D:5-6)

Margaret,John, Nathan deed.jpg

Margaret sold her farm on Beaverdam Creek, waters of Enoree, to her son Nathan Bramlett for $100 on April 16, 1809. The deed indicates the land was originally granted to Ezekiel Griffith on Jan. 20,  1770, and conveyed to Margaret Bramlett on May 10, 1791. Margaret’s grandson John Burditt and Jesse Gray witnessed the 1809 deed (DB-J:73). No other definite later record of Margaret has yet been found. Margaret and Henry II/Jr.’s children are Marianne, Benjamin, Jalilah, Henry III, Reuben, John, Nathan and perhaps William, Sarah and Nancy, Lucy.

Works Cited for Margaret Bramlett
Asbury, Rev. Francis. The Journal of the Rev. Francis Asbury, bishop of the Methodist Episcopal church. New York: The Methodist Episcopal Church, N. Bangs and T. Mason, 1821. p. 40. 1801 references to Widow (Margaret) Bramblet, Bramlett Methodist Episcopal Church, and (her son) John Bramblet, Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church: https://archive.org/stream/00612616.874.emory.edu/00612616_ 874#page/n41/mode/2up.
–. The Journal. The Methodist Episcopal Church. p. 86. 1802 references to Nathan Bramblet, Bramlett Church — “Bramblet’s Chapel”: https://archive.org/stream/006126

Map showing Bramlett Church, top left, and the Burdette Plantation, right, above William Bramblett’s Royal Land Grant from King George III

Bramlett Church, Bramletts, Burdettes

Chapter 3:
Generation 5
Marianne Bramlett and Frederick Burdette
(Children John, Henry, Margaret, Mary Ann, Reuben, Elizabeth, William, Ailsey, Jesse)
Virginia Seal
Virginia State Seal and Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Thus Ever To Tyrants